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ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts
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ClipFlair Conference Book of Abstracts

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  • 1. BOOK OF ABSTRACTS Facultat de Traducció i d’Interpretació Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
  • 2.  2   CREDITS   scientific committee Conceição Bravo, UALG Frederic Chaume, UJI Anna Matamala , UAB Laura Incalcaterra McLoughlin, NUIG Josélia Neves, IPLeiria Carmen Pérez, UPF Vera Lúcia Santiago Araújo, UOL Nikos Sifakis, EAP Noa Talavan, UNED Robert Vanderplank, OU  steering committee Helena Casas-Tost, UAB Anabel Galán-Mañas, UAB Lucía Molina, UAB Patricia Rodríguez-Inés, UAB Lupe Romero, UAB Sara Rovira, UAB Stavroula Sokoli, UPF Olga Torres-Hostench, UAB Patrick Zabalbeascoa, UPF  volunteers Liu Shiyang Yidi Deng Yuting Wu Jingya Sun Yuan Zhang Jingting Wang Fundació Catalana Síndrome de Down  contact  cg.clipflair@uab.cat  http://clipflair.net/
  • 3.  3   CONTENTS  MAPS............................................................................................................................................................4 map of the Facultat de Traducció i d’Interpretació..................................................................................5 PROGRAMME ...............................................................................................................................................6 wednesday, 18 june 2014 ........................................................................................................................7 thursday, 19 june 2014.............................................................................................................................9 ABSTRACTS.................................................................................................................................................11 plenary sessions ................................................................................................................................. 12 workshops .......................................................................................................................................... 15 roundtable.......................................................................................................................................... 21 oral presentations ............................................................................................................................. 24 LIST OF PARTICIPANTS................................................................................................................................70 NOTES ........................................................................................................................................................73
  • 4.  4   MAPS 
  • 5.  5   MAP OF THE FACULTAT DE TRADUCCIÓ I D’INTERPRETACIÓ 
  • 6.  6   PROGRAMME 
  • 7.  7   PROGRAMME  WEDNESDAY, 18 JUNE 2014 9:30-10:00 Registration (Hall of the Faculty of Translation and Interpreting) 10:00 - 10:30 WELCOME Room 2 Lluís Quintana Vice-Rector International Relations UNIVERSITAT AUTÒNOMA DE BARCELONA Neus Lorenzo Head of the Foreign Languages Service EDUCATION DEPARTMENT GOVERNMENT OF CATALONIA Laura Santamaria Dean of the Faculty of Translation and Interpreting UNIVERSITAT AUTÒNOMA DE BARCELONA Patrick Zabalbeascoa ClipFlair project Leader UNIVERSITAT POMPEU FABRA 10:30 - 11:15 Plenary session Room 2 Chair: Patrick Zabalbeascoa Language learner autonomy and multi-modality David Little – Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland 11:15 - 11:45  Coffee break  Japanese garden 11:45-12:45 Audiovisuals in language learning Room 1 Chair: Agnieszka Szarkowska ICT in language learning Room 4 Chair: Rocío Baños Translation & language learning Room 27 Chair: Jorge Díaz Cintas Session 1 Subtitle modifying in the lab, or “Involve me and I learn” Mariella De Meo & Emilia Di Martino Closed captions toward an opening of the text? Experimental results in Franco-Arabic language and literature teaching/learning Marie-Dominique Marcant The creation of interlingual subtitles: a method of improving foreign language skills Liana Muthu Audio-description and media literacy in foreign language acquisition. Un modelo integrador de cine y audiodescripción para el aprendizaje de lenguas extranjeras: Los abrazos rotos (Almodóvar) Carmen Herrero & Manuela Escobar Classroom digitization and digital language learning: practices in two 1x1 schools in Catalonia Boris Vázquez Calvo & Daniel Cassany Largometrajes y cortometrajes de autor en la enseñanza del español a italófonos. Reflexiones teóricas y propuestas prácticas Beatrice Garzelli El empleo de software de traducción audiovisual en la enseñanza de segundas lenguas Juan José Martínez Sierra Ø Ø
  • 8.  8   18 June 2014 [Cont.] 12:45-13:45 Audiovisuals in language learning Room 1 Chair: Marga Navarrete Audiovisuals in language learning Room 4 Chair: Ela Gajek ICT in language learning Room 27 Chair: Dorothy Ni Uigin Session 2 ClipFlair activities: creativity in L2 Romanian corpora Anamaria Radu & Alexandra Cotoc iCap-Intralingual captioning in foreign language education to enhance writing skills and vocabulary acquisition with the help of ClipFlair Noa Talaván, Jennifer Lertola & José Javier Ávila-Cabrera Technology enhanced collaboration as an extension of the language-learning environment Sara Valla & Gillian Mansfield ¿Debe ser feminista la enseñanza de segundas lenguas? Alfabetización audiovisual y perspectiva de género Natalia Contreras de la Llave Using ClipFlair across classrooms: text production and translation in a plurilingual context Rebecca Walter & Elena Voellmer Phonology in e-learning: speech analysis tools, multimediality and podcasts Carmela Dell’Aria & Laura Incalcaterra McLoughlin Translectures – Transcription and translation of video lectures Maria Gialama, Davor Orlic, Rachel Spencer & Yota Georgakopoulou Audiovisual translation as a new educational approach: intralingual and interlingual subtitling to learn a second language’ Betlem Soler Pardo & Gloria Torralba Miralles Multimodal learning. Evaluating attitudes towards ClipFlair language learning platform Cristina Varga & Anamaria Bogdan 13:45-15:00  Lunch break  15:00-16:15 Workshop 1 Rooms C & D Exploiting audiovisual materials by genres in foreign language teaching Description: (a) Choosing and exploiting audiovisuals by genres according to competences and learning aims, (b) The basics for creating and editing audiovisual clips. Lupe Romero, Patricia Rodríguez-Inés, Anabel Galán-Mañas & Marga Navarrete 16:30-18:00 Workshop 2 Room B Creating captioning activities in ClipFlair Studio Description: (a) Basic conventions for subtitling, spotting, splitting, measuring, timing, (b) how to adapt conventional activities to audiovisual format and (c) how to adapt the same video material for different activities, levels and languages. Rocío Baños & Jennifer Lertola 21:00  Conference Dinner  Restaurant Can Culleretes
  • 9.  9  THURSDAY, 19 JUNE 2014 9:30-10:15 Plenary session Room 2 Chair: Patrick Zabalbeascoa Fostering the development of communicative competence in foreign languages through translation: a new approach? Olga Esteve - Universitat Pompeu Fabra & María González Davies - Universitat Ramon Llull 10:15-11:15 Audiovisuals in language learning Room 1 Chair: Mari Luz Guenaga Translation & Language learning Room 4 Chair: Kristiina Rebane Audiovisuals in language learning Room 27 Chair: Kriistina Tedremaa Session 3 The use of audiovisual materials as a way to reinforce listening skills in the EFL classroom Pilar González Vera & Ana Hornero Corisco Reverse Subtitling Practice in the Foreign Language Classroom: a Pilot Study Ragni Valentina Investigating the effects of producing subtitles for TV series on language learning Micol Beseghi Audiovisual Translation in Teaching Foreign Languages: the use of Re-voicing to Improve Fluency and Pronunciation in Spontaneous Conversation Alicia Sánchez Requena Fostering new L2 word recall through word writing or word typing? Eyckmans June Reverse dubbing and subtitling: raising pragmatic awareness in Italian ESL learners Jennifer Lertola & Cristina Mariotti Babelium Project, a Rich Internet Application (RIA) for interactive speaking practice, collaborative assessment and video-exercise sharing Silvia Sanz-Santamaría, Juanan Pereira & Julián Gutiérrez Ø Audio description as a tool to improve lexical and phraseological competence in foreign language learning Ana Ibáñez Moreno & Anna Vermeulen 11:15-11:45  Coffee break – Meet the engineer George Birbilis  Japanese garden
  • 10.  10   19 June 2014 [Cont.] 11:45-12:45 ICT in language learning Room 4 Chair: Josélia Neves Audiovisuals in language learning Room 27 Chair: Conceição Bravo Session 4 Strategies for creating engaging blended learning environments by incorporating multiple representations of content - An exploratory study Cristina Felea Learning Catalan through captioning in a multilingual context Cristina Varga Using Blackboard Collaborate in language teaching – Avoiding the pitfalls and reaping the benefits Dorothy Ní Uigín Assistive technology & audiovisual translation. Combined solutions in higher education Emmanouela Patiniotaki The eTwinning Experience: Europe in the classroom Marta Pey Pratdesaba Innovation in Language Learning: Multimodal Approaches Rosa M. Estrada García 12:45-13:45 Round table (moderators: Stavroula Sokoli & Patrick Zabalbeascoa) Room 1 Where we are and where we are going. State of the art and future perspectives Laura Incalcaterra McLoughlin, Noa Talaván, Thanasis Hadzilacos & Jennifer Lertola 13:45-15:00  Lunch break  15:00-16.15 Workshop 3 Room C Creating revoicing activities in ClipFlair Studio Description: (a) Basic conventions for dubbing, voice over, etc., (b) adaptation of activities and reuse of materials (how to adapt conventional activities to audiovisual format and (c) how to adapt the same video material for different activities, levels and languages. Cristina Varga & Agnieszka Szarkowska 16:30-18:00 Workshop 4 Room D ClipFlair Studio for advanced users Description: (a) Beyond dubbing and subtitling: exploring the possibilities of CF activities (b) Hints and tips for the CF Studio (c) How to make the most out of CF Social Stavroula Sokoli & Noa Talaván
  • 11.  11   ABSTRACTS  Ordered by presentation type  Plenary sessions  Workshops  Roundtables  Oral presentations
  • 12.  12  from 12 to 14 pages  plenary sessions 
  • 13.  plenary sessions  13  David Little Trinity College Dublin, Ireland Language learner autonomy and multi-modality  Abstract The most successful language learning environments are those in which, from the beginning, the target language is the principal channel of the learners’ agency: the communicative and metacognitive medium through which, individually and collaboratively, they plan, execute, monitor and evaluate their own learning. This claim arises from an understanding of language learner autonomy that is shaped by three considerations. First, learners know what it is to be autonomous from their lives outside the classroom; thus our task as teachers is not to convert them to autonomy, but to find ways on focusing their existing capacity for autonomous behaviour on the business of language learning. Secondly, we do this by giving our learners co- responsibility for planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating their learning: processes in which the collaborative dynamic of the classroom provides a social-interactive frame for the cognitive-organizational effort of the individual learner. And thirdly, because authentic, spontaneous language use plays an essential role in effective language learning, we must find ways of helping our learners to channel their autonomy, or agency, through the target language from the very beginning. My presentation will elaborate this view of language learner autonomy with reference to the dual challenge posed by multi-modality. On the one hand it offers radical alternatives to the modes of communication by which knowledge has traditionally been accessed, appropriated, reproduced, and further developed; on the other, it gives enhanced autonomy to learners’ lives outside the classroom.  Bionote DAVID LITTLE retired in 2008 as Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics and Head of the School of Linguistic, Speech and Communication Sciences at Trinity College Dublin. His principal research interests are the theory and practice of learner autonomy in second language education, the exploitation of linguistic diversity in schools and classrooms, and the use of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages to support the design of second language curricula, teaching and assessment. Starting in 1998, he played a leading role in the development and implementation of the European Language Portfolio, and he has been a member of several Council of Europe expert groups.
  • 14.  plenary sessions  14  Olga Esteve Ruescas | María González Davies Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain | Universitat Ramon Llull, Spain Fostering the development of communicative competence in foreign languages through translation: a new approach?  Abstract Translation is usually considered as a one to one correspondence between languages that facilitates occasional hasty understanding. Translation, however, can become an explicit learning tool that enriches foreign language learning in different ways and for different reasons.  Bionotes OLGA ESTEVE RUESCAS was a teacher of German as a foreign language in the Official School of Languages in Barcelona (Drassanes) for 16 years. Currently, she is a lecturer at the Faculty of Translation and Interpretation (Universitat Pompeu Fabra). She holds a PhD in Education. Her main areas of research are foreign language learning processes, especially with respect to self- regulated learning, Integrated Treatment of Language and learning languages from the perspective of competence. She combines research with classroom practice and teacher training. Dr. MARIA GONZALEZ DAVIES is a lecturer in the Department of Foreign Languages and Education at the Faculty of Psychology, Education and Sport Sciences Blanquerna at the Ramon Llull University in Barcelona. She previously worked as a teacher of English and Translation in Primary Education, in the School of Modern Languages (University of Barcelona), where she co-directed the English Department, and at the University of Vic, where she was Head of the Translation Department. She has published widely on translation and language learning.
  • 15.  15  from 15 to 20 pages  workshops 
  • 16.  workshops  16  Lupe Romero | Patricia Rodríguez-Inés | Anabel Galán-Mañas | Marga Navarrete Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain | University College of London, UK Exploiting audiovisual materials by genres in foreign language teaching  Description  Choosing and exploiting audiovisuals by genres according to competences and learning aims,  The basics for creating and editing audiovisual clips.  Bionotes Dr. LUPE ROMERO holds a PhD in Translation Studies and is a lecturer at the Faculty of Translation and Interpreting of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain). She has worked as a professional translator. At present, she is the coordinator of the degree in Translation and Interpretation and she teaches Italian for Translators and Theory of Translation at the UAB. Her research interests focus on audiovisual translation, the acquisition of translation competence, language teaching for translators (Italian) and ICTs applied to second- language teaching. She is member of PACTE research group (Process in the Acquisition of Translation Competence and Evaluation), she has participated in several Spanish funded projects and in Internationals and EU funded projects. She is the responsible for the Spanish partner in the ClipFlair project. http://gent.uab.cat/luperomero/. Dr. PATRICIA RODRÍGUEZ-INÉS holds a PhD in Translation Studies, and is a lecturer at the Faculty of Translation and Interpreting of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). Her research interests include the use of ICT tools to improve translation teaching, the use of corpus methodology in Translation Studies, and empirical and experimental research in translation competence. She teaches general and specialised translation from English to Spanish and viceversa, translation technologies, and corpus linguistics applied to translation. She is a member of the ClipFlair project and has designed and piloted several translation- related activities using ClipFlair Studio. http://pagines.uab.cat/patricia_rodriguez_ines/ Dr. ANABEL GALÁN-MAÑAS holds a PhD in Translation, Interpreting and Intercultural Studies, and is a lecturer at the Faculty of Translation and Interpreting of the Universitat Autònoma (UAB). She has worked as a profesional translator in different language combinations. At present she teaches general and technical translation from English into Spanish at the UAB. Her research interests focus on translation competence acquisition, accessibility in audiovisual learning materials and blended learning. She is a member of PACTE research group and of ClipFlair Project, for which she has designed and piloted several activities for learning Portuguese.
  • 17.  workshops  17  Ms MARGA NAVARRETE teaches Spanish as a Foreign Language at Imperial College and Translation at University College London. She holds a BA in Filología Inglesa from the University of Seville, an MA in the Teaching of Modern Languages and a Certificate in Online Education Training (OET) both from the Institute of Education, London. She also holds a post- graduate Certificate of Advanced Study in Learning and Teaching (CASLAT) from Imperial College. Her research interests include teacher training, e-learning and the application of audiovisual translation for language learning. She has given workshops, presented papers at conferences and delivered distance courses in e-learning and in the application of technology for language learning aimed at teachers. She has also published resources for the training of academics in online education using learning object creators (LOCs) at the Subject Centre for Languages, Linguistics and Area Studies (LLAS) website. Currently she is working on the ClipFlair project, designing and piloting audiovisual tasks for language learning. She has also run workshops for teachers and students to promote language learning among school students as part of the department’s participation with Routes into Languages.
  • 18.  workshops  18  Rocío Baños | Jennifer Lertola University College of London, UK | National University of Ireland Creating captioning activities in ClipFlair Studio  Description  Basic conventions for subtitling, spotting, splitting, measuring, timing,  how to adapt conventional activities to audiovisual format,  how to adapt the same video material for different activities, levels and languages.  Bionotes ROCÍO BAÑOS is Lecturer in Translation at the Centre for Translation Studies at UCL, where she teaches Audiovisual Translation and Translation Technology. She holds a PhD from the University of Granada, focused on spoken Spanish in dubbed and domestic situation comedies. Her main research interests lie in the fields of Translation Technology, Localisation and Audiovisual Translation. She is also interested in the study of Spanish colloquial conversation, its teaching and its imitation in fictional dialogue. She is currently involved in projects focused on the integration of technology in Audiovisual Translation and on the use of Audiovisual Translation for foreign language learning (ClipFlair). She has worked both as an in-house and freelance translator. JENNIFER LERTOLA, PhD, is an e-tutor of the Diploma in Italian Online at the National University of Ireland, Galway where she has been teaching Italian since 2006. She is a member of the EU-funded project “ClipFlair. Foreign Language Learning through Interactive Captioning and Revoicing of Clips” (2011-2014). Her main research interests include teaching Italian as a foreign/second language, audiovisual translation, second language vocabulary acquisition and online education.
  • 19.  workshops  19  Cristina Varga | Agnieszka Szarkowska Universitatea Babeș-Bolyai, Romania | University of Warsaw, Poland Creating revoicing activities in ClipFlair Studio  Description  Basic conventions for dubbing, voiceover, etc.,  adaptation of activities and reuse of materials (how to adapt conventional activities to audiovisual format and (c) how to adapt the same video material for different activities, levels and languages.  Bionotes CRISTINA VARGA, PhD, is an assistant professor of Modern Languages Department at Universitatea “Babeș-Bolyai” in Cluj-Napoca where she teaches Audiovisual translation (subtitling, localization, voice-over) and Terminology. Her areas of work and research include audiovisual translation, localization, discourse analysis, corpus-based linguistics, creation and management of multilingual corpora, machine translation, and terminology. She is a collaborator of the Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, where she teaches in an Audiovisual translation MA program. She also works as a freelance subtitler and certified translator. AGNIESZKA SZARKOWSKA, PhD, is an assistant professor at the Institute of Applied Linguistics, the University of Warsaw. She is the founder and head of the Audiovisual Translation Lab (AVT Lab, www.avt.ils.uw.edu.pl). Her main research interest is audiovisual translation, especially subtitling for the deaf and hard of hearing and audio description. Her recent research projects include an eyetracking study on subtitling for the deaf and hard of hearing, multilingualism in subtitling, audiodescription in education, text-to-speech audio description, and audio description to foreign films. She is a member of European association for Studies in Screen Translation (ESIST), European Society for Translation Studies (EST) and an honorary member of the Polish Audiovisual Translators Association (STAW). She also works as a freelance subtitler and certified translator.
  • 20.  workshops  20  Stavroula Sokoli | Noa Talaván Universitat Pompeu Fabra | Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia ClipFlair Studio for advanced users  Description  Beyond dubbing and subtitling: exploring the possibilities of CF activities  Hints and tips for the CF Studio  How to make the most out of CF Social  Bionotes STAVROULA SOKOLI, PhD, is a researcher on Audiovisual Translation and Language Learning and has published over 20 articles on the subject. She has set up and coordinated the EU- funded projects “Learning via Subtitling” <http://levis.cti.gr> and “ClipFlair. Foreign Language Learning through Interactive Revoicing and Captioning of Clips” <www.clipflair.net>. She also collaborates with the Academic and Research Excellence Initiative in Greece <http://excellence.minedu.gov.gr>. Stavroula teaches Spanish at the Hellenic Open University and gives subtitling courses at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, as well as working as a subtitler and interpreter. Dr. NOA TALAVÁN holds a senior lecturer position in the Foreign Languages Department of the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Spain, where she teaches mainly in the areas of Translation, English for Specific Purposes and CALL (Computer-Assisted Language Learning). Her main fields of research are audiovisual translation, mobile learning and foreign language education. She is currently taking part in two research projects: a national project called SO-CALL-ME on Mobile Learning Applications in Language Learning (as part of the ATLAS group) and a European project—Lifelong Learning Program—called ClipFlair, Foreign Language Learning through Interactive Revoicing and Captioning of Clips (as an associate partner). She is also an official translator (English-Spanish) and holds a position as secretary of a Masters course on ICTs and Language Learning and Processing.
  • 21.  21  from 21 to 23 pages  roundtable 
  • 22.  roundtable  22  Laura Incalcaterra McLoughlin | Noa Talaván | Thanasis Hadzilacos | Jennifer Lertola National University of Ireland | Open University of Cyprus | Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Spain Where we are and where we are going. State of the art and future perspectives  Bionotes LAURA INCALCATERRA MCLOUGHLIN, PhD, is a lecturer at the National University of Ireland, Galway, co-director of the MA in Advanced Language Skills and coordinator of the online Diploma in Italian. Her research interests include applied linguistics and audiovisual translation in language teaching and learning. She has published widely on language teaching methodology, language and new technologies and subtitling in language teaching and translator training. She has presented numerous papers at many international conferences. She won the European Language Label in 2008 and 2009. Dr. NOA TALAVÁN holds a senior lecturer position in the Foreign Languages Department of the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Spain, where she teaches mainly in the areas of Translation, English for Specific Purposes and CALL (Computer-Assisted Language Learning). Her main fields of research are audiovisual translation, mobile learning and foreign language education. She is currently taking part in two research projects: a national project called SO-CALL-ME on Mobile Learning Applications in Language Learning (as part of the ATLAS group) and a European project—Lifelong Learning Program—called ClipFlair, Foreign Language Learning through Interactive Revoicing and Captioning of Clips (as an associate partner). She is also an official translator (English-Spanish) and holds a position as secretary of a Masters course on ICTs and Language Learning and Processing. THANASIS HADZILACOS is Professor of Information Systems and member of the Governing Board at the Open University of Cyprus; member of the Cyprus National Scientific Council. Formerly Dean of the School of Science and Technology at the Hellenic Open University where he was Associate Professor of Software Engineering, and directed the Open and Distance Laboratory for Educational Material and Methodology. Educated at Harvard, had industrial experience before his PhD in Database theory (U Patras). At the research academic Computer Technology Institute in Patras, Greece (1986-2007), he directed the Educational Technology and e-Learning Sectors, and R&D Unit “Applied Information Systems”. Has taught at the Universities of Patras and Thessaly in Greece; visiting professor at the University of Toronto (2010-11). During 1996-2001 he designed and managed the Greek national project “Odysseia” for the utilization of ICT in schools. He has served in international bodies (working groups of the Council of Europe and E.U. DG Education and Culture). He has published over 80 papers in international journals and conferences, including a chapter on “Teaching and Learning in the Communication Society” published by the Council of Europe. He has coordinated and participated in over 40 R&D projects funded by the E.C. and national research bodies. His
  • 23.  roundtable  23  research interests in educational technology relate to m-learning, distance education, internet- related dangers and system design for non-standard applications. His real interest is people, and has recently completed an M.A in Theology at HOU. He hikes in mountains and runs the Marathon. JENNIFER LERTOLA, PhD, is an e-tutor of the Diploma in Italian Online at the National University of Ireland, Galway where she has been teaching Italian since 2006. She is a member of the EU-funded project “ClipFlair. Foreign Language Learning through Interactive Captioning and Revoicing of Clips” (2011-2014). Her main research interests include teaching Italian as a foreign/second language, audiovisual translation, second language vocabulary acquisition and online education.
  • 24.  24  from 24 to 69 pages  oral presentations 
  • 25.  oral presentations  25  Micol Beseghi University of Parma, Italy Investigating the effects of producing subtitles for TV series on language learning  Abstract The aim of this paper is to describe a pedagogic experiment carried out in a language and translation course (Lingua e Traduzione Inglese) at the University of Parma to test the effect of producing subtitles on students’ learning, hence on the validity of audiovisual translation both as a translation learning tool and as a language learning tool. Subtitling as a task that involves the actual addition of subtitles to a clip by students can have a remarkable impact on the improvement of a number of skills, ranging from translation to the acquisition of linguistic and socio-cultural knowledge (Díaz Cintas 2008). The didactic project was carried out with a class of university language students, who were asked to engage in multimodal activities concerning the production of interlingual subtitles for a variety of TV series (e.g. Grey’s Anatomy, Gossip Girl, Criminal Minds, The Big Bang Theory, Scrubs, etc.). Using the software Subtitle Workshop, students translated the episodes trying to deal with issues such as the rendering of idiomatic expressions, slang, taboo language, language variation (idioms, dialects, sociolects), multilingualism, and the translation of humour and cultural references, thus making the most of their linguistic and cultural knowledge. The findings of this project suggest that subtitling activities can lead to significant benefits: first of all, motivation and engagement are promoted, because students are given the possibility to translate episodes of their favourite TV programmes. Secondly, the wide range of the audiovisual materials has important pedagogical implications, because students, by translating medical dramas, crime, legal and science fiction series, are presented with a variety of fields and deal with many different specialized languages. Finally, the production of subtitles is a realistic task that can be performed both inside and outside the classroom context, as a type of activity that helps develop learners’ autonomy and reflects their interests. References Díaz Cintas, J. (2008) “Teaching and learning to subtitle in an academic environment.” In Jorge Díaz Cintas (ed.) The didactics of audiovisual translation, 89-103. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins.  Bionote Dr MICÒL BESEGHI is currently a contract lecturer in English at the University of Parma. She holds a PhD in Comparative Languages and Cultures from the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. Her main research interests and publications concern audiovisual translation, translation teaching and autonomy in language learning.
  • 26.  oral presentations  26  Natalia Contreras de la Llave Centro Superior de Idiomas de la Universidad de Alicante, Spain ¿Debe ser feminista la enseñanza de segundas lenguas? Alfabetización audiovisual y perspectiva de género  Abstract Proponemos una comunicación cuyo objetivo es defender que la alfabetización audiovisual y el análisis fílmico desde una perspectiva de género, aplicados a una serie de actividades didácticas audiovisuales dirigidas principalmente al desarrollo de la competencia intercultural, no sólo promueven un avance de las destrezas lingüísticas sino que fomentan la superación de prejuicios y estereotipos sexistas en el ámbito del aprendizaje de idiomas. Según el Marco Común Europeo de Referencia para las lenguas, la actividad comunicativa de los estudiantes de idiomas se ve afectada también por factores individuales relacionados con su personalidad y caracterizados por las actitudes, las motivaciones, los valores, las creencias, los estilos cognitivos y los tipos de personalidad que contribuyen a su identidad personal”. Lo que el MCER denomina “saber ser” exige por parte del profesorado promover la capacidad y la voluntad de relativizar “la propia perspectiva cultural y el propio sistema de valores culturales”. Asimismo, el Plan Curricular del Instituto Cervantes fija como uno de los objetivos del profesorado de idiomas “colaborar en el desarrollo de actitudes y valores con respecto a la sociedad internacional, como el pluralismo cultural y lingüístico, la aceptación y la valoración positiva de la diversidad y de la diferencia, el reconocimiento y el respeto mutuo”. Es decir, desde numerosas instituciones y documentos que promueven la enseñanza y adquisición de segundas lenguas y lenguas extranjeras, se señala la necesidad del desarrollo de la llamada competencia intercultural a través de numerosos contenidos transversales en el aula, lo que conlleva también una necesidad de abordar y combatir los estereotipos de género que aparecen en numerosos materiales didácticos. La relevancia de la imagen en la sociedad actual “cada vez más visual y globalizada, y en la cual los medios de comunicación constituyen ya no el cuarto poder, sino el instrumento más poderoso para la plasmación, formación y control del imaginario social” (COLAIZZI, 2007), hace que sea más necesario que nunca abordar desde todos los ámbitos posibles (y especialmente desde el ámbito educativo) la alfabetización audiovisual y el desarrollo de la capacidad para leer y descifrar los códigos ideológicos del cine. Nuestro objetivo es demostrar que un material didáctico consistente a través del análisis fílmico feminista- en el ámbito del aprendizaje de idiomas, donde el alumnado aprende a relativizar cada día los espacios simbólicos que rodean su propia identidad cultural- supone un paso adelante para la igualdad.  Bionote NATALIA CONTRERAS DE LA LLAVE has been a teacher of Spanish Language and Literature at the Modern Language Centre of the University of Alicante for 15 years and was Associate Professor at the Translation Department of the UA, teaching Italian Language and Translation. She belongs to the ACQUA Research Group (Second and Foreign Language Acquisition Research), coordinated by Dr. Susana Pastor Cesteros. Her research interests focus on gender
  • 27.  oral presentations  27  studies and the use of film as a didactic tool, a factor wich is often reflected in her approach in her work as a teacher trainer in several courses for teachers of Spanish as a Foreign Language. She has also taught different courses on film and gender perspective for a number of institutions and was a member of the Editorial Board of the research journal Quaderns de cine of the University of Alicante. As a translator, she has specialized in audiovisual translation, working for a variety of agencies and film festivals since 1997, translating, subtitling and syncronizing more than a hundred movies. In 2013 she was Visiting Professor at the Foreign Language Department in the University of Udine (Italia), with a series of lectures on "Film and Intercultural Dimension in the learning of foreign languages".
  • 28.  oral presentations  28  Mariella De Meo | Emilia Di Martino Università di Salerno, Italy | Università Suor Orsola Benincasa, Italy Subtitle modifying in the lab, or “Involve me and I learn”  Abstract The presenters will relate an experiment carried out with a class of second year undergraduates focusing on the re-subtitling of the recent film by Lasse Hallström “Salmon fishing in the Yemen” by means of WinCaps (from SysMedia). They will argue that re-working a subtitled product through a hands-on attempt to (1) de-construct the language used in the ‘official’ subtitles and (2) reshape it with the aim of adding to it the traces of the accents/cultures clash which characterised the original film has a crucial potential to help the learner to acquire deeper awareness of the phenomenon of language variation. Furthermore, issues related to the intersemiotic transfer of culture-bound language in subtitling will be addressed in order to focus on their relevance in the delineation of characters and of the interaction that occurs between them.  Bionotes MARIAGRAZIA DE MEO is a researcher in English language and linguistics at the University of Salerno (Italy). She holds an MA in Translation Studies from the University of Warwick (UK) and teaches English at the Faculty of Scienze della Formazione. Among her publications is a book on phraseology and corpus linguistics. Her areas of interest are also sociolinguistics, pragmatics and language teaching. More recently her research has focused on audio-visual translation, subtitling of culture-bound language, adaptation and language censorship. EMILIA DI MARTINO is a researcher in English language and linguistics at the University of Naples Suor Orsola Benincasa (Italy). She holds an MA in Education from the University of East Anglia (UK) and a PhD in ESP from the University of Naples Federico II. She is the author of monographs, book chapters and journal articles dealing with Applied linguistics, English for Special Purposes, translation criticism and translation pedagogy. Her recent research work focuses on translation ethics.
  • 29.  oral presentations  29  Carmela Dell’Aria | Laura Incalcaterra McLoughlin Università degli Studi di Palermo, Italy | National University of Ireland Phonology in E-learning: Speech analysis tools, multimediality and podcasts  Abstract The presence of the Web and the introduction of immersive and collaborative computer technology in the teaching of foreign languages can help to re-create a relaxed cognitive environment and overcome the gap between formal and spontaneous learning. However, focusing merely on technologies as 'tools' can be restrictive; it is rather more beneficial to consider the 'mode' in which they help to create a learning environment in which the cognitive and social aspects of the human - machine interaction (McLuhan, 1964) are intertwined to form a single operating environment. In this perspective the enveloping multimediality of the Web stimulates different types of awareness in the various parts of the brain s lowly modifying processes of perception and cognitive strategies, and submitting them to constant stimuli from a multimedial habitat naturaliter (Di Sparti, 2011). In this perspective, there is a close relationship between the grammars of the media, the functioning of the human sensory systems and the cognitive schemata that influence them. This paper will discuss a trial which applies collaborative computer technology and multimedial environments to the teaching of FLs to adults (in particular Italian as a foreign language ), in order to develop and enhance prosodic and intonational awareness through training in listening /production of sounds and intonation patterns with the support of speech analysis tools (Dell’Aria, C. & Incalcaterra McLoughlin, L., 2013) The main hypothesis on which our approach was based, is that technology normally used in individual training - can in fact maximize opportunities for immersive group learning (Maragliano, 1998) , by recovering and extending modes of L1 language knowledge in to L2 teaching and learning, in accordance with Krashen’s theory of natural approach ( 1996). The field of research of this paper is interdisciplinary and involves both Linguistics and Computer Assisted Language Learning. The field of the experiment concerns the teaching of Italian as FL in blended learning, therefore halfway between face-to- face and distance learning, through the integrated use of the perceptive and the instrumental method in the acquisition of intonation. References Dell’Aria, C. & Incalcaterra McLoughlin, L. (2013). Developing Phonological Awareness in Blended-learning Language Courses. In L. Bradley & S. Thouësny (Eds.), 20 Years of EUROCALL: Learning from the Past, Looking to the Future. Proceedings of the 2013 EUROCALL Conference, Évora, Portugal (78-85). Dublin/Voillans: ©Research-publishing.net. Di Sparti, A. (2011). Digitali nativi e didattica della L2. In Di Sabato, B. & Mazzotta, P. (a cura di), Linguistica e didattica delle lingue e dell’inglese contemporaneo. Studi in onore di Gianfranco Porcelli , vol. 1, Lecce (349-368). Pensa MultiMedia Editore. Krashen, S. M. (1996). The natural approach: language acquisition in the classroom. Highgreen, Northumberland UK, Bloodaxe Books. Maragliano, R. (1998). Nuovo manuale di didattica multimediale, Bari, Laterza. McLuhan, M. (1964). Understanding media, New York, McGraw Hill.
  • 30.  oral presentations  30   Bionotes Dr CARMELA DELL’ARIA, PhD in Modern Literatures and Philological-Linguistic Studies, is currently a teacher of English/Italian as FL and a specialized teacher for students in special needs in a secondary school (S.M.S. “R. Franchetti”) in Palermo (Italy). She has been teaching languages since 1990, working in Italy, UK and Ireland for different institutions. She has been a contract Professor of CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning) at the University of Palermo from 2007 to 2010 where she designed training courses and taught online language activities in 3D virtual worlds and LMS. She also designed online pilot courses of Italian for the Duke University (North Carolina, USA) in 2008, the Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland) in 2010 and the National University of Ireland in 2012-2013. She has published widely on language teaching methodology, language and new technologies. She has presented papers at many international conferences. She was the winner of the ASFOL 2011 and contributed to the NUIG’s win at the European Language Label in 2013. She is interested in Second Language Pedagogy, her main research interest is CALL, particularly the use of Virtual Worlds and Social Networks. LAURA INCALCATERRA MCLOUGHLIN, PhD, is a lecturer at the National University of Ireland, Galway, co-director of the MA in Advanced Language Skills and coordinator of the online Diploma in Italian. Her research interests include applied linguistics and audiovisual translation in language teaching and learning. She has published widely on language teaching methodology, language and new technologies and subtitling in language teaching and translator training. She has presented numerous papers at many international conferences. She won the European Language Label in 2008 and 2009.
  • 31.  oral presentations  31  June Eyckmans Ghent University, Belgium Fostering new L2 word recall through word writing or word typing?  Abstract Research on the mnemonic benefits of writing down target words during L2 vocabulary acquisition has produced rather inconclusive results so far. In this study, we assess the effects of two different structurally-oriented processing techniques, namely writing vs. typing, on both receptive and productive word recall. As such it is an adapted reproduction of an experiment conducted by Barcroft (2007) comparing the effects of word writing vs. fragment writing on vocabulary learning. In our modified version, 53 Dutch-speaking lower-intermediate students of Spanish were invited to learn 24 unknown Spanish words on the basis of word-picture pairs in three learning conditions: (1) copying words by writing, (2) copying words by typing and (3) a control condition that did not involve copying of the words, but simply required participants to look at the target lexis. The results of the experiment reveal a significant effect of the writing condition in the immediate productive test and a significant effect of typing in the delayed test. These results are discussed in light of the levels-of-processing theory (Craik & Lockhart 1972), the transfer-appropriate-processing theory (TAP) (Morris et al. 1977) and Barcroft’s transfer-of-processing-resources-allocation (TOPRA) model for lexical learning (2000). Our study also included an investigation into whether cognitive-style variables play a role in the mnemonic benefits of the different processing techniques on trial.  Bionote JUNE EYCKMANS obtained her PhD at the Radboud University of Nijmegen (the Netherlands) in 2004 on the methodology of L2 vocabulary assessment. She is currently Lecturer of English at the department of Interpreting and Communication of Ghent University. Her research interests include cognitive approaches to foreign language learning and the methodology of interpreting and translation assessment. She publishes in national and international journals about foreign language acquisition, translation assessment and interpreting studies.
  • 32.  oral presentations  32  Cristina Felea Babes-Bolyai University, Romania Strategies for Creating Engaging Blended Learning Environments by Incorporating Multiple Representations of Content - An Exploratory Study  Abstract Blended learning has been extensively documented as an efficient approach for transforming higher education. In its simplest form, as integration of face-to-face and online learning experiences, the blended approach has been a key factor in the uptake of technology and the transition to a new educational paradigm. In their turn, Web 2.0 tools and social media have permeated the boundaries of the academic environment by their fast-growing culture of user- generated content, multimedia content, sharing, collaboration, and cooperation. In language education, more and more learning e-content is available in sharing systems and as open educational resources. In time, such resources have been gradually incorporated in language courses either as authentic materials for classroom teaching or supplemental materials for self-paced, autonomous learning. Their role is to create a rich learning environment conducive to better learner engagement and performance. The present paper draws on the author’s four-year experience in designing and implementing a wiki-based blended learning course of English for Academic Purposes for undergraduate students in social sciences. The findings of the author’s prior investigations are presented, with issues related to its implementation and factors that influence successful technology adoption especially in relation to the development of collaborative and independent work skills and students’ engagement behaviour. This paper focuses on strategies related to designing more engaging learning environments. Drawing on specialist literature, models of good practice, and on the author’s course design experience, the influence of incorporating multiple representations of content on student engagement in a blended learning environment are presented. The findings of an exploratory questionnaire on the perception of students are analysed to reveal the impact of multimedia enhancements on student learning performance and engagement. The implications of this study involve some recommendations to consider when planning and designing course content and an engaging learning environment. Future research directions are presented.  Bionote CRISTINA FELEA, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Letters of Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. As a member of the Department for Foreign Languages for Specific Purposes (since 1995), she has a broad experience in curriculum and material building, methodology development and teaching English for (Specific) Academic Purposes to undergraduate and graduate students in social sciences. Her current didactic and research interest focus on integrating Web 2.0 technology in teaching and on building a blended learning environment for full time and distance learning students. With an academic formation in British/ American literature, she is also a licensed translator, having translated some major American authors for important Romanian publishing houses. As an authorised translator, she has expertise in specialist text translation (mostly social sciences) where she works as a freelancer. She has worked on several national and EC-Funded projects.
  • 33.  oral presentations  33  Beatrice Garzelli Università per Stranieri di Siena, Italy Largometrajes y cortometrajes de autor en la enseñanza del español a italófonos. Reflexiones teóricas y propuestas prácticas Auteur films and short films in Spanish teaching to Italian speakers. Theoretical reflections and practical proposals  Abstract La ponencia destaca la importancia del producto fílmico de autor (largometraje y cortometraje) en la enseñanza del español a estudiantes universitarios italófonos, poniendo en evidencia las ventajas que ofrece el medio audiovisual en la clase de lengua extranjera. Las películas y los cortos abren a contextos extralingüísticos que se acercan a la realidad, sintetizan, resumen y compendian los componentes socioculturales y pragmáticos favoreciendo la explotación didáctica a través de actividades que desarrollan todas las destrezas. Además, la traducción para el doblaje y la subtitulación permite una profunda reflexión sobre las pérdidas que afloran en el paso de una lengua y cultura a otra y sobre las posibles compensaciones: es así como el docente puede proponer, en algunos casos, soluciones alternativas con respecto a las elecciones realizadas por los traductores profesionales. Mediante un rápido recorrido a través de películas dirigidas por grandes nombres de la filmografía española e hispanoamericana (Arau, Almodóvar, Amenábar) y de cortometrajes de autor (Calvo, Gil) se presentarán breves, pero significativos ejemplos, de actividades didácticas basadas en reflexiones teóricas previas. De Como agua para chocolate (1992), que utilizaremos para comentar las pérdida s en la traducción al italiano del título y de algunas frases idiomáticas mexicanas a La flor de mi secreto (1995), útil para estudiar la compleja conservación del humor en otro idioma, hasta llegar a Mar adentro (2004), donde destacaremos la ausencia del multilingüismo original en la versión italiana doblada y subtitulada. Los cortometrajes analizados nos ofrecerán la oportunidad, por un lado, de realizar ejercicios sobre e l guión y la subtitulación intralingüística (Ana y Manuel, 2004), por otro, de trabajar sobre los cambios de registro: en el caso de Dime que yo (2008), el repentino paso de un habla vulgar y soez a un lenguaje poético. En resumidas cuentas un itinerario exhaustivo y rico que demuestra la imprescindibilidad del producto fílmico, como forma de expresión multimedial, en la didáctica de las lenguas extranjeras.   The paper intends to show the importance of the auteur film or of the short film in the teaching of Spanish to Italian university students, underlining the advantages of the audiovisual product in the foreign language classroom. Films and short films open to extralinguistic contexts which tend to approach reality, summarize and recap its sociocultural and pragmatic features, thus allowing to create didactic activities capable of developing all the linguistic skills. Above all, dubbing and subtitling permit a deep reflection about the losses which appear when switching from one language and culture to another, and about their possible compensations, sometimes proposing alternative
  • 34.  oral presentations  34  solutions with respect to the options of the professional translators. By means of a quick but rich survey of films directed by famous names of Spanish and Spanish- American filmography (Arau, Almodóvar, Amenábar) and of short films by important authors (Calvo, Gil) we present a variety of practical examples of didactic activities based on theoretical reflections. From Como agua para chocolate (1992), which we use to discuss the loss in the Italian translation of the original title and of some Mexican idiomatic expressions, to La flor de mi secreto (1995), useful to reflect on the difficult translation of humour, to end with Mar adentro (2004), in which we point out the absence of the original multilingualism in the Italian version (both dubbed and subtitled). The short films analyzed offer the opportunity to devise exercises about the play script and the intralinguistic subtitling (Ana y Manuel , 2004) as well as to work about the change of registers, in this case, the rapid switch from a vulgar and rude code to a poetic language (Dime que yo, 2008). To conclude, this appears to be a rich and exhaustive itinerary which demonstrates the importance of the audiovisual as a form of multimedia expression in the didactics of foreign languages. Bibliography (of the author on the theme) Claudia Buffagni, Beatrice Garzelli, Serenella Zanotti (eds), The Translator as Author. Perspectives on Literary Translation, Berlino/New York, Lit Verlag, 2011. Beatrice Garzelli, “Translating cultures: mediation, authorship and the role of the translator”, The translator as Author. Perspectives on Literary Translation, Claudia Buffagni, Beatrice Garzelli, Serenella Za notti (eds), Berlino/New York, Lit-Verlag, 2011, pp. 175-180. Claudia Buffagni, Beatrice Garzelli (eds), Film translation from East to West. Dubbing, subtitling and didactic practice, Berna, Peter Lang, 2012. Beatrice Garzelli, “Dal testo letterario al testo f ilmico: Tristana e Como agua para chocolate nell’aula di spagnolo L2”, Claudia Buffagni, Beatrice Garzelli (eds), Film translation from East to West. Dubbing, subtit ling and didactic practice, Berna, Peter Lang, 2012, pp. 305-320. Beatrice Garzelli, “La explotación del cortometraje en la clase de español LE: Un perro andaluz (1929), Belarra (2002) y Ana y Manuel (2004)”, redELE, 2013, 25, pp. 1-20. http://www.mecd.gob.es/dctm/redele/MaterialRedEle/Revista/2013/2013_redELE_25_19BeatriceGarzelli.pdf?doc umentId=0901e72b81657995 Beatrice Garzelli, “El discurso cinematográfico entre traducción intersemiótica, doblaje y subtitulación: Como agua para chocolate (1992) y Mar adentro (2004)”, Cuadernos AISPI, 2, 2013, pp. 251-270. Beatrice Garzelli, “Lo humor di Almodóvar tradotto in italiano. Casi emblematic i di doppiaggio e sottotitolaggio in ¡Átame!, La flor de mi secreto e Todo sobre mi madre” (in print). Claudia Buffagni, Beatrice Garzelli, “Cinema e trad uzione: dalla ricerca all’applicazione didattica ne ll’aula di lingue. Riflessioni su un progetto in tre fasi” (in print). Claudia Buffagni, Beatrice Garzelli, “‘Extranjeros en Buenos Aires’: Herencia di Paula Hernández (2001) tra parlato spagnolo-tedesco e sottotitoli inglesi’” (in print). Beatrice Garzelli, “Dime que yo de Mateo Gil. El cortometraje como forma de narración en la didáctica del español L2” (in print).  Bionote BEATRICE GARZELLI is Lecturer in Spanish Language and Translation at the Università per Stranieri di Siena. Her research areas include Literary Translation, Spanish-Italian contrastive analysis, Audiovisual Translation and the use of film and short film in the didactics of Spanish as L2. She is General Editor (with Claudia Buffagni) of the collection of a new series of scientific books “InterLinguistica. Studi contrastivi tra lingue e culture” (Pisa, ETS).
  • 35.  oral presentations  35  Maria Gialama | Davor Orlic | Rachel Spencer | Yota Georgakopoulo Deluxe Media Europe, Greece | Knowledge 4 All Foundation Ltd., UK | Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain | Deluxe Media Europe, Greece Translectures – Transcription and translation of Video Lectures  Abstract transLectures is a three-year project to provide innovative technologies for the automatic transcription and translation of online educational videos. It began in November 2011 and is funded through the EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). Project partners include three European universities (Institut “Jozef Stefan”, RWTH Aachen, Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV)), three industrial partners (Deluxe Media Europe, European Media Laboratory GmbH, XEROX S.A.S.) and the Knowledge4All Foundation. Online collections of video material are fast becoming a staple feature of the Internet and a key educational resource. A key emerging trend in education is the incorporation of online video resources into university teaching models. One example of this is the UPV’s lecture capture system, poliMedia. This system, plus the award-winning video lecture repository VideoLectures.NET, are our case study sites. The outcome of the transLectures project will be a set of cost-effective tools that allow users to add multilingual subtitles to their videos. This will make their content available to a much wider audience and enhance knowledge transfer for both non-native speakers, and the deaf and hard-of-hearing. Beyond this, these subtitles will surely be an invaluable tool for language learning. Transcriptions alone can aid comprehension of a foreign language and our verbatim transcriptions mean that students won't miss a single word. The transLectures player, meanwhile, will also allow simultaneous viewing of both the transcription and the translation, further reinforcing the language-learning process. The languages being targeted in transLectures are English, Spanish and Slovenian for transcription, and English<>Spanish, English<>Slovenian, English>French and English>German for translation. Our tools will be fully compatible with Matterhorn, a free, open-source platform for the management of educational audiovisual content. Our primary goal is to have transLectures tools implemented across this platform and our two case study sites by project end (31 October 2014). The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2011) under grant agreement nº 287755.  Bionotes MARIA GIALAMA is currently working as Account Manager, R&D at Deluxe Media, focusing on the testing and implementation of language technologies in subtitling. She also project manages the work carried out by Deluxe as part of the transLectures project and has worked on machine translation for subtitling purposes through the SUMAT project. Maria received her MA in translation and subtitling from the University of Surrey. With a strong background in project management working for several different clients and industries she has been in the subtitling and localisation industry since 2000 and has led and managed teams of translation project managers working on complex subtitling and translation projects for almost a decade.
  • 36.  oral presentations  36  Alessandra Giglio National Research Council of Italy Flipping Classroom: A New Paradigm of Teaching  Abstract The Net, Web 2.0 and the new technologies and tools allow us to be constantly online, suggesting new paradigms that involve aspect of sociology and communication; in fact, learning methodology, as well, is affected by this wind of change. Flipped classroom methodology (Bergmann, Sams, 2012) is currently riding the wave of success in Higher Education and Distance Learning: it consists in a sort of an “upside down” way of teaching, comparing to the “traditional” one, where the student is personally involved into the learning process by giving him/her the responsibility of researching, comparing, contrasting concepts and ideas. The student takes an active role during the lesson in class and at home, when s/he prepares some material that can be useful for the lesson time (Maglioni, Biscaro, 2012). Moreover, the method promotes an extreme individualization of the learning process since the student is able to choose his/her personal rhythm of learning and his/her style of knowledge acquisition, pointing the accent on the well-known (and sometimes abused) Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences Theory (Gardner, 1983). In this contribution, an experimental session of language lessons will be presented. Since the “flipped classroom” method seems to fit the way of teaching and learning a second language, we will present the structure, methodology, technical tools and initial results of two different educational contexts: a university, online context of Italian for foreigner courses at beginner and false beginner levels, and a K12, absolute beginner, Italian for foreigner course. Such results will endorse a deeper reflection on how the method can be applied in K12 and Higher Education and will suggest some future developments. References Bergmann, Jonathan, Sams, Aaron. Flip your classroom: reach every student in every class, every day. International Society for Technology in Education, 2012. Gardner, Howard. Frames of mind: the theory of multiple intelligences. New York: Basic Books, 1983. Maglioni, Maurizio, Biscaro, Fabio. La classe capovolta. Innovare la didattica con il flipped learning. Centro Studi Erickson, 2012.  Bionote ALESSANDRA GIGLIO holds a European PhD in "Languages, Cultures and Technologies" from the University of Genoa, where she previously graduated with a thesis on Teaching Italian as a foreign language. She is specialized in the same discipline with a Masters Degree and has collaborated with the University of Genoa for the design of multimedia courseware and e- learning platforms. She created examination papers worldwide for the PLIDA certification of the Dante Alighieri Society. She teaches Italian Language and Linguistics at the University of Dalarna (Sweden) and at the University of Genoa, which is currently working with. Since 2008 she teaches Italian for Foreigners to Deledda International School. Currently, she is a research at the Institute for Educational Technologies of the Italian National Research Council.
  • 37.  oral presentations  37  Pilar González Vera | Ana Hornero Corisco Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain The use of audiovisual materials as a way to reinforce listening skills in the EFL classroom  Abstract This paper aims to show the effective use of technology and audiovisual materials in the teaching and learning of EFL. It intends to offer an efficient way to improve students’ listening skills through the use of intensive listening (Harmer 2007). That listening skills need to be reinforced both in and outside the classroom is proved by the evidence of the weak competence of Spanish students in oral skills in English provided by a number of surveys at national and European level (Hornero et al. 2013). According to the students’ perceptions, there would seem to be a need to insist on the practice of listening. Moreover, doing listening tasks outside the classroom following their teacher’s guidance, surely increases the students’ motivation and helps to get them used to the authentic L2 sounds (Mur et al. 2013). For that purpose a representative sample of undergraduate students of the degree in Primary Education with a pre-intermediate B1 was selected. They were given clear instructions for the completion of different tasks, which included ClipFlair’s, as part of their continuous assessment in the subject Inglés en Educación Primaria I. Their watching video clips allowed them to see language in use, that is, to relate paralinguistic behaviour to intonation, an effective way to learn at the same time a range of cross-cultural clues. Training future teachers with these tools and activities -once it has been proved they are effective and motivating- we are paving the ground for a more straightforward inclusion of these materials and technologies in the EFL teaching and learning process and ensuring an updating in the methodologies of foreign language teaching, a demand made by students themselves. References Hornero, Ana, Pilar Mur-Dueñas & Ramón Plo. 2013. “Oral skills in the spotlight: EFL in secondary education in a Spanish local context”. Synergy, Vol. 9, no. 2 (forthcoming). Harmer, Jeremy. 2007 (4 th ed.) The Practice of English Language Teaching. Harlow: Pearson/ Longman. Mur-Dueñas, Pilar, Ramón Plo & Ana Hornero. 2013. “Spanish Secondary School students’ oral competence in EFL: self-assessment, teacher assessment and assessment tasks”. Miscelánea: A Journal of English and American Studies, 47 (forthcoming).  Bionotes PILAR GONZALEZ-VERA graduated from the University of Central Lancashire and from the University of Zaragoza with a degree in English Philology followed by a doctorate. She is currently teaching in the Faculty of Education and in the Master of Translation of the University of Zaragoza. Her thesis dealt with the translation for dubbing in DreamWork’s animated films where she focused on humour and cultural aspects. Her research interests include audiovisual translation and the use of new technologies and audiovisual translation for teaching foreign languages. She has presented papers in several conferences such as TISLID 14
  • 38.  oral presentations  38  (Ávila), Languages and the Media (London), Points of View (Krakow) and Multilingualism and Applied Comparative Linguistics (Brussels). She has also published in journals like ANILIJ, IKALA, JoStrans or SENDEBAR. ANA MARÍA HORNERO is Senior Lecturer at the English Department of the University of Zaragoza (Spain). She has published articles in the field of English Historical Linguistics. Leader of the Swift research group, she has studied the reception of the author in Spain and at present the group works on different translation practices, with a special interest on audiovisual translation. From 2006 to 2013 she has been editor of Miscelánea: A Journal of English and American Studies. Her research work has been published at Cambridge Scholars Press, Peter Lang, or in journals like Swift Studies, Studia Anglica Posnaniensia, Atlantis, IJES, Synergy, SELIM, etc.
  • 39.  oral presentations  39  Carmen Herrero | Manuela Escobar Manchester Metropolitan University and Film in Language Teaching Association, UK | Universidad de Sevilla, Spain Audio-description and media literacy in foreign language acquisition. Un modelo integrador de cine y audiodescripción para el aprendizaje de lenguas extranjeras: Los abrazos rotos (Almodóvar)  Abstract Most of the latest research on media and foreign language learning has focused on the use of subtitling in the source and target languages. Different approaches have been used in translation and training of professional translators (Borras & Lafayette, 1994; Gambier, 2007: Díaz-Cintas, 2012; Sokoli, Zalalbeascoa & Fountana, 2011). Subtitling has also been used to develop oral and aural comprehension skills as well as to support lexical acquisition in the foreign language classroom. On the other hand, research on the audio description texts has focused on linguistic and semantic content (Diaz-Cintas, 2007), their specific features and their translability (Borne y Hurtado, 2007; Orero, 2007). Our proposal focuses on the exploitation of audio description, both in its audio-visual and written forms, applied to the acquisition of Spanish as a foreign language in higher education. Considering films as multimodal texts, we aim to develop a pedagogical model to help improve linguistic and intercultural competences by devising an audio-description script. In order to generate this text, learners have to acquire the relevant filmic terminology and visual literacy as well as pay attention to paralinguistic elements that will help to render a comprehensive linguistic, social and intercultural description. To illustrate this model we are applying it to a case study: Los abrazos rotos (Pedro Almodóvar 2009).  Bionotes Dr CARMEN HERRERO is a Principal Lecturer in Hispanic Studies and Subject leader for the Spanish Section at the Manchester Metropolitan University. Her research interests are language education and film, Hispanic cinemas and new technologies and education. She collaborates actively with the “Routes into Languages North West Consortium” and has participated in a wide range of activities to promote language learning. She is the co-founder and co-director of FILTA (Film in Language Teaching Association (http://www.filta.org.uk). With over 2,000 members from 95 countries, FILTA was formed in 2010 for the purpose of providing a forum for the exchange of information related to the use of film in language teaching and promoting linguistic diversity and intercultural awareness. She is also the co- director of the Research Centre FLAME (Film, Languages And Media in Education, https://flameresearchcentre.wordpress.com), a newly established Research Centre committed to the research and knowledge transfer of studies in the area of pedagogy of languages through film and related media. She teaches Hispanic cinema and culture at undergraduate level and is also involved in the TEFL Masters. Her research and publications: http://www2.mmu.ac.uk/languages/staff/profile/index.php?profile_id=184
  • 40.  oral presentations  40  Dr MANUELA ESCOBAR is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Seville in the English Language Department where she teaches English language for Finance and Accountancy, and English for the Tourism Industry at Undergraduate level, and Terminology and Translation in a Master Degree. Dr Escobar research interests include Teaching English as a Foreign Language and Translation Studies. A member of the Research Project La Enseñanza de Lenguas Extranjeras: Tareas con Contenido (Ref FFI 2010-19022), she is also involved in the FLAME Project (Film, Languages And Media in Education, https://flameresearchcentre.wordpress.com) in collaboration with Manchester Metropolitan University. She is also the co-director of the Research Centre FLAME (Film, Languages and Media in Education, https://flameresearchcentre.wordpress.com), a newly established Research Centre committed to the research and knowledge transfer of studies in the area of pedagogy of languages through film and related media. She teaches Hispanic cinema and culture at undergraduate level and is also involved in the TEFL Masters.
  • 41.  oral presentations  41  Ana Ibáñez Moreno | Anna Vermeulen Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Spain | Ghent University, Belgium Audio Description as a Tool to Improve Lexical and Phraseological Competence in Foreign Language Learning  Abstract Various studies have proven that different modalities of audiovisual translation (AVT) offer an excellent opportunity to promote foreign language (FL) learning, especially intra and interlingual subtitling (Vanderplanck 1988, d’Ydewalle 2002, King 2002, Vermeulen 2003, Danan 2004, Díaz Cintas and Fernández Cruz 2008, Pavesi and Perego 2008, Talaván Zanón 2013), and — to a lesser extent — dubbing (Chiu 2012). In our ARDELE project (Audiodescripción como Recurso Didáctico en la Enseñanza del Español como Lengua Extranjera) we explore the possibilities of another type of AVT as a didactic resource in the teaching of a FL: audio description (AD), a culture-based translating activity of inter-semiotic nature that consists in turning the visual content of an event into language, while sometimes offering additional information on cultural references for audiences who do not share the background of the source text (Orero and Warton 2007, Braga Riera 2008). In our presentation we will discuss the results obtained from the project that started in 2010 in the Faculty of Applied Language Studies of the University College at Ghent (Belgium), with third year Dutch speaking students of Spanish (level B2). Following the task-based approach, we designed several didactic units based on the AD of clips of the Spanish movie Sin Ti (Masllorens 2006) and of the Dutch movie Blind (Van den Dop 2007). By carrying out controlled observations, and by implementing tests and questionnaires on Google drive, the results showed that these didactic units provided motivating and useful activities to work with the four language skills. Focusing on the learning of lexical and phraseological units, our presentations shows a series of didactic techniques that were used in the classroom, as well as the results obtained from its implementation. We conclude that AD turns to be an adequate and motivating didactic tool in the Foreign Language classroom in order help students to develop their lexical and phraseological competence. This, in turn, enhances idiomaticity (Sinclair 1995), which is one of the most problematic tasks for foreign language learners (Cooper 1999, Buchwald 2000).  Bionotes ANA IBÁÑEZ MORENO is a Professor at the Faculty of Philology of the Spanish National University of Distance Education, UNED (Spain). She holds a PhD in English Linguistics. Her current main area of research focuses on the teaching and learning of foreign languages. She has long experience as emeritus researcher in the Department of Spanish of the Faculty of Applied Linguistics of the University College at Ghent (Belgium), where her main topics are error analysis, the development of communicative strategies when learning Spanish and the use of audio description as a didactic tool in the classroom of Spanish as a foreign language. She is active member of the UNED-based research group ATLAS, where she currently works
  • 42.  oral presentations  42  with her colleagues in the development of MALL applications based on audio description exercises. ANNA VERMEULEN is associate professor at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the Ghent University (Belgium). She holds a PHD in Spanish linguistics and literature. She is Head of the Spanish department at the Department of Translation, Interpretation and Communication and teaches Spanish Structures, Translation Spanish-Dutch and Audiovisual Translation. Her research and publications focus on translation strategies and techniques, pragmatic aspects and linguistic variation in AVT as well as AVT as a didactic tool in foreign language teaching and learning.
  • 43.  oral presentations  43  Jennifer Lertola | Cristina Mariotti National University of Ireland | University of Pavia, Italy Reverse Dubbing and Subtitling: Raising Pragmatic Awareness in Italian ESL Learners  Abstract Nowadays, language learning and teaching is moving towards the integration of new media technology with a communicative approach to Second Language Acquisition. ClipFlair is an innovative project that promotes language learning through interactive captioning and revoicing of clips. In recent years, scholars have investigated the benefits of captioning and revoicing in language learning (Danan 2004; Talaván 2011; Sokoli, Zabalbeascoa, and Fountana 2011; Lertola 2012). However, research on reverse dubbing and subtitling is still limited (Talaván, and Avila-Cabrera, forthcoming; Talaván and Rodríguez-Arancón, forthcoming). This paper will report on a quasi-experimental study on the effects of reverse dubbing and subtitling on the pragmatic awareness of Italian ESL learners. The participants are undergraduate language students of English enrolled in a Political Science Degree in Italy. Students were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: (1) Experimental group 1 performing reverse subtitling tasks through ClipFlair in a classroom environment, (2) Experimental group 2 performing reverse dubbing tasks through ClipFlair in a classroom environment, (3) Control Group 1 performing only translation tasks on the same materials used by the Experimental Groups in a classroom environment (no subtitling and dubbing) and (4) Control Group 2 learning English in a classroom environment but not working either on translation or on dubbing/subtitling tasks. All participants completed a pre-test two weeks before the experimental sessions in order to test their ability to recognise degrees of formality in NS-NS conversations. Participants from the first three groups were then asked to watch three short ads of a famous Italian mobile company over a period of three months. Participants from the two Experimental Groups and Control Group 1 were required to translate into English the three clips (reverse subtitling, reverse dubbing and translation respectively). An immediate post-test aimed at detecting variations in their pragmatic awareness of requesting expressions was administered after the activity, followed by a delayed post-test administered after one month. A pilot study was carried out one year before the present study to test the experimental design and the usability of the platform. Results will be presented and discussed. References Danan, M. (2004). “Captioning and Subtitling: Undervalued Language Learning Strategies.” Meta: journal des traducteurs / Meta: Translators' Journal 49 (1), 67-77. Lertola, J. (2012). The effect of subtitling task on vocabulary learning. In A. Pym &D. Orrego-Carmona (Eds.), Translation research projects 4 (pp. 61-70). Tarragona: Intercultural Studies Group. Sokoli, S., Zabalbeascoa, P., and Fountana, M. (2011). Subtitling Activities for Foreign Language Learning: What Learners and Teachers Think. In L. Incalcaterra McLoughlin, M. Biscio, & M. Á. Ní Mhainnín (Eds.), Audiovisual Translation Subtitles and Subtitling. Theory and Practice (pp. 219-242). Bern: Peter Lang. Talaván, N. (2011). A Quasi-experimental Research Project on Subtitling and Foreign Language Acquisition. In L. Incalcaterra McLoughlin, M. Biscio, & M. Á. Ní Mhainnín (Eds.), Audiovisual Translation Subtitles and Subtitling. Theory and Practice (pp. 197-217). Bern: Peter Lang.
  • 44.  oral presentations  44  Talaván, N. and Ávila-Cabrera, J. (forthcoming). First insights into the combination of dubbing and subtitling as L2 didactic tools. In Y. Gambier, A. Caimi and C. Mariotti (Eds.) Subtitles and Language Learning. Talaván, N. and Rodríguez-Arancón, P. (forthcoming). The use of reverse subtitling as an online collaborative language learning tool. The Interpreter and Translator Trainer 8 (1). St. Jerome.  Bionotes JENNIFER LERTOLA, PhD, is an e-tutor of the Diploma in Italian Online at the National University of Ireland, Galway where she has been teaching Italian since 2006. She is a member of the EU-funded project “ClipFlair. Foreign Language Learning through Interactive Captioning and Revoicing of Clips” (2011-2014). Her main research interests include teaching Italian as a foreign/second language, audiovisual translation, second language vocabulary acquisition and online education. CRISTINA MARIOTTI is Assistant Professor of English at the Department of Political and Social Sciences at the University of Pavia, Italy. Her main research interests include interaction strategies in Second Language Acquisition, Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), English as a Medium of Instruction (EMI) in internationalisation programmes, and the use of subtitled audiovisual materials in language learning. She is the author of the volume “Interaction Strategies in English-medium Instruction” (FrancoAngeli, Milano, 2007).
  • 45.  oral presentations  45  Marie-Dominique Marcant Université Paris 3 – Sorbonne Nouvelle / DILTEC, France Closed captions toward an opening of the text? Experimental results in Franco-Arabic language and literature teaching/learning  Abstract This paper addresses the use of ICT and more precisely of closed-captions in teaching literature in a foreign language in a language and literature degree at university. Literature – in the form of excerpts, montage or simplified books – is increasingly present in language teaching. However, this use of texts quickly becomes problematic in a university context, wherein texts cannot only be taken as “pretexts” for language learning (vocabulary, grammar, reading, speaking) but as the central objects of literary studies in a foreign language. Nonetheless, reading complex texts (and so literature) in a foreign language often provokes “cognitive overload” for student-readers concentrated on lower processes of comprehension and not on higher processes of meaning construction in literary texts. After first theoretically exploring this fundamentally practical problem the paper then outlines a (pilot) experiment, to be conducted in the French Department of Birzeit University, Palestine, which will implement a technique seeking to address the roots of this problématique . The experiment in question will seek to study the effect of closed-captions on understanding literature, utilizing a sample of university students studying texts presented either with or without hyperlinked closed captions. The exploratory dispositif in question is built on the hypothesis that the use of ICT could cement ties between the semiotics of literary texts and the Bakhtinian ‘material’ of the (foreign) language. The paper concludes by outlining the preliminary findings of the experiment and then exploring the practical and theoretical implications of these for the heuristic development of better pedagogical tools in foreign language and literature teaching/learning.  Bionote MARIDO-DOMINIQUE MARCANT taught French in Chile for two years under the direction of the Franco-Chilean institute and, later, in Palestine for five years, where she was first the pedagogical coordinator for the West Bank and Gaza at the French Cultural Centre, before then moving to teach at Birzeit university. She is presently a doctoral candidate at Université Paris 3 - Sorbonne-Nouvelle in the field of didactics of French as a Foreign Language. Her research focuses on the teaching/learning of literature at a university level through the case study of Birzeit University. She continues to teach French as a Foreign Language, hands on, in Lausanne, Switzerland.
  • 46.  oral presentations  46  Juan José Martínez Sierra Universitat de València, Spain Audiovisual Translation Software and Second Language Teaching  Abstract Increasingly, we can build new bridges between related fields of education. This makes it possible to use techniques that were originally designed for one specific area of teaching, in others. An example of this can be, on the one hand, the teaching of audiovisual translation and, secondly, the teaching of foreign languages. We can find instances of this possibility in recent and noteworthy works such as Talaván (2013), in which the application of subtitles to learn a foreign language is explored. Thus, along the same lines, the main objective of this presentation is the search for other possible avenues of connection between the two areas mentioned above, taking advantage of new technologies and of the tools they provide us. Our starting point will be audiovisual translation teaching and the use of software programs such as Windows Movie Maker and Subtitle Workshop, to later transfer them to the second language (in this case, English) classroom. In the first of these contexts, both software programs allow for, among many other possibilities and respectively, dubbing and subtitling simulations in class. On this occasion, our intention is to show the potential of the aforementioned software in the English language class, but not for interlinguistic purposes, as in the case of dubbing or subtitling into another language, but for intralinguistic ones, as it happens in the case of postsynchronization or of subtitling into the same language. Real examples of classroom activities by students of English as a second language will be shown, to illustrate the two discussed scenarios. References Talaván, Noa (2013) La subtitulación en el aprendizaje de lenguas extranjeras. Octaedro: Barcelona.  Bionote Dr. JUAN JOSÉ MARTÍNEZ SIERRA works as an Associate Professor in the Department of English and German Languages and Cultures at the Universitat de València, where he teaches Written and Audiovisual Translation and English Language. He is specialized in Audiovisual Translation, a field to which he devotes both part of his teaching work and his research activity, which has mainly been focused on the study of audiovisual translation from an intercultural perspective. He has published numerous works, including five books, several book chapters, reviews and many other pieces of research in the form of articles in prestigious scientific journals. He is a member of the research groups TRAMA (Universitat Jaume I) and SIRVA (Universitat de València).
  • 47.  oral presentations  47  Liana Muthu Babeș-Bolyai University, Romania The creation of interlingual subtitles: a method of improving foreign language skills  Abstract This article analyses the role of creating interlingual subtitles as a practical and instructive activity in the acquisition of a foreign language. The learners we refer to are the Romanian students situated at C1 level proficiency in English. For our analysis we take as example a fragment of a 2.32-minute length from the documentary Fractals: The Colors of Infinity presented by Arthur Clarke. When the students translate the voices heard in the film clip from the source language (i.e. English) into the mother tongue (i.e. Romanian) they may have an active role in their own learning process, so that their foreign language acquisition is improved. While they are listening attentively to an audiovisual material, the students are trying to find out the equivalents or the close synonyms of the source language lexical items in their mother tongue: e.g. since the documentary Fractals: The Colors of Infinity includes terms from mathematics domain and fractal geometry subdomain, the students may acquire specialised vocabulary. The act of translating the listened voices proves to be a very good exercise because it enhances the students’ attention. Moreover, this activity provides certain types of support: visual, textual, technological. That’s why trying to create interlingual subtitles is a useful exercise from various reasons: 1. it improves the listening skills; 2. it encourages creative thinking; 3. it encourages vocabulary acquisition; 4. it increases motivation to learn a foreign language, either at school or independently. Consequently, the act of translating an audiovisual material from the source language into the mother tongue may stimulate the students’ interest in improving their foreign language skills. Unlike traditional methods of learning (e.g. translating a written text, reading a text from a book etc.) that appear abstract, this relatively new method seems to be close to reality since the students get in contact with the uttered source language. Hearing the genuine pronunciation of words, the intonation of sentences and, at the same time, looking at the pictures on the screen they are motivated to learn the foreign language in a comprehensive way.  Bionote LIANA MUTHU is a Senior Lecturer with the Department of Applied Modern Languages of the Faculty of Letters, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. She holds a PhD in linguistics. Her academic concerns are focused on researches in text linguistics, discourse analysis and translation studies, areas in which she has published two books and numerous articles in specialised journals and collective volumes, in Romania and abroad (e.g. Cambridge Scholars Publishing). So far, she has been involved in two national research projects on discourse analysis and an international one, ClipFlair, that deals with foreign language learning through captioning and revoicing of clips.
  • 48.  oral presentations  48  Dorothy Ní Uigín National University of Ireland Using Blackboard Collaborate in Language Teaching – avoiding the pitfalls and reaping the benefits  Abstract This paper examines the use of Blackboard Collaborate with a cohort of students in their third year of the BA sa Ghaeilge Fheidhmeach (Applied Irish). In the first two years of the degree, language classes were delivered in the ‘traditional’ manner through face-to-face interaction with the students, but in the academic year 2013-2014, language classes are delivered though BB Collaborate as well as through monthly face-to-face workshops. This method will be employed in 2014-2015 as well, when the students will be in the final year of their degree course. The BA is delivered through blended learning but the students’ first experience of BB Collaborate was in the third-year language module being discussed here. The cohort taking this module comprises thirty students living in different parts of Ireland. This paper will examine the practical challenges faced by the students and the teacher in this new learning environment. Students’ attitudes regarding the classes will be measured through questionnaires and teacher observation, while students will also be asked to compare their on- line learning experience with the traditional approach to language teaching and learning that they experienced in year 1 and 2 of the BA. Examples of what the author believes to be useful exercises and techniques for on-line learning will be examined, while some practical tips for teachers new to this type of teaching will also be discussed.  Bionote DOROTHY NÍ UIGÍN is the Director of the Teaching of Irish in Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge at the National University of Ireland, Galway. She is interested in language teaching and learning and in the acquisition of academic literacy. She has a particular interest in the history of Irish-language journals and journalism and holds a PhD on that subject from NUI Galway. She also holds a BA from the same university as well as an MA in Irish, an MA in Literature & Publishing and an MA in Academic Practice. She is interested in the use of technology in language learning and in non-traditional teaching methods. For the past three years she has taught on a blended learning degree course in Applied Irish at NUI Galway and in the academic year 2013-2014 she taught language classes using the virtual classroom environment Blackboard Collaborate. She co-edited Translation, Technology and Autonomy in Language Teaching and Learning (2012, Oxford: Peter Lang) with Pilar Alderete-Díez, Laura Incalcaterra McLoughlin and Labhaoise Ní Dhonnchadha.
  • 49.  oral presentations  49  Emmanouela Patiniotaki University College of London, UK Assistive Technology & Audiovisual Translation. Combined Solutions in Higher Education  Abstract Accessibility as a concept in Audiovisual Translation and Assistive Technology has been gradually gaining ground during the last decades, while interest into making Online Education accessible is growing around the world. In an attempt to cater for the needs of students with sensory impairments, institutions, organisations, companies and researchers have been visualising, designing and improving tools that can be used to that end, i.e. access services or techniques and technology products (tools) through which content can be accessed, with the aim to provide what is now called 'education for all'. The purpose of this paper is to give prominence to the potential of the combination of access services which emerged within Audiovisual Translation, which has become known as Accessible Media or Media Accessibility, with Assistive Technology tools, which have been more widely realised as the media for accessibility, especially with regard to hardware in the past. Through a thorough investigation of access provision practices and tools within the two fields, the Accessible Online Education research aims to combine the best practices of the two in order to suggest potential implementation of Audiovisual Translation and Assistive Technology elements towards accessible online educational environments. The focus of this paper is the conditions that govern such a combination and the parameters that need to be considered through this multidisciplinary task. It also aims to bring the potential of Audiovisual Translation to the surface in parallel to Assistive Technology. What is more, a survey conducted among some one hundred universities around the world with the aim to rank them in terms of accessibility of educational material for students with sensory impairments will be presented. Among other areas, the survey covers the use of specific platforms, assistive technology tools provided, compliance to accessibility standards, accessibility of online contexts of educational material and general access-related practices followed by the participants. Finally, based on the survey findings, the evaluation of existing common practices in Higher Education will be followed by the presentation of a suggested holistic approach to Online Education with the combination of translation and technology resources.  Bionote EMMANOUELA PATINIOTAKI is a graduate of the Department of English and Greek Language and Literature of the Kapodistrian University and holds an MSc in Translation from Imperial College. She is currently conducting her PhD research on Access to the Media with special focus on the satisfaction of educational needs through online environments with the provision of accessible material using various technological means, focusing on Audiovisual Translation and Assistive Technology. She has been working as a teacher and language specialist since 2004 and as a translator, localizer and AV provider since 2006. In 2011 she was awarded with the Onassis Foundation Research Scholarship. She is now a member of several associations
  • 50.  oral presentations  50  and access services volunteer and is conducting her research at Imperial College London. At the moment she holds a position as Teaching Fellow at UCL, teaching Translation, Translation Technologies and Language Automation and designs university online courses in Translation.
  • 51.  oral presentations  51  Marta Pey Pratdesaba Institut Jaume Callís, Spain The eTwinning Experience: Europe in the classroom  Abstract The purpose of this paper is to give a presentation of the programme eTwinning, the future ahead and give a glimpse of a couple of successful projects carried out by Secondary students. Etwinning offers the suitable environment to use the English language in a “real” context, it can be integrated in any subject due to its cross-curricular nature. In short, it prepares the student for the real world: international research, to get to know other cultures, to communicate and to learn content. I will start by giving a general view of what eTwinning is about: a big community for teachers in 33 European countries. It was launched as the main action of the European Commission’s eLearning Programme, and has been integrated in the Lifelong Learning Programme since 2007. It offers a platform for staff working in a school in one of the European countries involved, to communicate, collaborate, develop projects and share. ETwinning projects are based on collaborative work, use of ICT and the fostering of a European identity. The second part will deal with the future of eTwinning within the new programme Erasmus+ (2014-20). The eTwinning initiative has been identified as a success to create links between educational centres of Europe and beyond its borders. It has highlighted the need for a safe environment in which to create pan-European meetings for teachers and students. Finally, and drawn from personal experience, two projects will be shown: “Addressing the Energy Crunch; Every Little Action Helps” (National Prize 2013), and “Songs, Language and Culture” (Runner-up European Prizes 2010) as good examples of how to use IT tools and learn English in a collaborative project between different schools in Europe.  Bionote MARTA PEY PRATDESABA is Head of the Foreign Languages Department at Institut Jaume Callís in Vic. She has been mentor of the Master for Teachers of Secondary Education. She has also collaborated with UVic in two Junior University’s modules. She is an eTwinning Ambassador and offers workshops and presentations around Catalonia. She has also published articles about eTwinning. She has been working in eTwinning projects since 2007 having carried out a total of 7 projects, all of them awarded with the National and European Labels. Three of them have been awarded with National and European Prizes.
  • 52.  oral presentations  52  Anamaria Radu & Alexandra Cotoc Babeș-Bolyai University, Romania ClipFlair Activities: Creativity in L2 Romanian Corpora  Abstract The present paper aims to analyse a corpus of several revoicing and captioning tasks of students in the preparatory year who study Romanian as a foreign language. The authentic discourses are triggered by using the ClipFlair activities and consist of short narratives, essays and subtitles. We will focus on B1 learners. At the same time, observing the Common European Framework, we present the multidimensional aspects encountered in their discourse: the morphosyntactic and lexical features. Our analysis covers important Romanian peculiarities and presents the way in which they are assimilated and used by the students. Although the learners’ discourses are different from what native speakers would produce, we consider that they create a new linguistic code, not only at a stylistic level, but also at a morphosyntactic level. Thus, foreign students who study Romanian sometimes produce discourses which are the results of a dynamic system which involve cognitive filters like English or their mother tongues. Hence, we can observe aspects like: linguistic calques, the use of foreign words to which they add Romanian morphemes, code switching etc. Moreover, considering the fact that foreign learners come across a lot of difficulties when studying Romanian (agreement, gender, complex verb conjugation, the genitive/dative clitics etc.), their discourses are to be viewed as proofs of progress in learning Romanian as a foreign language, especially when using audio- visual resources. Preferred line of research: Audiovisuals in language learning  Bionotes ANAMARIA RADU has a Ph.D. in Linguistics. The topic of her PhD thesis is “The Cluj School of Grammar in the Interwar Period”. Her experience includes teaching the practical course Normative Grammar, the Romanian Phonetics seminar and Romanian as a Foreign Language at the at the Faculty of Letters, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. She is currently teaching Romanian as a Foreign Language to students in the preparatory year, at the Faculty of Letters, Babeș-Bolyai University. She has also worked as a professional freelance translator (English and Romanian). Relevant publications: - Cotoc, Alexandra, Radu, Anamaria, “Interdiscourse Communication and Identity Construction in Online Social Networks”, in Dranidis D., Kapoulas A., Vivas A. (eds.), Proceedings of the 6th Annual South – East European Doctoral Student Conference, Thessaloniki, Greece: South-East European Research Centre. - Cotoc, Alexandra, Radu, Anamaria (2011), Online Identities on Blogs, in Acta Technica Napocensis – Languages for Specific Purposes, volume 11, issue no. 3, Cluj-Napoca: U. T. Press (CEEOL) - Radu, Anamaria, Cotoc, Alexandra (2012), “Creativity and Multidimensional Aspects of Written L2 Romanian Corpora”, in Acta Technica Napocensis – Languages for Specific Purposes, volume 12, issue no. 3, Cluj-Napoca: U. T. Press (CEEOL).
  • 53.  oral presentations  53  ALEXANDRA COTOC has a BA in English Language and Literature and French Language and Literature, an MA in Current Trends in Linguistics and a PhD in the field of sociolinguistics and Internet linguistics from the Faculty of Letters, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The title of her PhD thesis is “Language and Identity in Cyberspace. A Multidisciplinary Approach”. During the master programme, she was an Erasmus student at the Faculty of Letters of Université d'Orléans, France (January 2009-June 2009) and during her doctoral studies she was a visiting PhD candidate at the English Department of the University of Vienna, Austria (January 2012-July 2012). Her teaching experience includes teaching English, French and Romanian at the private school Bridge Language Study House, Cluj-Napoca, teaching the course French for Specific Purposes, as well as the French practical course for undergraduate students (Remise à niveau) at the Faculty of Letters, Babeș-Bolyai University, teaching the course English for Academic Purposes at the Faculty of Letters, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj- Napoca, Romania. She has published several articles and a book review related to computer mediated communication and an article on film and visual arts. She has also worked as a professional freelance translator (English, French and Romanian).
  • 54.  oral presentations  54  Valentina Ragni University of Leeds, UK Reverse Subtitling Practice in the Foreign Language Classroom: a Pilot Study  Abstract Throughout the past few decades, researchers have investigated several aspects of the use and reception of ready-made subtitles for foreign language learning (FLL) purposes. On the other hand, interlingual subtitling practice as a FLL tool remains a relatively unexplored subject. The few researchers (Williams & Thorne, 2000; Lertola, 2012; Talavan, 2006, 2011) who have exploited subtitling as a task in the language classroom at university undergraduate level have turned to either standard subtitling (L2 > L1) or bimodal input (L2 > L2). Translating out of one’s mother tongue is typically regarded as more problematic, since it involves a specific set of challenges and requires higher proficiency on the part of the learner. This may be one of the reasons why there is a dearth of research involving reverse subtitling (L1 > L2) in FLL. This paper describes a pilot project implemented at the University of Leeds, where BA students of Italian as an L2 were offered extra translation practice as part of their main language module. The participants carried out reverse subtitling through the ClipFlair platform over the course of two terms. This longitudinal study aimed at a) identifying what benefits this subtitling modality can offer in a non-professional perspective, i.e. learner-training rather than subtitler-training oriented; b) gathering information on the reception of this new practice by the students themselves, with particular attention to their habits and attitudes; and c) analysing the translational choices and strategies employed by the learners during on-screen language transfer. Data was collected through class observation, questionnaires and analysis of students’ translational outputs.  Bionote VALENTINA RAGNI is a PhD student at the University of Leeds currently exploring the potential of AVT in the foreign language (FL) classroom, through both the use and the creation of reverse subtitles (L1 audio > L2 subtitles). Her research interests include SLA (Second Language Acquisition), FL teaching, translation, the interaction between viewers and the audiovisual product, and some technologies used to explore this interaction, i.e. eye tracking. She graduated cum laude from the School of Interpreters and Translators of the University of Trieste, and completed a MA in Screen Translation Studies at Leeds, where she teaches Italian. She also works as a freelance translator and proofreader.
  • 55.  oral presentations  55  Alicia Sánchez Requena Universidad Antonio de Nebrija Madrid, Spain Audiovisual in language learning  Abstract The active use of techniques traditionally employed in audiovisual translation, such as subtitling or dubbing, constitutes a recent practice in the field of teaching foreign languages. In this paper, re-voicing is seen as a didactic resource consisting of replacing original voices in 2-3 minute long clips in a foreign language. This paper primary looks at the interface between the use of direct re-voicing in Spanish as a foreign language and oral expression in non-prepared conversations, with an emphasis on fluency and pronunciation. To this end, 17 English students aged 16-17 with an intermediate level of Spanish took part in the study. It is mainly a qualitative observational based study and the results have been validated by triangulating the data: firstly, analysing 20 minutes interviews on general topics to each individual before and after putting in place the re -voicing activity; secondly, analysing the answers of two different questionnaires about their feelings and thoughts when performing orally in Spanish; thirdly, through teacher’s notes made in class and after listening to each recording. At the same time, this data has been obtained through three different sources: the students, the teacher as observer and three native Spanish assessors. The results in this study cannot present universal validity but they provide promising information for future experimental research. The most important finding in this study is that in the short period of six weeks, students have significantly improved the speed of their speech by an average of 22 words per minute. They reported an increase in their confidence and they feel more relaxed, fluent and comfortable when speaking the foreign language. According to the qualitative data, other learning areas, such as listening comprehension and vocabulary acquisition, improved notably. However, the results suggest that to get more objective conclusions about pronunciation the activity needs to be carried out for a longer period of time and with more explicit practice.  Bionote ALICIA SÁNCHEZ REQUENA has been working as Spanish teacher at the Royal Grammar School Guildford, in Surrey (UK) for the last five years. She read Translation and Interpreting at the University of Granada and a Masters Degree in Linguistics Applied to Teaching Spanish as a Foreign Language at the University Antonio de Nebrija (Madrid). Recently, she has completed a pilot study about the contributions of Revoicing to develop Fluency and Pronunciation. She will be researching this topic more in detail at the Manchester Metropolitan University from October 2014.
  • 56.  oral presentations  56  Betlem Soler Pardo | Gloria Torralba Miralles Universitat de València, Spain | Universitat Jaume I de Castelló and Universitat de València, Spain Audiovisual Translation as a New Educational Approach: Intralingual and Interlingual Subtitling to Learn a Second Language  Abstract The technological advances that have occurred during recent decades in the field of language learning offer the possibility to find new teaching techniques. In this paper, we will present a proposal for learning a foreign language through subtitling as an Audiovisual Translation mode. We have chosen this resource because it combines two tools which can provide an innovative approach to language teaching: translation and audiovisual material. Our research was carried out during the first term of the academic year 2013-2014, and was conducted with 4th year undergraduates students of Audiovisual Communication from the Universitat Jaume I in Castelló, levels B1-B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). The AV input was a short video clip from a popular sitcom and the software used was Subtitle Workshop for being this a user-friendly, not time consuming, freeware application. Students were asked to perform two subtitling tasks: Firstly, after viewing the clip without audio, they had to create dialogues and to carry out intralingual subtitling; secondly, students were required to translate and adapt the original script in English so as to perform interlingual subtitling. Once students had completed both tasks, they were given a test to verify the effects of subtitling on the incidental acquisition of L2. Besides, participants’ opinions on the task performed were gathered through a final questionnaire. The research results show that most students did not know the didactic approach of subtitling. In addition, the collected data suggest that this audiovisual translation method promotes grammar and vocabulary acquisition, as well as improves writing skills. Furthermore, the data remarked the importance of ICT and self-learning when teaching a foreign language.  Bionotes BETLEM SOLER-PARDO received her doctorate in 2011 from the Department of English at the University of Valencia where she currently lectures in the Faculty of Education. The primary subject of her research is translation studies, especially dubbing and subtitling, and didactics. She has expertise in English, Spanish and Catalan studies; in 2001, she received an MA in Sociolinguistics from Queen Mary and Westfield, University of London and held the position of Faculty Language Instructor at the University of Oxford from 2003 to 2006. She has spoken at various international conferences, and is currently converting her thesis ‘Swearing and Translation: A Study of the Insults in the Films of Quentin Tarantino’ into a book. GLORIA TORRALBA is a freelance translator and part-time lecturer at the Universitat Jaume I and the Universitat de València. She completed her BA in Translation and Interpreting in 2000
  • 57.  oral presentations  57  with a specialisation in audiovisual translation. She has worked as an audiovisual translator for different TV channels and various dubbing and subtitling companies since 2000. She teaches Audiovisual Translation and Catalan Language Teaching at graduate level and Dubbing at post- graduate level. Her research interests include audiovisual translation and AVT as didactic tool applied to language learning.
  • 58.  oral presentations  58  Noa Talaván | Jennifer Lertola | José Javier Ávila-Cabrera Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Spain | National University of Ireland | Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Spain iCap-Intralingual captioning in foreign language education to enhance writing skills and vocabulary acquisition with the help of ClipFlair  Abstract The research on the use of active captioning in foreign language learning has considerably increased in the course of the last decade. Particular attention has been paid to standard interlingual subtitling with regard to listening, writing, vocabulary, intercultural and pragmatic awareness (Incalcaterra McLoughlin, 2009; Talaván 2010, 2011; Borghetti 2011; Lertola 2012; Talaván and Rodríguez-Arancón, 2014). However, although it has been suggested as a beneficial task, there is still lack of evidence as regards the potential benefits of intralingual captioning in this context. The present project (iCap-Intralingual Captioning) attempts to fill this void by analysing the use of intralingual subtitling as a didactic resource in a distance learning context both in terms of writing production and vocabulary acquisition. To this end, a total number of 70 undergraduate pre-intermediate B1 students have been working on 10 sequenced ClipFlair activities using short (2 minutes approx.) pre-selected videos taken from the American sitcom How I met your mother (Carter Bays and Craig Thomas, 2005-2014) in the course of a month and a half. Students were required to provide English subtitles (as condensed as possible) to each of the videos following the instructions contained in the ClipFlair activities and without the help of any type of written script or transcript. Peer-to-peer assessment was also fostered during the project through active use of online Forums. The research study has included language assessment tests (both writing and vocabulary), questionnaires and observation as the basic data gathering tools to make the results as reliable and thorough as possible in this type of educational setting. The conclusions are aimed to confirm the expected benefits as far as writing and vocabulary skills enhancement is concerned, accompanied by extra information on how to best implement this type of intralingual captioning tasks using ClipFlair. References Borghetti, C. (2011). Intercultural learning through subtitling: The cultural studies approach. In L. Incalcaterra McLoughlin, M. Biscio, & M. Á. Ní Mhainnín (Eds.), Audiovisual Translation Subtitles and Subtitling. Theory and Practice (pp. 111-137). Bern: Peter Lang. Incalcaterra McLoughlin, L. (2009). Inter-semiotic translation in foreign language acquisition: The case of subtitles. In A. Witte, T. Harden, & A. Ramos de Oliveira Harden (Eds.), Translation in Second Language Learning and Teaching (pp. 227-244). Bern: Peter Lang. Lertola, J. (2012). The effect of subtitling task on vocabulary learning. In A. Pym & D. Orrego-Carmona (Eds.), Translation Research Projects 4 (pp. 61-70). Tarragona: Intercultural Studies Group. Talaván, N. (2010). Subtitling as a task and subtitles as support: Pedagogical applications. In J. Díaz Cintas, A. Matamala, & J. Neves (Eds.), New Insights into Audiovisual Translation and Media Accessibility (pp. 285-299). Amsterdam: Rodopi. Talaván, N. (2011). A quasi-experimental research project on subtitling and foreign language acquisition. In L. Incalcaterra McLoughlin, M. Biscio, & M. Á. Ní Mhainnín (Eds.), Audiovisual Translation Subtitles and Subtitling. Theory and Practice (pp. 197-217). Bern: Peter Lang.
  • 59.  oral presentations  59  Talaván, N. & Rodríguez-Arancón, P. (2014 forthcoming). The use of reverse subtitling as an online collaborative language learning tool. The Interpreter and Translator Trainer 8(1). St. Jerome. Audiovisual reference How I met your mother. (2005-2014). Carter Bays and Craig Thomas. 20th Century Fox Television, and Bays Thomas Productions.  Bionotes Dr. NOA TALAVÁN holds a senior lecturer position in the Foreign Languages Department of the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Spain, where she teaches mainly in the areas of Translation, English for Specific Purposes and CALL (Computer-Assisted Language Learning). Her main fields of research are audiovisual translation, mobile learning and foreign language education. She is currently taking part in two research projects: a national project called SO-CALL-ME on Mobile Learning Applications in Language Learning (as part of the ATLAS group) and a European project—Lifelong Learning Program—called ClipFlair, Foreign Language Learning through Interactive Revoicing and Captioning of Clips (as an associate partner). She is also an official translator (English-Spanish) and holds a position as secretary of a Masters course on ICTs and Language Learning and Processing. JENNIFER LERTOLA, PhD, is an e-tutor of the Diploma in Italian Online at the National University of Ireland, Galway where she has been teaching Italian since 2006. She is a member of the EU-funded project “ClipFlair. Foreign Language Learning through Interactive Captioning and Revoicing of Clips” (2011-2014). Her main research interests include teaching Italian as a foreign/second language, audiovisual translation, second language vocabulary acquisition and online education. JOSÉ JAVIER ÁVILA-CABRERA, PhD, works as a part-time lecturer at the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Madrid (Spain). He holds a degree in English Philology from Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and has taken a series of postgraduate courses: both on Translation (UNED), and Translation and Technology (Heriot-Watt University, UK). He holds a PhD in English Studies by the UNED, specialising in the field of the subtitling of offensive/taboo terms into Spanish. Among his academic interests are subtitling, AVT as an L2 learning tool, and the use of technology in L2 education.
  • 60.  oral presentations  60  Silvia Sanz-Santamaría | Juanan Pereira | Julián Gutiérrez University of the Basque Country, Spain Babelium Project, a Rich Internet Application (RIA) for interactive speaking practice, collaborative assessment and video-exercise sharing  Abstract Attaining a satisfactory level of oral communication in a second language is a laborious process. The Babelium Project, an innovative Rich Internet Application, aims to help students to practice speaking skills through a variety of interactive, real-time, video-exercises. This open source, collaborative, web platform allows users to upload open video-content and share them with the community for practicing. The video clips are classified based both on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages and the ALTE/EAQUALS criteria, and are freely available, using Creative Commons licenses. Babelium allows students to record their voice and face (using microphones and webcams) and, after that, to collaboratively evaluate their activities according to a set of defined oral evaluation criteria. All these recordings and evaluations are saved in order to create a personal portfolio where students' evolution can be seen. Nowadays, Babelium contains multimedia material (interactive videos) developed and tested by language teachers in English and Basque and, in the future, thanks to the funding of an LLP European project, also by German, Spanish and French teachers. After showing all the features of the platform, we present some experiences using interactive video-exercises in real world scenarios with students of English and Basque as a second language. We also introduce, out of the language leaning knowledge area, one interesting experience in the Bachelor of Nursing. Finally, based on our experience and the similarity between Babelium and ClipFlair's approaches, this paper suggests the development of a new infrastructure that will allow the use of interactive video, captioning and revoicing in mobile devices (smartphones and tablets) and modern desktop browsers, using new features and functionalities provided by the HTML5 language.  Bionotes SILVIA SANZ-SANTAMARÍA: Computer Science graduate in 2002 at the University of The Basque Country (UPV/EHU). She has been teaching in the field of Computer Science since 2003 at the Public University of Navarre (2003-2008) and the University of The Basque Country (2008-2013). She also gave classes at the Third Age Schooling initiative at eh UPV/EHU program (Lifelong Learning) in 2011-2012. Actually she is a researcher of the GHyM research group at the Department of Computer Languages and Systems (UPV/EHU), where she is doing her PhD. on Video-based Language Learning Web applications. JUANAN PEREIRA VARELA is a PhD professor at the Department of Computer Languages and Systems, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU). Since 2005, he is teaching at the School of Industrial Engineering of Bilbao, in the field of Software Engineering. Before joining the university, he has also worked leading a web developers and system administration team in Arista Multimedia, as a computer engineer in the Chamber of Commerce of Gipuzkoa (Department of Information Systems and New Technologies) and as computer systems administration teacher. At the university he has been the coordinator of the Education
  • 61.  oral presentations  61  Counseling Service (SAE) in Gipuzkoa, teaching numerous ICT and eLearning related courses. Currently he is working in Babelium, a Rich Internet Application system for practicing second language speaking skills - a Lifelong Learning European project within the Key Activity 2 program. His research interests focus on the areas of Computer Assisted Language Learning, Technology Enhanced Learning and eLearning. JULIÁN GUTIÉRREZ: GHyM research group's director since 1995. Full Professor at the Computer Science Faculty (University of The Basque Country, UPV/EHU) since 1996. Vice-den (1996- 2003) and dean (2003-2008) at the Computer Science Faculty (UPV/EHU). Evaluator of Euskalit (the Basque Foundation for Quality, a private, not-for-profit organisation) projects since 2007. Teaching at the Third Age Schooling initiative at the UPV/EHU program (Lifelong Learning) since 2010.
  • 62.  oral presentations  62  Sara Valla | Gillian Mansfield University of Parma, Italy Technology enhanced collaboration as an extension of the language-learning environment  Abstract Readily available technologies make it necessary to rethink the approach to language learning (Mansfield, 2000). Rather than re lying on a technology driven approach lacking in solid pedagogical premises, greater attention must be given to the kinds of educational technology that apply “ideas from various sources to create the best learning environments possible for student s” (Hopper & Rieber, 1995: 154). Indeed, in a comprehensive review of technology types and their effectiveness in foreign language learning, Golonka et al (2012: 1-2 ) note how “technological innovations can increase learner interest and motivation; provide students with increased access to target language (TL) input, interaction opportunities, and feedback; and provide instructors with an efficient means for organizing course content and interacting with multiple students.” This paper sets out to discuss technology enhanced collaborative activities (e.g. posting of individual tasks for peer assessment, individual and group pre-translation text analysis, concordance analysis) according to specific student needs. On a practical level, it proposes innovative learning tasks as possible ways of fostering motivation with a view to investigating students’ reactions to these activities. The authors present a part of some ongoing research at the University of Parma that focuses on undergraduates and postgraduates specialising in modern languages, some intending to undertake a career in language teaching, others as professional translators. In both cases, learners will use the knowledge, competences and practical skills acquired for their future careers. Incorporating active reading and text highlighting (Nunes et al., 2012), for example, into the courses makes use of tools that will be available in students’ future professional lives (Mansfield & Beseghi, 2009; Mansfield & Poppi, 2012). Underlying this approach is the fact that learners can expect more from collaboration with their peers than from technology itself (Turkle, 2011). The aims of this research are thus to discover to w hat extent technology enhanced collaborative activities help to achieve learning outcomes and encourage possible strategies for students to adopt later on in their professional lives. To this end, observation of virtual classrooms and environments and learning with particular attention paid to learner engagement will be discussed in the light of awareness raising and motivation fostered by online collaboration. Preliminary bibliography Dudeney G & Hockly N. (2007). How to... teach English with technology. Harlow: Pearson. Golonka, E.M., Bowles, A.R., Frank, V.M., Richardson D.L. and Freynik, S. (2012). Technologies for language learning: a review of technology types and their effectiveness, Computer Assisted Language Learning, pp.1-36, i First article. Hopper, S., & Rieber L.P. (1995). Teaching with Technology. In A.C. Ornstein (Ed.) Teaching: Theory into practice (pp. 154–170). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, available at http://www.nowhereroad.com/twt/ Littlejohn, A., & Pegler, C. (2007). Preparing for blended e-learning (New Edition.). London: Routledge. Mansfield & Poppi (2012). The English as a Foreign language /Lingua Franca Debate: Sensitising Teachers of English as a Foreign Language Towards Teaching English as a Lingua Franca, In Profile Vol.14 April 2012, pp. 159-172. Mansfield, G., & Beseghi, M. (2009). Alla ricerca d el Significato: i corpora e la traduzione. In T. Zemella (ed.), Il Traduttore Visibile. Tradurre ovvero l’infinito gioco della possibilità. Parma: MUP, pp. 93-115.
  • 63.  oral presentations  63  Mansfield, G. (2000). ‘BALL, PALL, LALL or CALL? Or which technology for which pedagogy ... and for which purpose? in Rema Rossigni Favretti (ed.), Linguistica e Informatica: Multimedialità. Corpora e Percorsi di Apprendimento, Bulzoni. Nunes, B. P., Kawase, R., Dietze, S., Bernardino de Campos, G. H., & Nejdl, W. (2012). Annotation Tool for Enhancing e-Learning Courses. In Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Advances in Web-Based L earning Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, pp. 51–60. Turkle, S. (2011). Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other. New York: Basic Books.  Bionotes SARA VALLA is Learning Technology Officer at the University of Parma, at the Research Centre UniPR Co-Lab, where she is involved in expert guidance, advice and support to University professors and students on the design, development and implementation of online resources and the use of interactive educational technologies. Furthermore, she deals with instructional design, project management and coordination of on-line and blended educational projects and manages some Learning Management Systems and IT services for education at the University of Parma. She graduated in Business and Administration at theUniversity of Parma and obtained a Master of Arts in E-learning at University of La Tuscia, Italy. She has taken part in national and international research projects on language learning and digital library and was learning guide and assistant in the Italian semester of the International Erasmus Mundus Master's in Digital Library Learning (DILL). Her main research interests are E-earning and educational tutoring and coaching, sharing, e-collaboration and digital libraries for learning. GILLIAN MANSFIELD is Associate Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Parma. Her present research interests are wordplay in media texts, cultural identity in global advertising and the popularizing features of texts in museum websites, and also lifelong language learning skills. Her most recent publications include: “Laughter in the lecture theatre – a serious matter. Studying verbal humour in the British TV sitcom” (2012), “Make up or Made up? Intra and interlinguistic messages in the globalised world of cosmetic advertising" (2013), "Mind the Gap between form and function. Teaching pragmatics with the British sitcom in the foreign language classroom" (2013) and “Hands On. Developing Language Awareness Through Corpus Investigation" (2014). She is currently president of CercleS (European Confederation of Language Centres in Higher Education) and Editor-in-Chief with David Little of the CercleS academic journal Language Learning in Higher Education.
  • 64.  oral presentations  64  Cristina Varga Babeș-Bolyai University, Romania Learning Catalan through Captioning in a Multilingual Context  Abstract Following the actual trends in European education, the Multilingual and Multicultural Communication MA program at “Babeș-Bolyai” University offers to the students the possibility to obtain high language skills in romance languages such as: French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Occitan, and Catalan. All students enrolled in the MA program are required to follow an Intercomprehension between Romance Languages course. Catalan is one of the languages the students come in contact with in the framework of this multilingual and multicultural course. The majority of the students never had been in contact with this language before and they have difficulties to read, understand, and communicate in Catalan. Our objective in this paper is to present how ClipFlair cloud-based platform for foreign language learning facilitate the access of the students to Catalan learning through videoclips captioning and revoicing. Being fun, interactive, and interesting ClipFlair helps students to communicate and makes language learning a more enriching experience so the students are motivated to learn new languages. The design and implementation of Catalan activities the students work with involve different types of learning activities such as reading, writing, translating, subtitling, dubbing, voice-over, and so on. These activities allow the students to develop, in very short time, basic communicational skills in a language they never studied before. ClipFlair proves to be an excellent tool for language learning in multilingual environment. Based on previous studies such as: Göpferich & Jääskeläinen ( 2009); Stewart, Orbán & Kornelius (2010) Kiraly (2000), Pym (2009), Gaballo, (2009), Banks, Hodgson & McConnell (2004), the paper is the result of a two years investigation involving three groups of MA students.  Bionote CRISTINA VARGA, PhD, is an assistant professor of Modern Languages Department at Universitatea “Babeș-Bolyai” in Cluj-Napoca where she teaches Audiovisual translation (subtitling, localization, voice-over) and Terminology. Her areas of work and research include audiovisual translation, localization, discourse analysis, corpus-based linguistics, creation and management of multilingual corpora, machine translation, and terminology. She is a collaborator of the Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, where she teaches in an Audiovisual translation MA program. She also works as a freelance subtitler and certified translator.
  • 65.  oral presentations  65  Cristina Varga | Anamaria Bogdan Babeș-Bolyai University, Romania Multimodal Learning. Evaluating Attitudes Towards ClipFlair Language Learning Platform  Abstract Society is changing at a fast pace. Social network and Internet based teaching and learning are increasingly used in classroom. With the rapid development of technology, there is a gradual shift from the traditional learning environment to the cloud-based learning environment in the process of learning. This paper reports on a study conducting qualitative and quantitative research methods to examine the reception and to investigate the attitudes of Romanian students toward ClipFlair language learning platform. To that end, a survey was conducted to examine university students’ perceptions and attitudes about using this innovative method of learning foreign languages. Results of the study demonstrated that the surveyed students stated that they use in general social networking to improve their language, their communication skills, and to learn new languages. Results of the study also suggest that students consider revoicing and captioning a productive and motivating way to learn languages. The variety of AV materials, the cultural aspects of the communication, and the interactive method of work are elements which has been given a generally positive reception. The suggestions of the students in relation to the design and the implementation of ClipFlair online platform were taken into account and discussed in the paper. Methodologically, the paper is based on a questionnaire survey of a relevant group of 150 Romanian students. The researchers believe the results obtained from this investigation to be beneficial in terms of identifying the needs of the students in the use of ClipFlair learning platform upon their feedback. This will allow the teachers to adapt ClipFlair activities and to improve the use of the cloud-based platform in classroom in order to ease the access for the learners on the platform.  Bionotes CRISTINA VARGA, PhD, is an assistant professor of Modern Languages Department at Universitatea “Babeș-Bolyai” in Cluj-Napoca where she teaches Audiovisual translation (subtitling, localization, voice-over) and Terminology. Her areas of work and research include audiovisual translation, localization, discourse analysis, corpus-based linguistics, creation and management of multilingual corpora, machine translation, and terminology. She is a collaborator of the Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, where she teaches in an Audiovisual translation MA program. She also works as a freelance subtitler and certified translator.
  • 66.  oral presentations  66  Boris Vázquez Calvo | Daniel Cassany Pompeu Fabra University, Spain Classroom digitization and digital language learning: practices in two 1x1 schools in Catalonia  Abstract In the context of the digital culture, the digitized classroom seem to be the same old wine in a brand-new bottle. Emerging technologies still cause technophobic or techno-deterministic attitudes, which call for normalizing the technological component. The competitive research project IES2.0: Digital literacy practices. Materials, classroom activities and online language resources explores whether and how digitization changes reading and writing across the curriculum. During 2 years of case studies from an ethnographic standpoint, 112 semi-structured interviews to teachers and students have been collected in 20 1x1 schools in Catalonia. Within this framework of action, this paper focuses on technologically enhanced practices led by teachers of Catalan, English and Spanish in two out of the 20 schools, selected because of their innovative nature. We analyse teachers' and students' discourse on their work, together with the digital artefacts provided, with a special interest on good practices and the use of online language resources, such as online dictionaries, translation software or spell and grammar checkers. Preliminary results show that a slight number of teachers benefit from technologies while many still underutilise them. Comprehensive teaching projects may be deemed, however, as good practices, among which there are AR projects in English or digital creative writing workshops in Spanish. At an activity- based level, results suggest that students do have linguistic needs in the three languages in order to read and write texts, do classroom activities, homework and bigger projects, or follow CLIL modules. Despite this, online language resources familiar to them (Google Translate, online dictionaries and built-in checkers) are poorly used, learnt and taught. Additional resources such as parsers, conjugation software or text corpora remain unknown or unexplored.  Bionotes BORIS VÁZQUEZ is a teaching assistant and training researcher at Pompeu Fabra University. He has a degree in Translation and Interpreting by the University of Vigo, a Postgraduate Certificate in Translation and Interpreting by the University of Westminster, and a Master's in Language Teaching by the University of Santiago de Compostela. He holds a competitive research grant (FPI) given by the Spanish Ministry of Economy, while doing his PhD in Translation and Language Sciences. His PhD thesis is on Digital Language Learning: Online Language Resources and is being supervised by Dr. Daniel Cassany. He is a member of Gr@el (Research Group in Language Learning and Teaching) and fully participates in the research project IES2.0: Digital Literacy Practices. Materials, classroom activities and online language resources. He is also a member of the editorial board of Escola Acción, a journal integrated into the research group Stellae at the University of Santiago de Compostela. He has recently published papers in national and international journals as well as participated in national and international congresses on education, digital literacies and language learning.
  • 67.  oral presentations  67  DANIEL CASSANY is a Discourse Analysis teacher and researcher, at the Department of Translation and Philology (Universitat Pompeu Fabra). He has a degree on Catalan Philology and a Ph. D. on Educational Sciences. He has published more than 12 books about written communication and language teaching in Catalan, Spanish and Portuguese, like Describir el escribir (1987); La cocina de la escritura (1993); Construir la escritura (1999); Tras las líneas (2006); and Afilar el lapicero (2007), and also more than 90 texts, between scientific articles in bulletins and reviews, also in English and French. He has been visiting professor in postgraduate courses, masters and Ph D. programs at universities and institutions of more than 25 countries, in Europe, America and Asia. From 2004, he coordinates a research group about Critical Literacy. Personal web: http://www.upf.edu/pdi/dtf/daniel_cassany/
  • 68.  oral presentations  68  Rebecca Walter | Elena Voellmer Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain Using ClipFlair across Classrooms: Text Production and Translation in a Plurilingual Context  Abstract Implementing audiovisual material into the Foreign and Second Language Learning classroom is a very popular practice these days, but it requires a sensible and effective use of new devices and tools designed for language learning. One of these tools is ClipFlair. It permits students to revoice and caption audiovisual material, thereby working with their L2, L3, or Lx. The student’s active use of technology and the creation of their own audiovisual products in an L2 or Lx is a new way that may yield very promising results in Foreign and Second Language Learning. This paper presents the students’ and teachers’ experiences in implementing the ClipFlair tool in the university classroom within a plurilingual context, both of which encourage the learners’ multiliteracy competence. In our capacity as teachers and researchers, we work with two groups from two different undergraduate diplomas: (i) “Text production” as a course for Applied Languages and (ii) “Translation and the media” as a course in the degree of Translation and Interpreting. In compliance with the students' course programs, the first group (in Applied Languages) actively produces a written text in German, which they then use as a script for revoicing a clip with ClipFlair; the second group (Translation) uses the tool to caption the audiovisual text created by the first group, translating from German into English. In order to explore the full potential of ClipFlair and establish a form of interdisciplinarity, we need to work with both groups, as neither course on its own allows us to include both activities in one and the same course. The students participating in the activities are bilingual, Spanish and Catalan, and they produce the text in, or translate it into, their respective L3/Lx. In order to figure out the student’s and the teacher’s experience and motivation, we finish each activity with a questionnaire.  Bionotes REBECCA WALTER is a predoctoral scholar and lecturer at Pompeu Fabra University (Barcelona), where she teaches German as a foreign language and translation (ES/CA-DE) in the graduate programs of Translation and Applied Language Studies. She holds a Magister Artium in German Studies from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany. She is currently working on her thesis. The project focuses on language use in an immersion context at a German school in a foreign country and their implications for the classroom. The subject matter is the German language as a foreign language in the teaching and learning context. Her research focuses on the field of language and foreign language learning in the context of plurilingualism as well as in the field of multilingual approaches in language teaching. ELENA VOELLMER is a predoctoral scholar and lecturer at Pompeu Fabra University (Barcelona), where she teaches German language, translation (ES/CA-DE), translation and the media, and computer-assisted translation in the graduate programs of Translation and Applied Language Studies. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Translating and Interpreting from the
  • 69.  oral presentations  69  University of Heidelberg and a Master’s degree in Translation Studies from Pompeu Fabra University. She is currently working on her thesis, financed by a scholarship by the Catalan government. The project focuses on heterolingual audiovisual texts and their translations, investigating dubbing practices in Germany.
  • 70.  70   LIST OF PARTICIPANTS 
  • 71.  list of participants  71   A  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Ávila-Cabrera, José Javier Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia Spain  B  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Baños, Rocío Beseghi, Micol Birbilis, George Bogdan, Anamaria University College of London University of Parma Computer Technology Institute Babeș-Bolyai University UK Italy Greece Romania  C  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Cassany, Daniel Contreras de la Llave, Natalia Cotoc, Alexandra Pompeu Fabra University Universidad de Alicante Babeș-Bolyai University Spain Spain Romania  D  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY De Meo, Mariella Dell’Aria, Carmela Di Martino, Emilia Università di Salerno Università degli Studi di Palermo Università Suor Orsola Benincasa Italy Italy Italy  E  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Escobar, Manuela Esteve Ruescas, Olga Eyckmans, June Universidad de Sevilla Universitat Pompeu Fabra Ghent University Spain Spain Belgium  F  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Felea, Cristina Babes-Bolyai University Romania  G  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Galán-Mañas, Anabel Garzelli , Beatrice Georgakopoulo, Yota Gialama, Maria Giglio, Alessandra González Davies, María González Vera, Pilar Gutiérrez, Julián Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Università per Stranieri di Siena Deluxe Media Europe Deluxe Media Europe National Research Council of Italy Universitat Ramon Llull Universidad de Zaragoza University of the Basque Country Spain Italy Greece Greece Italy Spain Spain Spain  H  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Hadzilacos, Thanasis Herrero, Carmen Hornero Corisco, Ana Open University of Cyprus Manchester Metropolitan University Universidad de Zaragoza Greece UK Spain  I  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Ibáñez Moreno, Ana Incalcaterra McLoughlin, Laura Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia National University of Ireland Spain Ireland  L  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Lertola, Jennifer Little, David National University of Ireland Trinity College Dublin Ireland Ireland  M  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Mansfield, Gillian Marcant, Marie-Dominique Mariotti, Cristina Martínez Sierra, Juan José Muthu, Liana University of Parma Université Paris 3 – Sorbonne Nouvelle University of Pavia Universitat de València Babeș-Bolyai University Italy France Italy Spain Romania  N  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Navarrete, Marga Ní Uigín, Dorothy University College of London National University of Ireland UK Ireland  O  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Orlic, Davor Knowledge 4 All Foundation Ltd UKUK
  • 72.  list of participants  72   P  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Patiniotaki, Emmanouela Pereira, Juanan Pey Pratdesaba, Marta University College of London University of the Basque Country Institut Jaume Callís UK Spain Spain  R  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Radu, Anamaria Ragni, Valentina Rodríguez-Inés, Patricia Romero, Lupe Babeș-Bolyai University University of Leeds Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Romania UK Spain Spain  S  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Sánchez Requena, Alicia Sanz-Santamaría, Silvia Sokoli, Stavroula Soler Pardo, Betlem Spencer, Rachel Szarkowska, Agnieszka Universidad Antonio de Nebrija Madrid University of the Basque Country Universitat Pompeu Fabra Universitat de València Universitat Politècnica de València University of Warsaw Spain Spain Spain Spain Spain Poland  T  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Talaván, Noa Torralba Miralles, Gloria Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia Universitat Jaume I de Castelló | Univ. de València Spain Spain  V  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Valla, Sara Varga, Cristina Vázquez Calvo, Boris Vermeulen, Anna Voellmer, Elena University of Parma Universitatea Babeș-Bolyai Universitat Pompeu Fabra Ghent University Universitat Pompeu Fabra Italy Romania Spain Belgium Spain  W  UNIVERSITY COUNTRY Walter, Rebecca Universitat Pompeu Fabra Spain
  • 73.  73   NOTES 

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