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Columbia Space Shuttle Disaster

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a case study analysis

a case study analysis

Published in: Business, Technology

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  • ,,,,,, And
  • Columbia Accident Investigation Board
  • Lack of integrated management across program elements
  • Transcript

    • 1. COLUMBIA SPACE SHUTTLE DISASTER
    • 2. Presented By • Zainab Raja • Nazish Khalid
    • 3. Background Constructed in1975 First flight STS-1, April 12, 1981. Successfully completed the orbital flight test program - missions STS-1 through STS-4 First mission STS-5 in November, 1982 Flew 28 missions in its lifetime
    • 4. Structure Three main parts Weight 2030 tons Height 56.1 m
    • 5. STS-107; Columbia's Last Mission 113th mission Columbia’s 28th mission
    • 6. Mission Specialist David BrownCommander Rick HusbandPilot William MccoolIsraeli Payload Specialist Ilan RamonMission Specialist Laurel ClarkMission Specialist Kalpana ChawlaMission Specialist Michael Anderson
    • 7. Take Off Launch seemed successful NASA officials, engineers & the public were relieved & happy
    • 8. Crowds along State Road Florida, watching the space shuttle as it lifts off from its launch pad
    • 9. 1 FLORIDA TEXAS January,16. 2003
    • 10. 16 DAYS MISSION Life sciences, Material sciences, Fluid physics
    • 11. 1 FLORIDA TEXAS February,1 2003
    • 12. CAIB 13 board members 120 staff members 400 NASA engineers 25,000 researchers 7-8 months Examination of 30,000 documents 200+ formal interviews 3,000 general public reviews
    • 13. Causes Physical causes Organizational causes
    • 14. NASA security officers lower the American flag at Kennedy Space Center after the shuttle's breakup.
    • 15. Organizational Causes The space shuttle program’s history and culture – Resource and budgetary constraints – Fluctuating priorities
    • 16. Harmful cultural traits and organizational practices – Reliance on past success as a substitute for sound engineering practices – Informal chain of command and decision- making processes – Barriers to effective communication
    • 17. Possibilities Repairing the damage on-orbit Rescuing the crew with another shuttle mission Rescue option was considered challenging but feasible
    • 18. Reliability on past experiences Failure of foresight Weak risk assessment “NASA’s problems cannot be solved simply by retirements, resignations, or transferring personnel.”
    • 19. Eliminate External Tank foam shedding Improved imaging of the Space Shuttle from liftoff through separation of ET Orbiter's sustainability to minor debris damage Assessment of structural integrity Shuttle flight schedule consistent with available resources Independent technical engineering authority
    • 20. History of Columbia Space Shuttle The disaster Causes of disaster How it could have been avoided Weak risk assessment Recommendations

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