Lights, Nano, Action! - Assistant Professor Jennifer Dionne
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Lights, Nano, Action! - Assistant Professor Jennifer Dionne

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Professor Dionne explores the unique and enabling properties of nano-sized materials, with applications ranging from highly efficient solar-renewable technologies to optical computers and cloaks of ...

Professor Dionne explores the unique and enabling properties of nano-sized materials, with applications ranging from highly efficient solar-renewable technologies to optical computers and cloaks of invisibility.

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  • 1 meter approximately 3 feet (kindergardener)Million, billion, trillion metersClusters of clusters of galaxieshttp://scaleofuniverse.com/Size of universe
  • Virgo supercluster – a cluster of galaxiesMillion billion bilion meters
  • Milky way – our galaxyThousand billion billion meters
  • Solar system – trillion meters
  • 10 million
  • thousand
  • Milky way
  • hundred
  • Milky way
  • Hundredth of a meter
  • One one thousandth
  • One millionth
  • Milky way
  • A billionth
  • Cant be seen by the naked eyeMakes up everything in the universe
  • And this work is largely occurring at stanfordHow did I become involved in this story
  • Picture of me in 1987: nano was just starting to become big. LiterallyBut I had no idea I wanted to be a nanoscientist
  • Instead, my dreams were pretty different.
  • Grew up in RI, ice-skaing to much that even the ice seemed warm. I had the skating part down pretty well, and I’d often put on magic shows for my parents and their friends in our house. But combining the two proved to be harder than expected. Could never get down landing a double axel while pulling a rabiit out of a hat.
  • Interest in performing. I actually got really close in 2003, when I got called to interview at a nearby location
  • I wound up getting my PhD there, but the closest thing I experienced to being a movie star was being an extra in numbers.
  • Met some science stars along the way.
  • Plan C…based on my previous two aspirations, you may or may not think this was kind of a far-fetched goal. you can imagine my parent’s surprise when Ghostbusters, Unsolved mysteries, the x-files…This dream has not been abandonedUnderstanding the unseenNot readily apparent..and that’s where nanoscience comes in…probing deeper in reality to understand and control what can’t be seen, to make things
  • Light interacts with nano objects. Vivid example – butterfly Wing iridescence. Browns and blacks come from picments, but blues, greens, etc, come from microsctructurescales.
  • Why are they cool?
  • Nano is different
  • How are they made?
  • How are these materials made
  • Much faster speed of information travel – speed of lightMore bandwidth = more informationLower power consumption – won’t get as hot
  • For poorly absorbing cell, the situation is even worse.
  • For poorly absorbing cell, the situation is even worse.
  • Tailor the optical properties of the upconverter for maximum absorption and radiative recombination.
  • Overview of where my journey has taken me, and where you can be a part of itGood to start out on the right foot. I have a few pieces of advice
  • Keep asking questionsStay in detective modeAccept new findings, challenge what we think is impossibleLook at things from different anglesJulian wever
  • Spirit of servicehttp://weburbanist.com/2009/11/23/15-fantastic-new-futuristic-tech-gadget-designs/?ref=search&utm_campaign=googimages&utm_source=images&utm_medium=other
  • Discovery is about adventureMicrosocpe or surface of mars – try to have a lot of fun
  • Dreams
  • Dreams
  • David Krumholtz Numb3rs
  • Milky way
  • Roman artisans were crafting glass vases that told of the stories from greek mythology. This vase, know as the lycurgus cup, is on display in the britism museum. It is basically a piece of glass infiltrated with metal nanoparticles. (impurities in the processing). Normally, looks jade greenepisode from the myth of Lycurgus, a king of the Thracians (around 800 BC). A man of violent temper, he attacked Dionysos and one of his maenads, Ambrosia. Ambrosia called out to Mother Earth, who transformed her into a vine. She then coiled herself about the king, and held him captive. 
  • Based on the unique optical properties of nanoparticles.
  • Flash forward about 2000 years, and now…

Lights, Nano, Action! - Assistant Professor Jennifer Dionne Lights, Nano, Action! - Assistant Professor Jennifer Dionne Presentation Transcript

  • Lights, Nano, Action! Nano-optics for efficient solar cells, cancer treatments, and invisibility cloaksProf. Jen DionneMaterials Science & Engineering
  • 930,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 meters (9.3x1026 meters)Size of universe
  • 150,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 meters (1.5x1023 meters)Virgo supercluster
  • 1,200,000,000,000,000,000,000 meters (1.2x1021 meters)Milky Way
  • 5,900,000,000,000 meters (5.9x1012 meters)Solar System (Pluto to Sun)
  • 13,000,000 meters (1.3x107 meters)Earth
  • 8,800 meters tall (8.8x103 meters)Mount Everest
  • 3,000 meters (3x103 meters)Stanford Linear Accelerator
  • 110 meters tall (1.1x102 meters)Redwood tree
  • 1.7 meters tall 1.0 metersHuman
  • 0.055 meters (5.5x10-2 meters = 5.5 centimeters)Chicken Egg
  • 0.0044 meters (4.4x10-3 meters = 4.4 millimeters)Ant
  • 0.00005 meters (5x10-5 meters = 50 micrometers)Pollen grain
  • 0.000007 meters (7x10-6 meters = 7 micrometers)Red Blood Cell
  • 0.000000009 meters (90x10-9 meters = 90 nanometers)Virus
  • 0.0000000002 meters (2x10-9 meters = 2 nanometers)Nanoparticle
  • Electronics & Photonics Biomaterials Samsung Solar Cells & Batteries Profs. Heilshorn & Melosh Catalysis Materials Science & Profs. Cui, McGehee, Brongersma Engineering
  • Nano: (not to scale)
  • What I wanted to be when I grew up:
  • What I wanted to be when I grew up: 1. A skating magician
  • What I wanted to be when I grew up: 1. A skating magician 2. A Hollywood star
  • What I wanted to be when I grew up: 1. A skating magician 2. A Hollywood star3. A paranormal researcher
  • 1 nanometer 1 micrometer 1 meter400 nanometers (nm) 700 nanometers (nm)
  • 1 μm=100nm
  • Compared to bulk materials, nanomaterials have very different properties Bulk silver Silver nanoparticles (~10-100 nm diameter)
  • Compared to bulk materials, nanomaterials have very different properties 2 nmCdS („cadmium yellow‟) CdS nanocrystal
  • http://personal.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/D.Cox/page2/files/page2-1025-full.htmlhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CApUXcPKX90&feature=player_embedded
  • The Impact of Nano Weight: 0.5g (0.001 lbs) 2010 Cost: $100 - $150 (32 GB) Size: 11mm x 15mm x 1mm (size of a dime) 1980(20 GB) 1 TB hard Baby grand Ford F-150 drive (~3 lbs) piano (~600 lbs) (~4500 lbs)
  • The Impact of Nano Weight: 0.5g (0.001 lbs) 2010 Cost: $100 - $150 (32 GB) Size: 11mm x 15mm x 1mm (size of a dime) 1980(20 GB) Ford F-150 McLauren F1 Paul Allen’s yacht (~$30,000) (~$970,000) (~$100 million)
  • The Impact of Nano Weight: 0.5g (0.001 lbs) 2010 Cost: $100 - $150 (32 GB) Size: 11mm x 15mm x 1mm (size of a dime) Weight: 2,000,000 g (4400lbs) 1980 Cost: $648,000 - $1,137,600(20 GB) Size: 70’’ x 44’’ x 32’’ (for each 2.5 GB cabinet)
  • 1 μm1947: the first transistor Today: Intel quad core i7 processor (~8 billion transistors)
  • Tomorrow: Chip-sized supercomputers with optical computing IBM’s CMOS Integrated Silicon Nanophotonics Chip
  • William Adams and Richard Day – the first solar cell (Se, 1876) (below: The first solar powered battery at Bell labs, 1954)
  • Nanorod array solar cell, from Plass, Filler, et al., Advanced Materials 2009
  • Nanomaterials also enable more light absorption in solar cells • Sunlight outside of the visible frequency range is Solar cell usually poorly absorbed by solar cells 30-50% of sun‟s energy cannot be absorbed5 % Ultraviolet 43 % Visible 52 % Infrared
  • Nanomaterials also enable more light absorption in solar cells Solar cell Solar cell Insulator Upconverter 30-50% of sun‟s energy Utilize low-energy cannot be absorbed transmitted photons5 % Ultraviolet 43 % Visible 52 % Infrared
  • Cell efficiency (%) With upconverter 44 30 Solar cell 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Solar Cell bandgap (eV)
  • Cancer therapy with nanoparticles
  • Cancer therapy with nanoparticles Y. Xia, Acc. Chem. Res 44 (2011)
  • Cancer therapy with nanoparticles Atwater, “The Power of Plasmonics,” Scientific American
  • Cloaks of Invisibility Smith, Pendry, Schurig (2007)
  • Cloaks of Invisibility and Perfect Lenses object image Z. Xhang AFM Image of Pentacene (1.4 nm long), Science 2009, IBM Zurich Smith, Pendry, Schurig (2007)
  • Dolling, Optics Express 14 (2006)
  • Negative Refractive Index Materials Dolling, Optics Express 14 (2006)
  • http://spie.org/x34206.xml?ArticleID=x34206
  • http://spie.org/x34206.xml?ArticleID=x34206
  • http://spie.org/x34206.xml?ArticleID=x34206
  • Engineering challenges for your generation oHighly efficient, cost effective solar cells o Improved battery technology o Environmental materials engineering (e.g., water purification) oAdvanced computing (optical computing, spin computing) oImaging and visualization (display technology) o Biomaterials for medical imaging and therapeutics “What the world does in the coming decade will have enormous consequences that will last for centuries. It is imperative that we begin without further delay.” – Steve Chu
  • How to be a successful engineer: 1. Stay curious Julian Wever
  • How to be a successful engineer: 1. Stay curious 2. Help others
  • How to be a successful engineer: 1. Stay curious 2. Keep an open mind 3. Have fun
  • “Work hard, be kind, and amazing things will happen.” (Conan O‟Brien)
  • What I learned about in later years:Show me your achievement - and theknowledge will give me courage for mine (AnnRand) – the importance of good mentorsThe time is always right to do the right thing(MLK)Work hard, be kind, and amazing things willhappen. (Colbert)
  • What I wanted to be when I grew up: 1. A skating magician 2. A Hollywood star
  • The Dionne Group: We are a team ofundergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral researchers exploring new nanomaterials with properties that ‘go beyond’ naturally- occurring materials
  • s.com/forum/viewtopi9ef6c0d9f22326a1eca http://www.nisenet.org/catalog/assets/scien tific-images/blue-morpho-butterfly http://thefu incredible-
  • 4,200,000 meters (4.2x106 meters)United States
  • 4th Century AD: Lycurgus Cup
  • 4th Century AD: Lycurgus Cup
  • Electronics & Photonics Biomaterials Samsung Solar Cells & Batteries Catalysis 4th Century AD: Lycurgus Cup