The Evolving Role of Marketing in Student Recruitment and Retention

  • 558 views
Uploaded on

Presented by ACT Assistant Vice President Steve Kappler at the 2012 Stamats Integrated Marketing Conference in Chicago

Presented by ACT Assistant Vice President Steve Kappler at the 2012 Stamats Integrated Marketing Conference in Chicago

More in: Education , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
558
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The Evolving Role of Marketing inStudent Recruitment & Retention(The Reality of College & Career Readiness) Steve Kappler Assistant Vice President ACT, Inc. steve.kappler@act.org
  • 2. Agenda The Data – What we see Using the data – Score Senders – EOS (list buy)
  • 3. It’s all about the DATA (What we know)
  • 4. College & Career Readiness System Academic Readiness Academic Behavioral Readiness Career and Educational Planning
  • 5. Longitudinal AssessmentsCollege Readiness System Scores 8th/9th 10th 11th/12th Grade Grade Grade 25 32 36
  • 6. ACT College Readiness Standards
  • 7. Define Knowledge and Skills College Readiness Benchmark Scores College 8th 9th The Test Course Grade Grade PLAN ACT EnglishEnglish Composition 13 14 15 18Math Algebra 17 18 19 22Reading Social Sciences 15 16 17 21Science Biology 20 20 21 24 The ACT Benchmark Score indicated a 50% chance of obtaining a “B” or a 75% chance of obtaining a “C” in corresponding credit-bearing college courses
  • 8. Translating Scores to Skills Mathematics: Basic Operations & Applications - Score Range: 16 – 19  Solve routine one-step arithmetic problems (using whole numbers, fractions, and decimals) such as single-step percents  Solve some routine two-step arithmetic problems 8th-Grade On Course Benchmark: 17 Indicates that the student is on course for meeting the ACT benchmark in grade 11-12 EXPLORE 8th-Grade Benchmark = 17
  • 9. Enrollment Management Trends Report, 2012
  • 10. Achievement Matters
  • 11. Percent of ACT-Tested High SchoolGraduates by Number of ACT CollegeReadiness Benchmarks Attained, 2011 245,604 458,399 278,528 397,712 242,869
  • 12. College Type Attended by CollegeReadiness Benchmarks Attained, 2011
  • 13. Bachelor’s Degree CompletionWithin 4 Years by ACT Composite Score Range and High School GPA
  • 14. Bachelor’s Degree CompletionWithin 4 Years by ACT Composite Score Range and High School GPA
  • 15. How to UseWhat Students Tell Us
  • 16. Enrollment by College Choice Number and ACT Composite Score, 2011
  • 17. Enrollment at Same College Type asPreference by ACT Composite Score
  • 18. Number of Graduates Taking the ACT - 2011 NH 2,884 ME 1,476 WA 13,677 VT 2,053 ND MT 7,057 MN 6,037 44,952 NY MA 14,975 OR WI 52,255 11,715 ID SD 47,693 RI 1,487 11,321 MI 6,983 116,823 WY CT 10,809 5,533 PA IA 24,280 NJ 20,796 NE 22,968 OH IN 16,461 IL 20,462 92,313 DE 1,481 NV 144,469 6,931 WV VA UT MD 12,687 11,505 20,526 25,161 CO CA KS 48,565 KY DC 1,480 52,930 99,022 23,628 46,428 NC 16,736 TN 68,524 OK SC AR 21,064 AZ NM 28,223 27,020 27,952 13,599 AL GA MS 28,167 37,800 42,929 TX 101,569 LA 35,870 AK 3,022 FL 117,575 HI 3,259 > 100,000 20,000–40,000 70,000–100,000 10,000–20,000Source: ACT Annual State Report 40,000–70,000 < 10,000Updated: August 2011
  • 19. Percent of ACT-Tested College Students Enrolled Out-of-State by ACT Composite Score, 2011
  • 20. Median Distance to College by ACT Composite Score, 2011
  • 21. Percent of Graduates Taking ACT/SAT- 2011 20/56 9/86 60/26 98/3 72/7 35/56 28/85 64/20 81/3 71/5 100/5 100/5 CT 26/84 17/72 61/3 DC 28/74 69/20 DE 16/72 76/5 31/47 100/5 29/67 MA 22/85 73/6 65/17 24/69 MD 20/71 100/19 79/7 71/5 100/6 NH 18/75 24/53 18/66 NJ 19/75 100/10 RI 12/66 76/6 56/69 VT 28/65 34/27 91/5 72/12 100/4 81/8 47/78 100/8 36/58 40/51 66/64 24/63 More than 50% of graduates taking the ACT More than 50% of graduates taking SAT More than 50% of graduates taking the ACT & SATSource: 03/2008 WICHE data for number of H. S. Graduates per state, ACT Annual State Reports, College Board Annual State SummaryUpdated: August 2011
  • 22. Percent of ACT-Tested College StudentsEnrolled Out of State by State Category, 2011
  • 23. Median Distance to College by State Category, 2011
  • 24. EOS = Educational Opportunity Service (ACT’s list for purchase)
  • 25. Average Number of Times EOS StudentsWere Selected by Time of First Testing & ACT Composite Score, 2011
  • 26. The Case For the Score-Sender
  • 27. Annual ACT Test Takers  2011 Graduating Seniors = 1,623,112  2010-2011 Tested Juniors = 1,182,215 (PLAN Tested Sophomores = 1,127,875)Over 2.8 Million Students Tested Each Year
  • 28. Sample Inquiry Pool Data: Regional PublicTotal Inquiries N App Enroll Yld 18,973 3,409 1,186 6%ACT Scores N App Enroll Yld 4,873 1,185 561 12%All Other Inquiries N App Enroll Yld 14,100 2,224 625 4%
  • 29. Sample Inquiry Pool Data: Regional Public (contd.)The only source code yielding higher than ACTscores was applications:Applications N App Enroll Yld 940 854 251 27%If you take applications out of the mix, the yieldfor all non-ACT score inquiries was:All Other Inquiries N App Enroll Yld 13,160 1,370 374 3%
  • 30. Initial Source Types in the Funnel ACT ScoresInitial Source N All Other Sources 69% 26% Apps 5% All Others ACT ScoresApplicants 40% 35% Apps 25% All Others ACT Scores Apps 21% Enrolled 32% 47%
  • 31. Overview of Student Data in the ACT RecordMore than 265 fields of data provide acomplete student profile: – Personal/demographic data – Admissions/recruitment data – ACT Scores, norms, and prediction research – High school courses and grades – Educational plans, interests, and needs – Activities and accomplishments
  • 32. Key Points about Personalizing, Customizing, Segmenting Your ability to segment, customize, personalize and target is entirely dependent on the amount of student-level information you have available … and when you have it available Through the ACT student record… – you have the most complete information available – you have it at the earliest point in the recruitment cycle – you have it in the most portable format
  • 33. What do you know about your prospective students?
  • 34. Your Institution: Public 4 Year University In Colorado Full-time Enrollment – 9,711 Yearly Tuition/Fees - $6,280
  • 35. Meet Ann Wants to major in Accounting – likely a good fit Will probably have difficulty withHow do we freshman math and science requirements Needs expectations managed aboutknow so much honors courses Strong probability that she will enroll atabout Ann? your school Good idea to inform her about campus employment or Work-Study opportunities Highly involved in high school – possible campus leader
  • 36. Ann took the ACTand sent her score report to you
  • 37. About Ann: Wants to major in Accounting – likely a good fit
  • 38. About Ann: Wants to major in Accounting – likely a good fit
  • 39. About Ann: Will probably have difficulty with freshman math and science requirements College Readiness Benchmarks Test College Course ACT English English Composition 18 Math College Algebra 22 Reading Social Sciences 21 Science Biology 24
  • 40. About Ann: Will probably have difficulty with freshman math and science requirements
  • 41. About Ann: Needs expectations managed about honors courses
  • 42. About Ann: Strong probability that she will enroll at your school
  • 43. About Ann: Good idea to inform her about campus employment or Work-Study opportunities Highly involved in high school – possible campus leader
  • 44. NOW, how much do you know?
  • 45. Enhancements to the ACT Electronic Record Beginning in September 2012, ACT will begin appending 5 new data elements to the ACT Score Report: – Interest-Major Fit score – Four predictive modeling indexes
  • 46. The Interest-Major Fit Index The Fit score shows the strength of the relationship between a student’s profile of interests and the profile of interests of students in a given major. Interest-major fit clearly benefits both students and the college they attend: students in “good-fit majors” are more likely to stay in college, stay in their major, and finish sooner.
  • 47. Predicting Enrollment Behavior with Four Indexes The Mobility Index predicts the likelihood of a student enrolling at an out-of-state institution The Institution Type Index predicts the likelihood of a student enrolling at a private institution The Selectivity Index predicts the selectivity of the institution at which the student is likely to enroll The Institution Size Index predicts the size of the institution at which the student is likely to enroll
  • 48. Variables Included in the Four IndexesAcademic Variables Demographic VariablesACT Composite Home community sizeHigh school GPA High school enrollmentYears of foreign language Type of high schoolProgram of study in HS Enrollment Preference VariablesYears of math coursework Campus mix (score sending pattern)Highest degree expected Level of college choiceStudent Characteristic Variables Preferred college sizePlanned work hours in college Preferred college typeFamily income Intended major (7 groups)Involvement in science Preferred distance home to campusInvolvement in athletics No college in mindInvolvement in music Scores sent to comm. college
  • 49. How will you maximize your ACT score report data torecruit, enroll & retain your students?
  • 50. Key Takeaways1. Know what data you actually have – Understand the role of students choices, and their achievement, and fit2. Counsel students – Release their name to EOS – Send you their scores (a new campaign?)3. Require an official score report – You get more data!
  • 51. Key Takeaways4. Use what you know to buy better lists5. Decide which score report elements will help with campus goals and initiatives6. Identify any barriers to using the data — Delivery method from ACT – paper or electronic — Student information system capabilities
  • 52. Key Takeaways7. Discuss data sharing with appropriate campus stakeholders8. Incorporate new data elements into your communication plan (market segmentation) – email, print, phone calls, etc.
  • 53. Questions? Steve KapplerAssistant Vice President ACT, Inc.steve.kappler@act.org
  • 54. About Student Preferences
  • 55. Enrollment Information Service Comprehensive database for strategic marketing and segment/territory management containing aggregate data on all ACT-tested students
  • 56. Enrollment Funnel Through EIS 1.6 Million ACT-Tested Students Campus Scores Received (Visibility)Breakout by: Market OverlapAbility Campus Enrolled Competitor AnalysisGeography (Yield)Race/EthnicityFamily IncomeIntended majorEnrollment Preferences, etc.
  • 57. Do you have the complete picture?Sample Student Pool for Alpha University Purchased Names 75,000 Inquiries 40,000 Alpha has info on these students Applicants 6,000 ACT Tested Population 1,479,000 (Total 1.6 million) Purchased Names Inquiries Applicants EIS provides the rest of the pie ACT Tested Population
  • 58. Create Customized Queries on Demand Geographic variables  Key characteristics – States – Gender – ACT EIS segments – Educ. major – High school districts – Race/Ethnicity – High schools – Family income – Distance from campus – Religious pref. Academic performance – GPA – College selection variables – Class rank – ACT scores
  • 59. Data Provided by EIS Market Potential Market Penetration (Visibility) and Yield Market Position and Collegiate Competition Strategic Enrollment Planning
  • 60. Best Uses for EIS Manage primary markets – Identify underperforming high schools Identify new markets Train new admissions counselors Help senior administrators set realistic goals Develop marketing messages tied to student interests and characteristics Identify competing institutions for specific markets