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ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report
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ACT EPC Keynote - Enrollment Management Trends Report

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Delivered by Steve Kappler at the 2012 ACT Enrollment Planners Conference in Chicago

Delivered by Steve Kappler at the 2012 ACT Enrollment Planners Conference in Chicago

Published in: Education
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  • 1. Enrollment Management Trends Report Steve Kappler Eric SicklerAssistant Vice President Associate Vice President ACT, Inc. Stamatssteve.kappler@act.org eric.sickler@stamats.com
  • 2. Slideshare.net/Stamats_ACT
  • 3. What it is? Enrollment patterns of the 2011 ACT tested graduating class Review of last 10 years for trends
  • 4. Context
  • 5. College & Career Readiness System Academic Readiness Academic Behavioral Readiness Career and Educational Planning
  • 6. Longitudinal AssessmentsCollege Readiness System Scores 8th/9th 10th 11th/12th Grade Grade Grade 25 32 36
  • 7. ACT College Readiness Standards
  • 8. Define Knowledge and Skills College Readiness Benchmark Scores College 8th 9th The Test Course Grade Grade PLAN ACT EnglishEnglish Composition 13 14 15 18Math Algebra 17 18 19 22Reading Social Sciences 15 16 17 21Science Biology 20 20 21 24 The ACT Benchmark Score indicated a 50% chance of obtaining a “B” or a 75% chance of obtaining a “C” in corresponding credit-bearing college courses
  • 9. Key Finding 1: Students Tend to Enroll atInstitutions that Match the Preferences They Report to ACT–Level of college choice–Type of college preferred •Public vs. private •Two year vs. four year
  • 10. Enrollment by College Choice Number and ACT Composite Score, 2011 77%
  • 11. Enrollment at Same College Type as Preference by ACT Composite Score
  • 12. Key Finding 1: Students Tend to Enroll atInstitutions that Match the Preferences They Report to ACT Recommendations for Recruiting – Understand that students tend to do what they say they will do (believe it or not); so speak to their interests Recommendations for Marketing – Participate in making informed EOS purchases – don’t chase suspects, chase prospects – GET ME THAT DATA!!! Recommendations for Academic/Student Life – Require official score reports and incorporate the information you get into advising and retention programs
  • 13. Key Finding 2: Students’ Testing andEnrollment Behaviors Tend to Differ by Academic Achievement Level • As scores increase, students are more likely to: – First-time test in the 11th grade – Enroll in 4-year institutions – Enroll out of state – Enroll a greater distance from home – Attend the type of public (4-year public or 4-year private) that they prefer to attend – Have better Interest-Major Fit scores – Persist in their major – Graduate in fewer years
  • 14. Percent of ACT-Tested College StudentsEnrolled Out-of-State by ACT Composite Score, 2011
  • 15. Median Distance to College by ACT Composite Score, 2011
  • 16. Time of First Testing Among ACT-Tested High School Graduates by ACT Composite Score, 2011
  • 17. Interest-Major Fit by ACT Score Range, 2011
  • 18. Persistence in Major by ACT Score Range and Interest-Major Fit
  • 19. Key Finding 2: Students’ Testing andEnrollment Behaviors Tend to Differ by Academic Achievement Level Recommendations for Recruiting – Use data send on score reports to forecast yield Recommendations for Marketing – Participate in ordering EOS names that match your school’s likely-to-persist grade/score range Recommendations for Academic/Student Life – When placing EOS orders, order by ability bands narrow enough to distinguish varying student interests and enrollment behaviors
  • 20. Key Finding 3: Students’ Testing and Enrollment Behaviors Tend to Vary by the ACT and SAT Participation Rates in the State Compared with students in “ACT” and ACT+” states, ACT-tested students in “SAT” and “SAT+” states are: – More likely to first-test in 12th grade – Less likely to send their test scores to any college – More likely to enroll out of state – More likely to travel a greater distance from home to attend college
  • 21. Classification of States by ACT and SAT Participation, 2011
  • 22. Percent of ACT-Tested College Students Enrolled Out of State (ACT Composite Score 1-23), 2011
  • 23. Percent of ACT-Tested College Students EnrolledOut of State (ACT Composite Score 24-36), 2011
  • 24. Percent of ACT-Tested College StudentsEnrolled Out of State by State Category, 2011
  • 25. Median Distance to College by State Category, 2011
  • 26. Top-Choice School Description - TeensTALK® Distance to Current Top-Choice Campus from Home  2012 Prospective Mean Score: 204 mi students indicate a tightened travel range from 2010:  Up to 30 miles: 40% vs. 36% in spring 2010  121 to 500 miles: 20% vs.Base: All 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) 28% in spring 2010
  • 27. Number of College Choices at Time of First Testing by State Category, 2011
  • 28. Time of First Testing Among ACT-Tested High School Graduates by State Category, 2011
  • 29. Key Finding 3: Students’ Testing andEnrollment Behaviors Tend to Vary by the ACT and SAT Participation Rates in the State Recommendations for Recruitment – Understand how state environment affects test taking, score-sending, and enrollment behaviors Recommendations for Marketing – Use state testing knowledge to inform selection of target markets and round out your class – Don’t invest significant brand-building resources in low-potential markets Recommendations for Academic/Student Life – Use information for student life and academic interventions
  • 30. Key Finding 4: Students Who First Take the ACT in 12th Grade Are a Largely Overlooked Subset of Act-Tested High School Graduates– These students have a lower likelihood of being selected by any college through EOS– They are selected by far fewer colleges than students who first test in 11th grade– Higher tendency towards males and minorities
  • 31. Percent of EOS Students Selected by Time ofFirst Testing and ACT Composite Score, 2011
  • 32. Average Number of Times EOS Students Were Selected by Time of First Testing & ACT Composite Score, 2011
  • 33. Key Finding 4: Students Who First Takethe ACT in 12th Grade Are a Largely Overlooked Subset of Act-Tested High School Graduates• Recommendations for Recruitment – Counsel students who test, especially late test takers, on score sending and EOS name release• Recommendations for Marketing – Visibility campaigns must continue to target late- deciding high school seniors – When placing EOS orders, don’t forget students who first test as 12th graders• Recommendations for Academic/Student Life ‒ These students will likely need more guidance
  • 34. Key Finding 5: Many High School Graduates AreNot Prepared Academically for College Success – 28% of the ACT-tested graduating class of 2011 did not meet any ACT College Readiness Benchmarks – Important to use multiple measures
  • 35. Percent of ACT-Tested High School Graduates by Number of ACT College Readiness Benchmarks Attained, 2011 245,604 458,399 278,528 397,712 242,869
  • 36. College Type Attended by College Readiness Benchmarks Attained, 2011
  • 37. High School GPA Distribution Among ACT-Tested High School Graduates Who Reported Grades, 2011
  • 38. ACT Composite Score Distribution Among ACT- Tested High School Graduates Who Reported Grades, 2011
  • 39. Bachelor’s Degree Completion Within 4 Years byACT Composite Score Range and High School GPA
  • 40. Bachelor’s Degree Completion Within 4 Years byACT Composite Score Range and High School GPA
  • 41. Key Finding 5: Many High School Graduates AreNot Prepared Academically for College Success  Recommendations for Recruitment – Pay attention to ALL of the information you receive and not just a COMPOSITE score  Recommendations for Marketing – Messaging strategies must accurately reflect your school’s unique balance of rigor, support, and fun  Recommendations for Academic/Student Life ‒ Partner with local schools to offer academic and support services to help students prepare for college ‒ Have a clear voice in conversations with K-12 and state officials about adequate academic preparation for success in college
  • 42. New for 2012
  • 43. Enhancements to the ACT Electronic Record Beginning in September 2012, ACT will begin appending 5 new data elements to the ACT Score Report: – Interest-Major Fit score – Four predictive modeling indexes
  • 44. The Interest-Major Fit Index The Fit score shows the strength of the relationship between a student’s profile of interests and the profile of interests of students in a given major. Interest-major fit clearly benefits both students and the college they attend: students in “good-fit majors” are more likely to stay in college, stay in their major, and finish sooner.
  • 45. Predicting Enrollment Behavior with Four Indexes The Mobility Index predicts the likelihood of a student enrolling at an out-of-state institution The Institution Type Index predicts the likelihood of a student enrolling at a private institution The Selectivity Index predicts the selectivity of the institution at which the student is likely to enroll The Institution Size Index predicts the size of the institution at which the student is likely to enroll
  • 46. The Case For the Score-Sender
  • 47. Sample Inquiry Pool Data: Regional PublicTotal Inquiries N App Enroll Yld 18,973 3,409 1,186 6%ACT Scores N App Enroll Yld 4,873 1,185 561 12%All Other Inquiries N App Enroll Yld 14,100 2,224 625 4%
  • 48. Sample Inquiry Pool Data: Regional Public (contd.)The only source code yielding higher than ACTscores was applications:Applications N App Enroll Yld 940 854 251 27%If you take applications out of the mix, the yieldfor all non-ACT score inquiries was:All Other Inquiries N App Enroll Yld 13,160 1,370 374 3%
  • 49. Initial Source Types in the Funnel ACT ScoresInitial Source N All Other Sources 69% 26% Apps 5% All Others ACT ScoresApplicants 40% 35% Apps 25% All Others ACT Scores Apps 21% Enrolled 32% 47%
  • 50. Slideshare.net/Stamats_ACT
  • 51. Enrollment Management Trends Report Steve Kappler Eric SicklerAssistant Vice President Associate Vice President ACT, Inc. Stamatssteve.kappler@act.org eric.sickler@stamats.com

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