India  – The  Future of the New TV medium  and the  Retail experience  in 2012 Some leading socio economic trends in next ...
India  - Media + Consumer in  2012 <ul><li>This document purports to outlay (and if possible, specify) the trends, shapes ...
Reveals that  46%  of the time with television was spent in some activity instead of or in addition to looking at the TV. ...
The Federal Communications Commission (US) is currently considering modifying or eliminating existing media ownership rule...
The study compared the children's programming schedules from 1998, when the market's seven major commercial broadcast tele...
Future of Television in India Fast-forward five years.  1. Flipping through the movie channels; your eyes catch Nicole Kid...
Future of Television in India So what is interactive TV? It is a convergence technology that will convert the one-way pass...
Future of Television in India What's more television will move out from the box to fit snugly into your mobile phones pret...
Future of Television in India For advertisers, it is a major concern, as the revenue model of the television channels woul...
DTH – What is it ? DTH stands for Direct-To-Home television. DTH is defined as the reception of satellite programmes with ...
DTH – How is it different from Cable TV ? How does DTH really differ from cable TV? In DTH, TV channels would be transmitt...
DTH – How is it different from Cable TV ? Is DTH superior to cable TV? Yes. DTH offers better quality picture than cable T...
DTH – Why are networks pushing for DTH ? In DTH, the payments will be made directly by the subscriber to the satellite com...
DTH – Why are networks pushing for DTH ? The local cable operators or the ACOs then allegedly under-report the number of s...
DTH  –  Will DTH be cheaper than cable or more expensive? DTH will be definitely more expensive than cable as it exists to...
DTH – So what would rule the Indian TV homes ? Will DTH finally be the one that rules? The cable system is well entrenched...
Television – The Final Quote “ When you're young, you look at television and think, There's a conspiracy. The networks hav...
Future of Indian Shopping experiences Be future perfect  With burgeoning consumer spending, retailers must establish their...
Wipro Technologies’ The Intelligent Next Generation Associate (TINA), launched at the US National Retail Federation’s annu...
Developed as part of the customer experience enrichment programme at Wipro’s Applied Innovation Lab, TINA uses WiFi and RF...
As retail giants around the world look to transform shopping experiences from the mundane to the fantastic, India’s IT gia...
The Magic Mirror  for instance, can be typically mounted on a wall in the changing room of the apparel section of a retail...
Among other RFID innovations created by a specialised group that has been in existence at Infosys for nearly eight years i...
While Infosys has contributed the embedded software for the  Magic Mirror  as part of its Smart Visual Merchandising appli...
Pilot studies have shown that retail sales can increase by three-to-five per cent per store with smart visual merchandisin...
Future of Indian Shopping experiences Be future perfect  Modern retailing has brought us the concept of shopping for many ...
Future of Indian Shopping experiences – The Online perspective  The Internet is fast catching up as an alternative channel...
Future of Indian Shopping experiences – The Online perspective The Challenges  The challenge is to make customers look bey...
Future of Indian Shopping experiences – TeleMarketing Tele-retailing facilitates customers shopping from home over telepho...
Future of Indian Shopping experiences –TeleShopping These infomercials are typically aired between programmes or in a 15-2...
Curriculum TV – Young teen students in focus . Greycells18 Media, announced the launch of India's first curriculum-based e...
Topper TV – Young teen students in focus The modules complement existing tools of traditional classroom teaching and have ...
Topper TV – Also spreading on to the Web The website boasts of interactive facilities, forums and groups where like-minded...
Should there be a govt regulations and control on Pvt Satellite service providers ? Currently, though WorldSpace is in ope...
Should there be a govt regulations and control on Pvt Satellite service providers ? What should be the term of licence, if...
Pvt Satellite Radio stations – Can they play a socially  responsible role, beyond entertaining ? Its countrywide footprint...
The Indian Broadcasting Regulations forum – Seeking an opinion from the Satellite Channels and Cable TV Industry The India...
The Indian Broadcasting Regulations forum  – Consensus between the Industry and Govt bodies will lead to… Implications – *...
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Media Consumer Se Trends 2012

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A Look at how the Visual media, Retail experience ad the government rules and regulations will affect Media in India.

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Media Consumer Se Trends 2012

  1. 1. India – The Future of the New TV medium and the Retail experience in 2012 Some leading socio economic trends in next 5 years
  2. 2. India - Media + Consumer in 2012 <ul><li>This document purports to outlay (and if possible, specify) the trends, shapes and the world that will surround the media, consumer and the market place in the next 4-5 years. </li></ul><ul><li>This document will quote & refer to several leading and independent studies and secondary research, that has taken place across the past so many years. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Reveals that 46% of the time with television was spent in some activity instead of or in addition to looking at the TV. Notes that social interaction was the most common non-viewing activity for all viewers, followed by playing and eating for children and reading for adults. Considers how non-viewing behaviors occurred most often during programming that attracted less visual attention, particularly advertisements. Television Viewing habits – Now and in future Implications – The need for branded in-content and programme integration will increase, to address the viewers more efficiently…
  4. 4. The Federal Communications Commission (US) is currently considering modifying or eliminating existing media ownership rules. Children's advocates are concerned that any changes to these rules could negatively affect the already limited amount and types of programming available for children. An e.g. from US : Children Now conducted the first study to examine the availability and diversity of children programming in an increasingly consolidated media marketplace Los Angeles was selected as a case study for this research because it is the second largest media market in US, and two duopolies now exist among its television stations. Future of Television
  5. 5. The study compared the children's programming schedules from 1998, when the market's seven major commercial broadcast television stations were owned by seven different companies, to 2003, after consolidation reduced the number to five. The findings suggest that changes to the current ownership policies will have a serious impact on the availability and diversity of children's programming. Overall, the research shows there are fewer children's series, fewer broadcast hours, and an increase in repurposed (aired on more than one channel) programs in Los Angeles today compared to 5 years ago. Future of Television Implications – Consolidation/mergers of media networks, in the near future, will have adverse impact on the quality, diversity and richness of content.Primarily due to the fact that the delivery (and ownership) of the content will move away from free market economy , to monopolistic/oligopolistic environments.
  6. 6. Future of Television in India Fast-forward five years. 1. Flipping through the movie channels; your eyes catch Nicole Kidman. With your remote you reach the 'electronic programme guy', (better known by its abbreviation EPG, an in-built utility appearing on the television screen) which gives you the details of the movie: the title, the star cast, the director, the story in a nutshell, the duration in minutes, the number of minutes you have missed and the upcoming movie. 2. In the middle of an India-Pakistan match, one Sunday, a viewer receives an urgent call from his client in UK. Only, he is not upset at the interruption. He presses a button on his remote and the 'personal video recorder' (PVR), records the match for the duration that he takes to attend the call. He can, later, go back to the portion of the match he has missed. Welcome to the world of interactive television.
  7. 7. Future of Television in India So what is interactive TV? It is a convergence technology that will convert the one-way passive TV viewing into a two-way interactive experience. You can watch programmes of your choice at any given time. You can watch more than one programme simultaneously; or watch one and record another. Viewers will not be restricted to watching movies being screened by the channel they happen to be watching but can choose the one they wish to see. So, while you are still watching television, in the new order you can also have video on-demand, electronic programming guides, customised local information like news and weather, video recording, t-commerce and internet access.
  8. 8. Future of Television in India What's more television will move out from the box to fit snugly into your mobile phones pretty shortly. Whether you are struck in a traffic jam or delayed in a meeting you need not miss your favourite programme. From your mobile you can dial a number and request a 1-minute download (mobisode) of a 24-minute episode. Interactive TV does not use technology that will require you to change your television set. All that is required is a digital set top box and a compatible remote. Experts say, it would be quite affordable to the common man. For distributors, the crucial point will be the management of digital rights to protect the programme 'properties'
  9. 9. Future of Television in India For advertisers, it is a major concern, as the revenue model of the television channels would change from advertisements to subscriptions. In the interactive television era, mainline revenue will be subscription; advertising will take a backseat As a leading broadcaster says, &quot; I see the ad to subscription ratio moving from the current 70:30 to 50:50 and finally stabilising at 30:70. The challenge would be how not to sideline advertisers completely.&quot;
  10. 10. DTH – What is it ? DTH stands for Direct-To-Home television. DTH is defined as the reception of satellite programmes with a personal dish in an individual home. DTH does away with the need for the local cable operator and puts the broadcaster directly in touch with the consumer. A DTH service provider has to lease Ku-band transponders from the satellite. The encoder converts the audio, video and data signals into the digital format and the multiplexer mixes these signals. At the user end, there will be a small dish antenna and set-top boxes to decode and view numerous channels. On the user's end, receiving dishes can be as small as 45 cm in diametre.
  11. 11. DTH – How is it different from Cable TV ? How does DTH really differ from cable TV? In DTH, TV channels would be transmitted from the satellite to a small dish antenna mounted on the window or rooftop of the subscriber's home. So the broadcaster directly connects to the user. The middlemen like local cable operators are not there in the picture. DTH can also reach the remotest of areas since it does away with the intermediate step of a cable operator and the wires (cables) that come from the cable operator to your house Also, with DTH, a user can scan nearly 700 channels!
  12. 12. DTH – How is it different from Cable TV ? Is DTH superior to cable TV? Yes. DTH offers better quality picture than cable TV. This is because cable TV in India is analog. Despite digital transmission and reception, the cable transmission is still analog. DTH offers stereophonic sound effects. It can also reach remote areas where terrestrial transmission and cable TV have failed to penetrate. Apart from enhanced picture quality, DTH has also allows for interactive TV services such as movie-on-demand, Internet access, video conferencing and e-mail. But the thing that DTH has going for it is that the powerful broadcasting companies like Star, Zee, etc are pushing for it.
  13. 13. DTH – Why are networks pushing for DTH ? In DTH, the payments will be made directly by the subscriber to the satellite company offering the service. A big problem that broadcasters face in India is the issue of under-reporting of subscribers by cable operators. Consider the cable operators pyramid. Right at the top is the broadcaster. Next comes the Multi Service Cable Operator (MSOs) like Siticable, InCable, etc. Below them are the Access Cable Operators (ACOs) or your local cable guy who actually lays the wires to your house.
  14. 14. DTH – Why are networks pushing for DTH ? The local cable operators or the ACOs then allegedly under-report the number of subscribers they have bagged because they have to pay the MSOs something like Rs 30-45 per household. Showing a lesser number of households benefits ACOs. With no way to actually cross check, the MSOs and the broadcasters lose a lot. Broadcasters do not earn much in subscription fees and are mostly dependent on advertisement revenue to cover their costs, which is not sustainable and does not offer high growth in revenues for broadcasters. The way out of this is to use a set-top box so that it will be clear how many households are actually using cable or going for DTH where broadcasters directly connect to consumers and can actually grow revenues with a growth in the subscriber base.
  15. 15. DTH – Will DTH be cheaper than cable or more expensive? DTH will be definitely more expensive than cable as it exists today. A set-top box is a must for DTH. Earlier, when CAS made set-top box mandatory for households, the costs between DTH and cable would not have been too wide. But CAS on the backburner now -- which means no set-top box (a must for DTH), the price gap between DTH and cable will be wide
  16. 16. DTH – So what would rule the Indian TV homes ? Will DTH finally be the one that rules? The cable system is well entrenched in India and is showing quite rapid growth. If DTH had come to India in 1996-97 (like Star had originally attempted), then it could have made a significant breakthrough. Europe is an example of this. DTH developed there before cable and now controls nearly 80 per cent of the total satellite television subscriber base. But in US, cable rules because it came before DTH. DTH will definitely cut into the existing cable user base. It will make the local cable operator less important and take business away from him. It will give consumers greater choice. But it is likely to be an up market premium product and most middle class households will stick to cable.
  17. 17. Television – The Final Quote “ When you're young, you look at television and think, There's a conspiracy. The networks have conspired to dumb us down. But when you get a little older, you realize that's not true. The networks are in business to give people exactly what they want. That's a far more depressing thought. Conspiracy is optimistic! You can shoot the bastards! We can have a revolution! But the networks are really in business to give people what they want. It's the truth.” -- Steve Jobs
  18. 18. Future of Indian Shopping experiences Be future perfect With burgeoning consumer spending, retailers must establish their presence across all channels traditional and new to grab their share of wallet Price, selection and location are no longer enough for competitive differentiation. However, even as modern retailers gain share from traditional channels, there is a larger role they would be required to play in boosting consumption levels. Figures suggest that the total turnover of the sector is around Rs 10 lakh crore, of which only 2 per cent, is contributed by the organised sector.
  19. 19. Wipro Technologies’ The Intelligent Next Generation Associate (TINA), launched at the US National Retail Federation’s annual convention and expo this January, is a software platform on which retailers can deploy customer interaction applications . “ Imagine you are having guests over. You are looking to buy a bottle of good wine. Customer interaction applications on TINA can tell you what food goes best with the wine you chose or vice versa,” Future of Indian Shopping experiences
  20. 20. Developed as part of the customer experience enrichment programme at Wipro’s Applied Innovation Lab, TINA uses WiFi and RFID technologies and is currently undergoing pilot studies at select stores . “ Stores are getting more and more complex. The amount of information is multiplying. Information kiosks are not interactive. Customers would like a dialogue and shop assistants are difficult to keep trained. To ensure superior customer experience technology is coming in” Shopping images for the future include: your local store knowing you have run out of cola cans when you pick the last refrigerated one at your house; mobile phones adding things to your shopping list as you scan advertisements Future of Indian Shopping experiences
  21. 21. As retail giants around the world look to transform shopping experiences from the mundane to the fantastic, India’s IT giants, largely confined to the IT services sector until now, are contributing innovations to turn shopping science fiction into reality. Using radio frequency identification (RFID), wireless, mobile phone and information technology, India’s IT giants are looking to gain sizable ground in a fast emerging market for front-end retail technologies. Future of Indian Shopping experiences
  22. 22. The Magic Mirror for instance, can be typically mounted on a wall in the changing room of the apparel section of a retail store. Short of telling you who is the fairest one of all, the mirror on the wall can provide you details of the shirt or top you picked to try on in the trial room, alternatives in the same or other sizes; the best trouser or skirt, socks or shoe match for your pick. The Magic Mirror even sends out messages to shop assistants to bring you additional or alternate products of your choice—without you stepping out of the trial room. The mirror, having received rave reviews in the US, is one among a set of innovations created at Infosys applying the not-so-new radio frequency identification technology. Future of Indian Shopping experiences
  23. 23. Among other RFID innovations created by a specialised group that has been in existence at Infosys for nearly eight years is a smaller mirror that acts as a lip-to-lipstick matcher for women—apart from back-end supply chain maintenance solutions for the retailers. Future of Indian Shopping experiences
  24. 24. While Infosys has contributed the embedded software for the Magic Mirror as part of its Smart Visual Merchandising applications, the visual aesthetics and experience design is from an American company Bigspace, “ While RFID technology has been used in retail not too many applications have been seen in the front end. There have been concerns over privacy and costs but that is changing now,” a senior official has said . Future of Indian Shopping experiences
  25. 25. Pilot studies have shown that retail sales can increase by three-to-five per cent per store with smart visual merchandising and Infosys is in talks with retailers in the US and Europe for deployments. Future of Indian Shopping experiences
  26. 26. Future of Indian Shopping experiences Be future perfect Modern retailing has brought us the concept of shopping for many things under one roof. Malls are providing `shoppertainment' (shopping and entertainment). Pricing and shopping experience are the key differentiators, though they may not go hand in hand. Many of today's hardworking customers have lesser time to spend despite the growth in income. Hence, more than the shopping experience, customers are looking for value and convenience
  27. 27. Future of Indian Shopping experiences – The Online perspective The Internet is fast catching up as an alternative channel. It is expected to grow at a CAGR of 79 per cent to Rs 2,300 crore this year. The two key segments in this sector are companies with a solely online route like Rediff.com and Baazee.com, and traditional brick-and-mortar companies using this as a new channel, like Indian Railways and most airlines. There are three key drivers for online shopping catching up in India. Internet and PC penetration India's middle-class is mushrooming, with growing purchasing power and limited personal time. Increasing usage of credit and debit cards coupled with a growing young population who spend significant time online.
  28. 28. Future of Indian Shopping experiences – The Online perspective The Challenges The challenge is to make customers look beyond the informative and functional online activity such as matrimonials and direct them towards online shopping for travel, entertainment, lifestyle and food and grocery. Convenience of online product research, comparison shopping and competitive pricing are driving consumers to make online purchases.
  29. 29. Future of Indian Shopping experiences – TeleMarketing Tele-retailing facilitates customers shopping from home over telephone and making payments by cash or credit card. In India, Lever has tapped this market well, with Sangam Direct, a Hindustan Lever service that lets customers choose and shop from a wide range of over 3,500 grocery and household products. Consumers can practically shop for all household need from the comfort of their home at prices lower than MRP.
  30. 30. Future of Indian Shopping experiences –TeleShopping These infomercials are typically aired between programmes or in a 15-20 minute slot in which all the products are displayed. In India, the major players are Asian Sky Shop, TSN, TVC and Telebrands. However, the market for such a medium is still in the largely unorganised, pvt entreprenuer space. Large MNCs, consumer products companies have shied away from using this channel.
  31. 31. Curriculum TV – Young teen students in focus . Greycells18 Media, announced the launch of India's first curriculum-based education TV channel 'Topper' which is a part of the &quot;Topper Integrated Learning System&quot;. With the launch of India's first educational channel, mandatory TV viewing might find itself a place on the homework diaries of students. The educational channel being launched in English will be accessible to viewers through digital television and Internet, and will initially cater to higher secondary classes. Topper will provide validated curriculum-based content that will comply with CBSE and other related state boards.
  32. 32. Topper TV – Young teen students in focus The modules complement existing tools of traditional classroom teaching and have the technological muscle to deal with concepts that are difficult to explain theoretically The channel will telecast six fresh episodes daily, with four episodes based on the regular course and two episodes on the exam specials, pertaining to the upcoming board exams. So who are the teachers on Topper and how exactly will the students benefit from them? Topper will feature a group of star teachers who have been carefully identified. With exceptional track records-iconic and inspirational-these individuals come armed with experience gathered from teaching in the best institutes of the world, coupled with a passion for their subject.
  33. 33. Topper TV – Also spreading on to the Web The website boasts of interactive facilities, forums and groups where like-minded students can interact and discuss issues relevant to their subjects. Apart from Topper TV, students can also log into their website topper learning.com, which has been designed to corroborate lessons done on television. Implications – Ideal media to sustain a one-to-one dialogue, with young teens e.g. Young girls on feminine hygiene care, on TV and on the Net..
  34. 34. Should there be a govt regulations and control on Pvt Satellite service providers ? Currently, though WorldSpace is in operation in the country, there is no policy or regulatory framework for this sector. THE Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) has issued a consultation paper to come up with a policy framework for satellite radio services. Several issues such as having a level playing field between satellite radio service and private FM radio, regulation of broadcast content, licence fee and interoperability requirement in the case of a new satellite radio service provider need to be clarified
  35. 35. Should there be a govt regulations and control on Pvt Satellite service providers ? What should be the term of licence, if required, for satellite radio service and whether it should be licence fee-based or work on the basis of revenue share ? TRAI is still deciding….! World over there are four satellite digital radio systems in operation — WorldSpace, XM Radio, Sirius Radio and MBCo . WorldSpace provides about 40 radio channels to an estimated small fraction of 50,000 people in India. The regulator has asked whether uplinking from India should be permitted and &quot;Whether we should have a common uplink policy or a separate policy for uplink of satellite radio channels and TV channels?&quot;
  36. 36. Pvt Satellite Radio stations – Can they play a socially responsible role, beyond entertaining ? Its countrywide footprint enables the satellite radio system to provide instantaneous reach to all corners of the country including remote locations, especially the hilly areas. These remote areas may be impossible to cover through terrestrial means,'' the regulator said. The TRAI said satellite radio could also be useful as a disaster warning system, especially for India. WorldSpace is already in touch with the Indian Government regarding a project for fishermen that would bring them reliable and timely advance weather warnings Implications – Once clear well laid out rules and regulations are set out for this medium more pvt players will enter the category, and make this media more dynamic and alive as far as an advertising vehicle, and the social responsibility roles that they would play.
  37. 37. The Indian Broadcasting Regulations forum – Seeking an opinion from the Satellite Channels and Cable TV Industry The Indian government has announced that it wants a Broadcasting Act enacted within the next six months. It has the old broadcasting bill draft and the report of the Sharad Pawar Committee which reviewed the draft as reference points. But it is seeking the opinion of the satellite channels and cable TV industry once again later this month. Some of the questions they hope to clear clarity, and answers from the industry are : * The limits for foreign equity in Indian broadcasting and on cross-media holdings. On what should these restrictions be based. * Whether DTH television should be allowed and in what form * Whether a broadcasting regulator is needed or not and what shape should it take, what powers should it have. * Whether a television licence fee is needed * Whether a Prasar Bharati is needed and should it be autonomous or government-controlled * Whether the current unorganised nature of the cable TV business should be allowed to continue or whether licensing should be brought in and in what form. * Whether uplinking from India should be made mandatory for all channels including foreign ones. * Whether wireless cable should be permitted * Whether private firms should be allowed to enter terrestrial television broadcasting.
  38. 38. The Indian Broadcasting Regulations forum – Consensus between the Industry and Govt bodies will lead to… Implications – *The limits for foreign equity in Indian broadcasting and on cross-media holdings. Will it be lifted ? Will the norms change…? * In what form will DTH television be allowed ? Will there be stricter Govt control & regulations ? * Possibility of not having a Broadcast regulator or its powers curtailed off ? Maybe there won’t be a television licence fee ? * Prasar Bharati - autonomous ? * Licensing to brought in for the current unorganised nature of the cable TV business, and make it more accountable and credible ? * Possibility of uplinking from India be made mandatory for all channels including foreign ones. * Whether wireless cable should be permitted ?? * Whether private firms should be allowed to enter terrestrial television broadcasting ??
  39. 39. Thank You

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