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Zen and the art of website maintenence (Squiz NZ)
 

Zen and the art of website maintenence (Squiz NZ)

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Matt Lane of Squiz New Zealand ...

Matt Lane of Squiz New Zealand

From the Squiz 2011 New Zealand User Conference

In this presentation, Matt covers the fundamentals of running a website:

1. Web strategy
- Who is your website for?
- Balancing business expectations and user expectations
- What does your website provide versus what users expect it to provide?
- Analysing performance
- Setting up analytics and goals
- Setting up A/B testing
2. Usability
Rules of thumb:
- Clear and concise
- Obvious choices
- Unambiguous consequences
- Most important thing in the most obvious/prominent place
Implications:
- Adopt conventions
- Consistency
- Every page should answer:
"where am I?"
"what can I do here?"
"what should I do here?"
3. Content
Writing for the web:
- Call things what they are
- Avoid lengthy paragraphs
- Write in active voice
- Use correct tone
- Use terms consistently

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Zen and the art of website maintenence (Squiz NZ) Zen and the art of website maintenence (Squiz NZ) Presentation Transcript

  • > Zen and the art of website maintenence
    • Matt Lane
      • Squiz2011 User Conference
      • 21 st November 2010
  • > “ The Buddha, the Godhead, resides quite as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of the mountain, or in the petals of a flower.”
  • >
    • Web strategy
    • Usability
    • Content
  • > “ The place to improve the world is first in one's heart and head and hands, and then work outward from there. ”
  • > 1. Web strategy
  • > Why a web strategy Without a strategy, Time and resources are easily wasted, We suffer from an “ad hocracy” We end up in a constant state of reaction Web strategy
  • > Who is your website for? Web strategy
  • > “ The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquillity it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.” Web strategy > Users
  • > XKCD Web strategy > Users
  • > “ The test of the site is the satisfaction it gives your users . There isn't any other test. If the site produces tranquillity it's right. If it disturbs your users it's wrong” Web strategy > Users
  • > What does your site provide? What are users looking to do? Does the first satisfy the second? Web strategy > Users > Satisfying needs
  • > XKCD Tranquillity: Make sure you give them what they’re looking for Web strategy > Users > Satisfying needs
  • > How well is your site performing? (Analytics) Web strategy > Analytics
  • > “ With analytic thought, the knife, is applied to experience. Something is always killed in the process.” Web strategy > Analytics
  • > Take as much as you can from analytics (which is heaps). But remember it isn’t the full story (eg “were you satisfied?”) Web strategy > Analytics
  • >
    • What are the most popular pages / sections / routes on your site?
    • Which pages have low / high exit rates?
    • What percentage of your users use mobile?
    • Where does your traffic come from? Search? Referrals? Direct?
      • What are users searching for who get to your site?
    • What are users searching for on your site?***
    • How long do users spend on your site?
    • Which cities / countries are your users from?
    • How are these changing, if at all, over time?
    • Are your current users, actually your target users?
    Web strategy > Analytics
  • > Analytics > Goals Web strategy > Analytics > Goals
  • > “ You look at where you're going and where you are and it never makes sense, but then you look back at where you've been and a pattern seems to emerge. Web strategy > Analytics > Goals
  • >
    • You really should have analytics “goals”
    • Goals can be hard to settle on (they are proxies)
    Web strategy > Analytics > Goals
  • > Web strategy > Analytics > Goals Forms as goals
  • > Web strategy > Analytics > Goals
  • > Web strategy > Analytics > Goals
  • > Web strategy > Analytics > Goals
  • > 1. Locate form in Matrix Admin Interface 2. Create a new "Standard page" -  this will be your new confirmation page (ensure it has appropriate confirmation text). Located this under the custom form asset, next to form contents 3. Create a "redirect asset" that redirects to your new standard page. 4. In the form's "Thank you" Bodycopy, create a “raw html, nested content” div - make this nested content the redirect page asset 5. Test your form (make sure you can see the new confirmation URL) Using this URL in Google Analytics for your goal Note: Ensure form is not being cached (System Managment/Cache Manager) Web strategy > Analytics > Goals Setting up unique form confirmation pages in Matrix for Google Analytics goals
  • > Web strategy > Analytics > Goals Possible goals ideas:
    • Newsletter subscription
    • Contact form completion
    • Competition entry submission
    • Blog comment submission
    • Document downloaded
    • Item listed
    • “ Social interaction analytics” (see Google)
  • > A/B Testing (Analytics) Web strategy > Analytics > A/B Testing
  • > “ For every fact there is an infinity of hypotheses. ” Web strategy > Analytics > A/B Testing
  • >
    • A/B Testing allows you to pit A against B.
    • Eg:
    • Functionality
      • mega menus vs dropdowns vs none
      • multi page form vs single large page
    • Visual
      • colour, alignment, images vs images
    • Page layout
    • Text
      • Length, tone, headlines
    Web strategy > Analytics > A/B Testing
  • >
    • Examples (by no means universal):
    • “ 30-Day Free Trial on All Accounts” generated 30% more sign-ups than the original “Start a Highrise Account.”
    • “ You should follow me on Twitter here” worked 173% better than his control text, “I’m on Twitter.”
    • The words “It’s free” increased the clicks on this sign-up button by 28%
    • CareLogger increased its conversion rate by 34% simply by changing the colour of the sign-up button from green to red!
    Web strategy > Analytics > A/B Testing http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/06/24/the-ultimate-guide-to-a-b-testing/
  • “ An experiment is never a failure solely because it fails to achieve predicted results. An experiment is a failure only when it also fails adequately to test the hypothesis in question, when the data it produces don't prove anything one way or another.” Web strategy > Analytics > A/B Testing
  • >
  • > 2. Usability Web strategy > Usability
  • > “ The test of the site is the satisfaction it gives your users . There isn't any other test. If the site produces tranquillity it's right. If it disturbs your users it's wrong” Web strategy > Usability
  • > Rules of thumb: 1. Clear and concise (see Content ) 2. Obvious choices 3. Unambiguous consequences 4. Most important thing in the most obvious / prominent place Web strategy > Usability
  • > Implications: 1. Adopt conventions 2. Consistency 3. Every page should answer: “where am I?” “what can I do here?” “what should I do here?” Web strategy > Usability
  • >
  • > 3. Content Web strategy > Content
  • >
      • “ Now all businesses
      • are media businesses”
      • (or something similar)
      • -Clay Shirky
    Web strategy > Content
  • > “ Organisations invest tremendous resources on developing the framework for a robust user experience – fabulous design, robust content management infrastructure. Yet when it comes to the content itself, there’s often a gap . The end result is that the value proposition for customers can’t be delivered because the content is insufficient, inadequate, and inappropriate.” - Rachel Bailie Web strategy > Content
  • >
    • Writing for the web
    • Call things what they are
    • Avoid lengthy paragraphs
    • Write in active voice
    • Use correct tone
    • Use terms consistently
    Web strategy > Content
  • > Writing for the web Means making content: • short, • scannable, and • to the point (rather than full of fluffy marketese ). Web strategy > Content
  • > Writing for the web (Linking to Usability ) Every page should answer: “where am I?” “what can I do here?” “what should I do here?” Web strategy > Content
  • > Content strategy Friendly and human voice Information architecture Consistent and clear language Helpful and timely guidance Help users feel welcome, use a conversational tone When it works: “ This is friendly and encouraging” When it doesn't: “ This is uninviting” Use language that makes sense, consistently When it works: “ This make sense” When it doesn't: “ I don't understand” Leave a “scent” everywhere When it works: “ I know where I am” When it doesn't: “ I don't know where I am in the site” Give clear, friendly guidance and calls to action When it works: “ Now I'm going to...” When it doesn't: “ I think I'm done here” Web strategy > Content
  • “ The truth knocks on the door an you say, "Go away I am looking for truth," and it goes away, puzzling.”
  • > Zen and the art of website maintenence
    • Matt Lane
      • Squiz2011 User Conference
      • 21 st November 2010
  •