121220 wcd2013 toolkit

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121220 wcd2013 toolkit

  1. 1. TOOLKIT WORLD CANCER DAY 2013 CANCER - DID YOU KNOW? There are many myths out there. On 4 February 2013 get the facts.
  2. 2. PAGE 2 CONTENTS 3 INTRODUCTION 4 WORLD CANCER DAY BACKGROUND, OBJECTIVES AND AUDIENCE 5 LEVELS OF ENGAGEMENT 8 SOCIAL MEDIA 10 STOP THE PRESS! 12 WORLD CANCER DAY KEY MESSAGES 15 QUOTABLE QUOTES/MEDIA SOUNDBYTES 16 TEMPLATE WORLD CANCER DAY MATERIALS 17 WHAT’S BEEN HAPPENING SINCE LAST WORLD CANCER DAY? 17 NEXT STEPS 17 FEEDBACK YOUR SUCCESSES „Krebs ist die Krankheit, vor der wir Deutschen uns am meisten fürchten. Obwohl sich die Heilungschancen bei vielen Krebserkrankungen in den letzten Jahrzehnten deutlich verbesserten, haben drei von vier Menschen auch heute große Angst vor Krebs. Es liegt an uns – den Ärzten, Wissenschaftlern, Fachgesellschaften, Selbsthilfeorganisationen, Journalisten und Politikern – dazu beizutragen, den Menschen diese Angst vor Krebs zu nehmen. Wir können ihnen vermitteln: Krebs ist heute viel häufiger therapier- und heilbar als allgemein bekannt. Und immer mehr Menschen erkennen, dass ihr Lebensstil dazu beitragen kann, das Krebsrisiko zu reduzieren.“ Dr. h. c. Fritz Pleitgen Präsident der Deutschen Krebshilfe We Germans dread no disease more than cancer. Despite the fact that the chances of recovery from many cancers have significantly improved in recent decades, three out of four people still have an empathic fear of cancer. It is up to us – the doctors, scientists, societies, self-help organisations, journalists and politicians – to alleviate this dread. There is a message we can give them: Nowadays cancer can be treated and healed much better than generally known. Likewise, more and more people realise that their lifestyle greatly influences the risk. Dr. H. C. Fritz Pleitgen President, Deutsche Krebshilfe One of the most common misconceptions about cancer in my part of the world is that getting cancer is ‘fate’ and nothing can be done to prevent it, when in reality 40% of cancers can be prevented through simple lifestyle changes. HRH Princess Dina Mired Director General, King Hussein Cancer Foundation ‫ﺣﺎﻻﺕ‬ ‫ﻣﻥ‬ ٪40 ‫ﻣﻥ‬ ‫ﺍﻟﻭﻗﺎﻳﺔ‬ ‫ﻳﻣﻛﻥ‬ ‫ﺍﻟﻭﺍﻗﻊ‬ ‫ﻓﻲ‬ ‫ﺃﻧﻪ‬ ‫ﺇﻻ‬ ،‫ﻣﻧﻪ‬ ‫ﻟﻠﻭﻗﺎﻳﺔ‬ ‫ﺷﻲء‬ ‫ﻓﻌﻝ‬ ‫ﻳﻣﻛﻥ‬ ‫ﻻ‬ ‫ﻭﺃﻧﻪ‬ ،‫ﻣﺻﻳﺭﻱ‬ ‫ﺃﻣﺭ‬ ‫ﺭ‬ ‫ﺭﻁﺎﻥ‬ ‫ﺑﺎﻟﺳ‬ ‫ﺍﻹﺻﺎﺑﺔ‬ ‫ﺃﻥ‬ ‫ﻫﻭ‬ ‫ﻣﻧﻁﻘﺗﻧﺎ‬ ‫ﻓﻲ‬ ‫ﺍﻟﺳﺭﻁﺎﻥ‬ ‫ﻋﻥ‬ ً‫ﺎ‬‫ﺷﻳﻭﻋ‬ ‫ﺍﻷﻛﺛﺭ‬ ‫ﺍﻟﺧﺎﻁﺋﺔ‬ ‫ﺍﻟﻣﻔﺎﻫﻳﻡ‬ ‫ﺃﺣﺩ‬ ‫ﺇﻥ‬ ."‫ﺍﻟﺣﻳﺎﺓ‬ ‫ﻧﻣﻁ‬ ‫ﻓﻲ‬ ‫ﺑﺳﻳﻁﺔ‬ ‫ﺗﻐﻳﻳﺭﺍﺕ‬ ‫ﺑﺈﺟﺭﺍء‬ ‫ﺍﻟﺳﺭﻁﺎﻥ‬ ‫ﻟﻠﺳﺭﻁﺎﻥ‬ ‫ﺍﻟﺣﺳﻳﻥ‬ ‫ﻣﺅﺳﺳﺔ‬ ‫ﻋﺎﻡ‬ ‫ﻣﺩﻳﺭ‬ ،‫ﻣﺭﻋﺩ‬ ‫ﺩﻳﻧﺎ‬ ‫ﺍﻷﻣﻳﺭﺓ‬ ‫ﺍﻟﻣﻠﻛﻲ‬ ‫ﺍﻟﺳﻣﻭ‬ ‫ﺻﺎﺣﺑﺔ‬ The Dutch Cancer Society considers World Cancer Day as an excellent opportunity to enhance cancer control, including prevention, treatment and care. Cancer is a global disease that requires global collaboration to save as many lives as possible. Michel.T. Rudolphie Msc, MBA Chief Executive Officer Dutch Cancer Society “With cancer being the leading cause of death in Canada, it remains the number one health concern for Canadians. With this year’s World Cancer Day theme aiming to dispel common myths and misconceptions about cancer, we have a unique opportunity to broaden awareness on cancer topics and showcase how Canada is playing a leadership role and working in partnership to reduce the burden of cancer for Canadians. The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer is proud to be a member of UICC and help highlight World Cancer Day.” Dr Heather Bryant Vice-President, Cancer Control, Canadian Partnership Against Cancer UICC Board Member
  3. 3. PAGE 3 INTRODUCTION After a number of years during which cancer prevention has been at the heart of the World Cancer Day campaigns, in 2013, we have chosen to focus on Target 5 of the World Cancer Declaration: Dispel damaging myths and misconceptions about cancer, with the tagline “Cancer - Did you know?”. World Cancer Day is a chance to raise our collective voices in the name of better sharing of actual cancer facts and dismissing misconceptions around the disease. This toolkit is designed to give guidance on what can be done to mark this important day and provides you with an overview of the flexible tools which can be adapted by you for use in your own campaigns/events. It contains template materials plus strategic and implementation guidance. Please note that all template materials within this toolkit are approved by UICC for the use by all member organisations and partners at their discretion. In 2012, the World Cancer Day Toolkit was downloaded more than 4100 times and 456 events took place in 80 countries. Together with your help, we can increase these numbers. We hope that your organisation will join us on 4 February in raising awareness of what can and must be done to make progress in the global fight against cancer. WHY IS WORLD CANCER DAY IMPORTANT? Put simply, because the global cancer epidemic is huge and is set to rise. Every year, nearly 8 million people die of cancer and many of these deaths can be avoided with increased governmental support and funding for prevention, detection and treatment programmes. Unless urgent action is taken to raise awareness about cancer and develop practical strategies to address the disease, millions of people will continue to die. Significantly, the number of cancer cases and related deaths worldwide is estimated to double over the next 20-40 years. With the greatest increase in low- and middle-income countries, those least equipped to cope with the social and economic impact of the disease. In close collaboration with the NCD Alliance, UICC played a key role in securing the World Health Organization’s (WHO) target of a 25% reduction in premature deaths from non- communicable diseases (NCDs) by 2025. However, around one third of cancer cases could be prevented and World Cancer Day is the ideal opportunity to spread the word and raise the profile of cancer in people’s minds and in the world’s media. World Cancer Research Fund global network is delighted to support World Cancer Day and add our voice to dispel the myths and misconceptions about cancer. We want people to know that cancer is not just ‘bad luck’. Let’s use World Cancer Day to make sure that people know the truth - a third of the most common cancers could be prevented and lives saved. Dr Kathryn Allen Director, Science & Communications, World Cancer Research Fund International We are at an unprecedented place with an extraordinary opportunity to save lives... targets and indicators must be sure to cover the continuum of the NCD process – from primary prevention to treatment and palliative care. Dr John Seffrin Chief Executive Officer, American Cancer Society If we can erase the myths associated with the disease, we really do have the power to change the way people view cancer and can curb the suffering of 28 million people. Doug Ulman, President and CEO LIVESTRONG Foundation There is a vast array of myths and misinformation about cancer, particularly online where it is growing exponentially. The sheer volume of these claims is threatening to drown out evidence-based health advice that can make a real difference in reducing cancer risk. People disconcerted by media reports and unreliable online information about causes of cancer are less likely to take the simple steps that are proven to reduce cancer risk - quit smoking, avoid unnecessary sun exposure, maintain a healthy weight and reduce alcohol intake. Professor Ian Olver Chief Executive Officer, Cancer Council Australia It is fear and ignorance that causes cancer to become a bigger problem than it needs to be, especially in developing countries like India. Working together, we can ensure we meet our mutual goal of beating cancer in our lifetimes. Mr. Y. K. Sapru Founder, Chairman and CEO, Cancer Patients Aid Association, India ‘kçÀkç&Àjçíiç’ SkçÀ SÌmçç jçíiç nÌ, çÆpçmçkçíÀ vççcç mçí nçÇ cçvç á <³ç Yç³çYççÇlç nçí pççlçç nÌ ~ Gmçí cççÌlç kçÀç ©Hç oíkçÀj DççÌj SkçÀ yç[çÇ mçcçm³çç mçcçPçlçç nÌ ~ ‘³çí içuçlç nÌ’ ‘kçÀkç&Àjçíiç’ kçÀç Fuççpç nÌ ~ çÆnccçlç mçí mçyç çÆcçuçkçÀj Fmç Hçj pç©j çÆJçpç³ç ÒççHlç kçÀj mçkçÀlçí nÌ DççÌj ‘kçÀkç&Àjçíiç’ mçí cç á kçwlç nçí mçkçÀlçí nÌ ~ Mr. Y. K. Sapru Founder, Chairman and CEO, Cancer Patients Aid Association, India
  4. 4. PAGE 4 2013 OBJECTIVES World Cancer Day 2013 is particularly important as it falls 18 months after the first UN High-level Meeting on NCDs, and the signing of the Political Declaration supporting prevention and control of these devastating diseases, including cancer. Therefore, aligning under the banner of “Cancer - Did you know?”, UICC would like you, our members and partners, to support us in using this upcoming day to encourage everyone (individuals, communities, civil societies and governments) to do their part in helping reduce the global cancer burden. Our ultimate aim is to help cut premature deaths from cancer and other NCDs by 25% by 2025. We have some specific objectives for World Cancer Day 2013, which we can only achieve with your support: • Spread the word amongst your network: individuals, members, partners and supporters • Drive the wide-spread use of #worldcancerday to show support for cancer control • Drive traffic to the World Cancer Day website • “Like” our World Cancer Day Facebook page • Promote and use the “Cancer Myths” Facebook Application (launching late January 2013). WORLD CANCER DAY 2013 THEME World Cancer Day 2013 has been themed “Cancer - Did you know?” because there are still many myths and misconceptions about the disease out there and this Day is the perfect opportunity to make people aware of them and dispel them. Greater awareness and education about cancer can lead to positive change at an individual, community and policy level and across the continuum of cancer care. For World Cancer Day 2013 we focus on four key myths and go about ‘debunking’ them through the various materials we have produced. These are provided to you for you to use, adapt and share, so we can reach as many people as possible in order to offer a better understanding of cancer and, if possible, dispel these myths completely. WHO IS THE AUDIENCE FOR WORLD CANCER DAY 2013? Everyone! It is only by everyone doing their part that the world will reduce the burden of cancer. Please consider how your organisation can reach the public, your local government and other civil society organisations to participate in the 2013 World Cancer Day initiative online and in their own communities. WORLD CANCER DAY BACKGROUND, OBJECTIVES AND AUDIENCE WHAT IS WORLD CANCER DAY? World Cancer Day takes place every year on 4 February and is the single initiative under which the entire world can unite together in the fight against the global cancer epidemic. World Cancer Day is an initiative of the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), through which we aim to help save millions of preventable deaths each year by raising awareness and education about cancer, and pressing governments and individuals across the world to take action against the disease. CIANAgency©FrançoisStruzik–simplyhuman
  5. 5. PAGE 5 In the next pages, you will find an outline of three different engagement ‘levels’ and suggested messaging that can easily be adapted and applied to you or your organisation’s needs and capacities. We are offering a wide variety of ways for your organisation and members to get involved, from the basic engagement aimed at the general public (Level 1), to a more engaged level involving UICC member organisations and partners (Level 2) and even a “super engaged” level (Level 3), which is aimed at coordinating a global Advocacy Push. We encourage you to use the following platforms and suggested messaging to engage your members and encourage them to do something on the day to support our grassroots message of dispelling cancer myths. LEVELS OF ENGAGEMENT WORLD CANCER DAY ENGAGEMENT World Cancer Day is a truly global event, but to enable us to reach as much of the world’s population as possible, we need your help. We appreciate that you all have different needs and priorities, so whilst we greatly encourage you incorporate the day (and the theme ‘Cancer - Did you know?’) into existing outreach programmes you have, we also welcome you creating your own policy/awareness raising campaign which is in-line with the specific area(s) of focus within your organisation. LEVEL 1 - BASIC ANYONE AND EVERYONE / GENERAL PUBLIC Social media channels: Engage with your network via your Twitter and Facebook pages (global hashtags and key messages to share via social platforms are provided on page 8). Use the World Cancer Day poster which has been designed specifically for the 2013 campaign. You can use it digitally or as a printed document to promote the day and the theme. The “Cancer Myths vs Facts” Facebook application will be launched for World Cancer Day 2013 - be sure to use it and share it widely with your members to spread the truth about cancer on this day. Website: Ensure that the World Cancer Day logo is present on your website, link to www.worldcancerday.org and even better, upload a small article onto your site about the day.
  6. 6. PAGE 6 Press / Media campaign: Use the template press release (to be available January 2013) or write your own. See section ‘Stop the press’ for more information. Adapt the World Cancer Day poster, by adding your organisation’s logo before you disseminate it. Design files are available upon request. MYTH 1: CANCER IS JUST A HEALTH ISSUE CANCER AND DEVELOPMENT Cancer constitutes a major challenge to development, undermining social and economic advances throughout the world. EVIDENCE • Approximately 47% of cancer cases and 55% of cancer deaths occur in less developed regions of the world. • The situation is predicted to get worse: by 2030, if current trends continue, cancer cases will increase by 81% in developing countries. • Today, the impact of cancer on individuals, communities and populations threatens to prevent the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015. • Cancer is both a cause and an outcome of poverty. Cancer negatively impacts families’ ability to earn an income, with high treatment costs pushing them further into poverty. At the same time, poverty, lack of access to education and healthcare increases a person’s risk of getting cancer and dying from the disease. • Cancer is threatening further improvements in women’s health and gender equality. Just two cancers, cervical and breast, together account for over 750,000 deaths each year with the large majority of deaths occurring in developing countries. TRUTH: CANCER IS NOT JUST A HEALTH ISSUE It has wide-reaching social, economic, development, and human rights implications. GLOBAL ADVOCACY MESSAGE Cancer prevention and control interventions must be included in the new set of global development goals for the post-2015 agenda. Broadening the future global development goals to include proven, economically sound interventions that span the entire cancer control and care continuum can strengthen health systems, and increase capacity to respond to all health challenges faced by individuals, families and communities. UICC085_WCDFACT1_FA.indd 1 10/12/12 11:08 AM MYTH 2: CANCER IS A DISEASE OF THE WEALTHY, ELDERLY AND DEVELOPED COUNTRIES CANCER IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES Cancer is a global issue and becoming an increasing public health problem in poorer countries. EVIDENCE • Cancer now accounts for more deaths worldwide than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. Of the 7.6 million global deaths from cancer in 2008, more than 55% occurred in less developed regions of the world. By 2030, 60-70% of the estimated 21.4 million new cancer cases per year are predicted to occur in developing countries. • Cervical cancer is just one example of the disproportionate burden borne in the developing world. Over 85% of the 275,000 women who die every year from cervical cancer are from developing countries. If left unchecked, by 2030 cervical cancer will kill as many as 430,000 women per year, virtually all in these countries. • There are massive inequities in access to pain relief with more than 99% of untreated and painful deaths occurring in developing countries. In 2009, more than 90% of the global consumption of opioid analgesics was in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the US and some European countries; with less than 10% of global quantities used by the other 80% of the world’s population. GLOBAL ADVOCACY MESSAGE Efficacious and cost- effective interventions must be made available in an equitable manner through cancer prevention, early detection and treatment delivered as part of national cancer control plans (NCCPs) that respond to the national cancer burden. Access to effective, quality and affordable cancer services is a right of all individuals and should not be determined by where you live. TRUTH: CANCER IS A GLOBAL EPIDEMIC It affects all ages and socio- economic groups, with developing countries bearing a disproportionate burden. CIAN Agency © François Struzik - simply human - Tdh UICC085_WCDFACT2_FA.indd 1 10/12/12 11:19 AM MYTH 3: CANCER IS A DEATH SENTENCE ADVANCES IN CANCER PREVENTION AND TREATMENT Advances in understanding risk and prevention, early detection and treatment have revolutionised the management of cancer leading to improved outcomes for patients. EVIDENCE • With few exceptions, early stage cancers are less lethal and more treatable than late stage cancers. • In the United States alone, there are 12 million Americans living with cancer today. • In countries with more than a decade of experience with organised breast cancer screening programmes, the reduction in mortality from breast cancer is significant, with for example, Australia’s mammographic screening programme established in 1991, integral to achieving an almost 30% reduction in mortality from breast cancer over the last two decades. • Cervical cancer rates in wealthier nations plummeted once Pap testing was introduced broadly - and rates continue to lower, with recent figures showing that in some countries such as the UK, mortality has halved between 1990 and 2010. GLOBAL ADVOCACY MESSAGE Cost-effective strategies for cancer control such as breast and cervical cancer screening as well as early detection exist for all resource settings and can be tailored to the population-based need. TRUTH: Many cancers that were once considered a death sentence CAN NOW BE CURED AND FOR MANY MORE PEOPLE, THEIR CANCER CAN NOW BE TREATED EFFECTIVELY. UICC085_WCDFACT3_FA.indd 1 10/12/12 11:13 AM MYTH 4: CANCER IS MY FATE CANCER PREVENTION Prevention is the most cost-effective and sustainable way of reducing the global cancer burden in the long-term. EVIDENCE • Global, regional and national policies and programmes that promote healthy lifestyles can substantially reduce cancers that are caused by risk factors such as alcohol, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. Improving diet, physical activity and maintaining a healthy body weight could prevent around a third of the most common cancers. • Based on current trends, tobacco use is estimated to kill one billion people in the 21st century. Addressing tobacco use, which is linked to 71% of all lung cancer deaths, and accounts for at least 22% of all cancer deaths is therefore critical. • For developing countries, the situation often goes beyond addressing behavioural change, with many countries facing a ‘double burden’ of exposures, the most common of which is cancer-causing infections. Chronic infections are estimated to cause approximately 16% of all cancers globally, with this figure rising to almost 23% in developing countries. Several of the most common cancers in developing countries such as liver, cervical and stomach cancers are associated with infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV), the human papillomavirus (HPV), and the bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), respectively. As a consequence, the introduction of safe, effective and affordable vaccines should be implemented as part of national cancer control plans. • Exposure to a wide range of environmental causes of cancer in our personal and professional lives, including exposure to indoor air pollution, radiation and excessive sunlight are also major preventable causes of cancer GLOBAL ADVOCACY MESSAGE Effective cancer prevention at the national level begins with a national cancer control plan (NCCP) that responds to a country’s cancer burden and cancer risk factor prevalence, and is designed to implement evidence-based resource- appropriate policies and programmes that reduce the level of exposure to risk factors for cancer and strengthen the capacity of individuals to adopt healthy lifestyle choices. TRUTH: With the right strategies, A THIRD OF THE MOST COMMON CANCERS CAN BE PREVENTED. CIAN Agency © François Struzik - simply human UICC085_WCDFACT4_FA.indd 1 10/12/12 11:18 AM The four World Cancer Day fact sheets have been created to dispel common global myths and misconceptions about cancer. Disseminate or adapt them for use amongst your network. Translate: Help bring the messages and tools of the World Cancer Day campaign to a wider audience. We would love to have additional translations for the posters and fact sheets. Contact communication@uicc.org if you are interested in helping. The World Cancer Day Evidence sheets have been put together to provide additional supporting information to the fact sheets. These are perfect to encourage further reading and information sharing on the key topics and messages of the campaign. We encourage you to engage your corporate partners and other corporate or not-for-profit organisations in your country in support of World Cancer Day. They can help by organising fundraising activities on your behalf and/or by using World Cancer Day messaging in their internal and external communications mechanisms (newsletters, websites etc). Add to the World Cancer Day online map of events and activities - Please share what you will be doing on/ around World Cancer Day. The site is visited by media, individuals and organisations worldwide - therefore this is a great place in which to let the world know what you have planned, no matter how big or small. www.worldcancerday.org/events-map Cancer infographics: Visual tools that represent the global cancer burden in a visually engaging format. Consider using these on your website and on your social media platforms to support World Cancer Day. WORLD CANCER DAY 2012 LEVEL 2 - WANT TO DO MORE? GENERAL PUBLIC / UICC MEMBER ORGANISATIONS AND PARTNERS 700% INCREASE IN USE OF #WORLDCANCERDAY FROM 2011 160 MEMBERS ACTIVE ON WORLD CANCER DAY WORLD CANCER DAY TOOLKIT DOWNLOADED 4100 TIMES
  7. 7. PAGE 7 LEVEL 3 - SUPER ENGAGED ADVOCACY PUSH In the year since the UN High-level Meeting on the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable Diseases (NCDs), WHO has led a series of consultations that are vitally important to global action on NCDs. One of these consultations is on the development of a Global Action Plan for NCDs 2013-2020 which is due to be adopted at the 66th World Health Assembly in May 2013. Call on your government to ensure that cancer interventions, across the entire continuum of care from prevention to early detection, treatment and palliation, are adequately addressed in the new Global Action on Plan on NCDs. Please visit: http://www. uicc.org/advocacy/advocacy-in-action/advocacy- campaign-update for more information and supporting documents. CIANAgency©FrançoisStruzik–simplyhuman-Tdh
  8. 8. PAGE 8 SOCIAL MEDIA We invite you to use the following posts as templates to spread the word on Facebook and Twitter. SAMPLE FACEBOOK POSTS A special Facebook App will be launched for World Cancer Day (launching late January 2013). We encourage you to use it to post to your wall/page. Alternatively, we also are providing the following sample Facebook posts: • Today I learnt that cancer is not just a health issue: it has wide-reaching social, economic, development and human rights implications. • Today I learnt that cancer is not just a health issue: a ‘whole-of- society’ approach that includes non-governmental organisations, academia, private sector, people living with and affected by cancer, and others, is just as important to support cancer prevention and control. • Today I learnt that cancer is not only a disease of the rich: it is a global issue and becoming an increasing public health problem in poorer countries. • Today I learnt that cancer is not only a disease of the rich: it is a global issue and becoming an increasing public health problem in poorer countries. • Today I learnt that cancer is not only a disease of the elderly: it is a leading cause of death in many countries for children aged 5-14. • Today I learnt that cancer is not only a disease of the elderly: most of the 750,000 cervical and breast cancer deaths per year occur during a woman’s reproductive years. • Today I learnt that cancer is not only a disease of developed countries: out of the 7.6 million global deaths from cancer in 2008, more than 55% occurred in less developed regions of the world. • Today I learnt that cancer is not only a disease of developed countries: approximately 47% of cancer cases and 55% of cancer deaths occur in less developed regions of the world. • Today I learnt that cancer isn’t a death sentence: advances in understanding risk and prevention, early detection treatment and care can lead to improved outcomes for patients. • Today I learnt that cancer isn’t a death sentence: with few exceptions, early stage cancers are less lethal and more treatable than late stage cancers. • Today I learnt that around 30% of cancer cases can be prevented! Prevention is the most cost-effective and sustainable way of reducing the global cancer burden in the long-term. • Today I learnt that cancer does not have to be my fate: tobacco use is linked to 71% of all lung cancer deaths, and accounts for at least 22% of all cancer deaths. • Today I learnt that cancer is preventable: tobacco use is estimated to kill one billion people in the 21st century. To be included with these posts, we invite you to provide a link to additional information, such as a link to the fact sheets: http://www.worldcancerday.org/fact-sheets. WORLD CANCER DAY FACEBOOK COVER PAGE Alternatively, or in addition, to the World Cancer Day badge, you may also want to use the “World Cancer Day Cover Page Image” which can be downloaded at the link below and added to your Facebook page. http://www.worldcancerday.org/ social-media FACEBOOK WORLD CANCER DAY BADGE Add the “World Cancer Day” badge to your Facebook profile photo You may add the World Cancer Day badge to your Facebook profile photo, by using the link provided here below: http://www.picbadges.com/ badge/2942821 TOP TIP WHEN INSERTING LINKS INTO TWEETS, USE A FREE LINK- SHORTENING SERVICE SUCH AS BIT.LY (HTTPS://BITLY.COM/) FACEBOOK To stay up to date on what UICC does to support World Cancer Day please ‘like’ us on Facebook. Our Facebook pages: World Cancer Day www.facebook.com/ worldcancerday World Cancer Declaration www.facebook.com/ cancerfreeworld UICC www.facebook.com/uicc.org
  9. 9. PAGE 9 TWITTER READY TWEETS FOR WORLD CANCER DAY Please feel free to use the following sample tweets on and around World Cancer Day. OVERVIEW TWEETS • #TIL that #cancer is not just a #healthissue but also #development & #education. #worldcancerday bit. ly/Wmpi8v • #TIL that #cancer is not only a #disease of the #elderly #worldcancerday bit.ly/Wmpi8v • #TIL that #cancer is not only a #disease of #developedcountries #worldcancerday bit.ly/Wmpi8v • #TIL that #cancer is not only a #disease of the #rich #worldcancerday bit.ly/Wmpi8v • #TIL that #cancer is not a #deathsentence #worldcancerday bit.ly/Wmpi8v • #TIL that #cancer is not always #fate #worldcancerday bit.ly/Wmpi8v MYTH 1 • #TIL that #cancer is not just a health issue: it has wide-reaching social & economic implications #worldcancerday bit.ly/Zgioaf • #TIL that #cancer is not just a health issue: it has wide-reaching development & human rights implications #worldcancerday bit.ly/ Zgioaf • #TIL that #cancer has wide-reaching #social, #economic, #development and #humanrights implications #worldcancerday bit.ly/Zgioaf • #TIL that a whole-of-society approach is necessary to support #cancerprevention & #cancercontrol #worldcancerday bit.ly/Zgioaf MYTH 2 • #TIL that #cancer is a #globalissue & becoming an increasing #publichealth problem in poorer countries #worldcancerday bit.ly/ TXRQmo • #TIL #cancer is one of the main causes of #death for #children aged 5-14 in many countries of the world #worldcancerday bit.ly/TXRQmo • #TIL Most of the 750,000 #cervical & #breastcancer deaths/year occur during a woman’s reproductive years #worldcancerday bit.ly/TXRQmo • #TIL Out of the 7.6 million global deaths from cancer in 2008, more than 55% occurred in less developed regions of the world #worldcancerday • #TIL that approximately 47% of #cancer cases and 55% of #cancerdeaths occur in less developed regions of the world #worldcancerday bit.ly/TXRQmo MYTH 3 • #TIL Understanding #cancer #risk&prevention #earlydetection #treatment and #care can lead to improved outcomes for patients #worldcancerday • #TIL that early stage #cancers are less lethal and more treatable than late stage cancer #cancerscreening #worldcancerday bit.ly/V5eWLu MYTH 4 • #TIL that #canceris not just fate. 1 in 3 #cancers can be prevented #prevention #worldcancerday bit. ly/12ybICm • #TIL that 1 in 3 #cancer cases can be prevented. #healthylifestyle #worldcancerday bit.ly/12ybICm • #TIL #Prevention is the most #cost- effective and #sustainable way of reducing the global #cancerburden #worldcancerday bit.ly/12ybICm • #TIL that #tobacco use is linked to 71% of all lung cancer deaths #worldcancerday bit.ly/12ybICm • #TIL that #tobacco use accounts for at least 22% of all #cancer deaths #worldcancerday bit.ly/12ybICm • #TIL that #tobacco use is estimated to #kill one billion people in the 21st century #worldcancerday bit. ly/12ybICm TWITTER To stay up to date on what UICC is doing to support World Cancer Day please ‘follow’ us on Twitter at: UICC http://twitter.com/uicc For organisations who are proactively using twitter, we will be using #worldcancerday and ask that you use this hashtag as well for all relevant twitter posts.
  10. 10. PAGE 10 STOP THE PRESS! A great way to engage all audiences about World Cancer Day is through your local media. We encourage all of our member organisations to build relationships with influential/relevant journalists to help generate coverage of your local World Cancer Day activities as an integral part of the global awareness raising movement. We encourage you to develop your own media outreach programmes at national and local levels on 4 February 2013 and also utilise (as appropriate) the Facebook application, key messaging, infographics, social media hashtags, quotable quotes and other resources contained within this toolkit. A template press release will be available mid-January for your use and adaptation to outreach to your local press and media. We also encourage you to use the day as a hook for any media activities you may want to do around the launch of a new campaign, report or research findings. MORE INFORMATION Further information and support on creating media materials and communicating with media can be found on the World Cancer Day website www.worldcancerday.org/ presskit DEFINING THE STORY Media relations efforts need to begin with clearly articulated statements and answer the following five “w’s” to define the story. Who is central to the story? What is the news you want to report? When answering this question think carefully about what you want this story to accomplish. Why has it happened? When did it happen? What will the consequences be? • A story must be new, or offer a new angle, in order to be considered news. • Experts must offer reporters something new, a clear opinion and an additional insight, or they may not write the story or use that expert as a resource and look elsewhere to find the facts needed to write the story. In the worst case they may discount the story completely. CIANAgency©Shutterstock
  11. 11. PAGE 11 HOW TO DEVELOP A PRESS RELEASE 1) Find an interesting news angle e.g. new data, activities, important event etc. 2) Define your target group e.g. wire, trade or consumer journalist see checklist Who you’re talking to 3) Develop contact list ²see checklist How to produce a media list 4) Develop / write your press release and consider the following: • Why the release is being written? • Who is the audience? • Does the release contain invaluable or newsworthy information that will be used by target audience? • What do you want recipients to take away from the press release? Overall tone and structure • Content: ensure that the release is grammatically correct and doesn’t contain any spelling mistakes, errors, and that sources are quoted correctly. • Concise: keep it punchy and don’t use unnecessary flowery language e.g. cutting-edge, revolutionary. • Factual: present the information for distribution that is true, correct. • Objectivity: virtually impossible to do, but refrain from using over hyped quotes from sources, as they will be presented as being too biased. • Timing: the press release may not be topical, but it may be possible to link the release with a more recent news event. 5) Obtain approval of press release by legal team, communications department, CEO or relevant decision maker within your organisation. 6) Distribute press release via email, mail or fax (as required by journalist) ²see checklist How to produce a media list HOW TO DEVELOP OR LOCALISE A PRESS RELEASE HOW TO ADAPT OR LOCALISE A PRESS RELEASE 1) Review press release and decide if there is any need or interest group in your local market/target group 2) Define your media target group e.g. wire, trade or consumer journalist ²see checklist Who you’re talking to 3) Develop a contact list ²see checklist How to produce a media list 4) Adapt the press release with local information e.g. statements from local experts/celebrities or local data 5) Obtain approval of your press release by legal team, the communications department, CEO or relevant decision maker within your organisation. 6) Distribute press release via email, mail or fax (as required by individual journalist) ²see checklist How to produce a media list MORE INFORMATION Further information and support on creating media materials and communicating with media can be found on the World Cancer Day website www.worldcancerday.org/ presskit
  12. 12. PAGE 12 WORLD CANCER DAY KEY MESSAGES To achieve the objectives of the 2013 World Cancer Day campaign it is essential that we all use ‘one voice’ when we talk or write about the initiative. The following World Cancer Day 2013 messaging suggestions are provided for your use and adaptation. Please feel free to use these as a part of all press and social media platforms. Our goal is to spread the message worldwide and make a global impact on World Cancer Day. Please see the World Cancer Day 2013 Evidence Sheets for all supporting references to the facts and figures listed below. 1. PRIMARY WORLD CANCER DAY KEY MESSAGES WORLD CANCER DAY • World Cancer Day is the singular initiative under which UICC, its members, partners, supporters and the entire world can unite in the fight against the global cancer epidemic. • It is only by every person, organisation and government individually doing their part that the world will reduce the burden of cancer and premature deaths from NCDs by 25% by 2025. ©Shahidul/Drik/MajorityWorld/ CIANAgency
  13. 13. PAGE 13 MYTH 3: CANCER IS A DEATH SENTENCE Many cancers that were once considered a death sentence can now be cured and for many more people their cancer can now be treated effectively. • With few exceptions, early stage cancers are less lethal and more treatable than late stage cancers. • In the United States alone, there are 12 million Americans living with cancer today. • In countries with more than a decade of experience with organised breast cancer screening programmes, the reduction in mortality from breast cancer is significant, with for example, Australia’s mammographic screening program established in 1991, integral to achieving an almost 30% reduction in mortality from breast cancer over the last two decades. • Globally, closing the gap in cancer outcomes between rich and poor countries is an equity imperative. • It is a common misconception that cancer solutions are too complex and expensive for developing countries. MYTH 1: CANCER IS JUST A HEALTH ISSUE Cancer is not just a health issue. It has wide-reaching social, economic, development, and human rights implications. • Approximately 47% of cancer cases and 55% of cancer deaths occur in less developed regions of the world. • The situation is predicted to get worse. By 2030, if current trends continue, cancer cases will increase by 81% in developing countries. • Today, the impact of cancer on individuals, communities and populations threatens to prevent the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015. • Cancer is both a cause and an outcome of poverty. Cancer negatively impacts families’ ability to earn an income with high treatment costs pushing them further into poverty. At the same time, poverty, lack of access to education and healthcare increases a person’s risk of getting cancer and dying from the disease. • Cancer is threatening further improvements in women’s health and gender equality. Just two cancers, cervical and breast, together, account for over 750,000 deaths each year with the large majority of deaths occurring in developing countries. MYTH 2: CANCER IS A DISEASE OF THE WEALTHY, ELDERLY AND DEVELOPED COUNTRIES Cancer is a global epidemic, affecting all ages and socio- economic groups, with developing countries bearing a disproportionate burden. • Cancer now accounts for more deaths worldwide than HIV/ AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. Of the 7.6 million global deaths from cancer in 2008, more than 55% occurred in less developed regions of the world. By 2030, 60-70% of the estimated 21.4 million new cancer cases per year are predicted to occur in developing countries. • There are massive inequities in access to pain relief with more than 99% of untreated and painful deaths occurring in developing countries. In 2009, more than 90% of the global consumption of opioid analgesics was in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the US and some European countries; with less than 10% of global quantities used by the other 80% of the world’s population. • Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) including cancer, and infectious diseases, should not be seen as competing priorities but instead as global health issues that disproportionately affect developing countries. They require an integrated approach that builds capacity in national health systems to protect individuals across the spectrum of diseases. • Approximately 50% of cancer in developing countries occurs in individuals less than 65 years of age. This is a tragedy for families and for populations, and has the potential to have a long-term impact on economic development. • Demographic differences correlate highly with common cancer risk factors e.g. poor nutrition, tobacco use, physical inactivity and alcohol. 2. WORLD CANCER DAY 2013 SPECIFIC KEY MESSAGES
  14. 14. PAGE 14 4. KEY MESSAGES ABOUT UICC AS CUSTODIANS OF WORLD CANCER DAY UICC is the leading international non-governmental organisation dedicated to the prevention and control of cancer worldwide. • UICC is the largest cancer fighting organisation of its kind, with over 760 member organisations across 155 countries representing the world’s major cancer societies, ministries of health, research institutes, treatment centres and patient groups. • UICC is dedicated to continuing to work with world leaders to increase their support for cancer control measures, and hold them to account for the cancer commitments made in the UN Political Declaration. • UICC will use World Cancer Day to lobby to: 1. Develop targets and indicators to measure the implementation of policies and approaches to prevent and control cancer 2. Raise the priority accorded to cancer in the global development agenda 3. Promote a global response to cancer. UICC and its multisectoral partners are committed to convincing governments to adopt specific time-bound targets that address the global burden of cancer and other NCDs. • UICC is also a founding member of the NCD Alliance, a global civil society network that now represents almost 2,000 organisations in 170 countries. 3. PRIMARY GLOBAL CANCER MESSAGES The global cancer epidemic is huge and on the rise. It is a disease that knows no boundaries and has, or will, affect us all either directly or indirectly during our lifetime. • The economic cost of lost life years due to cancer exceed that of any other disease. • It is estimated that by 2030 there will be 12 million cancer deaths annually worldwide. • The scale of the cancer epidemic requires a global response. • Many of the 600,000 deaths each month attributed to cancer can be prevented with increased governmental support and funding for prevention, detection and treatment programmes. • WHO believes that avoidable deaths from NCDs can be reduced by 25% by 2025. The global cost of inaction against cancer exceeds the costs of action Cancer control measures have measurable benefits such as economic impacts and reduction in loss of life, which exceed their costs. • Cancer costs economies across the world an estimated US$458 billion per year and is set to rise. • Cost effective solutions exist – US$1.8 billion is the cost of reducing exposure to key risk factors like smoking, drinking and poor diet. Unless urgent action is taken to raise awareness about cancer and develop practical, multisectoral strategies to address the disease, millions of people around the world will continue to die prematurely or suffer every year. For every 100 people who get cancer, over 30 cases could have been prevented by healthy lifestyle or by immunisation against cancer causing infections. • The number of premature deaths is higher than then the actual number of deaths caused by HIV/AIDS, malaria, TB and a host of other diseases. MYTH 4: CANCER IS MY FATE With the right strategies, around 30% of cancer cases can be prevented. • Global, regional and national policies and programmes that promote healthy lifestyles can substantially reduce cancers that are caused by risk factors such as alcohol, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. Improving diet, physical activity and maintaining a healthy body weight could prevent around a third of the most common cancers. • Based on current trends, tobacco use is estimated to kill one billion people in the 21st century. Addressing tobacco use, which is linked to 71% of all lung cancer deaths, and accounts for at least 22% of all cancer deaths is therefore critical. • In many developing countries, misconceptions about diagnosis and treatment and stigma associated with cancer can lead individuals to seek alternative care in place of standard treatment or to avoid care altogether. Understanding and responding to cultural beliefs and practices is essential. • Patients whose cancers are curable in the developed world unnecessarily suffer and die due to a lack of awareness, resources and access to affordable, effective and quality cancer services that enable early diagnosis and appropriate treatment and care.
  15. 15. PAGE 15 QUOTABLE QUOTES / MEDIA SOUNDBYTES In addition to the World Cancer Day key messages, we have worked with our key above-country partners to provide you with additional quotes that can be used to supplement your cancer communications, and further link your efforts with the global World Cancer Day movement. These quotations can be used in your internal (newsletters etc.) and external World Cancer Day communications (media materials, website copy etc.). However, please note that they must be used verbatim, without edits and must be attributed fully. Translating the following quotes into your local language is appropriate, but please do ensure that the quotes remain true to their original content and meaning. As with any other developments or successes, please share any media coverage which you generate using these quotes! World Cancer Day is reminder to us all to take action against the increasing burden of cancer. Cancer cases are projected to almost double to 21.4 million by 2030, with nearly two thirds of these occurring in low- and middle-income countries. Importantly, this number could be significantly reduced through cost effective prevention, early detection and treatment strategies. Andreas Ullrich MD MPH, Medical Officer Cancer Control Department Chronic Diseases And Health Promotion, Who Headquarters Geneva On World Cancer Day, UICC urges world leaders to support the commitments of the UN Political Declaration on non-communicable diseases by promoting sustainable resourcing and measurable targets for cancer control in their countries. This is critical to give the world the best chance of fighting the cancer epidemic it currently faces. World Cancer Day is a vital reminder that it is only by every person, organisation, and government, individually doing their part, that the world will reduce the burden of cancer and premature deaths by 25% by 2025 – a target the WHO believes to be achievable. Together it is possible; alone, lives will continue to be lost. Cancer will touch us all at some point in our lives. On World Cancer Day, UICC urges everyone to make simple lifestyle changes to reduce their cancer risk and that of their loved ones. Cancer knows no boundaries, so we all must take responsibility for beating this devastating disease. Together it is possible. Cary Adams, Chief Executive Officer Union For International Cancer Control (UICC)
  16. 16. PAGE 16 TEMPLATE WORLD CANCER DAY MATERIALS World Cancer Day should be viewed as an opportunity to add the scale and momentum of coordinated global efforts to your local media, policy and advocacy efforts. UICC has developed a core set of materials to support you in developing your 2012 World Cancer Day campaign. However, there are a few important points to remember before adapting / preparing your local campaign: • All media materials provided have been developed and approved by the UICC communications team. However, they will need to be translated and adapted according to your local standard operating procedures. • All template materials currently include global-level statistics and spokespeople. Where appropriate, please localise your materials by using facts and figures from your own country, in addition to your own spokespeople; these will make your materials of more value to your local media. Map of events An online interactive map showing what is going on and where, on and around World Cancer Day 2013. Myth Factsheets Evidence sheets The fact sheets have been developed to give the reader a general overview of some of the myths and misconceptions that surround cancer. The fact sheets will provide the reader with key facts and figures that help to debunk these myths and misconceptions, as well as outlining important advocacy messages. For a more detailed look at the issues addressed in the fact sheets, including a reference list for each of the facts and figures used, we have developed supporting Evidence Sheets. Will be available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic and Portuguese. Facebook Application Launching late January 2013, this Facebook application will enable users to do something fun and informative on World Cancer Day and help spread the buzz on social media. World Cancer Day Poster The 2013 campaign poster is available in English, French, Spanish, German, Arabic, Portuguese, Bengali, as well as other languages. Template Press Release A template press release designed for your local adaptation for use on and around World Cancer Day 2013 (Embargo). Will be available in English, French, Spanish, German, Arabic and Portuguese. Cancer impact and prevention backgrounder Explains cancer, its many forms, signs and symptoms, details and defines the global burden of cancer, and touches on prevention and detection issues. World Cancer Declaration and the UN Political Declaration on NCDs A key action is to understand and communicate to others the promises made by governments on cancer in the Political Declaration and how they are linked to the World Cancer Declaration targets. MYTH 1: CANCER IS JUST A HEALTH ISSUE CANCER AND DEVELOPMENT Cancer constitutes a major challenge to development, undermining social and economic advances throughout the world. EVIDENCE • Approximately 47% of cancer cases and 55% of cancer deaths occur in less developed regions of the world. • The situation is predicted to get worse: by 2030, if current trends continue, cancer cases will increase by 81% in developing countries. • Today, the impact of cancer on individuals, communities and populations threatens to prevent the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015. • Cancer is both a cause and an outcome of poverty. Cancer negatively impacts families’ ability to earn an income, with high treatment costs pushing them further into poverty. At the same time, poverty, lack of access to education and healthcare increases a person’s risk of getting cancer and dying from the disease. • Cancer is threatening further improvements in women’s health and gender equality. Just two cancers, cervical and breast, together account for over 750,000 deaths each year with the large majority of deaths occurring in developing countries. TRUTH: CANCER IS NOT JUST A HEALTH ISSUE It has wide-reaching social, economic, development, and human rights implications. GLOBAL ADVOCACY MESSAGE Cancer prevention and control interventions must be included in the new set of global development goals for the post-2015 agenda. Broadening the future global development goals to include proven, economically sound interventions that span the entire cancer control and care continuum can strengthen health systems, and increase capacity to respond to all health challenges faced by individuals, families and communities. UICC085_WCDFACT1_FA.indd 1 10/12/12 11:08 AM Infographics Infographics which illustrate many aspects of the global cancer burden. Advocacy Toolkit The advocacy toolkit aims to respond to some of the many challenges for cancer advocates in influencing change in public perception, practice and policy. It includes how to write a letter to your health minister, how to write a position statement, Declaration icons, etc. DOWNLOAD To download these materials and more, you may access the following link: http://www. worldcancerday.org/wcd- resources
  17. 17. PAGE 17 APR MAYFEBJAN AUG SEP OCT NOV 1 year Anniversary of the UN High Level Meeting on NCDs “Working in partnership to secure a global platform for NCDs” NCD Alliance Event, Geneva, Switzerland World Health Assembly Geneva, Switzerland “Reducing the Burden of Pain and Suffering: developing Palliative Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries” UICC, Geneva, Switzerland Global Targets, Indicators and Expectations - US Mission to the UN, Republic of Kenya Mission to the UN and UICC Global Roundtable Series, Geneva, Switzerland Cancer Information Dilemma - IARC, IFPMA and UICC Global Roundtable Series, Geneva, Switzerland World Cancer Day UICC/ASCO Roundtable on Personalised Medicines Washington DC, United States Global Access to Pain Relief Initiative (GAPRI) Roundtable Washington DC, United States 132nd WHO Executive Board Meeting Geneva, Switzerland 2012 2013 4-FEB World Cancer Day 4-FEB World Cancer Day World Cancer Leaders’ Summit “Planning for National and Global Impact” Montréal, Canada World Cancer Congress “Connecting for Global Impact” Montréal, Canada Global Roundtable Series, UICC/US Mission to the UN/Permanent Mission of Panama to the UN – “Assuring Balance for NCDs 2012” Geneva, Switzerland Member State Consultations on the WHO Global Action Plan on NCDs (2013-2020) and the Global Monitoring Framework, Targets and Indicators for NCDs Geneva, Switzerland WHAT’S BEEN HAPPENING SINCE LAST WORLD CANCER DAY? FIND OUT HOW YOUR SUPPORT OF THE CAMPAIGN HAS A GLOBAL IMPACT KEY 2012 CANCER ADVOCACY DEVELOPMENTS ©USMission,Geneva
  18. 18. PAGE 18 FEEDBACK YOUR SUCCESSES We hope that you find both the guidance as well as the template materials contained and referenced within this toolkit to be useful. Please do also keep the Communications and the rest of the UICC team up to date with your local plans and how things are going – we look forward to hearing about all your successes, particularly any media coverage of your World Cancer Day activities. Thank you in advance for your support of World Cancer Day NEXT STEPS • Translate and ‘localise’ materials for your local use • Share copies of the materials (printed or electronic) with friendly local media and other stakeholders • Provide copies of the materials across all appropriate functions within your organisation (communications, marketing, advocacy, etc.) • ‘Localise’ and issue the World Cancer Day press release within your local media market • Host a World Cancer Day event or activity in your home country to highlight the local cancer burden and its contribution to the global cancer epidemic • Update the World Cancer Day global events map www.worldcancerday.org/events-map Please email us your updates at communication@uicc.org www.uicc.org Union for International Cancer Control • Union Internationale Contre le Cancer 62 route de Frontenex • 1207 Geneva • Switzerland Tel. +41 (0)22 809 1811 • Fax +41 (0)22 809 1810 • info@uicc.org

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