Breast Cancer and Breast Health: The Journey from Detection to Survivor

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Breast cancer is one of the most frightening diagnoses a woman can receive. Mary and a panel of survivors discuss the life-saving importance of mammograms, as well as healthy living for survivors and …

Breast cancer is one of the most frightening diagnoses a woman can receive. Mary and a panel of survivors discuss the life-saving importance of mammograms, as well as healthy living for survivors and those affected from detection to survivorship.

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  • 1. Breast Health Mary Haley-Emery, RN Nurse Navigator www.SpringfieldClinic.com
  • 2. Breast Health
    • What is a Nurse Navigator?
      • Someone that assists the patient through the healthcare system from the time of diagnosis to the end of treatment or survivorship
    • I am also responsible for community education regarding breast health
  • 3. Objectives
    • Educate you regarding breast health
    • Educate you regarding mammograms
    • Make a lasting impression regarding why you should get a mammogram
  • 4. Malcolm Knowles
    • What does he have to do with breast health?
    • Nothing, really. He found that effective adult learning works best when certain principles are followed (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2005).
  • 5. Adult Learning Principles
    • Adult Educators state people retain
      • 20% of what they HEAR
  • 6. Adult Learning Principles
    • Adult Educators state people retain
      • 20% of what they HEAR
      • 30% of what they SEE
  • 7. Adult Learning Principles
    • Adult Educators state people retain
      • 20% of what they HEAR
      • 30% of what they SEE
      • 50% of what they SEE and HEAR
  • 8. Adult Learning Principles
    • Adult Educators state people retain
      • 20% of what they HEAR
      • 30% of what they SEE
      • 50% of what they SEE and HEAR
      • 70% of what they SEE, HEAR & SAY
  • 9. Adult Learning Principles
    • Adult Educators state people retain
      • 20% of what they HEAR
      • 30% of what they SEE
      • 50% of what they SEE and HEAR
      • 70% of what they SEE, HEAR & SAY
      • 90% of what they SEE, HEAR, SAY & DO
  • 10.
    • Pay close attention tonight… There may be a quiz later!!
  • 11. Breast Cancer Statistics
    • According to the American Cancer Society there will be:
      • 57,650 cases of in-situ carcinoma and
      • 230,480 cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 2011 ( www.cancer.org ).
  • 12. Ductal Carcinoma in-situ www.breastcancer.org
  • 13.  
  • 14. Invasive Ductal Carcinoma www.Breastcancer.org
  • 15.
    • National Cancer Institute. www.cancer.gov
  • 16. Breast Cancer Statistics
    • The American Cancer Society also states that breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer in women, other than skin cancer.
    • Breast cancer is the 2 nd leading cause of death in women, after lung cancer
  • 17. Breast Cancer Statistics
    • A female’s chance of developing breast cancer are 1 in 8
    • There are currently more than 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States
  • 18. Probability of Developing Breast Cancer
    • Table 5. Age-specific Probabilities of Developing Invasive Female Breast Cancer*
    • The probability of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years is:
    • If current age is … † or 1 in:
    • 20 0.06% 1,760
    • 30 0.44% 229
    • 40 1.44% 69
    • 50 2.39% 42
    • 60 3.40% 29
    • 70 3.73% 27
    • Lifetime risk 12.08% 8
    • *Among those free of cancer at beginning of age interval. Based on cases diagnosed 2004-2006.
    • Percentages and ”1 in” numbers may not be numerically equivalent due to rounding.
    • † Probability derived using NCI DevCan Software, Version 6.4.0.
    • (American Cancer Society, Breast Cancer Facts and Figures, 2009-2010)
  • 19. Risk Factors
    • Risk Factors are divided into 2 categories
      • Those you cannot change
      • Those that are lifestyle choices/changeable
  • 20. Risk Factors
    • Non-changeable
      • Gender
      • Age
      • Inherited gene mutations
      • Family History
      • Race
      • History of Lobular Carcinoma in-situ
      • Menstrual cycle that started before the age of 12 or menopause after the age of 55 (American Cancer Society, 2011)
  • 21. Risk Factors
    • Lifestyle Choices/Changeable
      • Not having children or having them later in life
      • Use of hormone therapy after menopause
      • Not breast feeding
      • Alcohol intake – 2-5 drinks per day may increase the risk 1.5 times compared to women who don’t drink at all
      • Overweight/Obese
      • Lack of exercise (American Cancer Society, 2011)
  • 22. What can You do?
    • Self Breast Exam – perform monthly – choose a date that is easy for you to remember
    • If you do not perform this on a monthly basis then at least be “Aware” of your own body
  • 23. What can You do?
    • Clinical Breast Exam
      • This should be performed by a clinician at least once per year
  • 24. What can You do?
    • GET YOUR MAMMOGRAM!!
      • This should be a yearly screening beginning at the age of 40
      • You may begin mammography before the age of 40 depending on your medical and family history
  • 25. What can You do?
    • Get out and EXERCISE !
      • Engaging in at least 30 minutes of exercise per day may help reduce the risk of breast cancer
      • Exercise should be moderate in intensity… This means you have to sweat!
    (Facts for Life/Healthy Living, 2011. Susan G. Komen Foundation. www.komen.org)
  • 26. What can You do?
    • The American Institute for Cancer Research recommends changes in dietary consumption of certain foods to help reduce your risk of developing breast cancer
  • 27. What can You do?
    • Simple dietary changes can make a healthy impact
      • Consume more fruits, vegetables, whole grains and beans
      • Limit red meat
      • Limit alcohol to one drink per day
      • Don’t use supplements as a substitute for a healthy diet
      • (The American Institute for Cancer Research. Stopping Cancer Series. Questions and answers about breast health and breast cancer. Publication #E7B-QC)
  • 28. What is not a Normal finding?
    • A single lump that is soft or hard
    • A change in the shape of the breast
    • A change in the color or texture of the breast
    • A change in the location or appearance of the nipple
    • Bloody or cloudy discharge
    • Sores on the breast that do not heal
  • 29. A single lump in the breast that is hard or soft
  • 30.  
  • 31. A change in the shape, color or texture of the breast
  • 32. Nipple Retraction
  • 33. Surprise!!
    • What age should you begin getting mammograms and how often?
  • 34.
    • How often should you have a clinical breast exam?
  • 35.
    • What type of drink should be limited to one per day?
  • 36.
    • How many minutes of exercise should you get per day?
  • 37.
    • Name one abnormal finding that would prompt you to seek medical attention?
  • 38.
    • When are you going to schedule your mammogram?
  • 39. MAMMOGRAMS DON’T MISS ONE … NOT EVEN ONCE