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Breast Cancer and Breast Health: The Journey from Detection to Survivor
 

Breast Cancer and Breast Health: The Journey from Detection to Survivor

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Breast cancer is one of the most frightening diagnoses a woman can receive. Mary and a panel of survivors discuss the life-saving importance of mammograms, as well as healthy living for survivors and ...

Breast cancer is one of the most frightening diagnoses a woman can receive. Mary and a panel of survivors discuss the life-saving importance of mammograms, as well as healthy living for survivors and those affected from detection to survivorship.

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    Breast Cancer and Breast Health: The Journey from Detection to Survivor Breast Cancer and Breast Health: The Journey from Detection to Survivor Presentation Transcript

    • Breast Health Mary Haley-Emery, RN Nurse Navigator www.SpringfieldClinic.com
    • Breast Health
      • What is a Nurse Navigator?
        • Someone that assists the patient through the healthcare system from the time of diagnosis to the end of treatment or survivorship
      • I am also responsible for community education regarding breast health
    • Objectives
      • Educate you regarding breast health
      • Educate you regarding mammograms
      • Make a lasting impression regarding why you should get a mammogram
    • Malcolm Knowles
      • What does he have to do with breast health?
      • Nothing, really. He found that effective adult learning works best when certain principles are followed (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2005).
    • Adult Learning Principles
      • Adult Educators state people retain
        • 20% of what they HEAR
    • Adult Learning Principles
      • Adult Educators state people retain
        • 20% of what they HEAR
        • 30% of what they SEE
    • Adult Learning Principles
      • Adult Educators state people retain
        • 20% of what they HEAR
        • 30% of what they SEE
        • 50% of what they SEE and HEAR
    • Adult Learning Principles
      • Adult Educators state people retain
        • 20% of what they HEAR
        • 30% of what they SEE
        • 50% of what they SEE and HEAR
        • 70% of what they SEE, HEAR & SAY
    • Adult Learning Principles
      • Adult Educators state people retain
        • 20% of what they HEAR
        • 30% of what they SEE
        • 50% of what they SEE and HEAR
        • 70% of what they SEE, HEAR & SAY
        • 90% of what they SEE, HEAR, SAY & DO
      • Pay close attention tonight… There may be a quiz later!!
    • Breast Cancer Statistics
      • According to the American Cancer Society there will be:
        • 57,650 cases of in-situ carcinoma and
        • 230,480 cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 2011 ( www.cancer.org ).
    • Ductal Carcinoma in-situ www.breastcancer.org
    •  
    • Invasive Ductal Carcinoma www.Breastcancer.org
      • National Cancer Institute. www.cancer.gov
    • Breast Cancer Statistics
      • The American Cancer Society also states that breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer in women, other than skin cancer.
      • Breast cancer is the 2 nd leading cause of death in women, after lung cancer
    • Breast Cancer Statistics
      • A female’s chance of developing breast cancer are 1 in 8
      • There are currently more than 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States
    • Probability of Developing Breast Cancer
      • Table 5. Age-specific Probabilities of Developing Invasive Female Breast Cancer*
      • The probability of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years is:
      • If current age is … † or 1 in:
      • 20 0.06% 1,760
      • 30 0.44% 229
      • 40 1.44% 69
      • 50 2.39% 42
      • 60 3.40% 29
      • 70 3.73% 27
      • Lifetime risk 12.08% 8
      • *Among those free of cancer at beginning of age interval. Based on cases diagnosed 2004-2006.
      • Percentages and ”1 in” numbers may not be numerically equivalent due to rounding.
      • † Probability derived using NCI DevCan Software, Version 6.4.0.
      • (American Cancer Society, Breast Cancer Facts and Figures, 2009-2010)
    • Risk Factors
      • Risk Factors are divided into 2 categories
        • Those you cannot change
        • Those that are lifestyle choices/changeable
    • Risk Factors
      • Non-changeable
        • Gender
        • Age
        • Inherited gene mutations
        • Family History
        • Race
        • History of Lobular Carcinoma in-situ
        • Menstrual cycle that started before the age of 12 or menopause after the age of 55 (American Cancer Society, 2011)
    • Risk Factors
      • Lifestyle Choices/Changeable
        • Not having children or having them later in life
        • Use of hormone therapy after menopause
        • Not breast feeding
        • Alcohol intake – 2-5 drinks per day may increase the risk 1.5 times compared to women who don’t drink at all
        • Overweight/Obese
        • Lack of exercise (American Cancer Society, 2011)
    • What can You do?
      • Self Breast Exam – perform monthly – choose a date that is easy for you to remember
      • If you do not perform this on a monthly basis then at least be “Aware” of your own body
    • What can You do?
      • Clinical Breast Exam
        • This should be performed by a clinician at least once per year
    • What can You do?
      • GET YOUR MAMMOGRAM!!
        • This should be a yearly screening beginning at the age of 40
        • You may begin mammography before the age of 40 depending on your medical and family history
    • What can You do?
      • Get out and EXERCISE !
        • Engaging in at least 30 minutes of exercise per day may help reduce the risk of breast cancer
        • Exercise should be moderate in intensity… This means you have to sweat!
      (Facts for Life/Healthy Living, 2011. Susan G. Komen Foundation. www.komen.org)
    • What can You do?
      • The American Institute for Cancer Research recommends changes in dietary consumption of certain foods to help reduce your risk of developing breast cancer
    • What can You do?
      • Simple dietary changes can make a healthy impact
        • Consume more fruits, vegetables, whole grains and beans
        • Limit red meat
        • Limit alcohol to one drink per day
        • Don’t use supplements as a substitute for a healthy diet
        • (The American Institute for Cancer Research. Stopping Cancer Series. Questions and answers about breast health and breast cancer. Publication #E7B-QC)
    • What is not a Normal finding?
      • A single lump that is soft or hard
      • A change in the shape of the breast
      • A change in the color or texture of the breast
      • A change in the location or appearance of the nipple
      • Bloody or cloudy discharge
      • Sores on the breast that do not heal
    • A single lump in the breast that is hard or soft
    •  
    • A change in the shape, color or texture of the breast
    • Nipple Retraction
    • Surprise!!
      • What age should you begin getting mammograms and how often?
      • How often should you have a clinical breast exam?
      • What type of drink should be limited to one per day?
      • How many minutes of exercise should you get per day?
      • Name one abnormal finding that would prompt you to seek medical attention?
      • When are you going to schedule your mammogram?
    • MAMMOGRAMS DON’T MISS ONE … NOT EVEN ONCE