Testing for aerobic capacity

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Maximal incremental tests might not be the best solution to monitor changes in performance after high-volume, low-intensity training period as a rower spends only 20-30% of the time during the incremental tests at low intensities.

Therefore, if a training period was intended to stress the low intensity energy systems then the measurement validity would be higher if we test the athlete using similar intensities.

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Testing for aerobic capacity

  1. 1.  Training planning and analysis tips 195 175  Applicable bits of rowing research Heart rate  Rowing technique videos 10 8 155 6 135 4 115 95 2 75 0 60% 70% 80% Preparatory HR Jarek Mäestu Sports Scientist (PhD), Ex rower and rowing coach, Rowing Academy Scientist Precomp HR Comp HR Preparatory LA Precomp LA Comp La Lactate SPORTLYZER ROWING ACADEMY TESTING FOR AEROBIC CAPACITY
  2. 2. Maximal incremental tests might not be the best solution to monitor changes in performance after high-volume, low-intensity training period as a rower spends only 2030% of the time during the incremental tests at low intensities. Still, lots of coaches use maximal incremental tests to test the performance of the athlete. Therefore, if a training period was intended to stress the low intensity energy systems then the measurement validity would be higher if we test the athlete using similar intensities. Aerobic training has increased in recent decades in elite rowers and is the most important type of training for them (Figure 1). Figure 1. Changes in the distribution of training volume (h/week) between low intensity trainings and high intensive trainings from 70s to 90s in elite Norwegian rowers (Fiskerstrand & Seiler, 2004). SPORTLYZER ROWING ACADEMY
  3. 3. The US national team, for example, has used different submaximal intensities for tracking physiological changes in rowers during the annual training (Figure 2). The results clearly show an improved lactate/workload relationship when the competition period advances. Those constant submaximal intensity tests also give feedback about the capacity at a certain workload. This is difficult to measure during incremental tests where we can only measure different parameters at a certain intensity but we do not know how long we are able to sustain the certain workload. 8 155 6 135 4 115 95 2 75 Lactate 10 175 Heart rate 195 0 60% 70% 80% Preparatory HR Precomp HR Comp HR Preparatory LA Precomp LA Comp La Figure 2. Changes of lactate and heart rate values in US male rowers throughout the annual training year (Hagerman, 2000) SPORTLYZER ROWING ACADEMY
  4. 4. Biochemical testing during training intensity conditions should be preferred instead of fasting (at rest) hormone test when studying biochemical adaptation of the low intensity training. Rämson et al. (2009) indicated no change in fasting hormone concentrations while a decrease in post-exercise concentrations of testosterone and cortisol were seen. Cortisol (ng/ml) 350 300 250 Normal High load 200 Recovery Testosterone (ng/ml) 150 17 16.5 16 15.5 15 14.5 14 13.5 Pretest Post-test 30´recovery Normal High load Recovery Pretest Post-test 30´recovery Figure 3. Fasting hormone changes (left panel) compared to exercise induced changes in male rowers during high volume trainings and the following recovery period (Rämson et al. 2009). SPORTLYZER ROWING ACADEMY
  5. 5. Conclusions The validity of the performance test is higher if targeted to the same energy system or capacity that was used during the trainings. So, when training aerobic capacity, tests specific to that intensity should be used. References • • • Fiskerstrand A, Seiler KS. Training and performance characteristics among Norwegian international rowers. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports 2004; 14: 303-310. Hagerman FC. The physiology of competitive rowing. In: W. Garrett Jr., DT Kirkendall, editors. Exercise and Sport Science. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Philadelphia 2000; 843-873. Rämson R, Jürimäe J, Jürimäe T, Mäestu J. Behaviour of testosterone and cortisol during an intensity controlled high volume training period measured by a training task-specific test in male rowers. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 2009; 23: 645-651. SPORTLYZER ROWING ACADEMY
  6. 6. Hey, before you go! Please Tweet, Like, +1 and share this presentation if you found it helpful or entertaining. Next slide: learn more about the Rowing Academy SPORTLYZER ROWING ACADEMY
  7. 7. More related reading • • • Metabolic requirements for energy in rowing (whitepaper) Energy system contribution in 2000m rowing (research) Testing for maximal aerobic power (whitepaper) Sportlyzer Rowing Academy Sportlyzer Rowing Academy is No 1 source for rowing coaches looking for inspiration and ideas to: • • • make training plans more effective plan and analyze athletes' progress better learn from other coaches' experience Discover more

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