Warwickshire Observatory Mosaic Seminar 2012

1,393 views
1,284 views

Published on

Presentation by Warwickshire Observatory to WCC colleagues, raising awareness of the Mosaic dataset and promoting its use across the organisation to help better understand our customers.

Published in: Technology, Art & Photos
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,393
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
843
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Warwickshire Observatory Mosaic Seminar 2012

  1. 1. Mosaic Seminar23 May 2012
  2. 2. Programme• What is Mosaic?• Tell-us-a-postcode exercise• Warwickshire’s Mosaic Profile• Applying Mosaic• Case Study: One Front Door• Further scenarios• Discussion – how can Mosaic help you?• Moving forward
  3. 3. What is Mosaic?
  4. 4. What is Mosaic? “Mosaic Public Sector is the UKs only classification designed specifically for use by the public sector and focuses on the needs of citizens. It provides a detailed and accurate understanding of each citizens location, their demographics, lifestyles and behaviours.” Experian
  5. 5. What is Mosaic? • Household classification system • 440 datasets • 15 Groups • 69 Types • All unique characteristics healthtype of property attitudes demographicsperception of safety hobbies / interests household composition education channel preferences deprivation / income ethnicity
  6. 6. What is Mosaic?Mosaic Groups A Residents of isolated rural communities B Residents of small and mid-sized towns with strong local roots C Wealthy people living in the most sought after neighbourhoods D Successful professionals living in suburban or semi-rural homes E Middle income families living in moderate suburban semis F Couples with young children in comfortable modern housing G Young, well-educated city dwellers H Couples and young singles in small modern starter homes I Lower income workers in urban terraces in often diverse areas J Owner occupiers in older-style housing in ex-industrial areas K Residents with sufficient incomes in right-to-buy social houses L Active elderly people living in pleasant retirement locations M Elderly people reliant on state support N Young people renting flats in high density social housing O Families in low-rise social housing with high levels of benefit need
  7. 7. What is Mosaic?Mosaic Groups & Types A Residents of isolated rural communities A01 - Rural families with high incomes, often from city jobs A02 - Retirees electing to settle in environmentally attractive localities A03 - Remote communities with poor access to public and commercial services A04 - Villagers with few well paid alternatives to agricultural employment
  8. 8. What is Mosaic?Mosaic Groups & Types M Elderly people reliant on state support M57 - Old people in flats subsisting on welfare payments
  9. 9. What is Mosaic?M57 - Old people in flats subsisting on welfare payments
  10. 10. What is Mosaic?Resources• Pen Portraits• Descriptions• Grand Index• Interactive Guide• Observatory summaries• iCoder
  11. 11. Tell-us-a-Postcode
  12. 12. Tell-us-a-postcode• Look at individual postcodes around Warwickshire to see how Mosaic categorises them• Does it fit with expectations/knowledge of the area?
  13. 13. Tell-us-a-postcode• Postcodes can vary significantly
  14. 14. CV11 4BH (near Nuneaton library)
  15. 15. CV11 4BH (near Nuneaton library)
  16. 16. CV32 4NN (Regent St, Leamington Spa)
  17. 17. CV32 4NN (Regent St, Leamington Spa)
  18. 18. CV34 6GB (Warwick Gates)
  19. 19. CV34 6GB (Warwick Gates)
  20. 20. CV33 9TR (Lighthorne Heath)
  21. 21. CV33 9TR (Lighthorne Heath)
  22. 22. CV47 2UR (Temple Herdewyke)
  23. 23. CV47 2UR (Temple Herdewyke)
  24. 24. Warwickshire’s Mosaic Profile
  25. 25. Warwickshire’s Mosaic Profile• In 2011…• 237,900 households• Largest Group = D (14.6%)• Smallest Group = N (1.7%)• 68 of the 69 Types
  26. 26. Warwickshire’s Mosaic ProfileMosaic Groups in Warwickshire
  27. 27. Warwickshire’s Mosaic Profile Variations across the countyNuneaton & Bedworth Stratford-on-Avon
  28. 28. Warwickshire’s Mosaic Profile A B CSuper Output Areas D E F G H I J
  29. 29. Warwickshire’s Mosaic Profile
  30. 30. Warwickshire’s Mosaic ProfileGroup Profiles for Warwickshire• http://bit.ly/MosaicProfiles
  31. 31. Applying Mosaic
  32. 32. Applying Mosaic• Profiling customers• Identifying need• Understanding broader characteristics• Examining channel preferences
  33. 33. Applying MosaicProfiling customers• You know who your (current) customers are• Perhaps all you know is that they access your service• Turn your admin records into intelligence• What about… iCoder – Channel preferences – Their health, economic status, interests, perceptions and attitudes – Other services of interest
  34. 34. Applying MosaicIdentifying need• You want your service to reach certain communities of need• But who are they, where are they and what are their characteristics? – In which communities are they concentrated? – What is the best way to engage with these potential service users? – What else can we learn about these households?
  35. 35. Applying Mosaic Example: Accidental Dwelling Fires • F&R priority to reduce ADFs 5x 5 00 4x 4 00 3x 3 00 2x 2 00Average 1 00 No risk 0 A B C D E F G H I J K Mosaic Group (note: old version of Mosaic)
  36. 36. Applying Mosaic Volume or risk? VOLUME RISK D&B groups F, G & I 29% % of all ADFs 29% 31% % of all households 8%(note: uses old version of Mosaic)
  37. 37. Applying Mosaic Where? Group F - Clarendon, Brunswick, Newbold, Crown Group G - Camp Hill, Bar Pool, Wem Brook, Kingswood Group I - Newbold, Wem Brook, Bede, Caldecott(note: uses old version of Mosaic)
  38. 38. Applying Mosaic Who? The types of households that are most likely to experience ADFs are also the types of households that are most likely to have the following characteristics…smokers purpose built flats single person dwellings claim benefits / have low incomes / be unemployed public rented dwellings betting and bingo poor general health mental health issues sleep lots and watch TV high levels of debt / CCJs
  39. 39. Applying Mosaic Who? 4 00 Social Housing 3 5 0 3 00 Social housing 2 5 0 2 00 1 5 0 1 00 5 0 0 0 1 00 2 00 3 00 4 00 5 00 6 00 ADFs(note: uses old version of Mosaic)
  40. 40. Applying Mosaic Who? 3 00 Chronic liver disease / Cirrhosis Chronic liver disease / cirrhosis 2 5 0 2 00 1 5 0 1 00 5 0 0 0 1 00 2 00 3 00 4 00 5 00 6 00 ADFs(note: uses old version of Mosaic)
  41. 41. Applying MosaicHow?
  42. 42. Applying Mosaic How? 2 5 0 Shopping at Farmfoods 2 00 Shop at Farmfoods 1 5 0 1 00 5 0 0 0 1 00 2 00 3 00 4 00 5 00 6 00 ADFs(note: uses old version of Mosaic)
  43. 43. Applying Mosaic How? 2 5 0 Likelihood of having no bank account 2 00 No bank account 1 5 0 1 00 5 0 0 0 1 00 2 00 3 00 4 00 5 00 6 00 ADFs(note: uses old version of Mosaic)
  44. 44. Applying Mosaic How? Betting & Bingo 2 5 0 2 00 1 8 0 2 00 1 6 0 1 4 0 1 5 0 1 2 0 Betting Bingo 1 00 1 00 8 0 6 0 4 0 5 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 00 2 00 3 00 4 00 5 00 6 00 0 1 00 2 00 3 00 4 00 5 00 6 00 ADFs ADFs(note: uses old version of Mosaic)
  45. 45. Other examples…• Plotting a route for the ‘Branch Out Bus’ (BOB)• Identifying new ‘No Rogue Trader’ Zones• Exploring variations in school attainment• Improving the take-up of free school meals• Understanding drug treatment clients• Alcohol-related hospital admissions• Improving confidence in the police• Engaging with flood zone households
  46. 46. Case Study: One Front DoorJohn Crossling
  47. 47. Case Study: One Front Door• Taking key services to those in need• Contribute to reducing inequalities• Identify communities of need• Identify what they need• Determine the most efficient and effective ways to meet these needs
  48. 48. • First, identified all relevant properties - One Front Door WCC and potential partners
  49. 49. Case Study: One Front Door• What do we know about our customers?• Where do they come from?• How do they contact us?• What services do they use?
  50. 50. One Front Door
  51. 51. • Where are our customers? One Front Door
  52. 52. • Who do we target? One Front Door
  53. 53. • Where are our customers that prefer One Front Door face to face service delivery?
  54. 54. • Where are those in greatest need? One Front Door
  55. 55. • Where are those in greatest need? One Front Door
  56. 56. • Where are those in greatest need? One Front Door
  57. 57. • Where are those who prefer F2F? One Front Door
  58. 58. • Where are specific customer types? One Front Door
  59. 59. One Front DoorBenefits of this approach• This research… – Indicates target concentrations – Identifies typical issues/needs – Suggests communication techniques – Indicates key partners – Targets service points – Suggests properties for rationalisation – Let’s look at Lillington…
  60. 60. One Front Door
  61. 61. One Front Door
  62. 62. One Front Door
  63. 63. One Front DoorWhat next?• Identify what is being delivered – by who and how?• Not just fixed service delivery eg mobile libraries• Get partners on board – agree principles of co- location; shared service delivery; shared costs; shared efficiency savings• Get community on board – consult and involve; use appropriate communication; locality fora; volunteers- “Big Society”• Work together to develop new ways of delivering services – Community Information Points are one possible approach
  64. 64. One Front DoorMeasuring success• If we get this right we will… – Take right services to the right people – Raise profile and improve perception – Address inequalities – develop communities – help them migrate to other access channels – Foster closer working relationships between partners
  65. 65. Coffee
  66. 66. Further Scenarios
  67. 67. Further Scenarios• WOMBAT – using WCC’s mapping system to examine Mosaic• Tackling child poverty• Identifying need for Children’s Centres• Positioning Local Centres / Satellites• Targeted Community Forum engagement• Informing property rationalisation• Finding ‘big society’ hotspots• Shaping high speed broadband provision
  68. 68. Discussion
  69. 69. Discussion – how can Mosaic help you?• Work in groups of about 4 people• Use the sheet to guide discussion• Share some ideas for using Mosaic in your areas of work
  70. 70. Moving Forward
  71. 71. Moving forward• Share today’s material including ideas• Yammer Group?• Workshops, drop-in sessions?• What do you need?
  72. 72. Further InformationExperian Webpage > http://bit.ly/mosaic_ps Brochure > http://bit.ly/mosaic_ps_brochure Knowledge Base > www.publicsectorknowledgebase.co.uk Case studies > http://bit.ly/mosaic_egs Fact sheets > http://bit.ly/mosaic_facts Log-in requiredObservatory Our profiles > http://bit.ly/MosaicProfiles Our case studies > http://bit.ly/obs_mosaic Contact us > research@warwickshire.gov.uk

×