Speaking Phrases Boricua: Puerto Rican Sayings (Book Preview)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Speaking Phrases Boricua: Puerto Rican Sayings (Book Preview)

on

  • 2,526 views

This is the "Speaking Phrases Boricua: A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico" book preview by Jared Romey: http://www.speakinglatino.com/speaking-phrases-boricua/ ...

This is the "Speaking Phrases Boricua: A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico" book preview by Jared Romey: http://www.speakinglatino.com/speaking-phrases-boricua/

SPEAKING PHRASES BORICUA BOOK DESCRIPTION:
This follow-up to the Puerto Rican Spanish bestseller, Speaking Boricua, collects the unique Puerto Rican sayings that are passed down from generation to generation. Whether you are looking to share your life's wisdom with Island friends, trying to get a chuckle from colleagues or just want to better understand Puerto Ricans, Speaking Phrases Boricua offers both English and Spanish versions for these wisdoms.

Hundreds of them are translated literally into English, explained and, when available, paired with an English equivalent. Here are a few samples:


· In English something extremely white may be said to be as paler as snow, in Puerto Rican Spanish you can say whiter than a nun's butt-cheek, or más jincho que nalga de monja.
· La gallina vieja da buen caldo, or the old hen makes good broth is a form of saying that a woman's older age does not mean she has lost her touch.
· In English you say make a mountain out of a mole hill, to blow

something out of proportion. The Puerto Rican equivalent is ahogarse en un vaso de agua, or to drown in a glass of water.

Speaking Phrases Boricua continues the tradition of Speaking Boricua by using humor to illustrate phrases and their meanings. There is even an index of English sayings with Puerto Rican equivalents.

This book will bring you even closer to understanding Puerto Rican vocabulary and phrases for your conversations as you become more fluent in Puerto Rican Spanish.

============

Website: http://www.SpeakingLatino.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/speakinglatino
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/speakinglatino
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/speakinglatino
Google +: http://google.com/+SpeakingLatino
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/SpeakingLatino
Tumblr: http://speakinglatino.tumblr.com/

============


Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,526
Views on SlideShare
1,609
Embed Views
917

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
14
Comments
0

3 Embeds 917

http://www.speakinglatino.com 913
http://www.google.com 2
https://sharklearn.nova.edu 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Speaking Phrases Boricua: Puerto Rican Sayings (Book Preview) Speaking Phrases Boricua: Puerto Rican Sayings (Book Preview) Document Transcript

  • v The process of my learning Spanish started in the sixth grade and has continued ever since. I’d like to thank Ms. Gray, Charlezetta, Ms. McPherson, my professor at St. Mary’s, Patricia, the staffs at the University of South Carolina and El Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey in Guadalajara and Bernardo for their perseverance. Mi proceso de aprender el español empezó en sexto grado y ha continuado desde ese momento. Me gustaría agradecer a Srta. Gray, Charlezetta, Srta McPherson, mi profesor en St. Mary’s, Patricia, las facultades de la Universidad de South Carolina y del Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey en Guadalajara y Bernardo por su perseverancia.
  • vii Table of Contents Introduction/Introducción.............................................. ix Acknowledgements/Reconocimientos.......................xviii How to Use this Guide/Cómo Usar Esta Guía................ 1 Wisdom Boricua/Sabiduría Boricua Puerto Rican to English...................................... 5 Puertorriqueño a Español................................ 125 Index/Índice English Sayings with Spanish Equivalent/Refranes en inglés con su equivalente en español.......................... 133 Key Words/Palabras Claves............................ 153 Bibliography/Bibliografía........................................... 211
  • ix Introduction While you may see this book as one on language, to me it is also about travel…not travel in the traditional travel-guide sense of who, what, when, where, or how. This book touches on the WHY. You may wonder how a book about common sayings can be related to the WHYof travel. In preparing this guide I’ve learned about the history of Puerto Rico, the problems facing Puerto Ricans, Puerto Rican culture, the language and I’ve also learned to see my own culture differently. In my experience, language opens the mind to new points of view, teaches a person about culture (both their own and the “foreign” culture) and just, generally, creates new experiences for the traveler. These sayings have the same effect. To further explain the WHY I have turned to the help of several people. You will see their words on the inside flaps of the cover. Given that I am a somewhat inexpressive person (I’ve even occasionally been accused of being cold!), I found that they explained in amazing clarity what I could not.
  • A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Ricox One of my favorites is from Johan Huizinga, a Dutch historian who lived from 1872 to 1945. “The things which can make life enjoyable remain the same. They are, now as before, reading, music, fine arts, travel, the enjoyment of nature, sports, fashion, social vanity (knightly orders, honorary office, gatherings) and the intoxication of the senses.” This was written in 1921 and almost a century later is still a wonderfully applicable phrase. I can almost even forgive him for leaving out wine. One of the things that most surprised me about Puerto Rico is the presence of regional differences in the language. For a country that is 100 by 35 miles I find it entertaining that with a 30 minute car ride you can find words with different meanings or sayings that “city folk” just don’t get. As I write this I realize that the same is probably true for most other places, but it just seems to be more noticeable here. One day I had a friend come up to me and say “I think your definition of X word is wrong. It should say…”, referring to an entry in my first book, Speaking Boricua! Fortunately two other people were standing nearby and came over. What followed was a humorous debate among the three of them (all Puerto Ricans).
  • Speaking PHRASES Boricua! xi Three people that grew up less than 60 miles from each other had differing opinions on the meaning of a word. For me this was an entertaining experience, highlighting the amorphous nature of language. As an author perhaps my greatest pleasure is to hear people comment that my book made them laugh. In fact, the comments readers made referring to my first book pushed me to publish this one. I thank those people and look forward to hearing from them again. I hope this helps you understand WHY. August 2005 San Juan
  • 1 How to Use This Guide Most of the sayings in this book are written based on the grammatically correct way, and not based on how they are pronounced. In some situations the pronounced version may be significantly different from how it is written. If you cannot find the saying in this guide and you think it is because of the pronunciation, I would suggest either asking someone about the saying or use the index to look for other key words within the saying. The following symbols are located before a saying’s entry and are to help make the guide a bit easier to enjoy (NOTE: The symbol may apply to only one definition for sayings with more than one definition). The symbols are: Commonly used sayings Sayings that may not be acceptable in some circumstances, including expletives, insults, crude or politically incorrect words. Sayings that are the same or similar in English and Spanish. H M E
  • A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico2 Each entry follows this format: j Symbol (if necessary) k Saying in Spanish l Literal Translation into English m Definition in English n Similar sayings in Spanish (if any exist) o Equivalent or similar saying (if one exists) in English j H k Cuando el río, suena agua lleva. l L: When the river sounds, it carried water m D: There must be some truth to the rumor. Used in response... n S: Cuando el río suena, es porque algo trae. o E: Where there’s smoke, there’s fire
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent 5 Wisdom Boricua: Puerto Rican to English A E A caballo regalado no se le mira el colmillo L: A horse given as a gift, do not look at its eye teeth D: Don’t look for the faults in a gift, just be happy that you received something and accept it for what it is S: None E: Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth A cada guaraguao le llega su pitirre L: For each hawk his pitirre arrives D: The pitirre is a small bird that attacks specifically the guaraguao, a large hawk. The implication of the phrase is that just because someone is physically large does not mean that he/she will automatically dominate over someone much smaller E: Brains over brawn A cada lechón le llega su San Martín L: To each suckling pig, his Saint Martin arrives D: The belief that, although a person that deserves punishment has not received it, eventually he will be punished. S: A cada puerco le llega su sábado E: He’ll get his, He’ll get what’s coming to him, He’ll get what he deserves, His time will come
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico6 H A cada puerco le llega su sábado L: To each pig, his Saturday arrives D: Sooner or later whoever does something wrong will be caught S: A cada santo le llega su día, a cada lechón le llega su San Martín E: He’ll get his, He’ll get what’s coming to him, He’ll get what he deserves, His time will come H A cada santo le llega su día [hora] L: To each saint, his day [hour] arrives D: Anyone’s good deeds will be recognized eventually, if at no other time, than when the person faces their Creator E: His time will come A cada santo su vela L: To each saint his candle D: Recognizes the positive acts of people that deserve recognition E: His time will come A cualquiera se le muere un tío L: To anyone an uncle dies D: Refers to commonplace occurrences that happen to everyone E: It can happen to the best of us A Dios rogando y con el mazo dando L: To God begging and with the mallet going at it D: To keep at something. It is fine to ask for God’s help, but one must keep working so that the project moves forward A ése no lo salvan ni las once mil vírgenes L: That one cannot be saved even by the eleven thousand virgins D: To be beyond saving, either in a medical sense or in the sense that someone is so bad, there is no way to pull him out of it. H A falta de pan, galleta L: At the lack of bread, crackers.
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent Speaking PHRASES Boricua! 7 D: When one thing is not available, one must make do with something else E: Make do with what you’ve got A grandes males, grandes remedios L: For grand bads, grand remedies D: When you are confronted with large problems, just make sure that you have everything organized and in place to fix it. If it’s a big problem, don’t come with some small idea to patch over the situation. Make sure your solution will eliminate the problem A la corta o a la larga con el tiempo todo se alcanza L: In the short or in the long, with time everything is reachable D: Sooner or later problems or difficulties can be overcome or resolved A la larga todo se sabe L: In the long run, everything is known D: Sooner or later everything is revealed E: Everything eventually comes to light A la tierra que fueres haz lo que vieres L: In whichever land you are, do what you see. D: When you are visiting an unknown place, just copy what the locals are doing, and you will fit in fine S: Si a Roma fueras, haz lo que vieras, ¿Dónde va Vicente? Donde va la gente E: When in Rome, do as the Romans H A las millas de Chaflán L: To the miles of Chaflán D: Extremely fast A lo hecho pecho L: What is done, chest D: If you made a mistake you must confront it and resolve the situation E: Own up to one’s mistakes H A mal tiempo, buena cara L: At a bad time, good face D: When things do not come out as planned you must remain
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico8 calm to face the situation A mala hora no ladra el perro L: At a bad time the dog does not bark D: In spite of all the preparations and precautions taken something unexpected always happens, the one thing you never planned for is the one thing that happens MA mi plin y a la madama dulce de coco L: I couldn’t care less and for the madame coconut candy D: Who cares, I don’t care E: I couldn’t give a hoot, I couldn’t give a rat’s ass, I don’t give a shit H A otro perro con ese hueso L: Another dog with that bone D: Used when someone is lying to you, for example, the homeless person that says he needs money for food when everyone knows he really wants it for booze S: No me vengas con ese cuento E: I’ve heard that story before A palabras necias, oídos sordos L: For foolish words, deaf ears D: If you are going to say stupid or foolish things, I am not interested in listening E: To go in one ear and out the other H A quien Dios no le da hijos el diablo le da sobrinos L: To whom God does not give children, the devil gives nieces and nephews D: For the people that do not have kids, they still often share the same problems and pleasures that parents do, through their nieces, nephews or other children that are close to them M¿A quién le amarga un dulce? L: Who is soured by a candy? D: Smart aleck answer to any type of dumb question when the answer is obvious. E: Does a bear shit in the woods?, Does the pope wear a hat? H A rey muerto, rey puesto
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent Speaking PHRASES Boricua! 9 L: King dead, king placed D: Phrase meaning that someone, after passing away or leaving, is quickly replaced. For example a widow that quickly finds another partner to maintain him/her. Also implies that the person is taking advantage of the situation. H A río revuelto, ganancia de pescadores L: Churned up river, benefit of fishermen D: During times of uncertainty, there are still opportunities to be had A su tiempo maduran las uvas L: In their own time mature the grapes D: Good things take time to develop, be patient E: Good things come to those who wait A ver si es verdad que el gas pela L: Let’s see if it is true that gas peels D: Let’s find out if what you A río revuelto, ganancia de pescadores say is really true. Apparently at some point, people found out that gasoline can remove your skin after prolonged contact Admisión de delito, relevo de prueba L: Admission of guilt, release of proof D: Once you admit to
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico10 something, there is no further need to prove it. Also, if for example, you are caught in the same room where a vase just broke, it is obvious that you are the person that broke it E: Guilt by association Agua pasada no mueve molino L: Past water moves no windmill D: Forget about the past and focus on the present E: Water under the bridge Agua que no has de beber, déjala correr L: Water that you have not drunk, let it run D: Do not get involved in situations that do not affect you E: Don’t stick your nose where it does not belong Ahí sí hay mucha tela de donde cortar L: Here there is a lot of cloth from where to cut D: A topic of much interest, a subject with a wide range of possibilities to discuss Ahogarse en un vaso de agua L: To drown oneself in a glass of water D: To over-worry about simple things E: To make a mountain out of a molehill Ahorcarse con su propia soga L: Hang oneself with one’s own rope D: To suffer the consequences of a problem that was created by oneself E: You’ve made your bed, now lie in it Al mal paso, darle prisa L: At a bad step, hurry it up D: When facing a difficult situation, try all the alternatives or solutions as quickly as possible H Al mejor cazador se le va la liebre L: From the best hunter, the hare gets away
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent Speaking PHRASES Boricua! 11 D: Even the experts or best people make mistakes sometimes E: Everyone makes mistakes, It happens to the best of them H Al pan, pan y al vino, vino L: For bread, bread and for wine, wine D: Tells someone to speak directly without engaging in flowery conversation E: Cut to the chase, Get to the point, Call a spade a spade, Don’t talk in circles H Al perro flaco, todas las pulgas le caen L: To the thin dog, all the fleas fall D: The same people always have all the problems in life, someone with one problem often has lots of other problems piled on E: When it rains, it pours Al que a buen árbol se arrima, buena sombra le cobija L: He who draws close to a good tree, good shade will cover D: Working with good or positive people can rub off Al que Dios se lo da, que San Pedro se lo bendiga L: For whom God gives it, San Pedro should bless it D: Used by a less fortunate person (referring to looks or money) about someone that is better off, and means that the more fortunate person is lucky and should enjoy what they have Al que le caiga el sello [sayo] que se lo ponga L: To whom the seal [smock] falls, put it on D: Used when someone wants to identify a negative action without identifying the person committing it. For example, mentioning that whoever stole the chocolate bar from your desk should return it E: If the shoe fits, wear it Al que madruga, Dios lo ayuda L: He who rises early, God will help. D: Advice that he who arises early will be rewarded
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico12 E: The early bird catches the worm H Al que no le gusta el caldo, le dan tres tazas L: He who does not like the broth is given 3 cups D: If you do not like something you can be sure you will get a lot of it Al son que le toquen, bailan L: For whatever beat one gets, dance D: A person responds in a similar manner to how he/she is treated H Alábate pollo que mañana te guisan L: Praise yourself chicken for tomorrow they stew you D: This phrase is often used for a self-centered or stuck-up person. The meaning is that the person will get what he deserves E: To get what’s coming to you Allá ellos que son blancos y se entienden L: There they are whites and they understand each other D: A sarcastic phrase saying “I don’t belong, but I don’t care” often used by people who are poor and are looking at rich people Allá Marta con sus pollos L: There Marta [Martha] with her chickens D: Who cares what she is doing? E: I couldn’t care less Amigo, de cien uno y de mil ninguno L: Friend of a hundred, one and of a thousand none D: Really close, trustworthy friends are extremely hard to come by Amigo en la adversidad es un amigo de verdad L: A friend in adversity is a true friend D:Areal friend is one that stands by you, even in bad times E: A friend in need is a friend indeed
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent Speaking PHRASES Boricua! 13 Amigo es un peso en el bolsillo L: Friend is a weight in the pocket E: Friends can sometimes bring problems Amigo mío que nos perdemos, tú para más y yo para menos E: My friend that we lose each other, you for more and I for less D: Let’s break things off, since in everything but name, our relationship is already over (generally refers to partners or friends) Amor con amor se paga L: Love with love is paid D: You can achieve more by being nice to people than being rude E: You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar MAmor de lejos, amor de pendejos L: Love from afar, love of idiots D: Long distance relationships are a bad idea. You shouldn’t trust your partner from afar Antes de que te cases mira lo que haces L: Before you marry look at what you are doing D: Make sure you are aware of what you’re doing before making an important decision like getting married H Aparecer hasta en la sopa L: Appear even in the soup D: To be everywhere, all over the place Aprende a nadar y guardar la ropa L: Learn to swim and guard the clothing D: Always be sure to keep something to yourself. It is best to be reserved in one’s personal affairs Aquí paz y en el cielo gloria L: Here peace and in Heaven glory D: To put an end to an argument or feud and to begin a new stage in the relationship, to start anew
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico14 E: Wipe the slate clean, Start afresh HMArroz, que carne hay L: Rice, what meat there is D: Comment made when you see a hot chick in reference to her body H Aterriza que no hay tocón L: Land for there is no stump D: This is a goofy phrase used when someone stumbles, but there was nothing in their way or on the ground to cause their stumble. They just stumbled for no reason Ay Dios, mándame más si más me merezco L: Oh God, send me more if more I deserve D: Phrase that expresses resignation to the negative things that are happening in a person’s life Ayúdate que Dios te ayudará L: Help yourself that God help you D: A person that works to overcome his own problems will be helped along by God. This implies that a person that sits around and waits for solutions to be handed to them by others, will not be in God’s good graces S: Dios dice ayúdate que yo te ayudaré E: God helps those who help themselves B Barco grande, ande o no ande L: Large ship, working or not D: Means that someone is attracted by the size or quantity of something but ignores the quality of the item or its ability to function Barco que no anda no llega a puerto L: Ship that does not work does not arrive to port D: You will never achieve your objective if you don’t take steps towards it E: A journey of a thousand miles begins with one step
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent Speaking PHRASES Boricua! 15 H Buscar las cinco patas al gato L: Look for the five paws of the cat D: 1. Attempt to solve an insolvable situation, 2. To waste time looking for something that does not exist Barriga llena, corazón contento L: Tummy full, heart content D: By having fulfilled a need, a person enters a period of happiness Bien predica, quien bien vive L: Preaches well, who lives well D: A person that lives a healthy life preaches simply by his acts. In other words if the person is a good example to others, there is no need to go out and talk about it, others will see how he lives E: Practice what you preach Borrón y cuenta nueva L: Erased and new account D: To forget about everything bad in the past, and to get a fresh start E: Start from scratch, Let bygones be bygones, Wipe the slate clean Buscar las cinco patas al gato
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico16 C E Cada cual a lo suyo L: Each one to his own D: Everybody is different. Each person has unique preferences, tastes and needs E: To each his own, Different strokes for different folks Cada cual cuenta de la feria como le va en ella L: Each one tells of the fair how it goes for him D: Each person’s opinion of something depends on how well or poorly they did. For example, one merchant might think that the economy is really bad because his sales are low, but the other, who sells a lot, thinks that the economy is growing strongly Cada cual sabe de la pata que cojea L: Each one knows of the leg with which he limps D: This phrase means that each person knows his own weaknesses and faults S: Cada cual sabe donde le aprieta el zapato Cada cual sabe donde le aprieta el zapato L: Each one knows where the shoe squeezes them D:Each person knows where his/her own faults are S: Cada cual sabe de la pata que cojea Cada cual se reparte con la cuchara grande L: Each one gives out with the big spoon D: A person takes a more than proportionate share for themselves when given the chance. A person is in it for himself E: To look out for Number One Cada cuál tiene lo que busca L: Each one has what he looks for D: The idea that someone who wants to achieve a specific goal or objective generally does because they focus all of their efforts on that goal.
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent Speaking PHRASES Boricua! 17 H Cada gallina a su gallinero L: Each chicken to its chicken coop D: Each person has his own way of living, and for as strange as it may seem, everyone else should respect it S: Cada oveja con su pareja, Cada loco con su tema E: To each his own Cada loco con su tema L: Each crazy person with his theme D: A person’s actions or thoughts may not seem reasonable to you but you must respect their independence S: Cada gallina a su gallinero, Cada oveja con su pareja E: To each his own, Different strokes for different folks Cada oveja con su pareja L: Each sheep with its pair D: Each person has his own way living, and for as strange as it may seem, everyone else should respect it S: Cada gallina a su gallinero, Cada loco con su tema Cada oveja con su pareja
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent 125 Sabiduría Boricua: Puertorriqueño a Español NOTA: Esta sección incluye solamente los refranes más conocidos. En la sección Puerto Rican to English se puede encontrar una lista más amplia de los refranes. A cada puerco le llega su sábado D: Tarde o temprano le va a tocar lo que le corresponde S: A cada santo le llega su día A falta de pan, galleta D: Cuando te falta algo hay que aceptar otra cosa parecida aunque no es tu primera opción A las millas de Chaflán D: Extremadamente rápido A mal tiempo, buena cara D: Cuando las cosas no salen como se espera, uno se tiene que quedar tranquilo para enfrentar la situación A otro perro con ese hueso D: Frase destacando que sabes que la otra persona está mintiendo, que se inventó el cuento S: No me vengas con ese cuento A quien Dios no le da hijos el diablo le da sobrinos D: Para aquellas personas sin hijos, la experiencia de tener sobrinos o hijos de amigos es la misma como si tuvieran sus propios hijos A rey muerto, rey puesto D: Frase que significa que, con el fin de una relación romántica o muerte de una persona, uno se consigue otra persona rápida-mente. Por ejemplo, una viuda que rápidamente tiene nuevo marido. Al mismo tiempo, significa que la persona está aprovechando de la situación
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico126 A río revuelto, ganancia de pescadores D: Durante un periodo de incertidumbre o de cambio, siempre hay oportunidades Al mejor cazador se le va la liebre D:Aún los expertos se equivocan, todo el mundo se equivoca Al pan, pan y al vino, vino D: Pedir a alguien hablar directamente, ir al grano Al perro flaco, todas las pulgas le caen D: Las mismas personas siempre tienen todos los problemas en la vida, cuando una persona tiene un problema muchas veces aparecen otros problemas también Al que no le gusta el caldo, le dan tres tazas D: Si hay algo que no te gusta, sin duda vas a recibir mucho de ello Alábate pollo que mañana te guisan D: Se dice esta frase a una persona egoista destacando que pronto va a recibir lo que merece Aparecer hasta en la sopa D: Estar en todos los lugares a la vez Aterriza que no hay tocón D: Esta es una frase chistosa que se usa cuando alguien se caye pero sin motivo; la persona iba caminando y de repente se cayó Buscar las cinco patas al gato D: 1. Tratar de resolver una situación o problema que no tiene solución, 2. Perder tiempo buscando algo inexistente Caerse como una guanábana D: Caerse de forma dura Calma piojo que el peine llega D: Un pequeño regaño aconsejando a la persona tener paciencia para poder resolver una situación Chúpate esa, en lo que te mondan la otra D: Si pensabas que la primera vez fue mala, prepárate porque ya viene algo peor Cuando el río suena, agua lleva
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent Speaking PHRASES Boricua! 127 D: Valida que los rumores muchas veces tienen una parte cierta, aunque todo el rumor no sea cierto S: Cuando el río suena, es porque algo trae Cuatro ojos ven más que dos D: Consejo que es mejor tener dos personas trabajando un problema que una persona Cúentamelo todo, o no me cuentes nada D: Una frase motivando a otra persona de compartir un chisme o alguna noticia nueva Cuentas claras conservan amistades D: Cuando un amigo le presta a otro amigo algo, es mejor devolverlo lo más pronto posible para evitar problemas en la amistad Cuídate tú de las aguas bravas, y de las mansas que me libre Dios D: Las personas y situaciones agitadas son las más fáciles para manejar y diluir. Hay que realmente tener cuidado con aquellas personas y situaciones tranquilas y calladas ya que quizás no sabes qué realmente son problemas, hay que aceptar que Dios las va a corregir De tal palo, tal astilla D: Muchas veces los hijos copian el comportamiento del padre S: Quien lo hereda no lo hurta, De tal padre, tal hijo, Hijo de gato, caza ratón Del dicho al hecho, hay un gran trecho D: Prometer algo o decir que se puede lograr algo es muy diferente al cumplir con lo que se promete. Expresa duda en lo que una persona te está prometiendo Desde que se inventaron las excusas, nadie quiere ser culpable D: Siempre existe una excusa para evitar la culpa Desvestir un santo para vestir a otro D: No tiene sentido quitar algo
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico128 de una persona para darlo a la otra persona que carece del objeto Dime con quién andas y te diré quién eres D: Viendo como son las personas a tu alrededor se puede definer que tipo de persona eres Dios aprieta pero no ahoga D: La idea que, aunque Dios permite que alguien sufra, no permite que la persona desespere Donde manda capitán no manda marinero D: Hay un solo jefe, el que manda tiene la última palabra Dos jueyes machos no caben en la misma cueva D: Siempre peleando o argumentando S: Son como dos jueyes machos en la misma cueva El amor y el interés se fueron al campo un día y más pudo el interés que el amor que te tenía D: La otra persona estaba motivada por dinero en la relación, no por amor El caballo malo hay que venderlo lejos D: Si quieres aprovecharte de otra persona, debes estar seguro que nunca te vas a encontrar con esa persona después. Por ejemplo, si algo en tu carro no funciona bien, debes venderlo a una persona que no vive cerca a ti, con quien nunca te vas a encontrar El muerto, después de tres días apesta D: Aprovecharse demasiado de la persona generosa. Por ejemplo, quieres ayudar a tu amigo pero al final él termina abusando tu generosidad; él necesitaba un lugar para quedarse tres noches y un mes después todavía no se ha ido S: El muerto y el agregado a los tres días hieden, Se les da una uña y cogen hasta el codo, Te doy un dedo y me quieres coger el brazo El que calla, otorga D: El hecho de que la persona no enfrenta un comportamiento negativo, significa que lo está aceptando y apoyando
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent Speaking PHRASES Boricua! 129 El que come gofio se ahoga D: Una persona que no toma las cosas en serio, siempre está bromeando. Por ejemplo, la persona no va a la escuela, prefiere estar en la playa. Gofio es un dulce en polvo que te causa toser cuando lo tragas porque es seco El que se casa, para su casa D:Una vez que te cases debes buscar tu propia casa, y romper, de cierta forma, la relación con los padres y con los suegros, para evitar problemas con ellos y tu esposa S: El que se casa, casa quiere El que se va para Aguadilla pierde su silla y el que de Aguadilla viene su silla tiene D: Frase graciosa que se usa cuando una persona se levanta de su silla, y otra persona la toma. La frase valida el derecho de la segunda persona de usar la silla, pero la última parte confirma el derecho de la primera persona de reclamar su silla si vuelve de Aguadilla S: El que se va para Rincón pierde su sillón El que se va para Rincón pierde su sillón D: Frase graciosa que se usa cuando una persona se levanta de su sillón, y otra persona la toma. La frase valida el derecho de la segunda persona de usar el sillón S: El que se va para Aguadilla pierde su silla y el que de Aguadilla viene su silla tiene En el país de los ciegos, el tuerto es rey D: Una persona mediocre se puede destacar, no por su destrezas o habilidades, pero simplemente porque todos a su alrededor son incompetentes Entrar por arrimado y salir por dueño D: 1. Pedir prestado algo pero nunca devolverlo, 2. Ser más listo que la otra persona, engañarla Eramos muchos y parió la abuela D: Ya había problemas suficientes, y ahora además de todos esos problemas la abuela parió
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico130 Es de clavo pasado D: Un fanático o extremista, generalmente en referencia a los fanáticos de un partido político Es más feo que un caso de drogas D: Estar en una situación muy complicada o muy difícil Eso son otros veinte pesos D: Eso es algo completamente diferente, no se pueden comparar las dos cosas S: Eso es harina de otro costal Estar más halado que un timbre de guagua D: Una persona extremadamente flaca, más flaca que la cuerda que se hala para avisar al chofer de una guagua (autobus) pública que te quieres bajar en la próxima parada Estar más perdido que un juey bizco D: Una persona muy perdida, se puede referir a la persona que no puede llegar a cierto lugar, pero aún más común se usa para la persona que no sigue bien una conversación, se pierde tratando de entender lo que dicen los demás Estar soñando con pajaritos preñados D: Soñar de cosas inalcanzables MHa corrido más que una guagua de la AMA D: Describe a una mujer fácil en el sentido sexual; AMA son las siglas de la Autoridad Metropolitana de Autobuses, el nombre del sistema público de transporte en Puerto Rico Hablando del rey de Roma y las narices que asoma D: Comentario usado cuando una persona que era el tema de la conversación llega repentinamente Hablaste por boca de santo D: Una persona dice o predice algo que después ocurre o se demuestra cierto Hiciste como San Blas, comiste y te vas D: Critica a la persona que llega para cenar, come y se va inmediatamente. Alguien
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent Speaking PHRASES Boricua! 131 que hace esto frecuentamente parece cachetero o un vividor. El uso de la palabra comistes es un error común en Puerto Rico. La palabra correcta gramaticalmente es comiste. Ir contra viento y marea D: Lograr algo superando todas las fuerzas del mundo Irse como guineo en boca de vieja D: Ir o pasar rápidamente. Guineo es otra palabra para banana Juntos pero no revueltos D: Se usa esta frase para eliminar cualquier duda sobre una relación platónica. Quizás alguien piensa que dos personas tienen una relación romántica pero con esta respuesta se elimina esa duda, no existe nada romántico en la relación Le dieron gato por liebre D: Lo que esperaba la persona recibir era completamente diferente a lo que realmente recibió Le puso el dedo en la llaga D: Directamente identificar un problema, encontrarlo sin demora Más claro no canta un gallo D: La situación no puede ser más clara. Simplemente la entiendes o no Más feo que mandado a hacer D: Algo que es extremadamente feo Más pesado que un matrimonio mal llevado D: Algo extremadamente difícil de tratar Más sabe el diablo por viejo que por diablo D: Esta frase destaca la sabiduria que se acumula con la edad. El diablo es más listo por la edad que tiene que porque es el diablo Nadie te dio vela en este entierro D: Nadie te invitó (a la conversación o actividad) No por mucho madrugar amanece más temprano D: Más esfuerzo no necesariamente significa más éxito
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent A Collection of Wisdom and Sayings from Puerto Rico132 No tiene ni dos dedos de frente D: Se refiere a una persona realmente estúpida. Tiene la cabeza tan pequeña que ni siquiera dos dedos caben en su frente Para lo que falta que venga el resto D: Una frase casi de desesperación por todas las cosas malas que le han pasando. Ya que le ha pasado tantas cosas malas, una o dos cosas más no van a cambiar su situación Perro flaco soñando con longaniza D: Una persona que vive fuera de su nivel económica. La persona tiene un poco de dinero asi que sale a comprar algo muy caro, sabiendo que no puede pagar ni siquiera la primera cuota Por una teta no fue vaca D: Algo que no es completo, que le falta algunas partes S: Si tuviera manubrio, sería bicicleta Te doy pon y quieres guiar D: Aprovechar demasiado de la persona generosa. Por ejemplo, quieres ayudar a tu amigo pero al final termina abusando de ti; él necesitaba un lugar para quedarse tres noches y un mes después todavía no se ha ido S: Se les da una uña y cogen hasta el codo, Te doy un dedo y me quieres coger el brazo, El muerto después de tres días apesta Vestirse de Clubman D: Estar formalmente vestido, bien arreglado; Clubman es una tienda de ropa formal para hombres en Puerto Rico Vísteme despacio, que voy de prisa D: No me apures, avanzando rápidamente podría arruinar algo o terminarlo mal
  • L: Literal D: Definition S: Same/Similar E: Equivalent 133 Index: English Sayings with Spanish Equivalents A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush -Más vale pájaro en mano que cien volando -Más vale un hoy que dos mañanas A chain is only as strong as its weakest link -La soga rompe por lo más delgado A chip off the old block -De tal palo, tal astilla -Quien lo hereda no lo hurta E A friend in need is a friend indeed -Amigo en la adversidad es un amigo de verdad A journey of a thousand miles begins with one step -Barco que no anda no llega a puerto A lot of hot air -De ese infierno no salen chispas A man is known by the company he keeps -Dime con quien andas y te diré quién eres A perfect match -Me viene como anillo al dedo A prophet is not without honor, save in his own country -Nadie es profeta en su tierra [pueblo] E A taste of his own medicine -Estar probando su propia medicina A tiger doesn’t change its stripes -La yerba mala nunca se muere
  • English Sayings with Spanish Equivalents134 According to the latest gossip -Dicen las malas lenguas, y la mía que no es muy buena también lo repita Actions speak louder than words -El movimiento se demuestra andando -La ley entra por la casa -No es lo mismo decirlo que hacerlo E After a storm comes a calm -Después de la tormenta, siempre llega la calma After marriage, life goes downhill -En vida de matrimonio, ni soso ni salado All bark and no bite -Mucho ruido y pocas nueces E All cats are grey in the dark -De noche todos los gatos son prietos All good things must end -Lo bueno dura poco All over the place -Esta como el arroz blanco, en todas las partes E All that glitters is not gold -No todo lo que brilla es oro Always lands on his feet -El que nace para bombero, del cielo le cae el sombrero -El que nace para toro del cielo le caen los cuernos Always room for one more -Donde comen dos, comen tres E An eye for an eye -Ojo por ojo, diente por diente An idle mind is the devil’s workshop -El ocio es la madre de todos los vicios An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure -Es mejor precaver que tener que remediar -Más vale prevenir que tener que lamentar Appearances can be deceiving -Todo lo prieto no es morcilla As happy as a clam -Más contento que perro con dos rabos As old as the hills -Más viejo que el frío
  • Index 135 -Más viejo que Matusalen As stubborn as a mule -Es más terco que una mula As sure as death and taxes -La muerte es lo único seguro que tenemos en la vida As ugly as sin -Es más feo que un caso de drogas As white as snow -Más jincho que nalga de monja -Más jincho que un sobaco de monja Be happy with what you’ve got -Más vale tierra en cuerpo que cuerpo en tierra Bend over, here it comes again (BOHICA) -Chúpate esa en lo que te mondan la otra Better late than never -Más vale tarde que nunca Better the devil you know than the devil you don’t know -Es mejor malo conocido que bueno por conocer Between a rock and a hard place -Estar entre la espada y la pared Bitch, bitch, bitch -Como quiera que te pongas siempre tienes que llorar Bite off more than you can chew -Quedarse sin el plato y la comida -Quedarse sin la soga y sin la cabra Bites the hand that feeds him -Cría cuervos y te sacarán los ojos Black as coal -Prieto color telefono Born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth -Nacer en cuna de oro Brains over brawn -A cada guaraguao le llega su pitirre -Más vale maña que fuerza Business before pleasure -El deber antes que el placer Business is business -Compay, compay, pero la gallina vale dos reales
  • English Sayings with Spanish Equivalents136 Butt-ugly -Más feo que una patada en la cara Call a spade a spade -Al pan, pan y al vino, vino Caught red-handed -Pillar con las manos en la masa Caught with a hand in the cookie jar -Pillar con las manos en la masa E Charity begins at home -La caridad empieza por casa Children and fools tell the truth -Los niños y los borrachos siempre dicen la verdad Clothes don’t make the man -El hábito no hace al monje pero lo distingue Clueless -Estar más perdido que un juey bizco -Lo coge todo por el rabo E Curiosity killed the cat -La curiosidad mató al gato Cut to the chase -Al pan, pan y al vino, vino Different strokes for different folks -Cada cual a lo suyo -Cada loco con su tema -Para los gustos, los colores -Sobre los gustos no hay nada escrito -Zapatero a sus zapatos Do not put words in his mouth -No hables por boca ajena Do unto others as you would have them do unto you -No hagas hoy lo que no quieres que te hagan a ti mañana MDoes a bear shit in the woods? -¿A quién le amarga un dulce? Does not practice what he preaches -Predicar la moral en calzoncillos Don’t wish too hard, you might just get it -Está buscando lo que no se le ha perdido E Don’t add fuel to the fire -No eches más leña al fuego Don’t count your chickens before they’re hatched -No cantes victoria antes de tiempo
  • Index 137 E Don’t cross the bridge until you come to it -No cruces el puente antes de llegar a él Don’t kill the goose that lays the golden egg -No mates la gallina de los huevos de oro Don’t leave for tomorrow what you can do today -No dejes para mañana lo que puedas hacer hoy Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth -A caballo regalado no se le mira el colmillo Don’t stick your nose where it does not belong -Agua que no has de beber déjala correr Dressed to the nines -Estar más combinado que un cuadro del hipodromo -Genio y figura hasta la sepultura -Vestirse de ‘Clubman’ Drunk as a skunk -Más ahumado que un trapo de una plancha Drunk out of his mind -Más ahumado que un trapo de una plancha E Eat to live, not live to eat -Se come para vivir, no se vive para comer Enough is enough -Para al carajo albañil, que se acabó la mezcla Everyone makes mistakes -Al mejor cazador se le va la liebre Everything eventually comes to light -A la larga, todo se sabe Faith will move mountains -La fe mueve montañas Fight against all odds -Ir contra viento y marea Fight tooth and nail -Defenderse más que un gato boca arriba Fine words butter no parsnips -El que mucho promete, poco cumple Flat broke -Más pelado que un chucho Friends in high places
  • English Sayings with Spanish Equivalents138 -El que tiene padrino se bautiza Genius is ten percent inspiration and ninety percent perspiration -Más hace el que quiere que el que puede Get it over with quickly -Camino malo se anda ligero Get to the point -Al pan, pan y al vino, vino Get up on the wrong side of the bed -Levantarse de la cama con el pie izquierdo Give a little to get a little -Hay que dar del ala para comer de la pechuga Give credit where credit is due -Honor, a quien honor merece Give him a taste of his own medicine -Ladrón que roba a ladrón, merece el perdón Give someone an inch and he will take a mile -Se les da una uña y cogen hasta el codo -Te doy pon y quieres guiar -Te doy un dedo y me quieres coger el brazo Go like a bat out of hell -Ir como alma que lleva el diablo E God giveth and god taketh away -Dios da y quita E God helps those that help themselves -Dios dice ayúdate que yo te ayudaré -Ayúdate que Dios te ayudará God works in mysterious ways -Dios sabe lo que hace God’s gift to women -Creerse la última Coca Cola del desierto Good luck! -Dios quiera que tu guarapo siempre tenga hielo Good things are around the corner -No hay mal que por bien no venga Good things come in small packages -El perfume bueno siempre
  • SPEAKING PRASES BORICUA END OF PREVIEW www.speakinglatino.com/speaking-phrases-boricua FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE BOOK VISIT:
  • Jared grew up in Maryland, where he received his bachelor’s degree in economics and political science from St. Mary’s College of Maryland. After spending several years working in Washington, DC, during which time he started studying Spanish, Jared decided to return to school. He continued his studies in Spanish while receiving an International MBA from the University of South Carolina. Looking to further develop the Spanish, Jared accepted a job in Chile upon graduation. After several years living there and in Argentina, he moved to Puerto Rico, where he has resided since 2002. Whenever possible Jared travels, studies languages, reads and drinks wine. Any comments, corrections or inclusions should be sent to Jared@SpeakingLatino.com. Jared se crió en Maryland, donde se recibió de licenciado en economía y ciencias políticas en la universidad St. Mary’s College of Maryland. Trabajó durante varios años en Washington DC y durante ese tiempo estudió español. Después, decidió volver a la universidad y mientras seguía estudiando español, hizo una maestría en Administración de Empresas Internacionales en la University of South Carolina. Una vez terminada y con el propósito de desarrollar sus conocimientos del idioma, aceptó un trabajo en Chile. Después de varios años de vivir allá y en Argentina, se mudó a Puerto Rico donde vive desde el año 2002. Siempre que puede, aprovecha para viajar, estudiar idiomas, leer y compartir un buen vino. Pueden enviar cualquier comentario, corrección o sugerencia a Jared@SpeakingLatino.com. Jared Romey, author
  • IT’S EASY TO STAY IN TOUCH WITH www.SpeakingLatino.com www.Pinterest.com/SpeakingLatino www.Facebook.com/SpeakingLatino @SpeakingLatino www.YouTube.com/SpeakingLatino jared@speakinglatino.com
  • THE SPEAKING LATINO COLLECTION OF SPANISH SLANG DICTIONARIES AND PHRASEBOOKS 8 CUBA 8 DOMINICAN REP. 8 MEXICO 1 8 PERU 8 PUERTO RICO 1 8 MEXICO 2 8 VENEZUELA 1 8 VENEZUELA 2 8 Click here to browse the Spanish Slang Dictionary Directory » 8 ARGENTINA 8 CHILE 8 COLOMBIA
  • SPEAKING PRASES BORICUA END OF PREVIEW www.speakinglatino.com/speaking-phrases-boricua FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE BOOK VISIT: