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Cool South Africa Wildlife Photography & Conservation images
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Cool South Africa Wildlife Photography & Conservation images

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  • 1. Cool South Africa Wildlife Photography & ConservationimagesA few nice South Africa Wildlife Photography & Conservation images I found:Crowned PloverCrowned Lapwings(Plover) prefer short dry grassland which may be overgrazed or burnt, butavoid mountains. In higher-rainfall areas such as parts of Zambia and Zimbabwe, they occurmainly as dry-season visitors. In dry regions of northern Botswana however, they are attractedin large numbers when good rainfall occurs. In southern Africa their highest concentrations areto be found in the dry central Kalahari region.Although generally outnumbered by Blacksmith Lapwings, they are the most widespread andlocally the most numerous lapwing species in their area of distribution. Their numbers haveincreased in the latter part of the 20th-century after benefiting from a range of human activities.They live up to 20 years.The Crowned Lapwing is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation ofAfrican-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies.Wildlife photography, artwork and graphic editing from Jason Wharam Photography.Leopard 1/4
  • 2. Zoo NegaraSelangor Darul EhsanMalaysia.The leopard (IPA: [l?p?d]; Panthera pardus) is an Old World mammal of the Felidae family andthe smallest of the four roaring cats in the genus Panthera, the other three are the tiger, lion andjaguar. Once distributed across southern Asia and Africa, from Korea to South Africa, theleopard’s range of distribution has decreased radically over time because of a variety of factors,including human influence, and the leopard now chiefly occurs in sub-Saharan Africa. There arefragmented populations in India, Indochina, Malaysia, and China. Despite the loss of range andcontinual declines in population, the cat remains a "Least Concern" species; its numbers aregreater than that of the other Panthera species, all of which face more acute conservationconcerns.The leopard has relatively short legs and a long body, with a large skull. Physically, it mostclosely resembles the jaguar, although it is usually smaller and of slighter build. Its fur is markedwith rosettes which lack internal spots, unlike those of the jaguar. Leopards that are melanistic,either completely black or very dark in coloration, are one of the big cats known colloquially asblack panthers.The species’ success in the wild owes in part to its opportunistic hunting behaviour, itsadaptability to a variety of habitats and its ability to move at up to approximately 60 kilometres(37 miles) an hour. The leopard consumes virtually any animal it can hunt down and catch. Itspreferred habitat ranges from rainforest to desert terrains. Its ecological role and statusresembles that of the similarly-sized cougar in the Americas.Leopard – Lowery Park Zoo – Tampa Florida 2/4
  • 3. The leopard (pronounced /leop?rd/; Panthera pardus) is a member of the Felidae family and thesmallest of the four "big cats" in the genus Panthera; the other three being the tiger, lion andjaguar. Once distributed across southern Asia and Africa, from Korea to South Africa, theleopard’s range of distribution has decreased radically due to hunting and loss of habitat, andthe greatest concentration of leopards now occurs chiefly in sub-Saharan Africa; there are alsofragmented populations in Pakistan, India, Indochina, Malaysia, and China. Due to the loss ofrange and declines in population, it is graded as a "Near Threatened" species. Its numbers aregreater than other Panthera species, all of which face more acute conservation concerns.The leopard has relatively short legs and a long body, with a large skull. It is similar inappearance to the jaguar, although it is of smaller and slighter build. Its fur is marked withrosettes that are similar to those of the jaguar, though the leopard’s rosettes are smaller andmore densely packed. Leopards that are melanistic, that is either completely black or very dark,are known as black panthers. 3/4
  • 4. The species’ success in the wild owes in part to its opportunistic hunting behavior, its adaptability to habitats, and its ability to move at up to approximately 58 kilometres (36 miles) an hour. The leopard consumes virtually any animal it can hunt down and catch. Its preferred habitat ranges from rainforest to desert terrains. Its ecological role is similar to the American cougar. More information on South African experience at : http://southafricanexperience.com/cool-south-africa-wildlife-photography-conservation-images-2 / 4/4Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)