Ethical and effective online engagement with young people and families

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From the recent Youth & Family market seminar, Simon Davies presents the do's and don'ts for effectively engaging young people and families.

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Ethical and effective online engagement with young people and families

  1. 1. Ethical and effective online engagement with young people and families
  2. 2. Introduction •  Personal introduction
  3. 3. Introduction •  Personal introduction
  4. 4. 3Introduction to Fuse Digital
  5. 5. About today… •  The current digital environment •  The good, the bad and the ugly •  Opportunities •  Things to remember
  6. 6. The current digital environment
  7. 7. 6Introduction to Fuse Digital
  8. 8. 7Introduction to Fuse Digital
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  10. 10. 9Introduction to Fuse Digital
  11. 11. 10Introduction to Fuse Digital
  12. 12. 11Introduction to Fuse Digital
  13. 13. 12Introduction to Fuse Digital
  14. 14. 13Introduction to Fuse Digital
  15. 15. The digital footprint of a young consumer •  80% of children (7-16) use the Internet at home and 40% have their own computer •  90% of young people (11-16) have their own mobile phone •  A large majority 87% also own a games console •  Time online is heavily dominated by communities, chat, games and entertainment •  Most of these sites are commercially owned (with the exception of the BBC) Source: The Buckingham Report
  16. 16. The digital footprint of a young consumer Source: ICT at the School and in the home: efficiency, inclusion and digital skills
  17. 17. The digital footprint of a young consumer •  78% interactive whiteboard coverage in UK (US = 28%, worldwide = 7%) •  80% of all UK schools e-enabled by 2014 •  80% of teachers positive toward ICT (KS1, KS2, KS3 and KS4) •  83% (86%,80% primary,secondary) use technology in lessons for creative purposes •  76% (76%,68% primary,secondary) use technology in lessons for problem solving Source: Harnessing Technology for Next Generation Learning, Becta
  18. 18. The digital footprint of a young consumer Source: ICT at the School and in the home: efficiency, inclusion and digital skills
  19. 19. Regulation and legislation
  20. 20. Regulation and legislation
  21. 21. Regulation and legislation
  22. 22. 21Introduction to Fuse Digital
  23. 23. 22Introduction to Fuse Digital
  24. 24. 23Introduction to Fuse Digital
  25. 25. Further issues… •  No fixed definition of a child •  Current guidance can’t keep up with rate of change •  Blurring of geographical boundaries
  26. 26. What can we do about this? •  Follow the spirit of the guidelines throughout all communications
  27. 27. Making sense of the rules •  Marketing communications addressed to children must contain nothing that is likely to result in their physical, mental or moral harm. CAP code 5.1 •  Children must not be encouraged to enter strange places or talk to strangers. CAP code 5.1.1 •  Products unsuitable for children or young people should not be advertised in media targeted to them, and advertisements directed to children or young people should not be inserted in media where the editorial matter is unsuitable for them. ICC Article 18 •  Websites specifically aimed at children should ensure that content on their site is suitable for their audience. Sites should ensure that they offer navigation which does not lead younger users from content which is suitable for them e.g. on a general portal’s home page, directly to content which is clearly unsuitable. Home Office Best Practice •  Users of children’s sites should be clearly informed when they are about to move to third party content. Home Office Best Practice •  Message and bulletin boards aimed at children may wish to pre-moderate all user-generated content so that all material is seen and checked before it is published; and provision of a post-moderated service if the service is aimed at older children where messages will be removed by a moderator once published, if the posts are clearly in breach of house rules. Home Office Best Practice
  28. 28. Damage
  29. 29. Making sense of the rules - damage •  Marketing communications addressed to children must contain nothing that is likely to result in their physical, mental or moral harm. CAP code 5.1 •  Children must not be encouraged to enter strange places or talk to strangers. CAP code 5.1.1 •  Products unsuitable for children or young people should not be advertised in media targeted to them, and advertisements directed to children or young people should not be inserted in media where the editorial matter is unsuitable for them. ICC Article 18 •  Websites specifically aimed at children should ensure that content on their site is suitable for their audience. Sites should ensure that they offer navigation which does not lead younger users from content which is suitable for them e.g. on a general portal’s home page, directly to content which is clearly unsuitable. Home Office Best Practice •  Users of children’s sites should be clearly informed when they are about to move to third party content. Home Office Best Practice •  Message and bulletin boards aimed at children may wish to pre-moderate all user-generated content so that all material is seen and checked before it is published; and provision of a post-moderated service if the service is aimed at older children where messages will be removed by a moderator once published, if the posts are clearly in breach of house rules. Home Office Best Practice
  30. 30. Making sense of the rules - deception •  Marketing communications addressed to children must not exploit their credulity, loyalty, vulnerability or lack of experience. CAP code 5.2 (is this one law) •  Children must not be made to feel inferior or unpopular for not buying the advertised product. CAP code 5.2.1 •  Children must not be made to feel that they are lacking in courage, duty or loyalty if they do not buy or do not encourage others to buy a product. CAP code 5.2.2 •  Adult permission must be obtained before children are committed to buying complex or costly products. CAP code 5.2.4 •  Marketing communications addressed to or targeted directly at children must not exaggerate what is attainable by an ordinary child using the product being marketed. CAP code 5.3.1 •  Marketing communication directed to children should be clearly distinguishable to them as such. ICC Article 18 •  Children can be vulnerable to advertising that is not clearly marked as such, for example advertising which appears to be editorial content. Advertising can also exploit children through their lack of experience and maturity. Home Office Best Practice •  Marketing communications must not falsely claim or imply that the marketer is acting as a consumer or for purposes outside its trade, business, craft or profession; marketing communications must make clear their commercial intent, if that is not obvious from the context. DMA 2.3
  31. 31. Making sense of the rules - deception •  Marketing communications addressed to children must not exploit their credulity, loyalty, vulnerability or lack of experience. CAP code 5.2 (is this one law) •  Children must not be made to feel inferior or unpopular for not buying the advertised product. CAP code 5.2.1 •  Children must not be made to feel that they are lacking in courage, duty or loyalty if they do not buy or do not encourage others to buy a product. CAP code 5.2.2 •  Adult permission must be obtained before children are committed to buying complex or costly products. CAP code 5.2.4 •  Marketing communications addressed to or targeted directly at children must not exaggerate what is attainable by an ordinary child using the product being marketed. CAP code 5.3.1 •  Marketing communication directed to children should be clearly distinguishable to them as such. ICC Article 18 •  Children can be vulnerable to advertising that is not clearly marked as such, for example advertising which appears to be editorial content. Advertising can also exploit children through their lack of experience and maturity. Home Office Best Practice •  Marketing communications must not falsely claim or imply that the marketer is acting as a consumer or for purposes outside its trade, business, craft or profession; marketing communications must make clear their commercial intent, if that is not obvious from the context. DMA 2.3
  32. 32. Making sense of the rules - disruption •  Marketing communications addressed to children must not actively encourage children to make a nuisance of themselves to parents or others and must not undermine parental authority. CAP 5.4.1 •  Marketing communications addressed to or targeted directly at children must not include a direct exhortation to children to buy an advertised product or persuade their parents or other adults to buy an advertised product for them. CAP 5.4.2 •  Marketing communications that contain a direct exhortation to buy a product via a direct-response mechanism must not be directly targeted at children CAP 5.5 2010 •  Promotions addressed to or targeted directly at children must make clear that adult permission is required if a prize or an incentive might cause conflict between a child’s desire and a parent’s, or other adult’s, authority CAP 5.6.1 2010 •  Prices should not be presented in such a way as to lead children and young people to an unrealistic perception of the cost or value of the product. ICC Article 18 •  Marketing communication should not imply that the product being promoted is immediately within the reach of every family budget. ICC Article 18
  33. 33. Making sense of the rules - disruption •  Marketing communications addressed to children must not actively encourage children to make a nuisance of themselves to parents or others and must not undermine parental authority. CAP 5.4.1 •  Marketing communications addressed to or targeted directly at children must not include a direct exhortation to children to buy an advertised product or persuade their parents or other adults to buy an advertised product for them. CAP 5.4.2 •  Marketing communications that contain a direct exhortation to buy a product via a direct-response mechanism must not be directly targeted at children CAP 5.5 2010 •  Promotions addressed to or targeted directly at children must make clear that adult permission is required if a prize or an incentive might cause conflict between a child’s desire and a parent’s, or other adult’s, authority CAP 5.6.1 2010 •  Prices should not be presented in such a way as to lead children and young people to an unrealistic perception of the cost or value of the product. ICC Article 18 •  Marketing communication should not imply that the product being promoted is immediately within the reach of every family budget. ICC Article 18
  34. 34. Making sense of the rules - data •  Marketers must not knowingly collect from children under 12 personal information about those children for marketing purposes without first obtaining the consent of the child’s parent or guardian. CAP 10.15 2010 •  Marketers must not knowingly collect personal information about other people from children under 16. CAP 10.16 2010 •  Risks to children may arise from the misuse of their personal data. Children may willingly provide personal information without being aware of the implications , for example, in order to enter competitions, and this information can be open to misuse. Home Office Best Practice •  Websites should be careful about including photos, contact or other details, which together could serve to make children identifiable and contactable. Home Office Best Practice •  Websites that collect information from children must have stronger safeguards in place to make sure any processing is fair. . . The language of the explanation should be clear and appropriate to the age group the website is aimed at. “If you ask a child to provide personal information you need consent from a parent or guardian, unless it is reasonable to believe the child clearly understands what is involved and they are capable of making an informed decision.” UK Data Protection Act 1998
  35. 35. The good the bad and the ugly
  36. 36. 36Introduction to Fuse Digital
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  83. 83. More ‘good’ case studies
  84. 84. Opportunities
  85. 85. Opportunities
  86. 86. Things to remember
  87. 87. remember the four d’s, follow the spirit of guidelines and self-regulation
  88. 88. be creative, be unique, have a big idea, stand out!
  89. 89. be relevant, be interactive, be involving
  90. 90. provide enjoyable content that has a real value
  91. 91. generate true advocacy in the earned space
  92. 92. Thank you

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