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IT Survey: UK and Germany SMEs

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A look at IT decision making, budgeting, priorities and technology adoption among UK and Germany-based SMEs based on 500 interviews (250 in the UK and 250 in Germany) with IT decision makers from …

A look at IT decision making, budgeting, priorities and technology adoption among UK and Germany-based SMEs based on 500 interviews (250 in the UK and 250 in Germany) with IT decision makers from private sector SME organisations.

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  • 1. 1IT Survey: UK and Germany SMEsA look at IT decision making, budgeting, prioritiesand technology adoption amongst UK and Germany-based SMEsConducted by Vanson BourneMarch 2013
  • 2. 2Study overview: Areas of discussion» IT decision making and industry knowledge» Budgeting for, and buying software» Priorities and concerns for 2013» New technology adoption
  • 3. 3DEMOGRAPHICS
  • 4. 4Demographics: How the study is broken down41%32%27%6-50 employees51-100 employees101-250 employees18%17%15%14%10%6%6%5%4%2%2%1%IT & telecoms Manufacturing and productionRetail, distribution and transport Business and professional servicesConstruction and property Entertainment, media or leisureFinancial Services HealthcareConsumer services AgricultureEnergy, Oil/Gas & Utilities Other sectorSectorSizeFigure D1: Size of organisation (Total sample) Figure D2: Sector of organisation (Total sample)500 interviews (250 in the UK and 250 inGermany) with IT decision makers fromprivate sector SME organisations werecarried out during March 2013, brokendown as above
  • 5. 5IT DECISION MAKING ANDINDUSTRY KNOWLEDGE
  • 6. 6Figure 1: Who is principallyresponsible for addressing IT issues inyour company? (UK stats)Responsibility for addressing IT issuesThe majority of ITDMs based in UKsaid that the IT manager wasresponsible for addressing IT issues71%26%2%56%35%8% 2%IT ManagerBusiness Owner/ManagerEmployeesFinanceOver half of ITDMs based on Germany said that theIT manager was responsible, though a third said ITwas responsibility of the business owner/managerFigure 2: Who is principallyresponsible for addressing IT issues inyour company? (Germany stats)
  • 7. 7Respondent’s level of responsibility87%13%IT is my main responsibilityIT is not my main responsibilityFigure 3: Is IT your main responsibilitywithin your organisation? (UK sample)For almost nine out of tenITDMs based in UKinterviewed, IT is their mainresponsibility56%44% IT is my main responsibilityIT is not my main responsibilityITDMs in Germany are moreevenly split between thosewhose main responsibility is ITand those whose mainresponsibility is elsewhere54%75%93%6-50 employees 51-100 employees 101-250employeesThe larger the organisation, themore likely ITDMs will hold adedicated role in ITIn SME organisations, ITDMs sometimeshold a variety of roles that means theirtime is not purely dedicated to ITFigure 4: Is IT your main responsibilitywithin your organisation? (Germany sample)Figure 5: “IT is my main responsibility within myorganisation” – by size of organisation (Total sample)
  • 8. 8Time spent managing IT issues56%32%10%3%1-15% of my time16-30% of my time31-50% of my time51-75% of my timeFigure 6: How much time do you spendmanaging IT issues? (Those in UK for whomIT is not their main responsibility n=33)For those ITDMS whose main responsibility is not withIT, the majority spend up to 30% of their time managingIT issues. ITDMs based in Germany are only slightly morelikely to be spending more of their time managing IT issuesFigure 7: How much time do you spendmanaging IT issues? (Those in Germany forwhom IT is not their main responsibility n=111)61%33%6%1-15% of my time16-30% of my time31-50% of my timeSo there is a significant proportion of ITDMs in SMEorganisations who do not spend the majority of their timemanaging IT issues – and the smaller the organisation, theless time is spent on average. This makes choosingsoftware management that can be relied upon particularlycrucial for these organisations15%19%24%6-50 employees51-100 employees101-250 employeesThe smaller theorganisation, theless time non-ITdedicated ITDMsspend managingIT issuesFigure 8: Average time spent managing ITissues – by size of organisation (Those for whomIT is not their main responsibility n=144)
  • 9. 9Primary resource for staying up to date on the IT industryFigure 9: What resources do you use to stay up todate on the IT industry and inform your IT decisions?– resource ranked as primary resource (UK sample)For ITDMs based in both UK and Germany, IT publications are the most often usedprimary source for staying up to date on the IT industry. However, Google searches arealso used as the primary resource by a fifth of those interviewed. Two out of five ITDMsuse another resource as their preferred choice, with Facebook and company websitesbeing the most popular alternatives to the top twoFigure 10: What resources do you use to stay up todate on the IT industry and inform your IT decisions? –resource ranked as primary resource (Germany sample)41%19%9%9%6%3%5%3%2%1%1%IT publicationsGoogle searchFacebookCompany websitesLinkedInConferences/eventsTwitterForums/online communitySME publicationsOther resourceBooksBlogs38%22%10%9%4%6%2%1%2%2%2%
  • 10. 10Resources used for staying up to date on the IT industry73%56%46%28%23%19%17%12%12%9%2%2%IT publicationsGoogle searchCompany websitesConferences/eventsSME publicationsLinkedInFacebookBooksTwitterForums/onlinecommunityOther resourceBlogsFigure 11: What resources do you use to stay up todate on the IT industry and inform your IT decisions?– resources ranked as top three (UK sample)Figure 12: What resources do you use to stay up todate on the IT industry and inform your IT decisions?– resources ranked as top three (Germany sample)74%49%46%30%29%28%18%10%8%5%4%2%IT publicationsGoogle searchCompany websitesConferences/eventsSME publicationsBooksFacebookTwitterLinkedInForums/online communityOther resourceBlogsFor the most part, ITDMs in the UK and Germany gave similaranswers. There are however, exceptions: LinkedIn is asignificantly more popular resource in the UK than inGermany, and books are a significantly more popularresource in Germany than in the UKWhen combining the top three preferred resources for eachITDM, IT publications remain the most popular, with Googlesearches remaining in second place. However, company websitesprove almost as popular as Google for ITDMs inGermany, showing they are highly used as ITDM‟s second or thirdpreferred resource
  • 11. 11Help with IT issues – primary resourceFigure 13: When you have an issue with yourIT software where/who do you turn to for help?– resource ranked first (UK sample)When ITDMs based in the UK have anissue, the most popular primary resourcefor help is a Google search, thoughcontacting their IT service provider is also alikely choiceFigure 14: When you have an issue with your ITsoftware where/who do you turn to for help? –resource ranked first (Germany sample)33%24%10%6%11%6%3%2%2%2%20%33%14%9%9%6%3%2%2%1%1%1%GoogleIT service providerIT publicationsFacebookColleaguesManagers/senior decision makersLinkedInForums/online communitySME publicationsTwitterOther mediaBlogsIn contrast, when ITDMs based in Germany have anissue, the most common primary resource isthrough contacting their IT service provider, thoughGoogle remains the second most popular choice
  • 12. 12Help with IT issuesFigure 15: When you have an issue withyour IT software where/who do you turn tofor help? – top three resources (UK sample)When combining the top three preferredresources for ITDMs based in the UK, Google wasthe most popular, with their IT service providerand colleagues not too far behind. IT publicationsare also a likely source of helpFigure 16: When you have an issue with yourIT software where/who do you turn to forhelp? – top three resources (Germany sample)58%53%52%44%29%17%14%11%10%8%4%1%GoogleIT service providerColleaguesIT publicationsManagers/senior decision makersSME publicationsFacebookForums/online communityLinkedInTwitterBlogsOther media58%58%46%44%36%21%16%7%6%6%2%1%IT service providerIT publicationsGoogleColleaguesManagers/senior decision makersSME publicationsFacebookLinkedInTwitterForums/online communityBlogsOther mediaWhen combining the top three preferredresources for ITDMs based in Germany, their ITservice provider and IT publications were themost likely source of help. Google searches andcolleagues are also a popular source of helpOverall, UK ITDMs are slightly more likely to favourinformal sources of help, whereas German ITDMs are morelikely to seek official or approved sources for assistance
  • 13. 13BUDGETING FOR, AND BUYINGIT SOFTWARE
  • 14. 14“Technology is seen as a business enabler in my organisation and a keyelement in driving our business forward” – Agree or disagree?Figure 17: Agreement with statement“Technology is seen as a business enabler inmy organisation and a key element todriving our business forward” (UK sample)Generally speaking, in the UK the majority of organisationssee technology in a positive light and a key element in drivingtheir business forward. However just over one out of ten UKorganisations appear to not view technology this positively31%34%22%10%2%1 - completely agree2345 - completely disagree31%38%25%4% 2%Figure 18: Agreement with statement“Technology is seen as a business enabler inmy organisation and a key element to drivingour business forward” (Germany sample)Organisations in Germany are slightly less likelyto view technology negatively than organisationsin the UK, with only 6% disagreeing with theabove statement
  • 15. 15Budget changes over the past five years50%40%10%Budget increasedBudget remained the sameBudget decreasedOf those interviewed, half said theirorganisation‟s IT budget had increasedin the last five years. The picture wassimilar across UK and Germanorganisations, though the UK wasslightly more likely to have had a cutin budget than Germany42%57%56%6-50 employees51-100 employees101-250 employeesFigure 21: “IT budget has increased in last fiveyears” – by size of organisation (Total sample)51%45%4%Smallerorganisations areless likely thanmedium sizedorganisations tohave increased theirIT budget in the lastfive yearsDespite the majority of organisations recognising theimportance of technology to the business, budgetshave remained stagnant in half of organisations
  • 16. 16Effect on budget stagnation/decreaseFigure 22: Has this had a detrimental effecton your IT security/uptime? (Those in UKwhose budget has not increased n=125)For UK organisations whose IT budgethas not increased, almost a third say thatit has resulted in a detrimental effectupon their security and/or uptimeFigure 23: Has this had a detrimental effect onyour IT security/uptime? (Those in Germanywhose budget has not increased n=122)26%25%19%32 %trimental effect on IT securityDetrimental effect on uptimeDetrimental effect on security AND uptimeDetrimental effect on security and/or uptime7%8%2%14 %Detrimental effect on IT securityDetrimental effect on uptimeDetrimental effect on security AND uptimeDetrimental effect on security and/orGerman organisations whose IT budget has notincreased are much less likely than UKorganisations to feel this has resulted in adetrimental effect upon their security oruptime, though still over one in ten suffer fromthis
  • 17. 17Annual IT management software spendFigure 24: On average, how much do you spendon IT management software annually? (UK sample)The amount spent on IT management softwareannually varies a great deal amongstSMEs, though on average, organisations inGermany tend to spend slightly more (14,902Euros compared to 14,115 Euros for organisationsin the UK)Figure 25: On average, how much do you spend onIT management software annually? (Germany sample)20%12%18%22%18%9%1%0-1,750 €1,751-3,500 €3,501-5,750 €5,751-13,750 €13,751-35,000 €35,001-57,500 €More than 57,500 €14%16%16%23%20%7% 2%
  • 18. 18The main issues/problems with IT software35%22%13%10%10%5%5%Figure 26: What is your biggest bugbearabout IT software? (UK sample)UK and German ITDMs generally feel the samewhen it comes to identifying their biggestbugbear about IT software – paying for featuresthat are not needed was the most oftenselected issue in both regionsFigure 27: What is your biggest bugbearabout IT software? (Germany sample)34%30%10%7%12%4% 2%Paying for capabilities and features we dont need or useToo expensive and/or not enough budgetNot enough support from my companyToo long to installNot enough support from suppliersToo difficult to installOther bugbearThe issue of software being tooexpensive or not having enough budgetis also a common bugbear for ITDMsboth regions, particularly in the UK
  • 19. 19“Our organisation receives adequate support fromour IT software providers” – Agree or disagreeFigure 28: To what extent do you agree with thefollowing statement: "Our organisation receives adequatesupport from our IT software providers"? (UK sample)The majority of organisations feel they receive adequate support fromtheir IT software providers, though a quarter of organisations feelambivalent about this. In addition, almost one in ten UK organisationsfeel that they do not receive adequate support19%46%26%8% 1%1 – completely agree2 – slightly agree3 – neither agree nor disagree4 – slightly disagree5 – completely disagreeFigure 29: To what extent do you agree with the followingstatement: "Our organisation receives adequate supportfrom our IT software providers"? (Germany sample)21%50%25%4%
  • 20. 20Choosing software – primary motivator76%14%4%4%1%1%Functionality is theprimary motivatorfor both UK andGerman ITDMs64%20%7%7%2%1%FunctionalityPriceIT vendors reputation/sizeFamiliarity with vendorPeer/company stakeholder influenceOtherHowever UK ITDMs are more likely than German ITDMsto view price as their primary motivator – this isunsurprising given the figures highlighted earlier showingUK organisations are more likely to feel software is tooexpensive, or that their IT budgets have been cutFigure 30: How do you decide what IT softwareto purchase? Reason ranked first (UK sample)Figure 31: How do you decide what IT software topurchase? Reason ranked first (Germany sample)
  • 21. 21Choosing software - continued98%77%53%40%30%2%FunctionalityPriceIT vendorsreputation/sizeFamiliarity withvendorPeer/companystakeholder influenceOtherFigure 32: How do you decide what IT softwareto purchase? – top three reasons (UK sample)Functionality and price remain the two most important aspects for ITDMs whenchoosing software. However ITDMs based in Germany are less concerned withfamiliarity of the vendor and more concerned with stakeholder influence comparedto ITDMs based in the UKFigure 33: How do you decide what IT software topurchase? – top three reasons (Germany sample)96%81%55%50%16%1%FunctionalityPriceIT vendorsreputation/sizeFamiliarity with vendorPeer/companystakeholder influenceOther
  • 22. 22Seeking advice on IT software decisionsITDMs based in the UK seek the adviceof their IT staff more often than othersources of advice when makingsoftware decisions, with ITDMs inGermany more likely to seek IT staff‟sadvice than other sources of advice43%26%16%8%4%2%1%IT staffBusiness owner/managerPeersOther decision makers within the companyMediaSales manager of IT companiesOther54%22%8%8%3%3%2%ITDMs based in the UK andGermany are almost equally likelyto seek the advice of the businessowner/manager when makingdecisions, with this option beingranked first by almost a quarter ofthe overall sampleITDMs based in the UK weremore likely to seek theadvice first of their peersthan ITDMs based inGermany when makingsoftware decisionsFigure 34: Whose advice do you mostvalue when making IT software decisions?Advice ranked first (UK sample)Figure 35: Whose advice do you mostvalue when making IT software decisions?Advice ranked first (Germany sample)
  • 23. 23Seeking advice on IT software decisions - continued83%50%48%45%44%24%4%IT staffBusinessowner/managerPeersOther decision makerswithin the companySales manager of ITcompaniesMediaOtherOverall, ITDMs generallyseek the advice of ITstaff more often thanother potential sources80%53%53%47%30%30%4%IT staffBusinessowner/managerPeersOther decision makerswithin the companySales manager of ITcompaniesMediaOtherHowever there is great variation between the othermain sources of advice for ITDMs – businessowners/managers, peers and other decisionsmakers are all popular choices for ITDMs based inUK and GermanyITDMs based in the UK andGermany generally give similaranswers here, though GermanITDMs appear to value the adviceof the IT company‟s sales managermore than UK ITDMsFigure 36: Whose advice do you mostvalue when making IT software decisions?– top three advice valued (UK sample)Figure 37: Whose advice do you most valuewhen making IT software decisions? – topthree advice valued (Germany sample)
  • 24. 24Getting value from IT software73%27%Yes, we get good value from ourIT softwareOver a fifth of organisations do not think they getgood value from their IT software, with ITDMs in theUK more likely to believe this than ITDMs in Germany81%19%Yes, we get good value from ourIT softwareNo we dont get goodvalue, there is room forimprovementFigure 39: Do you feel that you are getting the bestvalue from your IT software? (Germany sample)Figure 40: “I feel pressure to purchase IT software fromtraditional enterprise vendors, forexample, Microsoft, IBM, Oracle, Cisco” – by Q8 „Do youfeel that you are getting the best value from your ITsoftware?‟ (Total sample)39 %54 %Yes, we get good value from our IT softwareNo we dont get good value, there is room for improveThose who feelthey don‟t getgood value fromtheir software aremore likely tohave feltpressured intopurchasing ITsoftware fromtraditional, well-known vendors
  • 25. 25Unused IT softwareFigure 41: Of the IT software you havepurchased, how much is not used? (UK sample)Figure 42: Of the IT software you havepurchased, how much is not used? (Germanysample)12%43%28%11%5% 1%0%1-10%11-20%21-35%36-50%More than 50%19%52%18%9%2%Over four in five of organisations do not use all of thesoftware they buy, with organisations in Germanyslightly more likely than organisations in UK to beusing all of the software they have bought23%46%All software usedSome softwarenot usedFigure 43: “I feel pressure to purchaseIT software from traditional enterprisevendors, forexample, Microsoft, IBM, Oracle, Cisco”– by Q4 „Of the IT software you havepurchased, how much is not used?‟(Total sample)Those who do not use all of the IT softwarethey have purchased are more likely to havefelt pressured into purchasing IT softwarefrom traditional, well-known vendors
  • 26. 26Pressure to purchase software from main players - UKFigure 44: Do you feel pressure to purchase ITsoftware from traditional enterprise vendors, forexample, Microsoft, IBM, Oracle, Cisco? (UK sample)Half of UK ITDMs feel underpressure to buy IT softwarefrom the traditional vendors –this pressure most oftencomes in the form of buyingbundles software/technologyFigure 45: Where does this pressure to purchase from traditionalenterprise vendors come from? (Those in UK who feel pressure n=127)51%49%PressuredNot pressured48%40%36%35%16%7%6%Bundled in with othersoftware/technologySales representativesPartners/other suppliersOther decision makerswithin the companySocial networksI dont have theknowledge myself, safestto trust the big fourOther84%16%Yes, sold a la carteNo, part of a bundleFigure 46: Would you prefer that your IT software be sold a la carteand not part of a bundle so you can buy only what you need? (Thosein UK who feel pressure to buy software as part of a bundle n=61)Of those who feel the pressure to be sold software aspart of a bundle, by far the majority would prefer tobe able to pick and choose their software so that theydon‟t spend money on software that remains unused
  • 27. 27Pressure to purchase software from main players - GermanyFigure 47: Do you feel pressure to purchase IT softwarefrom traditional enterprise vendors, forexample, Microsoft, IBM, Oracle, Cisco? (Germanysample)Figure 48: Where does this pressure to purchase from traditional enterprisevendors come from? (Those in Germany who feel pressure n=87)Figure 49: Would you prefer that your IT software be sold a la carteand not part of a bundle so you can buy only what you need? (Those inGermany who feel pressure to buy software as part of a bundle n=32)35%65%PressuredNot pressured44%37%37%36%13%6%5%Partners/other suppliersBundled in with othersoftware/technologyOther decision makers within thecompanySales representativesSocial networksI dont have the knowledgemyself, safest to trust the big fourOther78%22%Yes, sold a la carteNo, part of a bundleJust over a third of GermanITDMs feel under pressure tobuy IT software from thetraditional vendors. Thispressure is most often feltfrom partners or othersuppliers of the organisationOf those who feel the pressure to be sold software aspart of a bundle, by far the majority would prefer tobe able to pick and choose their software so that theydon‟t spend money on software that remains unused
  • 28. 28PRIORITIES AND CONCERNS FOR2013
  • 29. 29Top IT priority for 2013Figure 50: What are your biggest IT prioritiesthis year? – top priority (UK sample)The top priority for2013 most oftenselected by ITDMsbased in both UK andGermany is toimprove efficiencyFigure 51: What are your biggest IT prioritiesthis year? – top priority (Germany sample)34%21%6%7%7%12%5%5%2%1%Improve efficiency of how to enable better business resultsMaintain IT infrastructure as it is nowImprove data securityDecrease spend on ITStreamline processesImprove management of existing infrastructureMobile/cloud computingEducate oneself on better IT practices and new technologyMeet regulatory requirementsOther priority45%10%12%10%8%7%4%2%2%For a fifth of ITDMs based in theUK, maintaining their ITinfrastructure as it is now their toppriority, double the number ofGerman ITDMs answering similarlyJust over one in ten ITDMs based inGermany see improving their datasecurity as their top priority for 2013.This is double the number of ITDMsbased in UK answering similarly
  • 30. 302013 – IT prioritiesFigure 52: What are your biggest IT prioritiesthis year? – top three priorities (UK sample)Improving efficiency is one of the top three 2013 priorities foralmost two thirds of ITDMs, both UK and German. However, of theother priorities shown to respondents, there is significant variationbetween the two regionsFigure 53: What are your biggest IT priorities thisyear? – top three priorities (Germany sample)63%49%27%40%38%20%30%23%9%1%Improve efficiency of how toenable better business resultsStreamline processesImprove data securityImprove management of existinginfrastructureMaintain IT infrastructure as it isnowDecrease spend on ITEducate oneself on better ITpractices and new technologyMobile/cloud computingMeet regulatory requirementsOther priority64%38%51%32%22%31%20%26%15%0%Improve efficiency of how to enablebetter business resultsStreamline processesImprove data securityImprove management of existinginfrastructureMaintain IT infrastructure as it is nowDecrease spend on ITEducate oneself on better IT practicesand new technologyMobile/cloud computingMeet regulatory requirementsOther priorityAside from improving efficiency, the most often selected2013 priorities for ITDMs based in UK are streamliningprocesses, improving the management of infrastructureand maintaining the existing infrastructureAside from improving efficiency, the mostoften selected 2013 priorities for ITDMs basedin Germany are improving data security andimproving the management of infrastructureITDMs based inGermany seedecreasing ITspend as moreof a prioritythan UK ITDMsdo. It‟s possiblethen thatGerman ITDMsmay start toface budgetpressuressimilar to thatof UK ITDMs ashighlightedearlier
  • 31. 31Main IT/technology concern22%17%24%14%15%8%Figure 54: What is your main IT ortechnology concern? (UK sample)For ITDMs based in UK, not being able todeliver within budget is the most oftenselected primary IT concern, alongsidenot being able to meet business needsFigure 55: What is your main IT ortechnology concern? (Germany sample)27%27%14%16%12%4%Not being able to meetbusiness needsNot being able to deliverwithin budgetNot meeting securityrequirementsNot being able to keepsystems updatedNot being able to meet staffrequirementsNot being able to maintainsystem uptimeFor ITDMs based in Germany, not meeting securityrequirements is the most often selected primary ITconcern, though not being able to meet business needs isthe primary IT concern for almost as many German ITDMs
  • 32. 32NEW TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION
  • 33. 33BYOD adoption22%23%1%44%10%Figure 56: Does your company have a BringYour Own Device (BYOD) policy fortablets, notebook or smartphones? (UKsample)Organisations in the UK are slightly morelikely than organisations in Germany tohave adopted BYOD at this time. One inten organisations are currently in theprocess of developing a strategy for BYODFigure 57: Does your company have a BringYour Own Device (BYOD) policy fortablets, notebook or smartphones? (Germanysample)24%28%1%37%10% Yes - BYOD is unmanaged, butpermitted in restricted access zonesYes - BYOD is fully integrated in thecorporate network and managed by ITYes – we have another sort of policyNoNot yet, but we are in the process ofdeveloping oneOf the organisations that have adoptedBYOD, most have a fully integrated policythat is managed by IT, though almost asmany prefer an unmanaged policy thatrestricts access
  • 34. 34Reasons for not having a BYOD policyFigure 58: Why do you not have a BYOD policy?(UK sample who do not have a BYOD policy n=93)Organisations in the UK have not adopted a BYOD policy usually becauseeither BYOD is not seen as necessary or else it is seen as a security risk.The third most selected reason is that the ITDMs feels the IT departmentlacks the tools for implementing and enforcing any policiesFigure 59: Why do you not have a BYOD policy?(Germany sample who do not have a BYOD policy n=110)58%42%19%11%9%5%5%3%Not necessary for ourbusinessSecurity riskLack of tools forimplementing/enforcing apolicyToo complexResistance frommanagementToo expensiveI dont know how to do itOther reason63%47%5%9%9%10%3%1%Not necessary for ourbusinessSecurity riskLack of tools forimplementing/enforcing apolicyToo complexResistance frommanagementToo expensiveI dont know how to do itOther reasonAs with UK, organisations in Germany haveusually not adopted a BYOD policy becauseeither BYOD is not seen as necessary orelse it is seen as a security risk. UnlikeITDMs based in the UK however, there is noclear third placed reason, with only 5% ofGerman ITDMs selecting lack of tools as areason for no policy
  • 35. 35Cloud adoption - UK20%19%27%35%We have adopted a public cloudsolutionWe are in the process ofadopting a public cloud solutionWe are considering adopting apublic cloud solutionWe have not adopted a publiccloud solution and do not plan toFigure 60: Thinking about cloud computing inyour organisation, which of the following bestdescribe your current adoption? (UK sample)Just over a third of UK organisations donot plan to adopt a cloud solution of anykind, with a further third having eitheradopted or in the process of adopting ahybrid solution. Just over a quarter of UKorganisations are considering adopting acloud solution of some kind27%23%27%24% We have adopted a private cloudsolutionWe are in the process of adoptinga private cloud solutionWe are considering adopting aprivate cloud solutionWe have not adopted a privatecloud solution and do not plan to8%25%28%39%We have adopted a hybridsolutionWe are in the process of adoptinga hybrid solutionWe are considering adopting ahybrid solutionWe have not adopted a hybridsolution and do not plan to
  • 36. 36Cloud adoption - Germany18%22%22%39%We have adopted a public cloudsolutionWe are in the process ofadopting a public cloud solutionWe are considering adopting apublic cloud solutionWe have not adopted a publiccloud solution and do not plan toFigure 61: Thinking about cloud computing in yourorganisation, which of the following best describeyour current adoption? (Germany sample)36%18%18%29%We have adopted a private cloudsolutionWe are in the process ofadopting a private cloud solutionWe are considering adopting aprivate cloud solutionWe have not adopted a privatecloud solution and do not plan to13%22%26%39%We have adopted a hybridsolutionWe are in the process ofadopting a hybrid solutionWe are considering adopting ahybrid solutionWe have not adopted a hybridsolution and do not plan toMore organisations in Germany havealready adopted a private cloud or hybridsolution than organisations in theUK, though slightly less have adopted apublic cloud solution.Overall, organisations in Germany arealso slightly less likely than those in theUK to be planning to adopt any cloudsolution. These differences potentiallyreflect the greater concern ITDMs basedin Germany have with security, ashighlighted earlier
  • 37. 37Reasons for not adopting the cloudFigure 62: Why have you not yet adopted acloud computing solution? (Those in UK whohave not yet adopted a cloud solution n=97)The most often selectedreason by UK ITDMs fornot adopting cloud islack of knowledgeFigure 63: Why have you not yetadopted a cloud computing solution?(Those in Germany who have not yetadopted a cloud solution n=84)29%24%30%33%20%9%4%Its not relevant to ourbusinessWe dont trust it – werenervous about peoplefrom outside ourorganisation accessing…We dont trust it – werenervous about losingaccess to our dataWe dont know enoughabout itIts too expensiveWeve recently updatedour infrastructureOther reason48%40%32%20%7%7%1%Its not relevant to ourbusinessWe dont trust it – werenervous about peoplefrom outside ourorganisation accessing…We dont trust it – werenervous about losingaccess to our dataWe dont know enoughabout itIts too expensiveWeve recently updatedour infrastructureOther reasonThe most oftenselected reason byGerman ITDMs for notadopting cloud is thatit‟s not relevant totheir business39% of UK ITDMs said that theydon‟t trust cloud solutions –either because of losingaccess, or outsiders accessing it49% of German ITDMssaid that they don‟ttrust cloud solutions –either because of losingaccess, or outsidersaccessing it

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