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Lezing Cohousing Architect Laura Fitch (USA) - efficiënte ontwerpsessies
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Lezing Cohousing Architect Laura Fitch (USA) - efficiënte ontwerpsessies

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Op 28 juni 2013 kwam Laura Fitch in Gent een lezing geven over het ontwerpen van Cohousings. Een organisatie van Samenhuizen vzw. Dit tweede deel gaat over de aanpak van ontwerpsessies met de groep.

Op 28 juni 2013 kwam Laura Fitch in Gent een lezing geven over het ontwerpen van Cohousings. Een organisatie van Samenhuizen vzw. Dit tweede deel gaat over de aanpak van ontwerpsessies met de groep.

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  • 1. Endless Meetings or Efficiency in Design Decision-Making © Kraus-Fitch Architects, Inc. 2006 Developed by Laura Fitch, Kraus Fitch Architects (lfitch@krausfitch.com) Permission to edit granted to Samenhuizen (Belgium Housing Association) by Kraus Fitch Architects, 8/2013 The Workshop Approach
  • 2. Building cohousing communities starts with the people who will live there but it involves many professionals along the way. Workshops can be a win-win process For both the design professionals and group members
  • 3. We each have a job to do Professional’s jobs: • To work within the groups decision making process. • To educate members in advance of decisions • To reduce group member work load – they don’t need to reinvent the wheel • To be a cohousing expert – visit sites, attend conferences, do research Group’s job: • To come to consensus in a reasonable amount of time •To understand the difference between what is essential, what is nice to have, and that compromises are part of the process
  • 4. Programming & Design Workshops: 9 total Flow chart by Chris ScottHansen
  • 5. Programming & Design Workshops: 9 total I) Visioning – one day 2) Programming and Schematic Design • Site programming + Design – two days • Eco programming – one days • Common House – two days • Units – two days + one day 3) Design Development • Site – evening • Common House – one day, subgroups • Units – one day • Design Development acceptance - evening
  • 6. Typical Programming and Schematic Design Workshop: Homework in advance Friday evening slide show Saturday: Programming Sunday: Programming continued and Hands-on Schematic Design Professional Design Charrette Presentation, feedback, design development
  • 7. Homework Assigning homework to the group ahead of time brings more focus to the workshop. Homework can: Educate the resident group about issues in advance of the meeting Help the architect: • understand the core values of their client group • determine where there is already consensus • determine where a recommendation is all that is needed • determine workshop agenda and focus meeting discussions on the areas where homework has shown that there is no clear direction yet.
  • 8. HW - On-line survey Overarching goals Use a draft program: with cohousing standards Questions interlaced Answers should be designed to be easy to collate
  • 9. Use a simple rating system to evaluate green goals: 1. essential 2. important 3. nice to have 4. not important to me 5. don’t want
  • 10. HW – Site Visit
  • 11. HW – Gather Images
  • 12. HW – Visit cohousing communities and read the cohousing books
  • 13. Preparing for Workshop: Group: • Provide main contact person for architect • Determine location for and advertise slide show • Determine location for workshop • Choose a process facilitator • Do all homework assignments by deadline Architects: • Collate homework •Cull out discussion and items and recommendation items •Create draft program and send to group •Create agenda •Pack materials
  • 14. Know what your meeting facility and atmosphere will be like before you get there: Tables Break-out spaces Childcare Number of participants Lunch and snacks
  • 15. Set up the room in a way that will allow everyone to participate fully.
  • 16. Set up the room in a way that will allow everyone to participate fully.
  • 17. Team facilitation: Team facilitation is fun, we recommend THREE people: -Architect deals with content, -Aide (usually from architect’s staff) keeps notes and helps architect, -Group provided facilitator keeps stack and watches for emotional needs.
  • 18. The Workshop Six parts to a typical eco-design workshop: Part I – Educational Part II – Introduction and Group Building Part III – Programming (the hard work) Part IV – Prioritization (the even harder work) Part V – Testing Decisions (if applicable (e.g. site design) Part V1 – Summary, Evaluation
  • 19. Workshop – Part 1 Educational
  • 20. Two part: • What is Cohousing? • Workshop Specific: site, eco, common house, units Group: • Advertise and provide directions • Make newcomers feel welcome • Provide food • Introduce presenter • Field questions specific to group vision and site Presenter • Content •Tell cohousing stories not just technical information • Field Questions: Be prepared to answer questions about living in cohousing, not just about design. Slide Show
  • 21. Two part: • What is Cohousing? • Workshop Specific: site, eco, common house, units Group: • Advertise and provide directions • Make newcomers feel welcome • Provide food • Introduce presenter • Field questions specific to group vision and site Presenter • Content •Tell cohousing stories not just technical information • Field Questions: Be prepared to answer questions about living in cohousing, not just about design. Slide Show
  • 22. Workshop – Part II Introduction and Group Building: Present agenda and goals – it is easier to face a long agenda if you know where it is going Present ground rules Be organized AND fun – set the tone early Try simple get-to-know-you exercises (eg., QUICK go-around to answer a question such as: “What do you look forward to eating in your common house?”) Use visualization exercise to get members to share their dreams
  • 23. Sunday: 8:30 Gather 9:00/10 Opening 9:10/10 Introduction and Review 9:20/100 Site Layout – Block Exercises 11:00/30 Break – Architect’s work 11:30/60 Site Layout - Continued 12:30/60 Lunch 1:30/90 Secondary Discussion Items OR continuation of Site Layout Exercise 3:00/15 Break 3:15/60 Qualities of Spaces and Elements 4:14/30 Extra Time 4:45/15 Summary, Evaluation and Closing Saturday 8:30 Gather 9:00/10 Opening 9:10/10 Introduction, Ground Rules, Big Picture: What are goals of weekend, How do architects use this information 9:20/10 Site Feedback 9:30/60 Imaging Exercise 10:30/15 Break 10:45/15 Review OverarchingGoals 11:00/90 Program Discussion Items 12:30/45 Lunch 1:15/105 Discussion Items (Continued) 3:00/15 Break 3:15/90 Discussion Items (Continued) 4:45/15 Summary, Evaluation and Closing Typical Site Design Workshop Agenda:
  • 24. Ground Rules – my list Emotions are okay, Aggression is not Hands to speak (stacks of four) and/or willingness to work with group’s “card system” Listen for understanding When in doubt about process, the facilitators decides Silence = Assent If confused, ask Stay on topic / Storage bin for off topic items Let others speak No side conversations (distracting for facilitators and others) Imperfect process, facilitator is always making adjustments to match the group process Relies on Group coming to consensus in a reasonable timeframe Develop your own – teach by example.
  • 25. It will be a long weekend - humor helps
  • 26. Explore overarching values But don’t get bogged down here. Values are only words until put into the context of tough decisions.
  • 27. Visualization:
  • 28. Workshop – Part III Programming: This is the hard work (tedious, and unfamiliar) Homework can make all the difference. Prioritize the decisions that really need to be made, and let the others slide if necessary. Break the work into logical chunks. Put specific issues aside if you are getting bogged down. Use a “parking lot” for off-topic items. Stretch and take breaks Ask folks to take a deep breath while facilitators gather their thoughts
  • 29. Don’t start from scratch, use the homework to generate a DRAFT program.
  • 30. Time and frustration saving techniques: Survey and educate in advance One-on-one quick discussions Small groups Spectrum exercise Love it, Like it, Live with it, Don’t like it, Can’t live with it Prioritization index cards Block exercises for design Information about costs Simple choices Clear recommendations from professionals
  • 31. Workshop – Part IV Prioritizing the program:
  • 32. Workshop – Part V Testing the program (hands-on): This is fun but not natural to non-designers Display other community plans, for common house plans for reference. Break into small groups (4-8 people). Architect’s help out: give hints. Generate several schematic designs (e.g., try a “linear” and a “courtyard” scheme). Small groups report back: present each scheme and list pros and cons. Group takes lunch break, while professionals have a working lunch: group “types” of ideas and synthesize them. Come back together, review, discuss, and look for consensus on 1-3 directions
  • 33. Develop two or three different schemes and suggest different approaches (eg., Try the common house in three different locations)
  • 34. It’s a good idea to build a site model if the topography is a challenge. This is something that a group member can do to save money on architectural fees.
  • 35. “Blocks” for the common house hands-on exercise are just scraps of colored paper. Fold or cut and paste them to change them from simple rectangles to more complex shapes
  • 36. Present and evaluate ideas. Quickly list pros and cons of every scheme. Be sure to say something positive about every design – even rejected designs teach us a lot
  • 37. Synthesize this information. Look for a direction.
  • 38. Diagram the discoveries that were made. For example: Common house location, views, open space…
  • 39. Facilitate refinements of the preferred schemes.
  • 40. Workshop – Part V Summary and Evaluation Celebrate your progress at the end of each day! The design professional should ask for constructive feedback .
  • 41. Post - Workshop Design Development and Presentations
  • 42. Remind the group how they got to this point.
  • 43. Make revisions on your feet, bring the right tools, and leave their egos behind.
  • 44. Remember: • Cohousing design professionals help build community, not just buildings. • It’s an imperfect process, be gentle and flexible.
  • 45. Kraus Fitch Architects provides slide shows (for cohousing groups and professionals) on cohousing design and work systems. They include: Part 1 – What is Cohousing? Part 2 – Cohousing Site Design Part 3 – Common House Design Part 4 – Cohousing Unit Design Part 5 – Cohousing & Sustainability Part 6 – Getting the Work Done Contact for copies: Laura Fitch: lfitch@krausfitch.com
  • 46. This slide show was developed by Kraus Fitch Architects to educate cohousing groups about our workshop approach to making decisions during the design phase. Permission to edit was granted to Samenhuizen (Belgium Housing Association) by KFA in August 2013. Credits for photographers, communities, etc. should remain intact. If fees for presentations of this material are requested and accepted, please consider giving a donation to the Cohousing Association of the US (www. cohousing.org). KRAUS FITCH ARCHITECTS, INC. HOME COMMUNITY PLANET
  • 47. Resources Cohousing Association of the US (CohoUS) www.cohousing.org Kraus-Fitch Architects, Inc., (413) 549-5799 www.krausfitch.com Laura Fitch: lfitch@krausfitch.com
  • 48. Photo Credits: Mike April Janice Doyama Rebecca Reid Laura Fitch Mary Kraus John Fabel Jim Hanson With special thanks to the many individuals and communities featured in this show.

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