Career pathways Workshop at CWA Youth Conference
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Career pathways Workshop at CWA Youth Conference

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This training is designed for those who want to learn about designing local career pathways at the systems level. This session will review key elements of career pathway systems; identify the most ...

This training is designed for those who want to learn about designing local career pathways at the systems level. This session will review key elements of career pathway systems; identify the most important players and their roles; assess community readiness/progress; and share the best of promising practices.

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  • In 2011-2012 we were the technical assistance leads for the Career Pathways initiative which did some pathbreaking work (pun intended) for the three participating federal agencies.
  • We worked with 9 states (at the State and the local level) and an Indian tribe and an Urban Indian Center to help them – in the course of a year – put together a career pathways framework.
  • Grantees formed cross-agency teams (local and state level)
  • Definitions and Key TermsCareer pathway-oriented workforce development has the goal of increasing individuals’ educational and skills attainment and improving their employment outcomes while meeting the needs of local employers and growing sectors and industries.  Career pathway programs offer a clear sequence, or pathway, of education coursework and/or training credentials aligned with employer-validated work readiness standards and competencies.  This systems approach makes it easier for people to earn industry-recognized credentials (through more flexible avenues and opportunities for relevant education and training) and to attain marketable skills so that they can more easily find work in growing careers.  These comprehensive education and training systems are particularly suited to meeting the needs of working learners and non-traditional students. 
  • Sector Strategy –Career Pathways align with the skill needs of industries important to the regional or state economies in which they are located, and reflect the active engagement of employers in targeted industry sectors regarding the skill requirements for employment or career progression in high demand occupations. Stackable Educational/Training Options – Career Pathways include the full range of secondary, adult education, and postsecondary education options, including registered apprenticeship, with a non-duplicative progression of courses clearly articulated from one level of instruction to the next, with opportunities to earn postsecondary credits and lead to industry-recognized [and/or] postsecondary credentials;Contextualized Learning – Career Pathways focus on curriculum and instructional strategies that make work a central context for learning (contextual learning) and help students attain work readiness skills;Integrated Education & Training – As appropriate for the individual, Career Pathways integrate education and training that combine occupational skills training with adult education services, give credit for prior learning, and adopt other strategies that accelerate the educational and career advancement of the participant. Industry Recognized Credentials –Effective Career Pathways lead to the attainment of an industry-recognized degree or credential, which may include stackable credentials of value in the labor market and that articulate progressively to higher-level credentials or degrees. Multiple Entry & Exit Points –Career Pathways help a worker enter or advance within a specific sector or occupational field, regardless of their skills at the point of entry.   Linked/Connected/Blended – Connectes expert and peer, assumes online and offline components and includes ideas and concepts and hands-on.Designed for Working Learners – Career pathway programs are designed to meet the needs of adults and non-traditional students who often need to combine work and study. They provide childcare services and accommodate work schedules with flexible and non-semester-based scheduling, alternative class times and locations, and innovative uses of technology.
  • Notes:Some of these challenges relate to specific issues the grantees faced during the grantMost reflect useful information regarding common challenges that many communities might face during CP system development
  • What all the grantees, especially those at the local level could have benefited from – is an opportunity to ask themselves why they were embarking on Career Pathways at all.To look beyond the methodology as the “flavor of the month” and to not be afraid of asking the big question:Why use Career Pathways?What does our community need the most when it comes to building prosperity for all of our youth?How can Career Pathways help us get there?
  • Logic Models or Theories of Change are a way to deal with the Why question. This is a sample of one.
  • Over the course of the Initiative we developed the Six Elements Framework – here in its simpified form.Your handouts have the full version.
  • For each of the elements there are indicators of success.
  • One thing that would have really improved all of these
  • Add picture and name, title, etc.
  • Accounting Clerk: Jobs – Billing and Posting Clerks (many professions, i.e. Medical and insurance) Terms: 2 Quarters (16 units)Payroll Clerk: Jobs - Billing and Posting Clerks (many professions ex. Medical and insurance) Terms: 3 Quarters (27 credits)Business Assistant:Jobs – Receptionist, Office Clerk, Office Machine Operator, Human Resources AssistantTerms: 3 terms (47 units)AccountingJobs - Billing and Posting ClerkPayroll ClerkBookkeeperNew Accounts ClerkTax PreparerTerms: 2 years (3 quarters each)
  • Energy Management Technician:Jobs - Weatherization Installers and TechniciansEnergy AuditorsInsulation Workers, Floor, Ceiling, and WallTerms: 2 Years Associate (6 Quarters) EMT – Resource Conservation Management:Jobs: Solar Energy Installation ManagersSolar Photovoltaic InstallersSolar Sales Representatives and AssessorsSolar Thermal Installers and TechniciansTerms: 2 Years Associate (6 Quarters)
  • Continue the story with the path example. Career pathways really appealed to Nina because she was able to take short-term classes that lead to a certificate right away. Share the actual amount of time the first one took (OR) and what job(s) she was qualified for afterwards. Quarters about 10 weeks.The jobs are with the hospital, an insurance company, make specific to on or off res.Improves some basic skills in process?
  • 2, +1, +1, +2 (leads to A.S.), +6 (leads to B.S.)Continue the story with the path example. Career pathways really appealed to Nina because she was able to take short-term classes that lead to a certificate right away. Share the actual amount of time the first one took (OR) and what job(s) she was qualified for afterwards. Quarters about 10 weeks.Health Information Management and Medical Informatics – related fields
  • Salary. Ranges from 29-41K a year along the path and with a bachelors can earn 55-70K a year. Continue the story with the path example. Career pathways really appealed to Nina because she was able to take short-term classes that lead to a certificate right away. Share the actual amount of time the first one took (OR) and what job(s) she was qualified for afterwards. Quarters about 10 weeks.Health Information Management and Medical Informatics – related fields
  • Points to make: When asked the question, “in what component of the six key elements did you make the most progress?” grantees overwhelming reflected that they made the most progress in the are of building cross-agency partnerships and clarifying roles.For example, Kentucky was fairly new to working on career pathway-focused efforts. This initiative provided opportunity for partners to understand the role each could play. Culminated in completing a Jobs for the Future, Accelerating Opportunities Grant (which was awarded). Several grantees worked to expand their partnerships across the state this year, holding state summits and forums. In Montana, they held a statewide summit involving over 100 representatives from education, workforce development, social services, and CBOs. Led to successful collaboration with Perkins adult–focused efforts In Virginia, working together at the institutes they learned how to best utilize each other. They created a detailed model that they disseminated statewide that clearly defined the roles of each partner in the process. As a result, Community colleges jumped on board quickly – using information from the economic development council, the CC are looking at in-demand careers.Like Virgina, Minnesota was a little bit further along in their career pathways system development. However, involvement in the initiative has allowed them to refine their program model (called FastTrac) – clearly defining the partnership structure and clarifying the roles of partners.
  • Points to make:Gila River: TBDNew Mexico: outreached to the employer alliance advisory committeesSurveys and focus groups to understand healthcare sector needs for employment.In Virginia, they were able to use information generated from the economic development council to expedite buy-in from the community colleges. These partners are now looking into developing education and training programs for in-demand careers.Faced with limited resources, Maryland decided to conduct their own laborshed analysis. The data collected led to unexpected engagement from employers who were impressed with their findings.
  • Points to make- In Tucson, Arizona with only an initial $30K investment from the initiative, the Tucson Indian Center team developed a complete behavioral health pathway and started recruiting for the first cohort.- In Maryland, the team integrated career pathways ideology into the local college system. Adult education programs are now called “career pathways orientation”- In Pennsylvania, Completed designing two pathways – advanced manufacturing and healthcare. They also developed a service provider guide and to help staff understand how to talk about career pathways
  • Points to make:Like many of the other grantees, the Kansas team found that the initiative helped their team to rally around a common mission and vision, leading to the awarded Accelerating Opportunities grant. Continue to work to pursue new funding. In Ohio, Local area 17brought together partners, ID their joint desired outcomes. They developed a communications plan to engage stakeholders and have developed a sustainability plan that integrates CP into organization cultures that includes long-term funding strategies.In Minnesota, they have been doing this work for a couple of years through other initiatives, and through this project, increased their sustainability efforts and are looking into developing a braided funding model.Tucson Indian Center has shown that a little funding can go a long way. Building upon the original $30K investment, they have leveraged additional funding for the pathway through the Pima Community College and One-Stop. In addition, the new partnerships secured through the initiative have led to quick sign-off on new federal funding opportunity.
  • Points to make:InMinnesota, they have been working on improving the effectiveness of their program implementation (called Fast Trac). They have developed an administrative check-list, which outlines and summarizes for partners in a comprehensive chart the steps necessary for constructing an effective career pathways.In Montana, the stakeholders originally didn’t know about the existing career pathway-focused efforts. The initiative has provided an opportunity for them to not only learn about each other’s work, but to strategize around streamlining efforts, and move forward with deeper cross-system collaboration. Recently, this has included strategically partnering with folks involved with Perkins-funded efforts – in particular, their work with expanding their CTE model to community colleges and reaching adult-learners.In New Mexico, as part of a larger policy reform, they are exploring strengthening coordination with ABE partners through the revision of their statewide WIA policies.
  • Points to make:In Pennsylvania,the career pathways team invested time in conducting research before really launching any new projects. They interviewed educators, and other stakeholders from their high school based career pathways efforts about their experiences and the results were good). Wanted to first determine whether CP has value, and develop their plan based on that data to ensure buy-in and learn from what worked.Minnesota’s local career pathways system, FastTRAC, has always had its programs report a standard set of short-term outcome measures: number served in bridge programs, number served in integrated programs, number of credits completed by individuals, and the like. This reporting system, however, fails to provide the data necessary for determining the effectiveness of the program. To remedy this deficiency, Minnesota is developing a data-tracking system that collects in-depth information on individual FastTRAC students.  The data gathered using this system will paint a broader picture of each student’s situation and progress, showing such variables as use of the state's public assistance programs, current or most recent job title, and current wages. The system will also provide baseline data against which to compare future outcomes and thereby measure how well the program is performing.

Career pathways Workshop at CWA Youth Conference Career pathways Workshop at CWA Youth Conference Presentation Transcript

  • Career Pathways: Linking Education, Training, and Careers in Local Communities California Workforce Association Youth Conference January 28, 2014
  • Welcome & Overview Vinz Koller Director of Training and Technical Assistance Social Policy Research Associates 2
  • Career Pathways Initiative - Partners U.S. Department of Labor, ETA U.S. Department of Education, OVAE U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, ACF Jobs for the Future Social Policy Research Associates 3
  • Initiative Background - Grantees Gila River Indian Community Kansas Kentucky Maryland Minnesota Montana New Mexico Ohio Pennsylvania Tucson Indian Center Virginia 4
  • Cross Agency Teams Key Agency Partners: Local Level • • • • • Workforce Investment Board Community College(s) Adult Basic Education Providers TANF Providers Community-Based Organizations Key Agency Partners: State Level • • • • State Workforce Agency Adult Basic and Postsecondary Education Economic Development Human Services 5
  • Technical Assistance Strategy – Team Institutes Two Career Pathway Institutes
  • Definition of Career Pathways Career Pathways have the goal of increasing an individual’s educational and skills attainment and employment outcomes while meeting the needs of employers. Career Pathway Programs are a clear sequence of education coursework and/or training credentials with employer-validated work readiness standards and competencies. 7
  • Career Pathways Concepts Sector Strategy Stackable Educational/Training Options Contextualized Learning Integrated Education & Training Industry Recognized Credentials Multiple Entry & Exit Points Linked/Connected/Blended Learning Designed for Working Learners
  • Implementation Challenges Partnership challenges • Competing priorities • Rotating team members Leadership changes • State-level leadership & administration changes • Team leadership changes Transition to understanding the model • Time to get team member buy-in • Time to clarify goals and starting point Competing models/measures • Different federal & foundation models • Different performance measures 9
  • For Example: Career Pathways Logic Model
  • Six Key Elements Framework Build Cross-Agency Partnerships & Clarify Roles Measure System Change & Performance Identify Sector or Industry & Engage Employers Career Pathways: Six Key Elements Align Policies & Programs Design Education & Training Programs Identify Funding Needs & Sources
  • Build Cross-Agency • Key cross-agency partners at the local and state levels are engaged, agree to a shared vision, and gain support from political leaders. Roles and Partnerships & responsibilities are clearly defined and formalized. Clarify Roles Identify Sector or • Sectors and industries are selected and employers are engaged in the Industry & Engage development of career pathways. Employers Design Education & Training Programs • Career pathway programs provide a clear sequence of education courses and credentials that meet the skill needs of high-demand industries. Identify Funding Needs & Sources • Necessary resources are raised and/or leveraged to develop and operate the career pathway system, and education and training programs. Align Policies & Programs • Pursue state and local policy and administrative reforms in order to promote career pathway system development and to support implementation. Measure System Change & Performance • Assess system-wide change and measure performance outcomes to ensure continuous improvement.
  • Technical Assistance Strategy – Customized Tools & Resources Six Key Elements Framework Customized Strategic Planning Toolsets Career Pathways Toolkit 14
  • Technical Assistance Strategy – Community of Practice https://learnwork.workforce3one.org/page/home 15
  • Technical Assistance Strategy – Webinars Career Pathways: What, Why, and How? https://www.workforce3one.org/command/view.aspx?l ook=5001027448313677241&mode=info&pparams= Using Real-Time Labor Market Information to Support Credential Attainment and Career Pathways https://www.workforce3one.org/view/5001107429765 257509/info Career Pathways TAT Webinar Series: Building CrossAgency Partnerships https://www.workforce3one.org/command/view.aspx?l ook=5001104843457641130&mode=info&pparams= 16
  • Practitioner Perspective Laura Cantu Executive Director LA Youth Opportunity Movement Boyle Heights 17
  • Local Career Pathway Initiatives LOS ANGELES RECONNECTIONS CAREER ACADEMY (LARCA) 18
  • Los Angeles Reconnections Career Academy (LARCA) Workforce Innovation Fund - $12 million over a three year period. Goal is to serve 1200 youth ages 16-24 high school drop outs cross 6 sites in Los Angeles. Career Pathways have been developed in three areas: health care, construction and green technology. 19
  • LARCA Youth enrolled in program will – Return to school and complete high school diploma or GED – Exposed to a career pathway in health care, construction or green technology leading to stackable and recognized credentials. – Work Experience 20
  • Career Pathway Readiness Assessment All 6 sites completed the Career Pathway Readiness Assessment and Identified the following elements that they needed more support: – Identify Sector and Industry and Engage Employers – Design Education and Training Programs 21
  • Identify Sector and Industry and Engage Employers Identify intermediaries in health care, construction and green technology Labor Market Analysis Identify specific occupations that were emerging and growing Connect to employers 22
  • Design Education and Training Programs Contextualizing GED programs and Alternative High School Programs – YouthBuild – Construction and Green Technology Los Angeles Conservation Corp and Coalition for Responsible Community Development – GED – Health Care Identifying Program of Study within pathway that is flexible and stackable 23
  • Questions – Insights – Take Aways? 24
  • California Career Pathway Trust Fund 25
  • Pathfinder Pre-RFP Competition The Challenge: How will Career Pathways improve the well being of your community? What are your targeted Career Pathways? How did you choose them? Who are your key partners and what are their roles? What is unique about your approach? 26
  • Trust Fund Resources http://linkedlearning.org/policy/californiacareer-pathways-trust/ 27
  • Trust Fund Resources 28
  • Questions – Insights – Take Aways? 29
  • Contact Vinz Koller Director of Training and Technical Assistance Social Policy Research Associates Vinz_Koller@spra.com 831-277-4726 More Workshops at CWA 2014: Engaging Young People Using Social Media Tuesday, 4:15-5:15 Safer Commuities and Better Options for Young People: Reducing Gang Violence through Human Centered Design Wednesday – 10:15 – 11:30 30
  • Accounting Path 31 ACCOUNTING CLERK CERTIFICATE E M PAYROLL CLERK CERTIFICATE P L O BUSINESS ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE Y M E ACCOUNTING A.A. DEGREE N T 31
  • Energy Management Path 32 E M P EMT RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNICIAN A.A. DEGREE EMT RESOURCE CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT A.A. DEGREE ENERGY MANAGEMENT TECHNICIAN (EMT) A.A. DEGREE L O Y M E N T 32
  • Health Information Technology Path 33 MEDICAL INSURANCE CERTIFICATE E M MEDICAL SECRETARY CERTIFICATE P L O Y REGISTERED HEALTH INFO TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE MEDICAL CODING CERTIFICATE MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION CERTIFICATE M E N T 33
  • Health Information Technology Path 34 MEDICAL INSURANCE CERTIFICATE MEDICAL SECRETARY CERTIFICATE +1 2 E M P +1 L O +2 Y = number of school quarters REGISTERED HEALTH INFO TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE MEDICAL CODING CERTIFICATE MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION CERTIFICATE M Leads to A.S. E +6 N Leads to B.S. T 34
  • Health Information Technology Path 35 MEDICAL INSURANCE CERTIFICATE MEDICAL SECRETARY CERTIFICATE +1 2 E M P +1 L O +2 Y $29,000 -- $41,000 = number of school quarters REGISTERED HEALTH INFO TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE MEDICAL CODING CERTIFICATE MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION CERTIFICATE M Leads to A.S. E +6 N Leads to B.S. T $55,000 -- $70,000 35
  • Build Cross-Agency Partnerships & Clarify Roles Kentucky • Initiative provided opportunity for partners to understand the role each could play • Culminated in completing an Accelerating opportunities grant Montana • Held statewide summit involving cross system partners • Led to successful collaboration with Perkins adult –focused efforts Virginia • Learned how to best utilize each other at the institutes • Created a detailed model that they disseminated statewide that clearly defined the roles of each partner in the process 36
  • Identify Sector or Industry & Engage Employers Gila River • Healthcare and Hospitality New Mexico • Outreached to the employer alliance advisory committees • Conducted surveys and focus groups to understand healthcare sector needs for employment. Virginia • Economic development council data expedited buy-in from community colleges • Partners and are looking at developing programming for in-demand careers. Maryland • Conducted a laborshed analysis • Led to unexpected employer engagement 37
  • Design Education & Training Programs Tucson Indian Center • Developed a complete behavioral health pathway and started recruiting for the first cohort Maryland • Integrated career pathways ideology into the local college system. Pennsylvania • Completed designing two pathways – advanced manufacturing and healthcare • Developed a service provider guide describing career pathways 38
  • Identify Funding Needs and Sources Kansas • Strong partnerships and shared mission/vision led to new funding Ohio • Developed communications plan to engage stakeholders and developed a sustainability plan that includes long-term funding strategies. Minnesota • Increased sustainability efforts and looking into developing a braided funding model Tucson Indian Center • Leveraged additional funding for the pathway through the Pima Community College and One-Stop • New partnerships led to quick sign-off on new funding opportunity. 39
  • Align Policies and Programs Minnesota • Developed administrative check-list for partners that summarizes the steps necessary for constructing effective pathways Montana • Partners have focused on learning about existing initiatives and strategizing about stronger cross-agency collaboration New Mexico • As part of a larger policy reform, exploring strengthening coordinating with ABE partners through revision of their statewide WIA policies. 40
  • Measure Systems Change & Performance Pennsylvania • Conducted research prior to launching new strategies, to determine the value of career pathways and level of buy-in among stakeholders. Minnesota • Developing a data-tracking system that collects in-depth information about individual FastTRAC students (including use of public assistance programs, job titles, and wages). 41