Sustainability Interventions  – for managers of projects and programmes – with some serious opportunities,  challenges and...
2. Sustainability Interventions Source of PDF document: www..dashdot.co.uk/simpp.htm
3. A Different View <ul><li>What is this? </li></ul>
4.1 Caption Contest 1a
4.2 Caption Contest 1b <ul><li>A.  “Polar Bears’ natural habitats are diminishing as ice cap melts”. </li></ul><ul><li>B. ...
5.1 Caption Contest 2a
5.2 Caption Contest 2b <ul><li>A. “Rising temperatures dry out inland seas and lakes, kill off fish stocks and ruin fishin...
6.1 Start at Home – Agenda? – in UK. <ul><li>a. Loft Insulation </li></ul><ul><li>b. Hot water cylinder Insulation </li></...
6.2  Start at Home – and next <ul><li>a. Form an environmetal working party  – multigenerational </li></ul><ul><li>b. Cons...
7. Start at Work – Agenda for an Organisation <ul><li>a. Meetings - locations </li></ul><ul><li>b. - numbers attending </l...
8.1 Big Options <ul><li>Mitigation  – Global? </li></ul><ul><li>Adaptation  – National? </li></ul><ul><li>Crisis  – Chaoti...
8.2 Big Options <ul><li>Mitigation   – to reduce or minimise the cumulative impacts of human activity on the Earth so that...
8.3 Big Options <ul><li>Adaptation   – in these cases there is a realisation that despite all the mitigation effects above...
8.4 Big Options <ul><li>Crisis   – this is serious with catastrophic change from sustainability issues with step change an...
9. Cliché Time <ul><li>Programme Management – doing the right projects </li></ul><ul><li>Project Management – doing projec...
10. Start on the Project – How we manage. <ul><li>a) Number of tenders = waste? </li></ul><ul><li>b) Stages at which proje...
11.1 Whole Life Costings – to include: <ul><li>initial capital and investment project costs, </li></ul><ul><li>operational...
11.2 Whole Life Costings – the targets: <ul><li>to achieve the lowest discounted Whole Life Costing over the stated period...
12. The Environmental Project Steering Group <ul><li>the people who care (about the project / sustainability), </li></ul><...
13.1 Plan of Work 1
13.2 Plan of Work 2
13.3 Plan of Work 3
13.4 Plan of Work 4
13.5 Plan of Work 5
14.  Start on the Project – How we manage. <ul><li>a) Number of tenders = waste? </li></ul><ul><li>b) Stages at which proj...
15.1 Sustainability Interventions  – as and when required <ul><li>1. Sustainability Policies, Ethics, Responsibilities, an...
15.2 Sustainability Interventions – some more <ul><li>8. Sustainability in Specifications </li></ul><ul><li>9. Sequencing ...
16.1 Opportunities 1
16.2 Opportunities 2
17.1 Conclusions 1: Observations <ul><li>There will be Challenges and Opportunities related to Sustainability, the Environ...
17.2 Conclusions 2: Something Simple <ul><li>On your project is it possible to do something simple such as: </li></ul><ul>...
41 Sherard Court 3 Manor Gardens London N7 6FA Tel:  07831 675484 www.dashdot.co.uk 300 St. John Street London  EC1V 4PP T...
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Sustainability Interventions for Managers of Projects and Programmes - Professor Tom Taylor

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  • Tom
    Interesting. I recently read that Nils Axel Morner the apparent world expert on sea levels says that the sea levels are not rising and that NASA said similiar. Have you any comments please as this will help me in my doctorate

    Terry Duerden (SOBE PGR)
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    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
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Sustainability Interventions for Managers of Projects and Programmes - Professor Tom Taylor

  1. 1. Sustainability Interventions – for managers of projects and programmes – with some serious opportunities, challenges and dilemmas by Tom Taylor principal of dashdot joint founder of Buro Four vice President of APM visiting professor at Salford University v 3.1 08/11
  2. 2. 2. Sustainability Interventions Source of PDF document: www..dashdot.co.uk/simpp.htm
  3. 3. 3. A Different View <ul><li>What is this? </li></ul>
  4. 4. 4.1 Caption Contest 1a
  5. 5. 4.2 Caption Contest 1b <ul><li>A. “Polar Bears’ natural habitats are diminishing as ice cap melts”. </li></ul><ul><li>B. “Cuddly Polar Bears starving to death, on melting iceberg, miles from salvation, owing to human selfishness in pumping out greenhouse gases to maintain their growth in living standards.” </li></ul><ul><li>C. “Young bears romp on passing iceberg close to shoreline – as numbers of bears are fluctuating.” </li></ul><ul><li>D. </li></ul>
  6. 6. 5.1 Caption Contest 2a
  7. 7. 5.2 Caption Contest 2b <ul><li>A. “Rising temperatures dry out inland seas and lakes, kill off fish stocks and ruin fishing industries.” </li></ul><ul><li>B. “Man decides to divert river waters to agriculture diminishing supply to inland sea.” </li></ul><ul><li>C. “Seasonal rainfall variations have dramatic effects on shallow lakes.” </li></ul><ul><li>D. </li></ul>
  8. 8. 6.1 Start at Home – Agenda? – in UK. <ul><li>a. Loft Insulation </li></ul><ul><li>b. Hot water cylinder Insulation </li></ul><ul><li>c. Turn off Appliances </li></ul><ul><li>d. Recycle Waste </li></ul><ul><li>e. Upgrade Electrical Goods </li></ul><ul><li>f. Reuse Food </li></ul><ul><li>g. Install Thermostatic Valves </li></ul><ul><li>h. Upgrade Boilers </li></ul><ul><li>i. Use Energy-saving Light Bulbs </li></ul><ul><li>j. 1/2/3 Glazing </li></ul><ul><li>k. Insulate Walls </li></ul><ul><li>l. Add Water Butts </li></ul><ul><li>m. Draughtproof/Airtight Windows and Doors </li></ul><ul><li>n. Add Water Displacement Devices </li></ul><ul><li>o. Take a short Shower/ Reduce water </li></ul>
  9. 9. 6.2 Start at Home – and next <ul><li>a. Form an environmetal working party – multigenerational </li></ul><ul><li>b. Consider the Home (as above) </li></ul><ul><li>c. Consider Transport </li></ul><ul><li>d. Consider Lifestyle </li></ul><ul><li>e. Assess Carbon Footprint </li></ul><ul><li>f. Devise a Plan and Targets </li></ul><ul><li>g. Monitor and Manage </li></ul>
  10. 10. 7. Start at Work – Agenda for an Organisation <ul><li>a. Meetings - locations </li></ul><ul><li>b. - numbers attending </li></ul><ul><li>c. - frequency </li></ul><ul><li>d. Buildings - energy consumption </li></ul><ul><li>e. - use of space </li></ul><ul><li>f. Materials - sourcing </li></ul><ul><li>g. - storage </li></ul><ul><li>h. - waste </li></ul><ul><li>i. Recycling </li></ul><ul><li>j. Vehicles - carbon fuels </li></ul><ul><li>k. Green transport plan </li></ul><ul><li>l. Cycle to work </li></ul><ul><li>m. Child labour, avoidance </li></ul><ul><li>n. Biodiversity retention </li></ul><ul><li>o. </li></ul>
  11. 11. 8.1 Big Options <ul><li>Mitigation – Global? </li></ul><ul><li>Adaptation – National? </li></ul><ul><li>Crisis – Chaotic? </li></ul>
  12. 12. 8.2 Big Options <ul><li>Mitigation – to reduce or minimise the cumulative impacts of human activity on the Earth so that the perceived deterioration of the environment from a human perspective is stabilised or even reduced. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples….? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Renewable Energy sources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Carbon Capture and Storage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced Waste </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintaining Biodiversity </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Global? </li></ul>
  13. 13. 8.3 Big Options <ul><li>Adaptation – in these cases there is a realisation that despite all the mitigation effects above this may not be enough and consequently we need to adapt for hotter climates, extreme weather, rising sea levels, dwindling (low-cost) energy supplies. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples…..? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Building to deal with extreme weather </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lifestyles to deal with extreme weather </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Agriculture to deal with rising populations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>National? </li></ul>
  14. 14. 8.4 Big Options <ul><li>Crisis – this is serious with catastrophic change from sustainability issues with step change and environmental pressures including extreme weather, crop failures, pandemics, population growth, warfare plus environmental Migration. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples…..? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stocks for pandemics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Frontier and border controls </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dual-purpose buildings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Disaster provisions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Chaotic? </li></ul>
  15. 15. 9. Cliché Time <ul><li>Programme Management – doing the right projects </li></ul><ul><li>Project Management – doing projects right </li></ul><ul><li>__________________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>What does this mean in environmental, planet-saving terms? </li></ul><ul><li>__________________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver the Sustainability goods </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver the goods Sustainably </li></ul>
  16. 16. 10. Start on the Project – How we manage. <ul><li>a) Number of tenders = waste? </li></ul><ul><li>b) Stages at which projects stop = waste? </li></ul><ul><li>c) Duplication of efforts/involvements = waste? </li></ul><ul><li>d) Disbanding of successful teams = waste? </li></ul><ul><li>e) Whole-life costings </li></ul><ul><li>f) </li></ul>
  17. 17. 11.1 Whole Life Costings – to include: <ul><li>initial capital and investment project costs, </li></ul><ul><li>operational costs, </li></ul><ul><li>decommissioning and disposal costs, </li></ul><ul><li>for an appropriate product life cycle period, </li></ul><ul><li>discounted cash flow approach with terms at a recommended treasury rate, </li></ul><ul><li>with appropriate breakdown by element, component, subsystem – for options and combinations. </li></ul>
  18. 18. 11.2 Whole Life Costings – the targets: <ul><li>to achieve the lowest discounted Whole Life Costing over the stated period, </li></ul><ul><li>without reduction or compromise of critical performance criteria of the project, </li></ul><ul><li>to achieve the minimum carbon footprint or energy consumption from non-renewable (and from renewable) resources, </li></ul><ul><li>whilst optimising maintenance, repair and replacement regimes, </li></ul><ul><li>AND to convey the details of the adopted WLC model so that they be adopted, applied and enhanced in practice. </li></ul>
  19. 19. 12. The Environmental Project Steering Group <ul><li>the people who care (about the project / sustainability), </li></ul><ul><li>the people who have influence (on their projects / sustainability), </li></ul><ul><li>the people who can analyse, consider, recommend, decide, </li></ul><ul><li>the people who can bring out the best in a team. </li></ul><ul><li>Managers of projects: </li></ul><ul><li>Clients, champions, sponsors,lead designers, lead contractors, key stakeholders, influential regulators, project managers </li></ul><ul><li>The before and after test – the people who steered. </li></ul>
  20. 20. 13.1 Plan of Work 1
  21. 21. 13.2 Plan of Work 2
  22. 22. 13.3 Plan of Work 3
  23. 23. 13.4 Plan of Work 4
  24. 24. 13.5 Plan of Work 5
  25. 25. 14. Start on the Project – How we manage. <ul><li>a) Number of tenders = waste? </li></ul><ul><li>b) Stages at which projects stop = waste? </li></ul><ul><li>c) Duplication of efforts/involvements = waste? </li></ul><ul><li>d) Disbanding of successful teams = waste? </li></ul><ul><li>e) Whole-life costings </li></ul><ul><li>f) Sustainability Interventions </li></ul>
  26. 26. 15.1 Sustainability Interventions – as and when required <ul><li>1. Sustainability Policies, Ethics, Responsibilities, and Context </li></ul><ul><li>2. Project-specific Briefs and Statements of Requirements </li></ul><ul><li>3. Team Selections </li></ul><ul><li>4. Benefits – and Triple Bottom Line (and Five Principles) </li></ul><ul><li>5. Benchmarking </li></ul><ul><li>6. Standards and Legislation </li></ul><ul><li>7. Sustainability in Designs </li></ul>
  27. 27. 15.2 Sustainability Interventions – some more <ul><li>8. Sustainability in Specifications </li></ul><ul><li>9. Sequencing for Sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>10. Change Control and Sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>11. Delivery Stage </li></ul><ul><li>12. Handovers </li></ul><ul><li>13. Projects in Use </li></ul><ul><li>14. Decommissioning </li></ul>
  28. 28. 16.1 Opportunities 1
  29. 29. 16.2 Opportunities 2
  30. 30. 17.1 Conclusions 1: Observations <ul><li>There will be Challenges and Opportunities related to Sustainability, the Environment and Green Issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Much of it will be determined at macro level by politicians, corporations, regulations, public interest, events. </li></ul><ul><li>It will need to be pragmatically interpreted and incorporated by and within projects. </li></ul><ul><li>This will fall to the managers of projects – including project managers. </li></ul><ul><li>Let us hope they are ready willing and able. </li></ul>
  31. 31. 17.2 Conclusions 2: Something Simple <ul><li>On your project is it possible to do something simple such as: </li></ul><ul><li>thinking about life-cycle costings? </li></ul><ul><li>thinking about decommissioning? </li></ul><ul><li>greening the supply chain? </li></ul><ul><li>eating fairtrade food? </li></ul><ul><li>thinking about this generation? </li></ul><ul><li>taking a different view? </li></ul><ul><li>Good Luck Tom Taylor </li></ul>
  32. 32. 41 Sherard Court 3 Manor Gardens London N7 6FA Tel: 07831 675484 www.dashdot.co.uk 300 St. John Street London EC1V 4PP Tel: 020 7833 8663 Fax: 020 7833 8560 www.burofour.co.uk Ibis House Regent Park Summerleys Road Princes Risborough Buckinghamshire HP27 9LE Tel: 0845 458 1944 Fax: 0845 458 8807 www.apm.org.uk www.tomtaylor.info “ Sustainability Interventions – for managers of projects and programmes - with some serious opportuntities, challenges and dilemmas” is available as a free download under the creative commons license from: www.cebe.heacademy.ac.uk/employerengagement/list.php and also from www.dashdot.co.uk/simpp.htm It is also available in hard copy via Amazon.co.uk, or direct from dashdot. Full details for all publications by dashdot can be found at www.dashdot.co.uk 88 pages, illustrated ISBN-13: 978-0-9554132-8-5

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