DDECONSTRUCTIVISM   E                   C                   O                   N                   S                   T ...
D                                                                                         E                  DECONSTRCUTIV...
DE GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF DE CONSTRUCTIVISM                                                                           ...
D•   Two CONTEMPORARY PERIOD OF DEcubism, have had an influence          strains of modern art, minimalismand CONSTRUCTIVI...
D                 FRANK GEHRY                           E                                                       C         ...
D                        FRANK GEHRY                                       E                                              ...
D Every building is by its very nature a sculpture. You cant help it. Sculpture is a three-dimensional object and so is a ...
D    E    C    O    N    S    T    RT   U    C    T    I    V    I    S    M
D•EXPERIENCE MUSIC PROJECT AND THE SCIENCE FICTION HALL OF FAME ARE TWO EMUSEUMS JOINED AT THE HIP. ONE HOSTS ROCK MEMORAB...
D•IT WAS IMMEDIATELY HAILED AS ONE OF THE WORLDS MOST SPECTACULAR     EBUILDINGS IN THE STYLE OF DECONSTRUCTIVISM (ALTHOUG...
D                          E                          C                          O                          N             ...
D •IN A COST-SAVING MOVE THE ORIGINALLY DESIGNED STONE EXTERIOR WAS        E REPLACED WITH A LESS COSTLY METAL SKIN       ...
•THE STYLE IS KNOWN AS DECONSTRUCTIVISM(“NEW-BAROQUE” TO                  DTHE DESIGNERS) ARCHITECTURE DUE TO ITS UNUSUAL ...
D             EZAHA HADID   C             O             N             S             T             R   T         U         ...
D       The unique combination ofD      elements that make up          E       Zahas work can be seen in     CE      the M...
D                           BRIEF BIOGRAPHY                                         E• Born October 31, 1950, Baghdad, Ira...
D                               MAXXI, ROME    E• MAXXI (National Museum of 21st              C  Century Art).            ...
DArchitecture of MAXXI                                   E        Two principle architectural elements            C       ...
DECONSTRUCTIVISM
Olympic Aquatics Centre    D                                          EWining the last year’s most coveted       Carchitec...
D    Zha NordparCableRailway.                                              E    • In the project there are                ...
D           ET-SCHUMI   C           O           N           S           T           R  T        U           C           T ...
A brief biography.                                            D • BernardTschumi is an architect and educator born in     ...
Screenplays, 1978.                                                                           D                            ...
Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97.            D                                                  E  • Over 1 kilometer...
D                                                        E             THE CENTRE FOR SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY                ...
Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97.                                            D                                       ...
Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97.                           D                                                        ...
Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97.       D                                             E                              ...
Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97.                                               D                                    ...
D                                                                   E                                                     ...
Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97.                                                          D                         ...
Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97.                             D                                                      ...
New Acropolis Museum, Athens, 2001 -                                                        D                             ...
New Acropolis Museum, Athens, 2001 -                                            D                                         ...
New Acropolis Museum, Athens, 2001 -                        D                                                            E...
New Acropolis Museum, Athens, 2001 -   •The top is the                D                                       rectangular,...
N`ew Acropolis Museum, Athens, 2001 -                     D                                                          E    ...
D                EPETER EISHMEN   C                O                N                S                T                R  ...
D                                                                             E                         BRIEF HISTORY…    ...
D• He tries to do is to ‘unlink’ the function that architecture may represent   E   from the appearance - form - of that s...
D                                                                                E                 Wexner Center for the A...
D    E    C    O    N    S    T    RT   U    C    T    I    V    I    S    M
D• Scaffolding traditionally is the most impermanent part of a building.                                                  ...
ThankYou.....  T
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Deconstructivism

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CONCEPT OF DECONSTRUCTIVISM AND DECONSTRUCTIVIST ARCHITECTS

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  • how do they construct fluid and sinuous structure?
    what kind of materials they use? do you have any answer!!!
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Transcript of "Deconstructivism"

  1. 1. DDECONSTRUCTIVISM E C O N S T R T U C T I V I S M
  2. 2. D E DECONSTRCUTIVISM… ???? C O• Deconstructivism in architecture, also called deconstruction, is a N development of POST MODERNISM that began in the late 1980s. S• It is characterized by ideas of fragmentation, an interest in manipulating ideas of a structures surface or skin, non-rectilinear shapes which serve to distort and T dislocate some of the elements of architecture, such as structure and R. The finished visual appearance of buildings that exhibit the many T deconstructivist "styles" is characterised by a stimulating unpredictability and a controlled chaos U C• .Deconstructivist philosophy :It was influenced by the formal T experimentation and geometric imbalances of Russian constructivism I• There are additional references in deconstructivist to 20th-century V movements: the modernism/postmodernism, expressionism, cubism , minimalism and contemporary Art I S M
  3. 3. DE GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF DE CONSTRUCTIVISM E • Explodes architectural form into loose collections of related fragments. C • Destroys the dominance of the right angle and the cube by using the O diagonal line.. N • Uses ideas and images from Russian Revolutionary architecture and design S • Provokes shock, uncertainty, unease, disquiet, disruption, distortion by challenging familiar ideas about space, order and regularity in the T environment. R T • Rejects the idea of the `perfect form for a particular activity and rejects the familiar relationship between certain forms and certain activities. U C T I V I S M
  4. 4. D• Two CONTEMPORARY PERIOD OF DEcubism, have had an influence strains of modern art, minimalismand CONSTRUCTIVISM E on deconstructivism. C• Analytical cubism also had effect on deconstructivism, as forms and content are dissected and viewed from different perspectives O simultaneously. N• A synchronicity of disjoined space is evident in many of the works of Frank S Gehry and BernardTschumi. T• It also often shares with minimalism notions of conceptual art R T U C T I V I S M
  5. 5. D FRANK GEHRY E C O N S T R T U C T I V I SDeconstructivism is the wave of absolutely new Mstyle, which believes in irregular shapes of its own
  6. 6. D FRANK GEHRY E C FRANK OWEN GEHRY (BORN FRANK OWEN GOLDBERG; FEBRUARY O 28, 1929) IS A CANADIAN AMERICAN ARCHITECT. PRIZE-WINNING ARCHITECT N BASED IN LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA. FRANK GEHRY DID VERY UNIQUE AND CHALLENGING WORK IN HIS LIFE . S MAINLY WORK IN DECONSTRUCTIVISM AND HI-TECH ARCHITECTURE. T HE IS LEGENDRY ARCHITECT BECAUSE OF HIS STYLE OF DESIGN AND DIFFERENT R PHYLOSOPHY . T MOST OF HIS PROJECT BASE ON DECONSTRUCTIVISM for eg. Walt Disney U C Concert Hall , Dancing House in Prague T I V I S M
  7. 7. D Every building is by its very nature a sculpture. You cant help it. Sculpture is a three-dimensional object and so is a building.“ E C “I approach each building as a sculptural object, a spatial container, a space with light and air, a response to context and appropriateness of O feeling and spirit. To this container, this sculpture, the user begins his baggage, his program, and interacts with it to accommodate his needs. N If he can’t do that, I’ve failed.” S Frank O. Gehry T In spite of changes in Gehry’s design over the years, his R approach to a building as a sculpture retains. T• Gehry’s architecture has undergone a marked evolution from the plywood U C and corrugated-metal vernacular of his early works to the distorted but pristine concrete of his later works. However, the works retain a T deconstructed aesthetic that fits well with the increasingly disjointed culture to which they belong. I• Most recently, Gehry has combined sensuous curving forms with complex V deconstructive massing, achieving significant new results. I S M
  8. 8. D E C O N S T RT U C T I V I S M
  9. 9. D•EXPERIENCE MUSIC PROJECT AND THE SCIENCE FICTION HALL OF FAME ARE TWO EMUSEUMS JOINED AT THE HIP. ONE HOSTS ROCK MEMORABILIA AND MUSIC ANDEXHIBITIONS AND THE OTHER DOES THE SAME FOR SCI-FI. C O• FABRICATED STEEL FRAME CLAD WITH SHOTCRETE AND SHEET METAL PANELS N•MUCH OF THE BUILDING MATERIAL IS EXPOSED IN THE BUILDINGS INTERIOR. S T R T U C T I V I S M Experience Music Project
  10. 10. D•IT WAS IMMEDIATELY HAILED AS ONE OF THE WORLDS MOST SPECTACULAR EBUILDINGS IN THE STYLE OF DECONSTRUCTIVISM (ALTHOUGH GEHRY DOES NOT CASSOCIATE HIMSELF WITH THAT ARCHITECTURAL MOVEMENT) O•THE MUSEUM IS SEAMLESSLY INTEGRATED INTO THE URBAN NCONTEXT, UNFOLDING ITS INTERCONNECTING SHAPES OF STONE, GLASS AND STITANIUM T R T U C T I V I S M Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain
  11. 11. D E C O N S T R T U C T I V I SPARTITIONS IN GALLERIES M
  12. 12. D •IN A COST-SAVING MOVE THE ORIGINALLY DESIGNED STONE EXTERIOR WAS E REPLACED WITH A LESS COSTLY METAL SKIN C •MOST OF THE BUILDINGS EXTERIOR WAS DESIGNED WITH STAINLESS STEEL GIVEN O A MATTE FINISH, •THE FOUNDERS ROOM CHILDRENS AMPHITHEATER WERE DESIGNED WITH N HIGHLY POLISHED MIRROR-LIKE PANELS S T•THE REFLECTIVE QUALITIES OF THESURFACE WERE AMPLIFIED BY THE RCONCAVE SECTIONS OF THEFOUNDERS ROOM WALLS. T U C•THERE WAS ALSO THE INCREASED TRISK OF TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS DUE ITO BLINDING SUNLIGHT REFLECTED VFROM THE POLISHED SURFACES. I S M Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles,
  13. 13. •THE STYLE IS KNOWN AS DECONSTRUCTIVISM(“NEW-BAROQUE” TO DTHE DESIGNERS) ARCHITECTURE DUE TO ITS UNUSUAL SHAPE. E•THE “DANCING” SHAPE IS SUPPORTED BY 99 CONCRETE PANELS, EACH A DIFFERENT CSHAPE AND DIMENSION. ON THE TOP OF THE BUILDING IS A LARGE TWISTED OSTRUCTURE OF METAL NICKNAMED MEDUSA. NALSO THE WINDING MOLDINGS ON THE FACADE MAKE IT MORE CONFUSINGPERSPECTIVE, DIMINISHING THE CONTRAST WITH THE BUILDINGS THAT SSURROUND IT.“ T R T U C T I V I S Dancing House, Prague M
  14. 14. D EZAHA HADID C O N S T R T U C T I V I S M
  15. 15. D The unique combination ofD elements that make up E Zahas work can be seen in CE the Museum of Transport, Glasgow, now OS being constructed on the River Clyde in Scotland. NI Zahas mathematical SG expertise, her cosmopolitan T RN upbringing, and most of TSTYL all, her early inspiration U from exploring the CE riverbanks of her native Iraq - all can be seen in T this amazing building. I Viewed from above, the V impression of ripples in the I sand is suggestive. From ground level, transparent S walls will allow visitors to M see inside the building as they approach - from land
  16. 16. D BRIEF BIOGRAPHY E• Born October 31, 1950, Baghdad, Iraq Iraqi-born British architect C• Hadid began her studies at the American University in Beirut, Lebanon, O receiving a bachelors degree in mathematics N• 1972 she traveled to London to study at the Architectural Association, a major S centre of progressive architectural thought during the 1970s. T R• DESIGN STYLE T• Her style is Deconstructivism (breaking architecture, displacement and U distortion, leaving the vertical and the horizontal, using rotations on small, C sharp angles, breaks up structures apparent chaos) T• Using light volumes, sharp, angular forms, the play of light and the integration of the buildings with the landscape. I• Integrated into their architectural designs using spiral forms. V• She is an architect known worldwide for her talent in various disciplines such as painting, graphic arts, three-dimensional models and computer I design. S M
  17. 17. D MAXXI, ROME E• MAXXI (National Museum of 21st C Century Art). O• The museum became the joint home of N the MAXXI Arts and MAXXI Architecture S and Italy’s first national museum solely dedicated to contemporary arts. The T building is a composition of bending oblong tubes, overlapping, intersecting R T and piling over each other, resembling a piece of massive transport infrastructure U C• It acts as a tie between the geometrical T elements already present. I• The building absorbs the landscape V structures, dynamizes them and gives I them back to the urban environment. S M
  18. 18. DArchitecture of MAXXI E Two principle architectural elements C characterize the project: O the concrete walls that define the exhibition galleries and determine the N interweaving of volumes; S and the transparent roof that modulates natural light. The roofing system complies T with the highest standards required for R museums and is composed of integrated T frames and louvers with devices for filtering U sunlight, artificial light and environmental C cont T The fluid and sinuous shapes, the variety I and interweaving of spaces and the V modulated use of natural light lead to a spatial and functional framework of great I complexity, offering constantly changing S and unexpected views from within the M building and outdoor spaces.
  19. 19. DECONSTRUCTIVISM
  20. 20. Olympic Aquatics Centre D EWining the last year’s most coveted Carchitectural prize, Hadid was assigned Oto design London’s Olympic Aquatics N SCentre. The Olympic Aquatics centre, Twas constructed in London which the Rconstruction of this building tookplace in year of 2005 which will form T U Cpart of London’s Olympic Park for a T2012 Olympic Games and Paralympic IGames, has a spectacular, sinuous S- V Ishaped roof inspired by the flow of Swater, that is certain to make it a MLondon landmark.
  21. 21. D Zha NordparCableRailway. E • In the project there are C four stations. • The concepts of “Shell & O Shadow” generate each N station’s spatial quality. S The fluid shapes and soft T contours give the appearance of glacier movements. RT  New production methods like CNC U milling and thermoforming allow C computer generated designs to T be made into buildings structure. I • Parts of the building look like V cars, aeroplane wings, yachts. Large cantilevers and small touch I down areas give a floating S appearance to the shells. M Images courtesy of Zaha Hadid
  22. 22. D ET-SCHUMI C O N S T R T U C T I V I S M
  23. 23. A brief biography. D • BernardTschumi is an architect and educator born in E Lausanne, Switzerland in 1944. C •Presently, a permanentUnited States resident who holds O both French and Swiss nationalities, N •Tschumi studied in Paris and at the Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland, from which he S received his degree in 1969. T •From 1970 to 1979 he taught at the Architectural R Association . in London. T U C T I V I S M
  24. 24. Screenplays, 1978. D E • The use of film images in these works originated in Tschumis interest in C sequences and programmatic concerns. (“There is no architecture without O action, no architecture without event, no architecture without program.”) Rather than composing fictional events or sequences, it seemed more informative to act N upon existing ones. S • The cinema thus was an obvious source. At the same time, the rich formal and T narrative inventions of the only genuine 20th-century art inevitably encouraged parallels with current architectural thought. R T Flashbacks, crosscutting, jumpcuts, dissolves and other editing devices provided a rich set of analogies to the time and space nature of architecture. U C • Yetthe concerns of the Screenplays were essentially architectural. They dealt T with issues of: I - material (generators of form: reality, abstraction, movement, events, etc.) V - device (disjunction, distortion, repetition, and superimposition) I - counterpoint (between movement and space, events and spaces, etc.) S • The Screenplays aimed at developing a contemporary set of architectural tools. M
  25. 25. Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97. D E • Over 1 kilometer long in one direction C and 700 meters wide in the other La O Villette appears as a multiple programmatic field, containing in N addition to the park, the large Museum S of Science and Industry, a City of Music, a Grande Halle for exhibitions T and a rock concert hall. R The basis of the design is the superimposition of three T U C independent systems, namely: T Points I Lines V Surfaces I S Superimposition: M lines, points, surfaces.
  26. 26. D E THE CENTRE FOR SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY C O N S T R T GEODE U C T ZENITH I V IGRAND HALL S MAIN ENTRY M
  27. 27. Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97. D E 1. Points C • The folies are placed according to a point-grid O coordinate system at 120 meter intervals throughout the park. The form of each is a basic 10 x 10 x 10 N meter cube or three-story construction of neutral S space that can be transformed and elaborated according to specific programmatic needs. Taken as a T whole, the folies provide a common denominator for R • T a all of the events generated by the park program. The repetition of folies is aimed at developing U C clear symbol for the park, a recognizable identity T • Their grid provides a comprehensive image or shape for the otherwise ill-defined terrain. I •Similarly, the regularity of routes and positions V makes orientation simple for those unfamiliar with I the area. An advantage of the point-grid system is that it provides for the minimum adequate S equipment of the urban park relative to the number M of its visitors. Models of the Folies
  28. 28. Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97. D E C O N FOLLIES S FOLLIES T R T U C T FOLLIES I V I S M
  29. 29. Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97. D E C O N S T R T U C T I V I S MFolie P6: prototype folie
  30. 30. Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97. D E 2. Lines C • The folie grid is related to a larger O coordinate structure, an orthogonal system of high-density pedestrian N movement that marks the site with a S cross. T • The North-South passage or R Coordinate links the two Paris gates and subway stations of Porte de la T U North-south gallery Villette and Porte de Pantin, the East- C West Coordinate joins Paris to its T western suburbs. I •A5 meter wide, open, waved covered structure runs the length of V both Coordinates. I S M East-west passage
  31. 31. D E C LINES: O N EAST-WEST AXIS S Lines are the main T movement paths R T across the park U C NORTH-SOUTH AXIS TThe paths do not follow any organizational structure; rather Ithey intersect and lead to various points of intersection within Vthe park and the surrounding urban area. I S M
  32. 32. Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97. D E C O N S T R T U C T 3. Surfaces I V • The park surfaces receive all activities requiring large expanses of horizontal space for play, sports and exercise, mass-entertainment, markets and so forth. I S • During summer nights, for example, the central green becomes an open air film theater for 3,000 viewers. The so called left over surfaces where all aspects of the M program have been fulfilled, are composed of compacted earth and gravel.
  33. 33. Parc de La Villette, Paris, 1982 - 97. D E C O N SURFACES S SURFACES T SURFACES R T U C T SURFACES I V I S M
  34. 34. New Acropolis Museum, Athens, 2001 - D E A movement concept C • The visitors route forms a clear three- O dimensional loop, affording an architectural promenade with a rich N spatial experience extending from the S archeological excavations to the Parthenon Marbles and back through T the Roman period. R T U C T • Movement in and through time is a crucial dimension of architecture, and of I this museum in particular. V • Withover 10,000 visitors daily, the I sequence of movements through the museum artifacts is conceived to be of S utmost clarity. M
  35. 35. New Acropolis Museum, Athens, 2001 - D E ORGANIZARTION: C The Museum is conceived as a base, a middle zone and a top, taking its form O from the archeological excavation N below and from the orientation of the top floor toward the Parthenon. S T A tectonic & programmatic concept R T The base of the museum design contains an entrance lobby overlooking U C the Makriyianni excavations as well as temporary exhibition T spaces, lobby, retail, and all support I facilities. V •The base hoversover the excavation on more than 100 slender concrete I pillars. S M
  36. 36. New Acropolis Museum, Athens, 2001 - D E • The middle (which is C trapezoidal in plan) O is a double-height space that soars to N 10 meters (33 S feet), accommodatin g the galleries from T the Archaic to the R late Roman period. T U A mezzanine C features a bar and restaurant (with a T public terrace I looking out toward V the Acropolis) and multimedia space. I S MPlan at mid-level
  37. 37. New Acropolis Museum, Athens, 2001 - •The top is the D rectangular, glass- E enclosed, skylight Parthenon Gallery, over 7 C meters high and with a O floor space of over 2,050 square meters (22,100 N square ft). S •It is shifted 23 degrees T from the rest of the R T building to orient it directly toward the Acropolis. U C •The building’s concrete T core, which penetrates upward through all I levels, becomes the surface V on which the marble sculptures of the I Parthenon Frieze are S mounted. The core allows natural light to pass down MPlan at Top to the Caryatids on the
  38. 38. N`ew Acropolis Museum, Athens, 2001 - D E C O N S T R T U C T I V I S M Front elevation
  39. 39. D EPETER EISHMEN C O N S T R T U C T I V I S M
  40. 40. D E BRIEF HISTORY… C O• Peter Eisenman was born in Newark, New Jersey. N• He studied at Cornell and Columbia Universities . S• Eisenman first rose to prominence as a member of the New York Five.• In 2001, Eisenman won the National Design Award for Architecture from T R the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. T U STYLE C Eisenman has always sought somewhat obscure parallels between T his architectural works and philosophical or literary theory. I His earlier houses were "generated" from a transformation of forms V related to the tenuous relationship of language to an underlying I structure. Eisenmans latter works show a sympathy with the ideas of S deconstructionism M
  41. 41. D• He tries to do is to ‘unlink’ the function that architecture may represent E from the appearance - form - of that same architectural object. C O• Concepts: • Techniques: N – Artificial • Shear S excavation • Interference – Tracing T • Intersection – Layering R • Distortion – Deformation U • Scaling C • Diagrammatic image T – Add to superposition I – Deform composition V I S M
  42. 42. D E Wexner Center for the Arts C O• Location : Ohio State University,Ohio N• Building Type :University arts center. S• Construction System :steel, concrete, glass. T• Included in the Wexner Center space are a film and video theater, a R performance space, a film and video post production studio, a T bookstore, café, and 12,000 square feet (1,100 m²) of galleries. U• The design includes a large, white metal grid meant to suggest C scaffolding, to give the building a sense of incompleteness. T• The extension of the Columbus street grid generates a new pedestrian I path into the campus, a ramped east-west axis. V• a major part of the project is not a building itself, but a non-building. I S M
  43. 43. D E C O N S T RT U C T I V I S M
  44. 44. D• Scaffolding traditionally is the most impermanent part of a building. E• Thus, the primary symbolization of a visual arts center, which is traditionally that of a shelter of art, is not figured in this case. C• For although this building shelters, it does not symbolize that function. O N S T R T U C T I V I S M
  45. 45. ThankYou..... T

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