Out of our minds
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Out of our minds Document Transcript

  • 1. Out of our mindsLearning to be creativeBy Ken Robinson left5000132588000centercenter100000100000<br />About the author:<br />Sir Ken Robinson is an internationally recognized leader in the development of creativity, innovation and human resources. He speaks to audiences throughout the world on the creative challenges facing business and education in the new global economies.<br />He is an author, speaker, and international advisor on education in the arts to government, non-profits, education, and arts bodies. He was Director of The Arts in Schools Project (1985–89), Professor of Arts Education at the University of Warwick (1989–2001), and was knighted in 2003 for services to education.<br />His renowned talks at the annual TED conference (2006 and 2010) continued to be viewed online by many millions of people around the world. In 2003, he received a knighthood from H.M. Queen Elizabeth II for his services to the arts. In 2005 he was named as one of Time/Fortune/CNN's Principal Voices. He has received numerous honorary degrees and awards for his international work in education, creativity and cultural development.<br />Book reviews:<br />Ken Robinson's 2001 book, Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative  was described by Director  magazine as "a truly mind-opening analysis of why we don’t get the best out of people at a time of punishing change."<br /> John Cleese said of it: ‘Ken Robinson writes brilliantly about the different ways in which creativity is undervalued and ignored in Western culture and especially in our educational systems.<br />"Out of Our Minds explains why being creative in today's world is a vital necessity. This book is not to be missed."—Ken Blanchard, co-author of the one-minute manager and the secret<br />"If ever there was a time when creativity was necessary for the survival and growth of any organization, it is now. This book, more than any other I know, provides important insights on how leaders can evoke and sustain those creative juices."—Warren Bennis, Professor of business, University of southern California.<br />"All corporate leaders should read this book."—Richard Scase, author and business forecaster<br />"This really is a remarkable book. It does for human resources what Rachel Carson's Silent Spring did for the environment."—Wally Olins, founder, Wolff-Olins<br />"Books about creativity are not always creative. Ken Robinson's is a welcome exception?"— Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Professor of psychology, Claremont graduate university.<br />"The best analysis I've seen of the disjunction between the kinds of intelligence that we have traditionally honored in schools and the kinds of creativity that we need today in our organizations and our society."— Howard Gardner, Professor in cognition and education, Harvard graduate school of education.<br />Author has been felicitated with:<br />2009 Ambassador for the European Year of Creativity and Innovation<br />2009 Honorary Degree of Doctor from the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD)<br />2008 Governor's Award for the Arts in Pennsylvania<br />2008 Gheens Foundation Creativity and Entrepreneurship Award<br />2008 George Peabody Medal <br />2008 Royal Society for the Arts Benjamin Franklin Medal <br />2008 Honorary Degree of Doctor from the University of Central England<br />2004 Companionship of Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts<br />2003 Knighted<br />About Smriti Zalpuri:<br />Okay so the picture had a name. I thought it would be ‘creative’ of me to put a famous person’s picture instead of mine, whose known for being intelligent.<br /> <br />She is a physical therapy student pursuing her masters in health sciences from University of Indianapolis. She has not done great things like Sir Ken Robinson…yet! She also doesn’t have any experience in writing or in being creative (which I think I shouldn’t mention while writing a living book report on a book that says everyone is creative). Well let’s put it this way, she is creative with some limitations. Hope her first attempt at a living book report is not a disaster.<br />42545-483870<br />According to Sir Ken Robinson:<br />There is a paradox. Throughout the world, companies and organizations are trying to compete in a world of economic and technological change that is moving faster than ever. They urgently need people who are creative, innovative and flexible. Too often they can’t find them. Why is this? What’s the real problem — and what should be done about it? Out of Our Minds answers three vital questions for all organizations that have a serious strategic interest in creativity and innovation.<br />
    • Why is it essential to promote creativity? Governments, companies and organizations are concerned as never before with promoting creativity and innovation. Why is this so essential? What’s the price of failure?
    • 2. Why is it necessary to develop creativity? Why do so many adults think they’re not creative (and not very intelligent)? Most children are buzzing with ideas. What happens to them as they grow up?
    • 3. What is involved in promoting creativity? Is everyone creative or just a select few? Can creativity be developed? If so, how? What are the benefits of success?
    According to Smriti Zalpuri<br /> (Who is trying to apply this knowledge to Physical Therapy): <br />This book is a big book not because it has many pages but because it has great ideas and topics. When I read through this book I realized that it doesn’t teach us how to be creative but why it is good to be creative. It makes us introspect and realize that there is creativity in all of us: just some of us have forgotten about it growing up. It made me wonder: Why are we so content with our education systems? The system that is very narrow, partial and clearly inappropriate for the 21st century. <br />This made me think about the time when we enrolled in PT school, we had these great ideas and innovative ways in handling patients and treating them. Now when it is time to implement them, we shy away. Many of currently working PT’s will argue saying that they are creative- they find different ways of making their patient do the exercises. That’s hardly the point. My question is – are we not creative within boundaries? Are we not told what to do by the institution we work for? <br />According to Sir Ken Robinson:<br />In Out of our Minds, he argues that organizations are trying to fix a downstream problem that originates in schools and universities. Most people leave education with no idea what their real abilities are. He says what all organizations, including those in education, can do immediately to recover people’s creative talents. <br />Robinson also argues for radical changes in how we think about intelligence and human resources and in how we educate people to meet the extraordinary challenges of living and working in the 21st century. Ken Robinson gives his definition of creativity: “imaginative processes with outcomes that are original and of value.” He rightfully insists on the fact that, “Creativity is a process, not an event.” <br />According to Smriti Zalpuri<br /> (Who is trying to apply this knowledge to Physical Therapy): <br />I am putting down a list of some of my favorite quotes from this book. Though the book was filled with many such interesting quotes I tried to pick the ones that were relevant and could be applied to PT.<br />
    • “Pictures give the whole pattern of ideas simultaneously. In these forms we can express thoughts that do not fit the structures of words.”
    • 4. Creativity is often a dialogue between concept and material. The process of artistic creation in particular is not just a question of thinking of an idea and then finding a way to express it. Often it’s only in developing the dance, image or music that the idea emerges at all.”
    • 5. “Creativity is not purely intellectual process. It is enriched by other capabilities and in particular by feelings, intuition and by a playful imagination.”
    Do you come across a situation where you find it difficult to express yourself? Do you feel that you know what it is, but you just can’t find the right words? Well in such a situation pictures would be the perfect solution. For instance, we can give patients pictures with a brief description of the exercise for home exercise program (HEP). It would make it easier for the patient to understand what to do and less chances of making error in performance at home where they are not supervised.<br />I recently got a chance to go visit clinics as a part of a course I am enrolled in for this semester. I saw how most of the PT’s (physical therapist) did their jobs so creatively. The way the exercises were modified according to the patients interest, how examinations and assessments were made fun for the patient (especially an infant), how every PT had developed a strategy of their own to treat patients in the best possible way; minimizing the effort and maximizing the effect. So many efforts are put in by PT’s but it still brings me back to my first question. Are we limited in our creativity? What if we find a way to get through to a patient, but the institution we work for doesn’t agree? , or the insurance company? , or the treatment guide? What should we do then?<br />According to Sir Ken Robinson:<br />Schools kill creativity. <br />http://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_changing_education_paradigms.html<br />The Power of the Imaginative Mind.<br />http://www.edutopia.org/sir-ken-robinson-creativity-part-one-video<br />According to Smriti Zalpuri<br /> (Who is trying to apply this knowledge to Physical Therapy): <br />Everyone has creative capacities; the challenge is to know how to cultivate them. Everyone can be a good therapist but the challenge is to know how high to aim and which path to take to reach there. Sometimes, it is better to aim low and succeed than aim high and fail. It’s just that we should know when to aim high and when not to.<br /> When we see a good therapist we often say that he/she is gifted and when we see a bad therapist it’s vice versa. What I came to learn from reading this book is that no one is less gifted than the other; it’s just the way of looking at it. <br />To conclude, something for everyone to think and something I realized. Even the most obstinately prosaic and safe thinkers will be tempted to think out of their comfort zone. It’s is a quote from Ken Robinsons next book; The Element: A New View of Human Capacity.<br />"If you're not prepared to be wrong, you'll never come up with anything original." <br />