Interviewing 101

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A presentation by Lexie Forman-Ortiz from at the InforumSF and Commonwealth Club's “The New Rules of Getting and Keeping a Job You Love."

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  • Research: You should know they company you’re going to interview for. What are their core competencies, their business models, their competitor, etc. How can you see yourself adding value? A lot of candidates will just say, “I fit in here” and leave it at that. Go a step further, “I fit in here, because I can contribute x, y, & z and it seems you don’t have that yet.” It sets you apart. Be prepared to give a concrete example of what you can bring, or a process you can improve upon.
  • This is just as much a test for you as it is for them. You want to get a real sense of what you’ll be doing. What it’s like to work there. If this is a good fit. This also goes along with being prepared. Are you the kind of candidate that doesn’t have any questions? Don’t be. EX of good questions to ask…
  • A lot of candidates go in thinking, “I hope they like me, and I’ll say whatever they want to hear.” Wrong. First of all good hiring managers, will be able to sniff that out in a second so you’re not doing yourself any favors. And even if they don’t “sniff it out” you’re still not doing yourself any favors. EX. You ask if people work in teams or individually, you know you work SIGNIFICANTLY better alone, in fact working with people makes your incredibly uncomfortable. When you agree to take a job, you’re getting married. And you just agreed to spend the better part of the day in a situation you hate.
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