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Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
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Smart Commute Initiative: Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton

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Presented by: Ryan Lanyon, BA …

Presented by: Ryan Lanyon, BA
Presented at: Transportation Association of Canada, Saskatoon, October 2007

Published in: Automotive
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  • - This makes Smart Commute like a diet – not as much fun as buying new pants, but a way to manage growth and save some money
  • Tens of thousands of new cars each year Commuters moving further out Changing patterns mean more suburb-to-suburb commuting Dual-income households Kids living at home
  • -Gridlock to worsen by 45% -Much of the travel cross municipal boundaries -Congestion costs $1.8 billion per year -Congestion cost porjection of $3.0 billion by 2021
  • -Smart Commute necessary response to those growth and congestion pressures -Reaction to the current situation and land use patterns -Transportation demand management is a faster, more cost-effective solution
  • -Transport Canada UTSP program catalyst for partnership -Take a proven model in GTAH and expand across -Smart Commute Black Creek -SOV mode share dropped from 70% to 60% at York University -deferred construction of two parking garages saving $30 million
  • -New type of collaboration required new organizational structure -TC funding required one recipient = York Region -Partnership required spreading responsibility to all parties = MOU
  • -Municipalities that signed MOU formed SCI Steering Committee - financial management - administration - Smart Commute Association - overall direction = FUNDERS Technical Committee - Participating municipalities - Technical details - TMAs = IMPLEMENTERS Advisory Committee - link to broader community - Transit, NGOs, Academics, Businesses = SUPPORTERS - SCA = PROJECT COORDINATORS
  • -TMAs established in each partner municipality Largely follow municipal boundaries 7 created and operational by end of timeframe Durham has since launched, Hamilton soon, Downtown on hold
  • -each TMA set up differently according to local context - 404-7 = board of trade - Mississauga = non-profit - Halton = municipality Municipal incubator Employers engaged as participants, but also lead initiatives on boards, steering and advisory committees for each TMA TWO TIERS - regional coordination but local customization - TMAs engage employers and work on the ground - SCA engages general public and provides support services to TMAs
  • Unique split of responsibilities; some variances on the model in US and Canada Economies of scale vs. autonomy Response to differing municipal expectations and challenges Hamilton = environment 404-7 = traffic BLURRY LINE – shifting activities and responsibilities as initiative evolved
  • Programming and services with employers and commuters – the ‘WHAT’ we do CPZ CONSOLIDATED systems and reduced cost - 404-7 - North Toronto, Vaughan - Employers CPZ – 16 MONTHS - 6,000 users - 500 carpools
  • Programming captured in TMA Toolkit - assistance to TMAs from inception to full operation - practical tools - templates - services - knowledge and best practices - resource for TMAs, not required - services tailored by each TMA e.g. CYCLING - available at www.smartcommute.ca
  • Monitoring a critical component of funding TTS not available at end of project Observed data difficult to isolate to behaviour change Commuter survey a basic scan of regional attitudes CPZ direct survey of clients
  • -easier to isolate at employer level, but still not a closed system
  • Much of the change through carpooling and from established programs Attitudinal survey and cordon counts both showed overall increase in carpooling From 7-12% of commute trips in 18 months Echoed by name recognition of Carpool Zone = 17% of commuters knew it Smart Commute name recognition at 10% Impacts from final year as TMAs come online
  • UTSP funding to learn lessons Minimum 16 months to form a TMA from conception to launch
  • -significant time investment in building relationships -minimum 10 months to recruit an employer from first phone call to launching service with employees -may be concurrent with TMA formation for leading employers
  • -program still monitoring now = 18 employers SCA -need to provide value to existing partners -standardize development process
  • -establishing good relationships is very important in a voluntary and cooperative effort
  • Need central point of contact for all partners for flow of information Central point of contact for the public – redirect as appropriate -Technical committee crucial to communicating and obtaining understanding between partners -Employee turnover within program can have serious impact
  • -TMA Toolkit offered choice Templates provide an economy of scale - not enough to create templates and packages and then distribute - must be accompanied with training and support for implementation
  • -must be flexible but maintain some consistent for comparison - different operating models may lead to different results CONTRIBUTION AGREEMENT - monitor framework established before implementation - build into services like Carpool Zone - clear definition of indicators
  • -gas prices -environmental consciousness CHANGE FROM NOTHING TO SUBSTANTIAL - Hurricane Katrina - windstorms in Vancouver - smog days, heat alerts and heavy rainstorms in Toronto -time for change - AWARENESS - TRIAL - USAGE - takes employees time to work through and change habits - look for immediate opportunities like OFFICE MOVES
  • Relationship with business community is invaluable - Ontario Chamber called for provincial funding and involvement in 2006
  • Transcript

    • 1. Smart Commute Initiative Establishment of a Multijurisdictional Workplace-based Transportation Demand Management Program Serving the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton
    • 2. <ul><li>“ Experience in both the [Greater Golden Horseshoe] and other metropolitan regions shows that adding lanes to solve traffic congestion is like loosening one’s belt to deal with obesity, since traffic quickly fills up any new road space built.” </li></ul><ul><li>- Conference Board of Canada, 2005 </li></ul>
    • 3. Outline <ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><li>Smart Commute Initiative </li></ul><ul><li>Impacts </li></ul><ul><li>Lessons Learned </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul>Ryan Lanyon Project Director Smart Commute Association 2007 Annual Conference Transportation Association of Canada
    • 4. Background - Growth <ul><li>Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rapid population growth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Six million residents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Three million jobs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>100,000 new residents per year </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Suburban growth and urban sprawl </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Automobile-oriented </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased traffic congestion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gridlock costing local economy $1.8 billion per year </li></ul></ul>
    • 5. Background - Travel Demand <ul><li>Source: MTO, GO Transit, Globe and Mail </li></ul>
    • 6. Smart Commute Initiative (SCI) <ul><li>Workplace-based TDM program </li></ul><ul><li>Pan GTA and Hamilton </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on employers in GTAH </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Outreach to overall commutershed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Objectives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce SOV trips </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce VKT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid GHG emissions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid CAC emissions </li></ul></ul>
    • 7. Smart Commute Initiative (SCI) <ul><li>Formal partnership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regions of Halton, Peel, York and Durham </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cities of Hamilton, Mississauga and Toronto </li></ul></ul><ul><li>May 2004 – March 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Funding </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Transport Canada </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Municipalities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Private sector </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community funding </li></ul></ul>
    • 8. SCI - Governance
    • 9. SCI - Governance
    • 10. SCI - TMAs
    • 11. SCI - Delivery and Partnerships <ul><li>Eight new organizations or initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>Municipal government incubator </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Municipal initiative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Incorporated non-profit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chamber of commerce or board of trade </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Employer involvement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Service delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>TMA management </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Two tiers of service delivery </li></ul>
    • 12. SCI - Two-tiered Operations <ul><li>Pilot projects </li></ul><ul><li>Steer research </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation and best practices </li></ul>Research and Development <ul><li>Employee surveys </li></ul><ul><li>Data collection </li></ul><ul><li>Data presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Standards and tools </li></ul><ul><li>Regional surveys </li></ul><ul><li>Compilation of data </li></ul>Monitoring and Evaluation <ul><li>Use of services </li></ul><ul><li>Customized modules </li></ul><ul><li>Centralized services </li></ul><ul><li>Module development </li></ul>Commuter Services <ul><li>Local and workplace marketing, media and events </li></ul><ul><li>Regional marketing, media and events </li></ul>Marketing and Education TMA (Local tier) SCA (Regional tier) Activities
    • 13. SCI - Programming <ul><li>Improved bicycle parking </li></ul><ul><li>Showers and change rooms with flexible dress codes </li></ul><ul><li>Education and skills training </li></ul>Cycling <ul><li>Volume incentive programs </li></ul><ul><li>Route-planning assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Shuttles to/from rapid transit </li></ul><ul><li>Emergency Ride Home or commuter insurance </li></ul>Transit <ul><li>Assistance with employer-provided vanpools </li></ul><ul><li>Preferential parking </li></ul><ul><li>Emergency Ride Home or commuter insurance </li></ul>Vanpooling <ul><li>Online ridematching service (Carpool Zone) </li></ul><ul><li>Preferential parking </li></ul><ul><li>Cash incentives </li></ul><ul><li>Emergency Ride Home or commuter insurance </li></ul>Carpooling Tools and Services Target Mode
    • 14. SCI - Programming <ul><li>TMA Toolkit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Marketing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Special events </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Full- and part-time telework </li></ul><ul><li>Compressed work weeks </li></ul>Trip elimination <ul><li>Flexible start and finish times </li></ul><ul><li>Compressed work weeks </li></ul>Travel time shift Tools and Services Target Behaviour
    • 15. SCI - Monitoring and Evaluation <ul><li>Regional level </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Observed behaviour change </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Transportation Tomorrow Survey (TTS) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cordon Count Program </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reported behaviour change </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Baseline commuter survey (May 2005) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Follow-up commuter survey (November 2006) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Client interaction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Carpool Zone user survey (monthly) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 16. SCI - Monitoring and Evaluation <ul><li>Employer level </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Establish baseline </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Employee commuting survey </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Site assessment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Vehicle and occupancy count (+1,000 employees) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deliver program and track outreach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Brochure and incentive distribution </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Other communications </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Events </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Measure change from baseline </li></ul></ul>
    • 17. Impacts <ul><li>Reduced or eliminated (2006-07) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>14,500 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>62,800,000 VKT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1.19 million SOV trips </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reduced or eliminated (2004-07) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>17,400 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>100 tonnes of criteria air contaminants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>75,750,000 VKT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1.27 million SOV trips </li></ul></ul>
    • 18. Lessons Learned - Time <ul><li>TMA development </li></ul><ul><ul><li>6-12 months: Municipal approval to begin </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4-16 months: Investigation of feasibility </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>6-9 months: Agreement with host organization (concurrent) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>6-12 months: Stakeholder commitment to launch </li></ul></ul>
    • 19. Lessons Learned - Time <ul><li>Employer implementation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2-9 months: Recruitment of employer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2-9 months: Commitment and baseline survey </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3-12 months: Measurement, analysis and approval </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3-6 months: Planning and initial launch of services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On-going: Implementation and continued promotion </li></ul></ul>
    • 20. Lessons Learned - Time <ul><li>Monitoring </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Premature follow-up will show little change </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two years from baseline </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Two-tiered structure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regional tier developed earlier </li></ul></ul>
    • 21. Lessons Learned - Commitment <ul><li>Unprecedented municipal cooperation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Governance framework, accountability </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Secure buy-in for deliverables </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Roles and responsibilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Implementation methods and services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitoring and reporting </li></ul></ul>
    • 22. Lessons Learned - Communication <ul><li>Central point of contact </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Smart Commute Association - www.smartcommute.ca </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local Smart Commutes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>On-going communication </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensure all partners are up-to-date </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engage through in-person meetings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Partnership requires travel </li></ul></ul>
    • 23. Lessons Learned - Customization <ul><li>One-size-fits-all does not work </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Local context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local ownership </li></ul></ul>
    • 24. Lessons Learned - Monitoring <ul><li>Employer surveys </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Buy-in can be difficult </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Must be flexible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Employer has final approval </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Established framework </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Targets and processes set before implementation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitoring considered during development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Data collection automated and planned </li></ul></ul>
    • 25. Lessons Learned - Monitoring <ul><li>Impossible to isolate effects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Track inputs and outputs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be aware of double-counting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Account for environmental changes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allow sufficient time for behaviour change </li></ul></ul>
    • 26. Conclusions <ul><li>Successful implementation across jurisdictions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Partnership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cooperation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two-tiers of program delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Monitoring showed programs worked </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Exact results not isolated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trends, activities and awareness show success </li></ul></ul>
    • 27. Conclusions <ul><li>Value for businesses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>High satisfaction with services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tangible and intangible benefits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support of Ontario Chamber of Commerce </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Smart Commute continuing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adjustments to structure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Municipal funding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continued learning </li></ul></ul>
    • 28. Questions? Ryan Lanyon Project Director Smart Commute Association [email_address] 416-338-0498

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