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Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
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Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study

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Presented by: Jennifer Lay, BES …

Presented by: Jennifer Lay, BES
Presented at: ACT Canada TDM Summit, Toronto, November 2009

Published in: Automotive
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  • The three most common modes of travel – accounting for over ninety percent of respondents’ children – were walking, being driven, and riding the school bus. Travel modes to and from tend to be consistent, with 9% identifying a change in mode. Two thirds of these respondents drive their children to school, but they travel home a different way – nearly half walk home, while the majority of others ride the school bus or public transit. Public transit becomes a more significant mode of travel by grades 7 and 8 – important to note that nearly all public transit was in Toronto census division.
  • The three most common modes of travel – accounting for over ninety percent of respondents’ children – were walking, being driven, and riding the school bus. Travel modes to and from tend to be consistent, with 9% identifying a change in mode. Two thirds of these respondents drive their children to school, but they travel home a different way – nearly half walk home, while the majority of others ride the school bus or public transit. Public transit becomes a more significant mode of travel by grades 7 and 8 – important to note that nearly all public transit was in Toronto census division.
  • Within 1 km, three in four have their child walk to and home from school. Drops off significantly for those who live further away.
  • Within 1 km, three in four have their child walk to and home from school. Drops off significantly for those who live further away.
  • Respondents who live in the Toronto census division, and within 1 km of their child’s school, are the most likely to have their children walk to school, at 82%, and walk home from school, at 86%. We find few significant differences in travel habits between Hamilton or Peel and the rest of the GTHA. We do see a significantly greater likelihood in each of these regions for children to ride the school bus, and a significantly lower rate of walking in Hamilton than the average, but these differences can be traced to the effects of the distinctive travel profile found in the Toronto CD (specifically, a higher rate of walking, and lower rate of riding/availability of the school bus), rather than unique habits found in Hamilton or Peel.
  • Main reason for mode fell into three basic categories: They or their child preferred that method; They feel that there are no other options available to them; and They have concerns about other methods. For example, “safety issues” fit into the concerns category, while an ineligibility for school bus service fits into the no other options category. These responses were open ended, and while we asked for their main method, we accepted more than one response where applicable. The only regional difference we find is in Peel, where active methods are more likely to be used because of a lack of other options and less likely to be used because it is preferred ( no other options 34%; preferred 59%).
  • There does appear to be a relationship between parent’s own experience and their child’s mode of transport.
  • Six in ten children who walk or bike to or home from school do so with other school-aged children. Looking at travel to and home from school combined , 9% of children travel in an organized group for at least one journey.
  • Over 7 in 10 children who walk or bike to school are accompanied by an adult. We see significantly different patterns of accompaniment when considering the grade of the child. More than half of children attending kindergarten are accompanied  nearly half of grades 1 – 6  drops off significantly in grades 4 through 6, with a commensurate increase in travel with children but not an adult.  In grades 7 and 8, majority travel with other children, but no adult, and nearly 1 in 5 travels alone.
  • 14.1% of total 14.5% Peel 13.3% Hamilton
  • 14.1% of total 14.5% Peel 13.3% Hamilton
  • Transcript

    • 1. Greater Toronto & Hamilton Area School Travel Household Attitudinal Study
    • 2. Methodology overview
      • A total of 1,001 English interviews were conducted with parents and guardians of the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA)
      • Respondents were asked questions about school travel related to their ‘eldest child attending elementary school’ (i.e. Kindergarten to Grade 8)
      • The survey was conducted over the course of three weeks, including pretest and fieldwork (September-October)
      • Sample was drawn based on Census Division (CD). The table below displays weighted and unweighted totals and margins of error, by CD
      • Oversampling was conducted in Hamilton and Peel to ensure adequate representation for analysis
      • The final dataset is weighted by the child’s gender and grade, and by CD. Population totals were derived from the 2006 Census
      6,060,475 561,260 892,710 2,503,285 1,159,405 439,255 504,560 POP’N ±3.1 1,001 1,001 TOTAL ±11.32 93 75 Durham ±9.8 147 100 York ±6.2 413 250 Toronto ±6.2 191 250 Peel ±11.32 73 75 Halton ±6.19 83 251 Hamilton Margin of Error Weighted TOTAL Unweighted TOTAL CD
    • 3. GTHA School Travel Household Attitudinal Study Objectives
        • Examine current school travel mode split, including:
          • By area, by grade, by distance
          • Compare to school versus home from school
          • Look at threshold distance for walking-driving
          • Determine main reasons for mode choice
          • Look at parent school travel mode vs child school travel mode
        • Profile: Active Travel, Auto Travel, Carpool Travel
        • Identify school travel-related issues and concerns
        • Gauge awareness of school travel programs and infrastructure
        • Identify potential target market for a shift towards sustainable and active school travel
    • 4. Respondent Profile 13% 10% 17% Over 125 thousand 10% 18% 14% 95 to 125 thousand 21% 23% 17% 65 to 95 thousand 24% 17% 19% 35 to 65 thousand 10% 13% 11% Less than 35 thousand HOUSEHOLD INCOME (CAD) 4% 3% 2% Student 25% 24% 22% Not Working 8% 14% 10% Employed PT 59% 57% 61% Employed FT EMPLOYMENT STATUS 1% 1% 1% Step-parent 3% - 1% Older sibling 3% 4% 3% Other relative 93% 94% 94% Parent RELATION TO CHILDREN IN HOUSEHOLD 4% 5% 4% 55 and over 20% 16% 22% 45-54 48% 49% 52% 35-44 25% 27% 19% 18-34 AGE Peel Hamilton Overall 66% 69% 62% 34% 31% 38% GENDER Male Female 1.5 1.5 1.5 Mean (children) 8% 8% 8% Three or more 34% 31% 33% Two 58% 60% 59% One # OF CHILDREN IN HOUSEHOLD ATTENDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 51.8 72.8 48.8 Mean (minutes) 14% 26% 12% More than 1 hour 26% 26% 29% 31 to 60 minutes 39% 31% 35% 16 to 30 minutes 19% 15% 18% 15 minutes or less TIME SPENT WALKING DAILY 24% 12% 21% Other 10% - 2% Panjabi/Punjabi 8% 1% 3% Urdu 2% - 4% Chinese (Mand. or Canton.) 4% 3% 4% French 76% 94% 82% English LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME Peel Hamilton Overall
    • 5. Transportation Profile ELDEST CHILD ATTENDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    • 6. Q1E. How does your child usually travel to school? Q1F. How does your child usually travel home from school? Q1E. Base: All respondents (N=1,001); Q1F. Base: All respondents (N=1,001) Mode of travel to and from school
    • 7. Q1E/Q1F. How does your child usually travel to and home from school? Q1E. Base: All respondents (N=1,001), ~9% (N=87); Q1F. Base: All respondents (N=1,001), ~9% (N=87) Differing modes of travel to and from school
      • Nine percent of respondents’ children travelled to and from school by different modes. We find a few patterns within this group:
      21.8% Other (collapsed due to sample size; e.g. school bus to school, walk home) 6.1% Walk to school, driven home 7.1% Ride school bus to school, driven home 10.2% Driven to school, ride public transit home 10.7% Driven to school, ride school bus home 44.0% Driven to school, walk home % Modes of travel
    • 8. Q1E. How does your child usually travel to school? Q1E. Base: All respondents (N=1,001) Mode of school travel – by grade
    • 9. Q1F. How does your child usually travel home from school? Q1F. Base: All respondents (N=1,001) Mode of travel home from school – by grade
    • 10. Q1E/Q1F. How does your child usually travel to and home from school? Q1E/Q1F. Base: All respondents (N=1,001) Mode of school travel – by distance to school Overall Live within 1 km of child’s school Live between 1 and 2 km of child’s school Live more than 2 km from child’s school
    • 11. Q1E/Q1F. How does your child usually travel to and home from school? Q1E/Q1F. Base: All respondents (N=1,001) Walking to school – threshold distance
    • 12. Q1E/Q1F. How does your child usually travel to and home from school? Mode of school travel – by area Q1E/Q1F. Base: All respondents (N=1,001) Overall Peel Hamilton
    • 13. Main reason for mode choice 3% 20% 73% ACTIVE METHOD (walking or cycling) 8% 47% 44% RIDING THE SCHOOL BUS 24% 38% 42% DRIVEN TO SCHOOL BY A HOUSEHOLD MEMBER CONCERNS ABOUT OTHER METHODS NO OTHER OPTIONS PREFERRED
    • 14. Correlation between parent’s mode of school travel and child’s mode of school travel Parent’s Mode Child’s Mode 42% 35% 22% ACTIVE METHOD (walking or cycling) 20% 37% 23% RIDING THE SCHOOL BUS or PUBLIC TRANSIT 38% 28% 55% DRIVEN TO SCHOOL ACTIVE METHOD (walking or cycling) RIDING THE SCHOOL BUS or PUBLIC TRANSIT DRIVEN TO SCHOOL
    • 15. Transportation Profile: ACTIVE MODES ELDEST CHILD ATTENDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    • 16. Q1E3/Q1F3. Does your child travel to/ from school with other school-aged children? Q1E3A/Q1F3A. Is this as part of a group organized by the school or community? Q1E3/Q1E3A. Base: Respondents whose child walks or bikes to school (N=384) Q1F3/Q1F3A. Base: Respondents whose child walks or bikes home from school (N=401) Travel with other children Overall Peel Hamilton
    • 17. Q1E3. Does your child travel to school with other school-aged children? Q1E7. Is your child accompanied by an adult when they walk/bike to school? Q1E3/Q1E7. Base: Respondents whose child walks or bikes to school (N=384) Active travel with adults and children
    • 18. Profile: “Active Travellers” 14% 17% >$125K 14% 14% $95K to $125K 21% 17% $65K to $95K 19% 19% $35K to $65K 13% 11% <$35K HOUSEHOLD INCOME 53% 59% Two+ drivers & two+ cars 23% 23% Two+ drivers; one car 20% 16% One driver 4% 2% None DRIVERS & CARS IN HOUSEHOLD 7% 32% >2KM 23% 27% 1-2KM 63% 33% <1KM DISTANCE TO SCHOOL ACTIVE TRAVELLERS (N=417) OVERALL
    • 19. Q18. Is your child's school close enough that they could reasonably walk to school on a regular basis? Child’s school within walking distance Q18. Base: All respondents (N=984)
    • 20. Q21A. There are safe bike routes or paths around the school. Active and safe routes to school Q21A. Base: Respondents whose child’s school is close enough for them to reasonably walk or bike (N=680) Q21D. I have discussed how to walk or bike to school safely with my child.
    • 21. Q21H. It is important to me that my child gets exercise while travelling to and from school. Importance of exercise & environment Q21H/I. Base: All respondents (N=984) Q21I. It is important to me that my child gets to and from school in an environment-friendly way.
    • 22. Transportation Profile: DRIVEN ELDEST CHILD ATTENDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    • 23. Q1E2/Q1F2. When the adult drives your child to/from school, is this part of a commute to/from work, a commute to/from another destination, or is the main purpose of the trip to drop off/pick up your child at school? Q1E2. Base: Respondents whose child is driven to school (N=314) Q1F2. Base: Respondents whose child is driven home from school (N=277) Purpose of adult’s trip Overall Peel Hamilton
    • 24. Profile: “Auto Travellers” 22% 17% >$125K 18% 14% $95K to $125K 18% 17% $65K to $95K 15% 19% $35K to $65K 6% 11% <$35K HOUSEHOLD INCOME 71% 59% Two or more drivers & two or more cars 19% 23% Two or more drivers; one car 9% 16% One driver 0% 2% None DRIVERS & CARS IN HOUSEHOLD 37% 32% >2KM 33% 27% 1-2KM 20% 33% <1KM DISTANCE TO SCHOOL AUTO TRAVELLERS (N=329) OVERALL
    • 25. Transportation Profile: CARPOOLING ELDEST CHILD ATTENDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    • 26. Q14. Are there times that you participate in a carpool for school travel with neighbours or friends? Participation in carpools Q14. Base: All respondents (N=984)
    • 27. Q21E. A list of nearby parents who would like to carpool would be useful to me. Interest in a carpool list Q21E. Base: Respondents whose child is driven to school by a member of their household, and would be comfortable with them participating in a carpool (N=244)
    • 28. Profile: Potential Carpoolers 25% 17% >$125K 17% 14% $95K to $125K 23% 17% $65K to $95K 17% 19% $35K to $65K 3% 11% <$35K HOUSEHOLD INCOME 75% 59% Two or more drivers & two or more cars 18% 23% Two or more drivers; one car 6% 16% One driver 0% 2% None DRIVERS & CARS IN HOUSEHOLD 42% 32% >2KM 33% 27% 1-2KM 18% 33% <1KM DISTANCE TO SCHOOL INTERESTED IN CARPOOLING (N=179) OVERALL
    • 29. Interest in Alternative Modes ELDEST CHILD ATTENDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    • 30. Q21G. I'm interested in considering alternatives to the way that my child currently travels. Interest in considering alternatives Q21G. Base: All respondents (N=984)
    • 31. School Travel Issues and Concerns ELDEST CHILD ATTENDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    • 32. Neighbourhood safety Q21A. Base: Respondents whose child’s school is close enough for them to reasonably walk or bike (N=680) Q21B. People drive safely enough in my neighbourhood. Q21C. I worry about strangers or bullies approaching my child if they travel alone.
    • 33. Program Awareness RESPONDENT/HOUSEHOLD
    • 34. Q22. Are you aware of any programs in your area designed to promote walking, biking or carpooling for school travel? Awareness of programs Q22. Base: All respondents (N=1,001)
    • 35. Q23. Have you heard of each of the following programs? Awareness of Specific Programs Q23. Base: All respondents (N=1,001) International Walk to School Day or Month (iWalk) Walking or Cycling School Bus Carpool Zone CAN-BIKE
    • 36. School Travel Infrastructure and Programs ELDEST CHILD ATTENDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    • 37. Q24. Does your child's school offer… School Travel Infrastructure Q24. Base: All respondents (N=1,001) Sidewalks leading to the school entrance Crossing guards and marked crossings at the school Bicycle parking A student drop off area for automobiles
    • 38. Q24. Does your child's school offer… School Travel Programs Q24. Base: All respondents (N=1,001) Walking safety education, special events or programs Cycling safety education, special events or programs Maps of the best or safest routes to school A carpool matching service or list
    • 39. Key target markets ELDEST CHILD ATTENDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    • 40. Profile: “Close Drivers” 17% 17% >$125K 17% 14% $95K to $125K 20% 17% $65K to $95K 16% 19% $35K to $65K 8% 11% <$35K HOUSEHOLD INCOME 72% 59% Two or more drivers & two or more cars 18% 23% Two or more drivers; one car 10% 16% One driver 0% 2% None DRIVERS & CARS IN HOUSEHOLD 14% 32% >2KM 41% 27% 1-2KM 39% 33% <1KM DISTANCE TO SCHOOL CLOSE DRIVERS (N=160) OVERALL
    • 41. Those who do not use available school bus service 32% 17% >$125K 17% 14% $95K to $125K 17% 17% $65K to $95K 12% 19% $35K to $65K 4% 11% <$35K HOUSEHOLD INCOME 78% 59% Two or more drivers & two or more cars 16% 23% Two or more drivers; one car 5% 16% One driver 0% 2% None DRIVERS & CARS IN HOUSEHOLD 47% 32% >2KM 33% 27% 1-2KM 14% 33% <1KM DISTANCE TO SCHOOL THOSE WHO DO NOT USE AVAILABLE SCHOOL BUS SERVICE (N=88) OVERALL
    • 42. Convenience and Appeal of Alternate modes Base: Respondents whose child is driven to or home from school & for whom the alternate method is available 37 131 131 117 70 239 COLUMN ‘N’ 56% 55% 31% 16% 53% 59% CONVENENT AND APPEALING 50% 64% 66% 25% 70% 69% CHILD’S INTEREST 88% 76% 62% 26% 64% 73% APPEAL 71% 78% 50% 24% 66% 66% CONVENIENCE WALK OR BIKE ALONE WALK OR BIKE WITH GROUP WALK OR BIKE WITH PARENT PUBLIC TRANIST SCHOOL BUS CARPOOL
    • 43. Final Study Report to be available at: www.metrolinx.com/schooltravel Jennifer Lay School-based TDM Coordinator, Metrolinx [email_address]

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