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Benefits of co-operative vehicle systems

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Criticism of infrastructure-heavy approach to next-gen intelligent transportation systems.

Criticism of infrastructure-heavy approach to next-gen intelligent transportation systems.

Published in Automotive , Business , Technology
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  • So the road-side stuff will soon become an anchor. It is odd how people wanting to change things design things that then prevent change.
  • We can solve this without roadside infrastructure

Transcript

  • 1. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments IBEC3. Benefits Of Co-operative Systems Bern Grush, Chief Scientist Skymeter Corporation 17th ITS World Congress, Busan, Korea October 25-29, 20101 Thinking about cooperative vehicle architecture?
  • 2. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments How should we think about cooperative system architectures?  What’s fixed?  What’s autonomous? 2
  • 3. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments NextGen intelligent integrated systems  National and international efforts  VII, CVIS, Intellidrive  Manage massive vehicle fleets or very complex things about a vehicle – or both  Sometimes we envision participation of large fleets, perhaps an entire extant fleet 3
  • 4. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments New industry initiatives?  E.g., ng Connect  Is this the beginning of commercialization?  Does it signal the end to government’s dominant innovator role? 4
  • 5. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments Equipment activities include:  I2V - Tell cars local enviro & mobility guidance  V2I - Tell the console about car behaviors  V2V - Cars talk among themselves 5
  • 6. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments Do we really need fixed infrastructure?  Expensive  Not pervasive  Monolithic  Anti-autonomous  Anti-evolution  Anti-innovation 6 If we misjudge this, someone else will eat our lunch.
  • 7. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments Who knows?  Randal O’Toole (CATO) says we needs the coming revolution in automotive technology to reduce congestion by making cars drive safer, faster and closer together  Anthony Downs (Brookings) says this technology will never work and we are stuck with congestion, anyway  If O’Toole is right we need autonomous technology  If Downs is right we would clutter our landscape for nothing 7 Is Downs right?
  • 8. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments Technical impedance  Telematics and car-attached systems can change and multiply rapidly and dramatically (iPhone model)  see Google self drive…  Aftermarket devices can be now be made sufficiently reliable  The road-side infrastructure will never keep up (tolling gantry model)  There will be strong, positive correlation between the volume and expense of fixed infrastructure and rapid obsolescence 8 Innovation promotes heterogeneity
  • 9. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments Fixed won’t fix it  “In an era of wireless communication, cheap sensors, miniaturization, free storage, free processing, redundancy and some pretty amazing software, there is no better way to stifle innovation and evolution than to stick something in concrete.” Grush, B., Overcoming Global Gridlock, 2011 9
  • 10. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments Can we skip the infrastructure part?  Maybe not yet  Maybe not completely  But pretty soon, according to Google  Minimize roadside infrastructure in the interim  Invest mostly in intelligent telematics first 10
  • 11. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments Applications include:  V2I – about local context: guidance re speed, conditions, construction, safety, congestion  I2V – about the car (or neighboring context): speed, position  V2V – about each other or each other’s history: collision warnings, convoys  All solvable with little or no roadside infrastructure 11
  • 12. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments Less roadside more in-vehicle Reduce/replace V2I and I2V with V2V  Mesh Networks (e.g. Robin Chase’s Meadow)  On board maps and maps updates  4G (LTE) networks can manage continuous proximity maps updated by vehicles recently there (subscription)  FGPS (private, accurate, reliable, cheap)  FGPS + proximity sensors can provide crash avoidance 12
  • 13. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments We need:  Standards  interoperability  Markets  value and competition  Regulations  Consumer protection  Safety  Certification  Reliability  Licensing  fair market access to protect investment 13
  • 14. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments This gives us:  Maximum autonomy  Voluntary systems  Rapid evolution  Competition  Commercial motivation  Clutter free landscapes  Platforms for tag-along road-pricing 14
  • 15. Financial-grade GPS for mobility payments IBEC3. Benefits Of Co-operative Systems THANK YOU 17th ITS World Congress, Busan, Korea October 25-29, 201015 Think hard about cooperative architecture while it is still greenfield