761 syllabus

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761 syllabus

  1. 1. English 350-761: Discourse Analysis R 4:30-7:10, CRT 286 Patricia Mayes Office Hours: R 1:30-3:30 & by appointment Office: 486 Curtin Hall, ext. 6992 e-mail: mayes@uwm.edu Required Texts: Course reader, available at Clark Graphics, 2915 N. Oakland Ave. Phone first! (962-4633) Course Objectives: ‘Discourse analysis’ as broadly conceived is an interdisciplinary field, including work in linguistics, anthropology, sociology, and rhetoric. Though the subject of a discourse analysis could be any aspect of human communication, in this class, we’ll focus primarily on naturally occurring verbal interaction (mostly English). However, many of the methods and general principles discussed can be used to study written discourse or discourse from other languages. Thus the primary goal of the course is to provide graduate students in linguistics, rhetoric and composition, education, sociology, and other language arts fields with a basic theoretical and methodological foundation for the study of naturally occurring language. Course Requirements 1. Reading and Participation: A significant part of this course is based on the readings and in-class discussions. You will be expected to actively engage in the learning experience by doing the readings and participating in the class discussions. Note: Readings are due the day they are listed on the schedule. 2. Response Journal: We’ll divide the class into two groups. Each time response journal is listed on the schedule one of the groups will submit their responses to the readings via the BlackBoard site. To produce your entry, do the following: When you are reading, make notes of any questions or comments you have; then synthesize your response into two or three paragraphs discussing the week’s readings. Your journal entry should include at least one question that concerns all of the week’s readings as an integrated whole. This question might also refer to other information already discussed in previous readings or in class. Post your entry, including your question(s) on the BlackBoard site by 12:00 noon on the Wednesday before the readings are due so that everyone will have time to read your entry before class. Be prepared to discuss your entry in class. 3. Transcription: You will be responsible for submitting a typed transcript of 3-5 minutes of audio or videotaped interaction that you have recorded, using one of the transcription systems we’ll discuss in class. Turn in both the transcript and the tape.
  2. 2. 4. Short Papers: You will write two short (6-8 double-spaced pages) papers for the course. Each paper must deal with issues related to one of the discussion topics already dealt with in class or to one currently under discussion at the time the paper is due. They must be on different topics. You are to choose your own relevant topics, though I will be glad to advise and answer questions on this choice. Each paper must be based on real discourse data, and at least one of these papers should be based on the data you collected for your transcription. Each paper should connect ideas from the readings and discussions to observations from your data. They do not have to make a new 'discovery'; it's enough to raise thoughtful questions about how the issues examined in the readings apply to your data. It should not be necessary to do additional reading for these papers, though you may if you have time. Your main task is to apply the principles brought out in class to some data of your own. 5. Proposal for final paper: Submit a statement concerning the research theme for your final paper. 6. Final Paper: The requirements for the final paper are the same as those listed in 4, but this paper should be a bit longer (about 15 double-spaced pages). Though this paper may build on a theme that you discussed in one of your other papers, it should not just be just a revision of that paper. It should present new information and/or data. Before the paper is due, you’ll have a chance to present your research to the class. The paper will be due on the last day of class, unless you are presenting that day, in which case, it will be due on Monday (12/16). Grading Class Participation Transcription Response Journal Short Papers Final Paper Total 10 points 10 points 10 points (5 points each) 40 points (20 points each) 30 points 100 points Tentative Schedule Week/Date 1 (9/5) 2 (9/12) Topic Course Introduction – What is discourse? Discourse Transcription 3 (9/19) Conversation Analysis Du Bois et al.; Hutchby & Wooffitt; Swann (handouts) Reader: Readings 1-3 4 (9/26) Institutional Talk Reader: Readings 4-7 5 (10/3) Anthropological Perspectives on Discourse Critical Discourse Reader: Readings: 8-10 Response Journal (Grp 1) Response Journal (Grp 2) Due: transcription Reader: Reading 11 Response Journal 6 (10/10) Readings van Dijk (handout) 2 Assignments
  3. 3. 7 (10/17) Analysis Genre Analysis Reader: Readings 12-13 8 (10/24) 9 (10/31) 10 (11/7) Corpus Linguistics Discourse and Grammar Discourse and Cognition Reader: Readings 14-16 Reader: Readings 17-19 Reader: Readings 20-23 11 (11/14) 12 (11/21) 11/28 13 (12/5) 14 (12/12) Prosody Participation Structure Thanksgiving Reader: Readings 24-26 Reader: Readings 27-29 15 (12/19) (Grp 1) Response Journal (Grp 2) Due: Short paper 1 Final Exams Due: Proposal for final paper Due: Short paper 2 Student Presentations Student Presentations Due: Final papers (unless presenting); presenters papers are due Monday (12/16) Reader Contents 1. Heritage, John. 1995. Conversation analysis: Methodological aspects. Aspects of Oral Communication, ed by Uta M. Quasthoff, 391-418. Berlin: de Gruyter. 2. Sacks, Harvey. 1992 (1972). Adjacency pairs: Scope of operation. Lectures on Conversation: Volume II, ed. by Gail Jefferson, 521-532. Oxford: Blackwell. 3. Sacks, Harvey, Emanuel A. Schegloff, and Gail Jefferson. 1974. A simplest systematics for the organization of turn-taking for conversation. Language 50:696-735. 4. Ellis, Donald G. 1999. Research on social interaction and the micro-macro issue. Language and Social Interaction 32 (1&2): 31-40. 5. Zimmerman, Don H. and Deirdre Boden. 1991. Structure in action: An introduction. Talk and Social Structure, ed. by Deirdre Boden and Don H. Zimmerman, 3-21. Berkeley: University of California Press. 6. Goodwin, Charles and Marjorie Harness Goodwin. 1992. Professional vision. Plenary Lecture presented at the International Conference on Discourse and the Professions, Uppsala, Sweden. 7. Chapter 2 ( The structure of classroom lessons) from Mehan, Hugh. 1979. Learning Lessons. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 8. Hymes, Dell H. 1962. The ethnography of speaking. Anthropology and Human Behavior, ed. by Thomas Gladwin and William C. Sturtevant, 13-53. Washington, DC: The Anthropological Society of Washington. (Printed by Theo, Gaus’ Sons, Incorporated, New York.) 3
  4. 4. 9. Duranti, Alessandro. 1985. Sociocultural dimensions of discourse. Handbook of Discourse Analysis, Vol. 1, ed. by Teun A. Van Dijk, 193-231. Orlando: Academic Press. 10. Auer, Peter. 1995. Ethnographic methods in the analysis of oral communication. Aspects of Oral Communication, ed by Uta M. Quasthoff, 419-440. Berlin: de Gruyter. 11. Excerpts from Fairclough, Norman. 1995. Critical Discourse Analysis: The Critical Study of Language. London: Longman. 12. Chapters 1-3 from Swales, John. 1990. Genre Analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 13. Kress, Gunther. 1993. Genre as social process. The Power of Literacy: A Genre Approach to Teaching Writing, ed. by Bill Cope and Mary Kalantzis, 22-37. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press. 14. Chapter 1 (Introduction to a corpus in use) from Hunston, Susan. 2002. Corpora in Applied Linguistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 15. Biber, Douglas. 2001. Using corpus-based methods to investigate grammar and use: Some case studies on the use of verbs in English. Corpus Linguistics in North America, ed. by Rita C. Simpson and John M. Swales, 101-115. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press. 16. Tao, Hongyin. 2001. Discovering the usual with corpora: The case of remember. . Corpus Linguistics in North America, ed. by Rita C. Simpson and John M. Swales, 116-144. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press. 17. Schegloff, Emanuel A., Elinor Ochs, and Sandra A. Thompson. 1996. Introduction. Interaction and Grammar, ed. by Elinor Ochs, Emanuel Schegloff, and Sandra A. Thompson, 1-51. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 18. Cumming, Susanna and Tsuyoshi Ono. 1997. Discourse and grammar. Discourse as Structure and Process, ed. by Teun A. van Dijk, 112-137. London: Sage Publications. 19. Hopper, Paul J. 1998. Emergent grammar. The New Psychology of Language, ed. by Michael Tomasello, 155-175. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. 20. Chafe, Wallace. 1992. Information flow. Oxford International Encyclopedia, 215218. 21. Chapter 6 (Activation cost) from Chafe, Wallace. 1994. Discourse, Consciousness, and Time. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. 4
  5. 5. 22. Tomlin, Russell S. Linda Forrest, Ming Ming Pu, and Myung Hee Kim. 1997. Discourse semantics Discourse as Structure and Process, ed. by Teun A. van Dijk, 63111. London: Sage Publications. 23. Slobin, Dan I. 1996. From “thought and language” to “thinking for speaking”. Rethinking Linguistic Relativity, ed. by John Gumperz and Stephen Levinson, 70-96. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 24. Chapter 6 (Contextualization conventions) from Gumperz, John. 1982. Discourse Strategies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 25. Couper-Kuhlen, Elizabeth and Margret Selting. 1996. Towards an interactional perspective on prosody and a prosodic perspective on interaction. Prosody in Conversation, ed. by Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen and Margret Selting, 11-56. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 26. Pickering, Lucy. The role of tone choice in improving ITA communication in the classroom. 2002. TESOL Quarterly 35 (2): 233-255. 27. Chapter 3 (Footing) from Goffman, Erving. 1981. Forms of Talk. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 28. Irvine, Judith. 1996. Shadow conversations: The indeterminacy of participant roles. Natural Histories of Discourse, ed. by Michael Silverstein and Greg Urban, 131-159. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 29. Chapters 9-10 from Goodwin, Marjorie Harness. 1990. He-Said-She-Said. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 5
  6. 6. 22. Tomlin, Russell S. Linda Forrest, Ming Ming Pu, and Myung Hee Kim. 1997. Discourse semantics Discourse as Structure and Process, ed. by Teun A. van Dijk, 63111. London: Sage Publications. 23. Slobin, Dan I. 1996. From “thought and language” to “thinking for speaking”. Rethinking Linguistic Relativity, ed. by John Gumperz and Stephen Levinson, 70-96. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 24. Chapter 6 (Contextualization conventions) from Gumperz, John. 1982. Discourse Strategies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 25. Couper-Kuhlen, Elizabeth and Margret Selting. 1996. Towards an interactional perspective on prosody and a prosodic perspective on interaction. Prosody in Conversation, ed. by Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen and Margret Selting, 11-56. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 26. Pickering, Lucy. The role of tone choice in improving ITA communication in the classroom. 2002. TESOL Quarterly 35 (2): 233-255. 27. Chapter 3 (Footing) from Goffman, Erving. 1981. Forms of Talk. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 28. Irvine, Judith. 1996. Shadow conversations: The indeterminacy of participant roles. Natural Histories of Discourse, ed. by Michael Silverstein and Greg Urban, 131-159. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 29. Chapters 9-10 from Goodwin, Marjorie Harness. 1990. He-Said-She-Said. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 5

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