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Workforce Florida’s Strategy Council Creating the Strategy for Today’s Needs and Tomorrow’s Talent  Session 5 October 12, ...
<ul><li>Belinda Keiser Chair, Workforce Florida, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>David Armstrong Chair, Workforce Florida Strategy ...
<ul><li>Introductions </li></ul><ul><li>Good Progress thus Far </li></ul><ul><li>Use the Online ToolKit </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><li>Welcome Belinda Keiser –   Chair, Workforce Florida, Inc. David Armstrong –  Chair, Workforce Florida Strategy Cou...
<ul><li>Discussion A – Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion B – Recruitment, Retention and Expansion </li></ul><ul><...
Overarching Discussion Items Framework for Strategic Plan Priorities for Strategic Plan Measurement / Targets – Enterprise...
Milestone Timeline Are We on Schedule?
<ul><li>Readiness </li></ul><ul><li>Seamlessness </li></ul><ul><li>Anticipatory </li></ul><ul><li>Reliable </li></ul><ul><...
<ul><li>Florida’s  Talent Supply Chain  is a system of resources and infrastructure that prepares people, on a lifelong ba...
<ul><li>Talent Summit: Imagining a World of Talent   </li></ul><ul><li>October 12 - 13  |  Disney’s Yacht & Beach Club  | ...
<ul><li>Talent Summit: Imagining a World of Talent   </li></ul><ul><li>October 12 - 13  |  Disney’s Yacht & Beach Club  | ...
<ul><li>Don Gugliuzza –  Managing Director,  Mileo and Associates, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Nancy Stephens, CAE, IOM, ND, DP...
Rudder Team Strategy Council of Workforce Florida, Inc. Session 5 October 12, 2009 Discussion A Manufacturing Al Stimac – ...
Source:  NAM calculations from UN data
<ul><li>Four Principle Reasons or Pillars </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contribution to GDP Growth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The ...
Pillar I  - Contribution to Economic Growth
Source:  U.S. Department of Commerce Pillar II -   The Multiplier Effect
Source:  U.S. Department of Commerce U.S. Manufacturing’s Multiplier Effect  (2007) 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 F.I.R....
Source:  NAM Calculations from U.S. Department of Commerce data U.S. Manufacturing’s Multiplier Effect  (2007) -4 1 6 11 1...
Source:  National Science Foundation (2006) Pillar III -  Innovation and Productivity  Manufacturing Performs Half of our ...
NAM Calculations from U.S. Department of Labor Data
Source:  NAM Analysis from Commerce Department Data Higher Productivity Leads to Higher Pay 1930s  7% higher 2008  26% hig...
Source:  U.S. Department of Commerce (2007) Pillar IV -  Manufacturing Drives U.S. Exports (Distribution of U.S. exports)
Manufacturing Exports Support Millions of Jobs in Manufacturing and in Other Sectors of the Economy U.S. Department of Com...
 
NAM calculations from U.S. Department of Commerce data
NAM calculations from U.S. Department of Commerce data
U.S. Department of Commerce
U.S. Department of Commerce data
A Look At The Current  State of the Economy
The 2008-2009 Recession U.S. Department of Commerce data
The Manufacturing Sector Dec 07 March 09 Nov 01 Federal Reserve
State of Manufacturing <ul><li>13 million Americans employed in the manufacturing sector </li></ul><ul><li>9.9% of U.S. em...
State of Manufacturing <ul><li>President appoints Ron Bloom, Senior Counselor on Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>France, G...
Manufacturing Institute Survey: <ul><ul><li>82% of respondents agree that America’s manufacturing base is key to the count...
American Small Manufacturers Coalition Survey : <ul><ul><li>90,000 (1/4) American manufacturing firms are at risk of not b...
<ul><li>Florida’s Economy:  744 billion in 2008 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>4 th  largest state economy (behind CA, TX, NY) </li...
Florida Manufacturers <ul><li>329,000 employees </li></ul><ul><li>14,181 manufacturing establishments </li></ul><ul><li>4....
Florida’s Demographic Outlook <ul><li>1 million people are actively looking for jobs in FL </li></ul><ul><li>Recession unt...
A Look At The Current State  of the Florida’s Workforce
<ul><ul><li>More than 70 percent of the current labor force will still be in the state’s workforce in 2020, underscoring t...
NAM Education Imperatives <ul><li>Support for quality learning from early education through post secondary education </li>...
What do Manufacturers on the Street Say They Need in Employees Today? <ul><li>Values, work ethic & integrity   </li></ul><...
What specific skill sets? <ul><li>Specialized skills: printing pressmen and plastic extrusion operators   </li></ul><ul><l...
Total Nonagricultural Employment Aug 2009 7,348,400 (-4.83% year on year) Professional    Trade, Transportation  Construct...
Talent Supply Chain Florida’s  Talent Supply Chain is a system of  resources  and  infrastructure that prepares people, on...
Talent Supply Chain Florida’s  Talent Supply Chain is a system of  resources  and  infrastructure that prepares people, on...
<ul><li>Talent Supply Chain </li></ul><ul><li>Florida’s  Talent Supply Chain is a system of  resources  and  infrastructur...
Talent Supply Chain Florida’s  Talent Supply Chain  is a system of  resources  and  infrastructure that prepares people, o...
Whether it’s a struggling student on the brink of dropping out, a laid off worker searching for a job, or a low-income fam...
<ul><li>Educational institutions can provide the core foundational skills and technical competencies if their programs ali...
Ready for Work, Ready for College Entry Level Industry Certifications Occupation-Specific Certifications Career Paths –  L...
Talent Imperatives for Consideration <ul><li>1. WIA Reauthorization </li></ul><ul><li>2. Improve coordination between Work...
Questions
Appendix
Stakeholder Feedback What do our Florida Manufacturers Need? <ul><li>Employ Florida Banner Center For Manufactur ing  </li...
Stakeholder Feedback What did the Focus Groups tell us? <ul><li>Lean Concepts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Six Sigma </li></ul></...
Stakeholder Feedback What did the Focus Groups tell us? <ul><li>Quality </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ISO standards  </li></ul></u...
<ul><li>Future Manufacturing Talent Needs </li></ul><ul><li>to Improve the Florida Manufacturing Base </li></ul><ul><li>Sk...
What Skills does an Employee Need? Competencies Expected for Various Levels of Employment in Manufacturing Jobs with a sho...
<ul><li>Provide (including those with barriers to education and employment) with access to lifelong education, training, a...
<ul><li>Andra Cornelius –  Vice President of Business and Workforce Development Opportunities,  Workforce Florida, Inc. </...
Workforce Florida, Inc. Rudder Team Meeting State Training Grant Programs October 12, 2009 Disney’s Yacht & Beach Club Res...
Incumbent Worker Training (IWT) STATE TRAINING GRANT PROGRAMS Quick Response Training (QRT) <ul><li>Started in 2000 </li><...
SIDE-BY-SIDE COMPARISON INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING Requirements Applicants must: <ul><li>Have been ...
SIDE-BY-SIDE COMPARISON INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING   Funding  (FY 2009-2010) Funding  (FY 2009-2010...
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING <ul><li>50 percent match required (75 perc...
MOST COMMON TYPES OF TRAINING INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING <ul><li>Six Sigma – Green and Black Belt <...
GRANT INVESTMENTS  2000-2009 INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING PS&T*   $22.6 million Business Svcs.   $19....
INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING: PENETRATION
QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING PENETRATION
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES <ul><li>Most of Florida’s workforce system funds are federal and subject to specific prohi...
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES <ul><li>However: </li></ul><ul><li>Despite a  75 percent disparity in the amount of funds ...
THE COMPETITION <ul><li>Georgia - $50 Million </li></ul><ul><li>South Carolina - $4 Million </li></ul><ul><li>North Caroli...
QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING: FUNDING vs. DEMAND <ul><li>Increase in number of businesses </li></ul><ul><li>Population growth <...
BUILDING OUR WAR CHEST <ul><li>It’s about more than money: </li></ul><ul><li>Need for flexibility and agility to meet the ...
Strategy Framework – Overarching Questions
Preparation for Interim Briefings, Events and Roundtables – Key Questions and Inquiries
Key Insights and Next Steps
Adjourn
 
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  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • The U.S. has consistently been the world’s largest manufacturing nation in the world, averaging 24% of Global Manufacturing Output (GDP) since 1970. In 2006, its share was 21 percent. 62% bigger than China, more than double Japan, and three times larger than Germany’s manufacturing base. Collectively the U.S. and the next 8 countries in this chart accounted for more than two-thirds (69%) of Global manufacturing output in 2006. (latest data available
  • Between 1987 and 2007, the manufacturing sector accounted for 15 percent of overall growth of the U.S. economy…more than any other sector. In fact, manufacturing contribution to GDP growth during the past 2 decades was more than the combined contributions of Construction, Mining, Agriculture, Utilities, Arts/Entertainment/Recreation , Transportation and Government PUT TOGETHER!
  • Pillar II. The Multiplier Effect Every $1 of Manufacturing GDP creates an additional 1.43 dollars of economic activity in the economy. This is more than any other sector
  • Pillar III. Manufacturing is the Source of Productivity and Innovation in the United States. Manufacturing Performs roughly half of R&amp;D in the United States
  • Manufacturing productivity has risen 424 percent since 1950, roughly 80 percent faster than the 236 percent rise in overall nonfarm business productivity growth.
  • Back in the 1930s, manufacturers earned 7% more than workers in the rest of the economy. By 2008, than advantaged more than tripled to a premium of 26 percent. Manufacturing Rest of Workforce Average Compensation 71,623 57,064 26% premium
  • Pillar IV: Manufacturing Accounts for two thirds of U.S. exports.
  • Between 2003 and 2007, Florida manufacturing output increased by 27 percent. While this was slower than some sectors that accounted for 35 percent of Florida’s Economy (Information, Real Estate, Professional Services and Retail Trade) collectively grew by 33 percent, Manufacturing grew much faster than the bulk (60%) of Florida’s economy during this time.
  • And while in manufacturing accounted for 5% of Florida&apos;s Economy in 2008, during the 2003-2007 period, manufacturing accounted for 9 percent of the state’s economic growth (in real, inflation-adjusted terms). This is more than all but four sectors of the Florida economy (Real Estate, Retail Trade, Information and Professional Services.
  • 2007.4 to 2009.2 (Six Quarters) GDP -3.7% Consumer Spending -1.9% Business Investment -19% Residential Investment -34.4% Exports -12.6% Imports -20% Government +4% The decline in consumer spending, business investment, residential investment, exports have been record declines in the post WWII era, making the current recession the longest and deepest since the Great Depression
  • The record declines in housing, consumer spending, business investment and exports have hit the manufacturing sector especially hard. From December 2007 to June 2009, manufacturing production fell by 17 percent. This 18 month decline erased the growth that had take place during the prior six years (72 months). There have been some positive signs in recent months. In the 3 months ending in August, manufacturing production rose at an annual rate of 7 percent (exports and cash for clunkers) Of the 7.2 million Jobs lost since Dec 2007, 29% (2.1 mil) have bee in manufacturing. In Florida, while the 388 thousand mfg workers accounted for 5% of the FL workforce in Dec 07, the 84 thousand mfg jobs lost through August of 2009 accounted for 14% of the 603,000 FL jobs lost so far in this recession.
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • (President Hart’s Report.)
  • Transcript of "Strategy Council Session 5 (MS PowerPoint, 3.46Mb)"

    1. 2. Workforce Florida’s Strategy Council Creating the Strategy for Today’s Needs and Tomorrow’s Talent Session 5 October 12, 2009 | Future of Florida Forum Disney’s Yacht & Beach Club Resort
    2. 3. <ul><li>Belinda Keiser Chair, Workforce Florida, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>David Armstrong Chair, Workforce Florida Strategy Council </li></ul>Welcome
    3. 4. <ul><li>Introductions </li></ul><ul><li>Good Progress thus Far </li></ul><ul><li>Use the Online ToolKit </li></ul><ul><li>Consider Strengths and Critical Insights of Each Session </li></ul>
    4. 5. <ul><li>Welcome Belinda Keiser – Chair, Workforce Florida, Inc. David Armstrong – Chair, Workforce Florida Strategy Council </li></ul><ul><li>Introductions – Formative Question Don Upton – President, Fairfield Index, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Business of the Day Upton </li></ul><ul><li>Milestone Timeline – Are We On Schedule? Armstrong, Team and Upton </li></ul>Rudder Team’s Business of the Day
    5. 6. <ul><li>Discussion A – Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion B – Recruitment, Retention and Expansion </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy Framework – Overarching Questions Team </li></ul><ul><li>Preparation for Interim Briefings, Events and Roundtables – Key Questions and Inquiries Upton and Team </li></ul><ul><li>Key Insights and Next Steps Keiser, Armstrong, Team and Upton </li></ul>Rudder Team’s Business of the Day
    6. 7. Overarching Discussion Items Framework for Strategic Plan Priorities for Strategic Plan Measurement / Targets – Enterprise Operationalization and Testing Ideas Innovation Creation of a Talent Supply Chain Team Measurement / Targets – Global
    7. 8. Milestone Timeline Are We on Schedule?
    8. 9. <ul><li>Readiness </li></ul><ul><li>Seamlessness </li></ul><ul><li>Anticipatory </li></ul><ul><li>Reliable </li></ul><ul><li>Flexible </li></ul><ul><li>Responsive </li></ul><ul><li>Lifelong </li></ul><ul><li>Coordinated </li></ul>Definition of Talent Supply Chain: common system characteristics emerging
    9. 10. <ul><li>Florida’s Talent Supply Chain is a system of resources and infrastructure that prepares people, on a lifelong basis, to advance the needs of enterprises of all scales, sizes and sectors. Like other supply chains, excellence is achieved through customer satisfaction, on-time delivery, reliability, foresight and seamless coordination and process improvement among and between all participants in the chain. In Florida, people are participant-owners in the chain, by exerting their own transformative abilities to learn, apply knowledge and create wealth. </li></ul>Talent Supply Chain: Working Definition
    10. 11. <ul><li>Talent Summit: Imagining a World of Talent </li></ul><ul><li>October 12 - 13 | Disney’s Yacht & Beach Club | Orlando, Florida </li></ul><ul><li>Monday, October 12 | 1:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. ET </li></ul><ul><li>Framing Florida’s Talent Agenda Insights into Markets and Demographics Business Panel: Emerging Trends, Threats and Opportunities Panel: Understanding Florida’s Human Resource Issues… 0-90+ </li></ul><ul><li>Breakout Sessions & Work Groups (Part 1) A. Investments for Formative Years (birth to age 8) B. Redefining Talent Development (PreK-20 & beyond) C. Aligning Florida’s Education, Workforce and Economic Development Systems D. Florida’s STEMM Agenda (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math & Medicine) E. Essentials for Discovery and Development </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic Doing: Translating Ideas into Action </li></ul><ul><li>Welcome Reception </li></ul>Tier 3 Element of Strategic Planning Process: Florida Chamber’s Future of Florida Forum
    11. 12. <ul><li>Talent Summit: Imagining a World of Talent </li></ul><ul><li>October 12 - 13 | Disney’s Yacht & Beach Club | Orlando, Florida </li></ul><ul><li>Tuesday, October 13 | 7:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. ET </li></ul><ul><li>Breakfast and Morning Briefing </li></ul><ul><li>Breakout Sessions & Work Groups (Part 2) – Continuing Monday conversations Game Changing Strategies: Moving from Concepts to Action A. Investments for Formative Years (birth to age 8) B. Redefining Talent Development (PreK-20 & beyond) C. Aligning Florida’s Education, Workforce and Economic Development System D. Florida’s STEMM Agenda (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math & Medicine) E. Essentials for Discovery and Development </li></ul><ul><li>Debrief and Next Steps </li></ul>Tier 3 Element of Strategic Planning Process: Florida Chamber’s Future of Florida Forum
    12. 13. <ul><li>Don Gugliuzza – Managing Director, Mileo and Associates, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Nancy Stephens, CAE, IOM, ND, DPL – President , Nancy D. Stephens & Associates, LLC </li></ul><ul><li>Al Stimac – President and CEO , Metal Essence, Inc. </li></ul>Discussion A: Manufacturing
    13. 14. Rudder Team Strategy Council of Workforce Florida, Inc. Session 5 October 12, 2009 Discussion A Manufacturing Al Stimac – Nancy Stephens - Don Gugliuzza
    14. 15. Source: NAM calculations from UN data
    15. 16. <ul><li>Four Principle Reasons or Pillars </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contribution to GDP Growth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Economic Multiplier Effect </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>R&D, Productivity and Higher Pay </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exports </li></ul></ul>Why Manufacturing Is Important to the U.S. Economy
    16. 17. Pillar I - Contribution to Economic Growth
    17. 18. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce Pillar II - The Multiplier Effect
    18. 19. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce U.S. Manufacturing’s Multiplier Effect (2007) 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 F.I.R.E. Professional services Manufacturing Educational, health, Retail Wholesale Information Construction Entertain, recr, Transportation Other services Utilities Mining Agriculture $Trillions GDP Additional Economic Output Generated
    19. 20. Source: NAM Calculations from U.S. Department of Commerce data U.S. Manufacturing’s Multiplier Effect (2007) -4 1 6 11 16 21 Professional services Manufacturing Educational, health, Retail Entertain, recr, F.I.R.E. Construction Wholesale Other services Transportation Information Agriculture Mining Utilities Employment Supported (Millions) Other Sectors Within the Industry
    20. 21. Source: National Science Foundation (2006) Pillar III - Innovation and Productivity Manufacturing Performs Half of our country’s R&D
    21. 22. NAM Calculations from U.S. Department of Labor Data
    22. 23. Source: NAM Analysis from Commerce Department Data Higher Productivity Leads to Higher Pay 1930s 7% higher 2008 26% higher
    23. 24. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce (2007) Pillar IV - Manufacturing Drives U.S. Exports (Distribution of U.S. exports)
    24. 25. Manufacturing Exports Support Millions of Jobs in Manufacturing and in Other Sectors of the Economy U.S. Department of Commerce
    25. 27. NAM calculations from U.S. Department of Commerce data
    26. 28. NAM calculations from U.S. Department of Commerce data
    27. 29. U.S. Department of Commerce
    28. 30. U.S. Department of Commerce data
    29. 31. A Look At The Current State of the Economy
    30. 32. The 2008-2009 Recession U.S. Department of Commerce data
    31. 33. The Manufacturing Sector Dec 07 March 09 Nov 01 Federal Reserve
    32. 34. State of Manufacturing <ul><li>13 million Americans employed in the manufacturing sector </li></ul><ul><li>9.9% of U.S. employment is manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>Manufactured goods represent 2/3 of U.S. exports and drive more net wealth creation than any other industry </li></ul><ul><li>NAM predicts 1 million new manufacturing jobs by 2014 </li></ul>
    33. 35. State of Manufacturing <ul><li>President appoints Ron Bloom, Senior Counselor on Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>France, Germany and Japan are officially out of the recession </li></ul><ul><li>World Economic Outlook predicts 3.1% growth in world economy in 2010 with China and India leading the way </li></ul><ul><li>Florida ranked in the top 10 states for having a business friendly tax system by the Tax Foundation. 2010 State Business Tax Climate Index </li></ul>
    34. 36. Manufacturing Institute Survey: <ul><ul><li>82% of respondents agree that America’s manufacturing base is key to the country’s economic prosperity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>71% view manufacturing as a national priority </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>59% believe U.S. manufacturing competes effectively on a global scale </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Only 17% name manufacturing as top two career choices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Only 30% would encourage children to work in manufacturing </li></ul></ul>
    35. 37. American Small Manufacturers Coalition Survey : <ul><ul><li>90,000 (1/4) American manufacturing firms are at risk of not being able to compete globally </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>81% of respondents believe manufacturing industry significantly impacts standard of living </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>74% of respondents say U.S. should invest more in manufacturing industry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>16% rank sustainability as important to their success </li></ul></ul>
    36. 38. <ul><li>Florida’s Economy: 744 billion in 2008 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>4 th largest state economy (behind CA, TX, NY) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Similar in size to the country of Turkey (730 billion) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Larger than economies of land, Indonesia, Belgium, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and Switzerland </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Florida’s Manufacturing Economy: 36 billion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>15 th Largest Manufacturing State in the United States </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Similar to the size of manufacturing output of Norway </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and Singapore </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Source: Commerce Department, IMF, United Nations </li></ul>Florida’s Economy in Context
    37. 39. Florida Manufacturers <ul><li>329,000 employees </li></ul><ul><li>14,181 manufacturing establishments </li></ul><ul><li>4.8% of FL employment mix </li></ul><ul><li>Jobs pay 89.4% of national average </li></ul><ul><li>93% of FL exports </li></ul><ul><li>#1 sector is food products </li></ul><ul><li>45,000 jobs lost over last year, but we know companies hiring! </li></ul>
    38. 40. Florida’s Demographic Outlook <ul><li>1 million people are actively looking for jobs in FL </li></ul><ul><li>Recession until spring of 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Population begins growing again in 2010 (more births than deaths) </li></ul><ul><li>Real improvement starts in 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>Manufacturing jobs positive in 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>Misalignment of job skills; shortages in highly skilled areas </li></ul><ul><li>Once recovery starts it will be faster than normal </li></ul><ul><li>By 2015 people will start moving here again </li></ul><ul><li>1.1% population growth expected between 2025 and 2030 </li></ul><ul><li>By 2030 2 workers:1 retiree </li></ul>
    39. 41. A Look At The Current State of the Florida’s Workforce
    40. 42. <ul><ul><li>More than 70 percent of the current labor force will still be in the state’s workforce in 2020, underscoring the need for lifelong learning and skills development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ More than 88 million adults in the U.S. have at least one major educational barrier (no HS diploma, no college, or ESL needs) to get a job or advance in jobs that pay a family sustaining wage”* </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ More than two thirds of the workforce are beyond the reach of schools, and our current adult education system – designed for a different time and different challenges – is not equipped to address this urgent national need” * </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Meanwhile, 88 million working-age adults in the U.S. have not completed high school, have completed just a high school diploma but have not entered college, or do not speak English well enough to contribute to a knowledge-based economy * </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>* From Adult Literacy's Reach Higher, America report and the Council for Advancement of Adult Literacy (CAAL) Did you know?
    41. 43. NAM Education Imperatives <ul><li>Support for quality learning from early education through post secondary education </li></ul><ul><li>Employee development through training and education at all levels </li></ul><ul><li>Promotion of lifelong learning </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities for adult education </li></ul>
    42. 44. What do Manufacturers on the Street Say They Need in Employees Today? <ul><li>Values, work ethic & integrity </li></ul><ul><li>Computer literacy for every job </li></ul><ul><li>Versatility </li></ul><ul><li>Super multitasking </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative learner that is willing to change and adapt </li></ul><ul><li>Technical certifications </li></ul><ul><li>A way to provide value to the new employee generation, recognizing different attention spans and work habits than the existing workforce </li></ul>
    43. 45. What specific skill sets? <ul><li>Specialized skills: printing pressmen and plastic extrusion operators </li></ul><ul><li>Skilled Machinists – CNC, Mill and Lathe, Machine set up </li></ul><ul><li>Technicians skilled in automation, robotics and controls such as Megatronics </li></ul><ul><li>Professional, high level production planning specialists </li></ul><ul><li>Familiarity with sophisticated ERP systems such as SAP, JD Edwards Oracle, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Apprentice candidates for CNC machining </li></ul><ul><li>Cost accountants familiar with the manufacturing atmosphere and m anufacturing engineers familiar with tooling and machining </li></ul><ul><li>Production supervisors familiar with ERP systems and Lean manufacturing techniques </li></ul><ul><li>Lean and Six Sigma Specialists </li></ul><ul><li>Safety engineers familiar with manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>“ Green” Manufacturing Specialists </li></ul>
    44. 46. Total Nonagricultural Employment Aug 2009 7,348,400 (-4.83% year on year) Professional Trade, Transportation Construction Manufacturing Leisure and Hospitality and Business and Utilities Services - 12.2% - 12.62 % - 8.19% Title August 2009 Employment August 2008 Employment % Change      Professional and Business Services 1,045,700 1,139,000 -8.2%      Trade, Transportation, and Utilities 1,486,500 1,571,600 -5.4%    Construction 434,300 497,000 -12.6%      Manufacturing 324,400 369,400 -12.2%      Leisure and Hospitality 905,600 940,800 -3.7%
    45. 47. Talent Supply Chain Florida’s Talent Supply Chain is a system of resources and infrastructure that prepares people, on a lifelong basis, to advance the needs of enterprises of all scales, sizes and sectors. Like other supply chains,excellence is achieved through customer satisfaction, on-time delivery, reliability, foresight and seamless coordination and process improvement among and between all participants in the chain. In Florida, people are participant-owners in the chain, by exerting their own transformative abilities to learn, apply knowledge and create wealth.
    46. 48. Talent Supply Chain Florida’s Talent Supply Chain is a system of resources and infrastructure that prepares people, on a lifelong basis, to advance the needs of enterprises of all scales, sizes and sectors.
    47. 49. <ul><li>Talent Supply Chain </li></ul><ul><li>Florida’s Talent Supply Chain is a system of resources and infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>that prepares people, on a lifelong basis, to advance the needs of enterprises of all scales, sizes and sectors. </li></ul><ul><li>Like other supply chains, excellence is achieved through </li></ul><ul><ul><li>customer satisfaction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>on-time delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>reliability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>foresight </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>seamless coordination </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>process improvement </li></ul></ul>
    48. 50. Talent Supply Chain Florida’s Talent Supply Chain is a system of resources and infrastructure that prepares people, on a lifelong basis, to advance the needs of enterprises of all scales, sizes and sectors. Like other supply chains,excellence is achieved through customer satisfaction, on-time delivery, reliability, foresight and seamless coordination and process improvement among and between all participants in the chain. In Florida, people are participant-owners in the chain, by exerting their own transformative abilities to learn, apply knowledge and create wealth . The challenge is to find the optimal way for employers, job seekers, and government agencies to share the cost of providing workers with the knowledge and skills needed to compete in the 21st century….to fully utilize our Workforce Education in Florida
    49. 51. Whether it’s a struggling student on the brink of dropping out, a laid off worker searching for a job, or a low-income family barely making ends meet, these are the many candidates that need help to become a better educated, better trained, better paid workforce <ul><li>So who are Workforce Education Customers? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>• Adults and youth seeking technical skills and training for the workplace </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>• Employed adults seeking skill upgrades and maintenance through </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>continuing workforce education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>• Adults and youth seeking a high school diploma or GED </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>• Adults seeking literacy skills for employment and lifelong learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>• Adults seeking enhanced fluency in written and spoken English </li></ul></ul>Talent Supply Chain
    50. 52. <ul><li>Educational institutions can provide the core foundational skills and technical competencies if their programs align with relevant national standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Employers can provide the sector and occupation specific competencies through in-house or contracted training, but…open labor markets mean workers can easily switch jobs, exposing companies to the risk of lost investments in human capital </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Employers have abandoned once-common workplace education programs increasing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the responsibility on individuals to acquire their job-related skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many individuals lack both the capital to invest in their own development and the </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>foresight to know which skills will have the highest payoff </li></ul></ul><ul><li>So, what needs to be done to facilitate the change we need to re-skill, re-employ, upgrade the employee for the new economy? </li></ul>But how to train/educate? <ul><li>We need to look at the total supply chain, and develop skills to use in high tech growth industries and connect with real target industries </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Looking at the NAM Competency Model – We need the system that builds skills and knowledge from basic employability and workplace skills through occupation specific competencies </li></ul></ul></ul>
    51. 53. Ready for Work, Ready for College Entry Level Industry Certifications Occupation-Specific Certifications Career Paths – Life Long Learning High Quality Carrers
    52. 54. Talent Imperatives for Consideration <ul><li>1. WIA Reauthorization </li></ul><ul><li>2. Improve coordination between Workforce Regional Boards, Economic Development, and Dept. of </li></ul><ul><li>Education - Career & Adult Education in manufacturing, STEM, and other strategic industry clusters </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Stronger integration between WFI and FL DOE </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Make the existing Banner Centers' curricula available on all RWB approved </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>training curricula lists and vendor lists </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>3. Meet employee education and training needs by: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Expanding and improving customized training </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Developing more workplace based learning and flexible methods of education </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>delivery, such as online courses </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Creation of “gold standard career pathways” - statewide articulation agreements aligned </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>with training needs and industry certifications </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Increase the skilled workers businesses need by boosting capacity at community and state colleges, </li></ul><ul><li>technical centers, private career schools, secondary career academies, and apprenticeship </li></ul><ul><li>programs (example: the discontinued SUCCEED grant program) </li></ul><ul><li>Boost the employability of workers through programs that roll basic skills, English language </li></ul><ul><li>instruction, and job skills into one complete package </li></ul>
    53. 55. Questions
    54. 56. Appendix
    55. 57. Stakeholder Feedback What do our Florida Manufacturers Need? <ul><li>Employ Florida Banner Center For Manufactur ing </li></ul><ul><li>Year-2 Regional Manufacturing Industry Focus Groups </li></ul><ul><li>Information exchange essential to addressing the significant and emerging training requirements for the manufacturing workforce in the Southwest, North Central, Northeast, Greater Tampa Bay, and Southeast regions of Florida </li></ul><ul><li>One hundred twenty-seven (127) representatives (54% of which were from small, medium, and large-sized manufacturing companies) from these regions participated in the five focus groups conducted by the Center </li></ul><ul><li>An online survey was provided for focus group participants to comment on aggregated data, and provide an opportunity for stakeholders that couldn’t attend a regional focus group to provide input </li></ul><ul><ul><li>76% participated in the online survey, 92% of the respondents indicated they were manufacturers </li></ul></ul>
    56. 58. Stakeholder Feedback What did the Focus Groups tell us? <ul><li>Lean Concepts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Six Sigma </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Predictive maintenance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Self-directed work teams </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Root cause analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased productivity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increase profit </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Knowledge-based workforce </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Employees taking on greater responsibilities (e.g., integration of job) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased awareness of manufacturing careers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge of business fundamentals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Big Picture Thinking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Culture of/managing change </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Critical thinking </li></ul></ul>
    57. 59. Stakeholder Feedback What did the Focus Groups tell us? <ul><li>Quality </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ISO standards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Regulatory compliance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Building quality into the manufacturing process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality as a value proposition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customer-initiated increased quality demands </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Automation </li></ul><ul><li>Green Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Supply Chain Management </li></ul>
    58. 60. <ul><li>Future Manufacturing Talent Needs </li></ul><ul><li>to Improve the Florida Manufacturing Base </li></ul><ul><li>Skilled Machinists </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CNC, Mill and Lathe, capable of machine set-up </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Technicians skilled in automation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Robotics and controls such as Megatronics </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Professional, high-level Production Planning Specialists </li></ul><ul><li>Production Supervisors should be familiar with sophisticated ERP </li></ul><ul><li>systems such as SAP, JD Edwards Oracle, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Apprentice candidates for CNC machining </li></ul><ul><li>Cost Accountants – familiar with manufacturing atmosphere </li></ul><ul><li>Manufacturing Engineers familiar with tooling and machining </li></ul><ul><li>Lean Manufacturing techniques / Lean and Six Sigma Specialists </li></ul><ul><li>Safety Engineers familiar with manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>“ Green” Manufacturing Specialists </li></ul><ul><li>Tom Kipp Vice President Production Hoerbiger Corporation of America </li></ul>“ Future needs are for positions requiring specific training requirements such as printing pressmen and plastic extrusion operators. Another area that is growing but lacks candidates is computer literate warehousemen.“ “ Warehousing and shipping has become much more complicated and technology driven, requiring much more technology minded candidates.“   Rob Adamiak Vice President/COO Conimar Corporation “ custom engineered ring and packing solutions for users of reciprocating compressors and engines” <ul><li>Polk Manufacturers Assn. </li></ul><ul><li>Values, work ethic, & integrity </li></ul><ul><li>Computer literacy (for ALL mfg careers/jobs) </li></ul><ul><li>Versatility </li></ul><ul><li>Multitasking (one person: set-up - clean-up – </li></ul><ul><li>operations – quality.) </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative learner that can change (increasing </li></ul><ul><li>rate of change) and learn </li></ul><ul><li>Technical certifications </li></ul>
    59. 61. What Skills does an Employee Need? Competencies Expected for Various Levels of Employment in Manufacturing Jobs with a short learning curve that require only cursory instructions to enable an individual to perform satisfactorily. <ul><li>Basic skills - 8th grade competency in Math, Reading (English), Writing (English) </li></ul><ul><li>Work ethic, Interpersonal skills, Team Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Lean Concepts </li></ul><ul><li>Problem Solving </li></ul><ul><li>Basic Computer skills </li></ul><ul><li>MSSC Certification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintenance Awareness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Industrial safety skills OSHA-First Aid / CPR </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manufacturing awareness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality skills, Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), Definition of Quality, Food Safety </li></ul></ul>Jobs that have a longer learning curve and involve more complex operations and the mastery of more complex pieces of manufacturing equipment. <ul><li>Basic skills - >12th grade competency (10th grade – interim target), Math, Reading (English), Writing (English) </li></ul><ul><li>Interpersonal skills (Communications, Teamwork, Problem Solving, Conflict Resolution, Presentation skills) </li></ul><ul><li>Computer skills –Windows </li></ul><ul><li>Basic Science - Applied Math & Physics, Statistics, Biology/Microbiology </li></ul><ul><li>Six Sigma/TPM Fundamentals </li></ul><ul><li>Mechanical aptitude/Technical skills </li></ul><ul><li>Use of hand tools </li></ul><ul><li>Business knowledge (Accounting, Budgeting) </li></ul><ul><li>MSSC Certification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Same Safety and Quality knowledge/skills along with Advanced Quality (SPC, Quality tools, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manufacturing processes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintenance knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Basic electricity </li></ul></ul>Skilled Trades jobs that require 4 to 5 years to attain a mastery level, such as Electrician or Mechanic. Same base skills as Semi-skilled along with: <ul><li>Basic skills, >12th grade competency (10th grade – interim target), Math, Reading (English), Writing (English) </li></ul><ul><li>Mechanical aptitude - Advanced use of hand tools, Manufacturing processes, Advanced blueprint reading, P&ID </li></ul><ul><li>Lean Concept Mastery (Six Sigma, TPM, etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Troubleshooting </li></ul><ul><li>Mechanical Concepts </li></ul><ul><li>Hydraulics / Pneumatics </li></ul><ul><li>Specialized Trade Specific skills </li></ul>ENTRY SEMI-SKILLED HIGH SKILLED
    60. 62. <ul><li>Provide (including those with barriers to education and employment) with access to lifelong education, training, and employment services </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Develop public/private financial aid support to assist working adults to gain further education and training credentials including: Lifelong Learning Accounts (LiLas) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on industry clusters that drive regional economies so that regional communities build on their strengths and grow even stronger </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Expand workplace based learning, online courses and other flexible education options to help workers move ahead and expand their careers </li></ul><ul><li>Continue to identify and remove barriers to employment, education and training so that workers have a clear path to reach their career goals </li></ul><ul><li>Increase financial aid and other services for workforce education students so they are able to afford additional education and have coordinated support in completing their education and training </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Research shows one year of education beyond high school, paired with a credential, is the “tipping point” that provides the greatest chance to achieve family-wage employment </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Financial barriers are the number one reason job seekers do not obtain education and training beyond high school </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>More ideas for consideration as Talent Imperatives…
    61. 63. <ul><li>Andra Cornelius – Vice President of Business and Workforce Development Opportunities, Workforce Florida, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Debbie McMullian – Quick Response Training Program Manager , Workforce Florida, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Rusty Skinner – Chief Executive Officer , CLM Workforce Connection </li></ul><ul><li>Margaret Spontak – Senior Vice President , CLM Workforce Connection </li></ul><ul><li>Pete Tesch – President/CEO , Ocala/Marion Economic Development Corporation </li></ul>Discussion B: Recruitment, Retention and Expansion
    62. 64. Workforce Florida, Inc. Rudder Team Meeting State Training Grant Programs October 12, 2009 Disney’s Yacht & Beach Club Resort Orlando, Florida
    63. 65. Incumbent Worker Training (IWT) STATE TRAINING GRANT PROGRAMS Quick Response Training (QRT) <ul><li>Started in 2000 </li></ul><ul><li>Provides performance-based expense reimbursement grants to existing, for-profit businesses to provide skills upgrade training to currently employed full-time workers </li></ul><ul><li>Started in 1993; administered by Workforce Florida since 2000 </li></ul><ul><li>Provides performance-based expense reimbursement grants to meet short-term, immediate, customized workforce training needs of new or existing businesses and industries that are creating new, full-time, permanent jobs </li></ul>
    64. 66. SIDE-BY-SIDE COMPARISON INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING Requirements Applicants must: <ul><li>Have been in operation in Florida for at </li></ul><ul><li>least one year prior to application date </li></ul><ul><li>Have at least one full-time employee </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate financial viability be current on all state tax obligations </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>Requirements Applicants must: <ul><li>Produce an exportable good or service </li></ul><ul><li>Create new, full-time, high-quality jobs </li></ul><ul><li>• Require customized entry-level skills training for high-skill/high-wage positions (115 percent of average county or state wage ) </li></ul>
    65. 67. SIDE-BY-SIDE COMPARISON INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING   Funding (FY 2009-2010) Funding (FY 2009-2010) <ul><li>$2 million WIA (Federal) </li></ul><ul><li>$2 million ARRA (Federal Stimulus) </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>$3.3 million Nonrecurring annual allocation from state General Revenue funds. </li></ul><ul><li> ( Reduced from $5 million ) </li></ul>
    66. 68. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING <ul><li>50 percent match required (75 percent match in rural areas) </li></ul><ul><li>Costs reimbursed directly to </li></ul><ul><li>company </li></ul><ul><li>Priority given to businesses: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>With less than 50 employees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In targeted industries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who are seeking to avoid </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>layoffs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>No required match </li></ul><ul><li>Fiscal agent (state educational entity) assists with application, reporting and check delivery </li></ul><ul><li>Increased ability to customize due to lack of federal restraints </li></ul><ul><li>Priority given to businesses: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Creating new jobs in Florida </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In targeted industries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Whose proposals offer the </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>greatest economic impact </li></ul></ul>
    67. 69. MOST COMMON TYPES OF TRAINING INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING <ul><li>Six Sigma – Green and Black Belt </li></ul><ul><li>Lean </li></ul><ul><li>AS 9000 </li></ul><ul><li>ISO 9001:2008 </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul>All QRT training is customized to meet the specific needs of each business <ul><li>Entry-level </li></ul><ul><li>On-site training </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom Training </li></ul><ul><li>Laboratory Training </li></ul>Company always chooses training provider
    68. 70. GRANT INVESTMENTS 2000-2009 INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING PS&T* $22.6 million Business Svcs. $19.6 million Wholesale Trade $11.1 million Manufacturing $8.4 million Information Tech. $6.7 million Other $1.9 million Finance/Insurance $1.2 million Corporate Hdqtrs. $952,000 Manufacturing $17.8 million Information Tech. $11.7 million Wholesale Trade $3.6 million Finance/Insurance $2.2 million PS&T* $1.9 million Management $1.5 million * Professional, Science & Technology
    69. 71. INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING: PENETRATION
    70. 72. QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING PENETRATION
    71. 73. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES <ul><li>Most of Florida’s workforce system funds are federal and subject to specific prohibitions. According to the Federal Workforce Investment Act of 1998: </li></ul><ul><li>Funding cannot be used to generate employment or for economic development purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Funding cannot be used to encourage businesses to relocate to Florida if the move would result in a loss of employment at the original site </li></ul><ul><li>Funding cannot be given to a relocated business until 120 days after the date of relocation if the relocation results in a loss of employment at the original location </li></ul><ul><li>Funds must be used for activity directly related to training </li></ul>State workforce development funds – QRT dollars – provide Florida with the means to attract and retain businesses, and to meet their needs without the limitations imposed by federal funds
    72. 74. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES <ul><li>However: </li></ul><ul><li>Despite a 75 percent disparity in the amount of funds requested vs. the amount of funds available, QRT state funding decreased from $6 million to $5 million in fiscal year 2003/2004, and then remained stagnant until 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>Our funding is non-recurring and at risk in the current economic downturn – in 2009, QRT funding was further reduced 34 PERCENT from $5 million to $3.3 million </li></ul><ul><li>QRT funds are the only non-federal funds Florida has for business-specific, customized workforce training </li></ul>Workforce Florida’s vision is to develop a globally competitive workforce. But without QRT, the ability of Florida’s workforce to compete even domestically would be hampered.
    73. 75. THE COMPETITION <ul><li>Georgia - $50 Million </li></ul><ul><li>South Carolina - $4 Million </li></ul><ul><li>North Carolina - $18 Million </li></ul><ul><li>Alabama - $43 Million </li></ul><ul><li>Tennessee - $17 Million </li></ul>6. Texas - $40 Million 7. Virginia - $7 Million 8. Arizona - $15 Million 9. Mississippi - $20 Million 10. Oklahoma - $5.3 Million <ul><li>Florida’s population now exceeds that of all but one state – Texas – on the list of the top ten states in customized training funding </li></ul><ul><li>Texas’ population tops Florida’s by 6 million, roughly a third of – and not even two times – the state population . However, Texas allocates more than 12 times in customized training dollars than does Florida </li></ul><ul><li>Even South Carolina , a state with 25 percent fewer residents, allocates over 17 percent more state dollars to customized training than Florida </li></ul>
    74. 76. QUICK RESPONSE TRAINING: FUNDING vs. DEMAND <ul><li>Increase in number of businesses </li></ul><ul><li>Population growth </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge to keep up with demand </li></ul><ul><li>Increased focus on challenge </li></ul><ul><li>to achieve domestic and global competitiveness </li></ul><ul><li>In 2009, QRT funds were reduced from $5 million to $3.3 million non-recurring General Revenue </li></ul>
    75. 77. BUILDING OUR WAR CHEST <ul><li>It’s about more than money: </li></ul><ul><li>Need for flexibility and agility to meet the needs of </li></ul><ul><li>business </li></ul><ul><li>Need for consistent information/single point of </li></ul><ul><li>contact </li></ul><ul><li>Need for certainty in funding and proven track record </li></ul>
    76. 78. Strategy Framework – Overarching Questions
    77. 79. Preparation for Interim Briefings, Events and Roundtables – Key Questions and Inquiries
    78. 80. Key Insights and Next Steps
    79. 81. Adjourn
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