A World on the Move Lecture nine Transnationalism and the Translocal Village
Readings <ul><li>Velayutham, Selvaraj and Amanda Wise 2005 ‘Moral Economies of a Translocal Village: Obligation and Shame ...
Objectives <ul><li>To gain a further understanding of theories of identification and belonging, </li></ul><ul><li>To exami...
Learning Outcomes <ul><li>An understanding of how the concepts of ‘transnationalism’, ‘translocalism’ and ‘the translocal ...
Key concepts in the WotM module Focus in this lecture <ul><li>Global networks (spread, intensity, frequency): </li></ul><u...
 
 
 
 
<ul><li>Transnationalism  </li></ul><ul><li>‘ the processes by which immigrants forge and sustain multi-stranded social re...
Trans local  connections  <ul><li>To particular migrant groups, national identity may be less relevant or not relevant at ...
Musuguntha Vellalar caste members, Tamil Nadu
 
 
Panoramic view of Little India in Singapore
Little India,   Veeramakaliamman Temple
Tanjore temple, India
 
Little India,   Veeramakaliamman Temple
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Musuguntha Vellalar caste members <ul><li>from Soorapallam (5000 people, 50 percent Musuguntha Vellalars)  </li></ul><ul><...
Caste loyalty and the translocal village <ul><li>Frequent visits and communication </li></ul><ul><li>arranged marriages wi...
Managing the translocal village <ul><li>Moral economy : reciprocity, family honour </li></ul><ul><li>Affective regime : fe...
Conclusion <ul><li>Translocal networks between South Indian migrants and homeland communities </li></ul><ul><li>Global mov...
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  1. 1. A World on the Move Lecture nine Transnationalism and the Translocal Village
  2. 2. Readings <ul><li>Velayutham, Selvaraj and Amanda Wise 2005 ‘Moral Economies of a Translocal Village: Obligation and Shame Among South Indian Transnational Migrants’. Global Networks 5(1): 27-47. </li></ul><ul><li>Eriksen, Thomas Hylland 2007 Globalization . Oxford: Berg. Chapter 5. pp 91-106 </li></ul>
  3. 3. Objectives <ul><li>To gain a further understanding of theories of identification and belonging, </li></ul><ul><li>To examine the social and emotional dynamics of transnational family connections </li></ul><ul><li>To analyse the phenomenon of the translocal village. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Learning Outcomes <ul><li>An understanding of how the concepts of ‘transnationalism’, ‘translocalism’ and ‘the translocal village’ may be useful to the analysis of migration </li></ul><ul><li>An understanding of the moral and affective dimensions of transnational family dynamics </li></ul>
  5. 5. Key concepts in the WotM module Focus in this lecture <ul><li>Global networks (spread, intensity, frequency): </li></ul><ul><li>Networks between migrants and homeland communities </li></ul><ul><li>Global movement/flows along these networks: people, objects/images, commodities, money, ideas, diseases: </li></ul><ul><li>South Indian migrants in Singapore and relatives in India, money, material culture, kinship/cast ideologies, family news, wives </li></ul><ul><li>Homogenization versus diversity </li></ul><ul><li>ideal of one homogenous community, moral pressure? </li></ul><ul><li>Appropriation: locally specific understanding and use of globally distributed cultural products (things, customs, ideologies, etc.) identification and appropriation in the diaspora </li></ul>
  6. 10. <ul><li>Transnationalism </li></ul><ul><li>‘ the processes by which immigrants forge and sustain multi-stranded social relations that link together their societies of origin and settlement’ (Basch, Glick Schiller and Blanc-Szanton 1994: 7, quoted by Viruell-Fuentes 2006: 335) </li></ul>
  7. 11. Trans local connections <ul><li>To particular migrant groups, national identity may be less relevant or not relevant at all. </li></ul><ul><li>Instead regional identities and connection with particular religious or caste groups may be more important. </li></ul>
  8. 12. Musuguntha Vellalar caste members, Tamil Nadu
  9. 15. Panoramic view of Little India in Singapore
  10. 16. Little India, Veeramakaliamman Temple
  11. 17. Tanjore temple, India
  12. 19. Little India, Veeramakaliamman Temple
  13. 32. Musuguntha Vellalar caste members <ul><li>from Soorapallam (5000 people, 50 percent Musuguntha Vellalars) </li></ul><ul><li>migrated to Singapore since the 1950s </li></ul><ul><li>endogamous marriage practices (marrying within the cast group) </li></ul><ul><li>cross-cousin marriage (with mother’s brother’s daughter) </li></ul><ul><li>reproduction of kindred is a strictly policed rule </li></ul>
  14. 33. Caste loyalty and the translocal village <ul><li>Frequent visits and communication </li></ul><ul><li>arranged marriages with children from the village </li></ul><ul><li>economic obligations, remittances, building activities </li></ul><ul><li>creation of diaspora: socio-cultural activities in Singapore </li></ul>
  15. 34. Managing the translocal village <ul><li>Moral economy : reciprocity, family honour </li></ul><ul><li>Affective regime : fear of shame and ostracism </li></ul><ul><li>‘ as with all forms of society, the translocal traffic in sentiments (Werbner 1999: 26) entails a degree of social social coercian. Appadurai calls this a “community of sentiment” (Appadurai 1996: 8)’ (Velayutham and Wise 2005: 34) </li></ul>
  16. 35. Conclusion <ul><li>Translocal networks between South Indian migrants and homeland communities </li></ul><ul><li>Global movement along these networks: caste members, cast ideologies, remittances, kin </li></ul><ul><li>Ideal of one homogenous translocal community, moral and emotional pressure to continue the links through marriage </li></ul><ul><li>locally specific kinship practices stretched out over large distances to shape migrant life. </li></ul>

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