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Il sistema protezione civile islandese

Il sistema protezione civile islandese

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  • 1. Safe Community Conference 19 -20 May 2010 Reykjavík, Iceland THE CHALLENGE OF BUILDING COMMUNITY SAFETY AND RESILIENCE IN DISASTER MANAGEMENT: COORDINATION BETWEEN LOCAL AND NATIONAL LEVEL Gu!rún Jóhannesdóttir
  • 2. Iceland: Small nation- large country - many hazards •! Volcanic activity – Strong motion earthquakes •! Avalanches and mudslides, floods and drift ice. •! Meteorological hazards –violent storms and surges •! Health disasters: pandemic influenza •! Environmental disasters: pollution, toxic or radioactive spills •! Infrastructures failures: power outage, dam or structural failures •! People in many communities are living with threat www.almannavarnir.is
  • 3. Hazard and risk can affect many communities in Iceland www.almannavarnir.is
  • 4. Natural Hazard and Risk in Iceland Major Snow Avalanche Areas Areas Impacted by Sea Ice Major Landslide Areas Earthquake Hazard Zones Jökulhlaup - Glacial River Surges Active Volcanic Systems www.almannavarnir.is
  • 5. The Civil Protection Act 82/2008 •! All hazard approach. The aim of the Civil Protection is preparing, organizing and implementing measures aimed at preventing and, to the extent possible, limiting physical injury or damage to the health of the public and damage to the environment and property, whether this results from natural catastrophes or from human actions, epidemics, military action or other causes, and to provide emergency relief and assistance due to any injury or damage that may occur or has occurred. www.almannavarnir.is
  • 6. The Civil Protection Structure
  • 7. Recent Major Civil Protection Operation •! Snow Avalanches 1995 •! Earthquakes 2000 •! Earthquakes 2008 •! Pandemic Influenza 2009 •! Volcanic Eruption 2010 ...ongoing www.almannavarnir.is
  • 8. Working within the crisis cycle Demands great coordination and cooperation www.almannavarnir.is
  • 9. Disaster Management and Resilience Preparedness is the key to resilience Prevention Recovery Prepared- ness Response Resilience: the ability of an individual, community or country potentially exposed to hazards to cope with and to ‘bounce back’ from the effects of adversity.
  • 10. Prevention and Preparedness •! Planning for disaster is the most effective way to deal with disasters and needs co-operation with those who live in the local communities. •! A risk catalouge and assessment project was recently made by the Department of Civil Protection and Emergency Management in cooperation with local communities, local civil protection and response bodies and other stakeholders to identify hazard and risk in their local community. •! Long term planning in collaboration with local communities, identifying risk and community resilience to disasters and the need for risk assessments. www.almannavarnir.is
  • 11. Hazard catalog and risk evalutation project •! This provides overview of hazards and risk in local communities and the stakeholders themselves prioritize needs for further analysis in each community in collaboaration with the DCPEM. •! Evaluation of ~40 types of risk (from natural hazard, accidents, pollution, infrastructure and community safety), were measured in 15 districts against people and their health, on the environment, material goods and property and the society/local community. Local communities will use the results to prioritise work in disaster management. www.almannavarnir.is
  • 12. SEVERITY/IMPACT/CONSEQUENCES Almost Certain F Reduce Likelihood Avoid R 5 Risks E Likely Q Reduce U 4 E N C 3 Moderate Y / L Unlikely I 2 K Acceptable E or Reduce Consequences L Tolerable 1 Rare Level of Risk I H O O 0 Insignificant Minor Major Critical Extreme D 1 2 3 4 5
  • 13. Coordination between local and national levels •! Many communities lack capacity and capability to respond to disasters. •! Cooperation and coordination of actions and resources is paramount and it is one of the cornerstones of disaster response. •! The Joint Rescue and and Coordination Centre is activated during major disasters and assists local communities with the response. www.almannavarnir.is
  • 14. M C S V T I I Parliament/Ministries Meteorological Office Local Government Civil Aviation Coast Guard Red Cross Rescue Teams /volunteers Police Fire brigade Paramedics Public Health D R S A S E S T I 14
  • 15. JRCC Co-ordination that brings together agencies to ensure consistent and effective response www.almannavarnir.is
  • 16. Backbone of the Civil Protection during disasters •! Red Cross: They have the role of gathering, processing and registering information on victims during disasters as well as running mass care and aid centers. •! ICE-SAR: The rescue teams number about 100, within which there are thousands of people who are always available when needed for search and rescue operations. •! Medical personnel have an important role in the CP structure. •! Scientists and interagency collaboration: The DCPEM and sicentists from the Earth Science Institute, the Met-Office, Directorate of Health, Chief Epidemiologist and many more – meet regularily to monitor and analyse the situation. •! Collaboration is frequent with The Icelandic Coast Guards, utility companies, aviation authorities (ISAVIA), Environmental Agency, Icelandic Food and Veterinary Authority, Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority and many more www.almannavarnir.is
  • 17. Coordinating on local, national and international level can increase resilience
  • 18. Community Resilience and Safety: research, community planning, civil protection, local and national authorities “Disaster management is a journey not a destination. What may be of minor significance today may be the disaster of tomorrow” TEPHRA vol 22 CDEM

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