The characters as protagonist in virginia woolf’s kew
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The characters as protagonist in virginia woolf’s kew

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Virginia Woolf short story

Virginia Woolf short story

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The characters as protagonist in virginia woolf’s kew The characters as protagonist in virginia woolf’s kew Presentation Transcript

  • Simone Santana Ferraz ssferraz1@hotmail.com
  •  Revolt against the conservative values of realism;  Use of descontinuous fragments;  Focuses in metropolis, cities and urban landscapes;  DISPLACEMENT: deslocation of meaning and sense;  Self-consciousness; individualism; slice of live;
  •   STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS – tracing non-linear thought processes, moving by “the logic of association” or “the logic of the unconscious”;  Point of view: rejection of the single, authoritative, omniscient point of view for a narrative focalized instead on the consciousness of characters whose point of view is limited--or through characters who establish relative, multiple points of view--or through a shifting & plastic narrating consciousness that moves in & out of different characters' views
  •  People work as scenery and the garden is the main character;  The story is around the garden point of view;  “they walked on the past flower-bed, not walking four abreaast, and soon diminished in size among the trees and looked half transparent as the sunlight and shade swam over their backs in large trembling irregular patches” (WOOLF, p. 41)
  •  Slice  “in of conversation; the middle of the life in the garden, it seems that the narrator opens a parentheses to show how humans can be”. [SSF]
  •  The narrator gives life to the garden through the detailed description:  “From the oval-shaped flower-bed there rose perhaps a hundred stalks spreading into heart-shaped or tongue-shaped leaves half way up and unfurling at the tip red or yellow petals marked with spots of colour raised upon the surface” (WOOLF, p. 39)
  •  Reader’s  “In comprehension; the end, the narrator tells that life keeps in this way, nothing changed. It’s still hot because of the summer time, the colors of the flowers and the personal conflicts between people, the snail worries, etc.”
  •  BRITAIN EXPRESS. Guide Travel. Available in: http://www.britainexpress.com/London/kew.ht m. Access: September, 30, 2011. At: 15h23;  ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW. Official website: http://www.kew.org/index.htm. Access: September, 30, 2011. At: 16h43  WOOLF, Virginia. Kew Gardens. In Monday or Tuesday: Eight Stories. London: Dover, 1997.