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Indigenous Perspectives Lecture
 

Indigenous Perspectives Lecture

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Indigenous Education: What Works Lecture

Indigenous Education: What Works Lecture

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    Indigenous Perspectives Lecture Indigenous Perspectives Lecture Presentation Transcript

    • Indigenous Perspectives Across the Curriculum Evaluating Resources 1 9/17/09
    • •  Check
the
publica.on
date
 Authen'city
 and
beware
of
reprints.

 Is
the
material
up
to
date?
 •  As
a
general
rule
do
not
use
 material
published
before
 1980.
 9/17/09
 2

    • •  Lookout
for
statements
 Authen'city
 such
as
‘vast
and
empty
 Does
the
material
perpetuate
the
 concept
of
terra
nullius?
 land’
and
‘explorers
 discovering
vast
tracks
of
 unused
land’.
 •  Do
not
use.

 9/17/09
 3

    • Terra
Nullius
 The
idea
of
terra
nullius
can
be
present
 in
less
obvious
ways.

 This
picture
from
the
book
Dot
and
the
 Kangaroo
provides
an
interes.ng
 example.
By
itself
it
seems
a
 reasonable
historical
representa.on
 (allowing
for
the
story
of
a
talking
 kangaroo).


    • Terra
Nullius
 But
in
the
context
of
the
other
pictures
 in
the
book
Aboriginal
people
are
part
 of
this
construc.on
of
an
exo.c
and
 prehistoric
land.



    • Terra
Nullius
 Or
are
constructed
as
part
of
‘nature’.

    • •  Aboriginal
people
are
oPen
 Authen'city
 represented
as
 Does
the
material
ignore
or
 misrepresent
Aboriginal
resistance
to
 ‘treacherous’
or
 European
occupa.on
of
the
land?
 ‘murderous’
and
not
as
 defenders
of
their
land.

 •  Next
slide
gives
an
 example,
again
from
Dot
 and
the
Kangaroo.
 •  The
film
version
of
this
can
be
seen
at
 hTp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HpbbnjqaLLw

 •  This
should
load
automa.cally
aPer
the
next
slide
 if
watching
on
slideshare.


    • Authen'city
 Does
the
material
over‐generalise?

 Many
resources
call
on
limited
images
 and
icons.

 Avoid
resources
that
ignore
the
 diversity
of
Aboriginal
and
Torres
Strait
 Islander
cultures.


    • Balance
 Are
stereotypes
and
racist
 connota.ons
present?

 Or
do
we
see
Aboriginal
people
 engaged
in
the
diversity
of
ac.vity
that
 they
really
are
engaged
in?
 
–
in
this
case
replan.ng
a
bauxite
 mine.

    • Balance
 Does
the
resource
emphasise
the
 ‘exo.c’
and
exclude
other
cultural
and
 community
prac.ces?
 These
three
slides
show
pages
from
an
 ‘alphabet’
book
A
is
For
Aunty
(Russell,
 2000).
 They
show
contemporary
images
 relevant
to
many
Indigenous
children.

    • Balance
 They
include
important
parts
of
life
 that
are
not
at
all
exo.c.

    • Balance
 They
do
make
reference
to
difference
 in
the
history
and
experiences
of
 Indigenous
communi.es
but
as
part
of
 a
broader
context.


    • Secret
and
Sacred
 It
can
be
distressing
for
some
Indigenous
students
to
be
exposed
to
material
that
they
 should
not
see.
There
is
also
an
issue
of
respect
–
some
events,
images
and
ideas
 belong
to
the
par.cipants
only.

 •  Look
for:
 •  Do
not
use
without
 –  Material
presen.ng
 discussing
with
local
 par.cular
ceremonies,
eg
 community/AECG
 ini.a.on
rites
 –  Dreaming
sites
of
 par.cular
groups
 –  Photographs
and
names
of
 deceased
Torres
Strait
 Islander
and/or
Aboriginal
 people

    • Useful
Resource
 Curriculum
Corpora.on
(1995)
 Resource
Guide
for
Aboriginal
Studies
 and
Torres
Strait
Islander
Studies
 This
presenta>on
is
based
on
the
 informa>on
in
this
book.

 Pages
2‐8
of
the
book
are
available
on
 e‐reserve
and
moodle.
They
for
the
 basis
for
the
resource
review
op>on
in
 the
final
assignment.