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Pilot in Lecture Capture (PiLC): a small web-based lecture capture project, with Denise Sweeney
 

Pilot in Lecture Capture (PiLC): a small web-based lecture capture project, with Denise Sweeney

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A short paper presented at ALT C 2012 in Manchester, 11 September 2012

A short paper presented at ALT C 2012 in Manchester, 11 September 2012

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  • Norm Freisen’s blog - Certain Media biases, 1954, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation/ University of Toronto (5 departments) Explorations on Marchand McLuhan Each communication channel codifies reality differently and thus influences, to a surprising degree the content of the message communicated. Each employs a separate language One purely oral, the other verbal and kinesic, combined with situational data Dramatic media (music and art, language and gesture, rhetoric and colour) - convey emotional tones not merely information Oldest mass medium (print) carries prestige - (book format with its bias toward lineality) relative permanence gives in an air of ‘immortality’ PRINT - reader controls exposure - reads when he pleases, pauses when he wishes, and repeats or skips sections at will.
  • Video - Visual - expressions, gestures, human voice Stimuates students interest Influences learning in a positive manner Evidence of students employing deep learning approaches Accessed parts of the lecture they did not understand/revisit complex concepts/take comprehensive notes while listening/prepare for exams and other assessments/ achieve better results Flexibility in access NOTE: Not APPROPRIATE in all contexts ALTC project 4 universities Macquarie/Newcastle/Murdoch/Flinders - challenges of lecture capture and the implications for the design of the curriculum, teaching and learning 13,278 students surveyed 815 student respondents (further 60 surveyed) 676 staff surveyed 155 respondents Traditional lecture enduring feature of university life/ staff workloads/curriculum designs and student experiences are constructed STUDENT - 76% positive STAFF- 54% generally positive, 26% negative STUDENT - 67% STAFF 30% (achieve better results) STUDENTS - 80% made it easier to learning STAFF 49%
  • Traditional lecture enduring feature of university life/ staff workloads/curriculum designs and student experiences are constructed Review the role of the lecture/restructure the learning environment to provide a more integrated experience for students
  • Traditional lecture enduring feature of university life/ staff workloads/curriculum designs and student experiences are constructed Review the role of the lecture/restructure the learning environment to provide a more integrated experience for students
  • CS1 - reflection on my pacing/phasing of his lectures Key - was how I could strategically plan the content/interactivity/questions/feedback/right timings Structure/Delivery/performance Rethink way particular concepts were presented CS2 A record of the lectures helped those that were struggling with language, provided a reminder/record of the lecture/ Helped me with future planning - intend to refresh/update material/find new material/ I have a record of that process to remind me of what worked/didn’t work OVERALL - Professional development by ‘stealth’/continuous improvement with something ‘objective’ a ‘record’ and not just my ‘memory’ Provided ‘evidence’ for teaching promotion/research/
  • How many of the following support structures do you have in place?

Pilot in Lecture Capture (PiLC): a small web-based lecture capture project, with Denise Sweeney  Pilot in Lecture Capture (PiLC): a small web-based lecture capture project, with Denise Sweeney Presentation Transcript

  • Pilot in Lecture Capture (PiLC): a small web-based lecture capture project Denise Sweeney and Simon KearAcademic Practice Unit and Beyond Distance Research Alliance University of Leicester Funded by the Teaching Enhancement Programme, University of Leicester ALT-C 2012, Paper 262, University of Manchester
  • BackgroundAdobe® Connect™
  • What do we know about lecture capture? 1954 - 136 2nd Yr UG students - University of Toronto - 4 groups Single lecture Identical examination (understanding & retention of content) • Heard and saw a lecture delivered in a television studio • Heard and saw this same lecture on a television screen • Heard it over the radio • Read it in manuscript Experiment repeated with some modifications - 3 groups Which group got the top score on the examination?
  • What do we know about lecture capture?• Learner control – self-directed learning; asynchronous access – empowering the learner with control of the lecture and convenience/flexibility (Simpson, 2006; Gosper, McNeil & Woo, 2010)• Combination of f2f; video recorded lectures; uploaded course documents (Soong et al, 2006)• Mis-match between staff and student views (positive views; on learning and achieving better results; made it easier to learn (ALTC project - Gosper et al 2008)
  • Participants92 first-year undergraduates (Chemistry)45 taught postgraduate students (Media andCommunication)2 lecturers Icons by Everaldo Coelho
  • Hardware Projector by Piotrus Voice recorder by Stilfehler
  • The recordings• 6 lectures of 1 hour each (Chemistry)• 6 lectures of 2 hours each (Media and Communication)• All available in both Adobe Connect and MP3 formats. What do they sound like?
  • Research findings overview• Blackboard analytics• Student focus groups (in progress)• Comprehensive online questionnaire (use of lecture capture - when, where, frequency of use, purposes) study patterns, demographics• Extended ‘phenomenographic’ interviews with 2 university teachers on their experiences
  • Blackboard reportMedia and Communication
  • Students• Students appreciate the flexibility of access & support for learning - staff have concerns• contributes to a ‘blurring’ of the boundaries between internal and external students• Change lecture attendance patterns, raises questions about the roles of lectures• Demands changes in the way students learn and teachers teach• Affects the design of the whole curriculum has professional and organisational development implications
  • Which format they preferred
  • How they listened
  • Why they listened
  • What they thought of lecture capture
  • LecturersLecturers’ experience of being part of the projectCase study 1… helped refine my lectures‘Reviewing the recordings takes it all to another level’Case study 2… helped me reflect on future planning‘… part of the planning process certainly…improving the module…’
  • Those institutions using lecture capture technologies… Do youhave a ‘pedagogy strategy’…or plan to have one? Which of thefollowing do you provide?•Mentoring•Examples of best practice•FAQs•Guidelines•Workshops•Just-in-time technical support•Student support
  • Thank youDenise Sweeney Simon KearEducational Designer Senior Learning TechnologistAcademic Practice Unit Beyond Distance Research Alliancedms34@le.ac.uk spk7@le.ac.uk
  • References and links• ‘Certain Media Biases’ (1954) New York Times, http://learningspaces.org/page/2/• Gosper, M. V., McNeil, M. A. & Woo, K. (2010) Harnessing the Power of Technologies to Manage Collaborative e-Learning Projects in Dispersed Environments, Journal of Distance Education, vol. 24, No. 1 pp. 167 - 186.• Simpson, N. (2006). Asynchronous access to conventional course delivery: a pilot project. British Journal of Educational Technology, 37(4), 527–537.• Soong, S. K. A., Chan, L. K., Cheers, C., Hu, C. (2006) Impact of video recorded lectures among students, proceedings of the 23rd annual ascilite conference, Who’s learning? Whose technology?, Sydney Australia, pp. 789 - 793.• Open EYA http://www.openeya.org/