Simon Inger Consulting

What Scholarly Societies Want
from their Publishers – a
Changing Landscape
My brands
 Simon Inger Consulting Ltd – publisherfacing brand, often get asked to undertake
strategic business reviews fo...
Journal Brand Image
Author Experience
Funding Agencies

Government Policy

Review Process
Full OA Journals

Author Marketi...
Societies with Partner Publishers







Education
Requirements Filtering
Prioritisation – key objective
RFP
Objecti...
What societies want to know about









Big deals and lock-in
Reach, usage, impact factor
Open Access
Delivery ...
What self-published societies ask about
 How to get to widest markets (compete
with big deals)
 Impact factor
 Open Acc...
Big deals and lock-in
Usage of <TITLE> by access type (all libraries)

Big deal
Subscription to at least one title plus bi...
Reach, usage, impact factor





Impact factor related to readership
Readership related to big deals
Big deals = lock-...
Open Access
 OA = Author Market
 Author Market = Community
 Community = Society

13 January, 2014

www.sic.ox14.com

9
OA as a Service Industry
 If OA is the future, we have moved
essentially from a product-based business
model, to a servic...
13 January, 2014

www.sic.ox14.com

11
13 January, 2014

www.sic.ox14.com

12
Implications of Service Model
 Author is King
 Author experience
– Ease of submission
– Review fairness and speed
– Valu...
Data
 Who owns the author data?
– Publisher or Society?
– Society is free to change publisher, but what
about its author ...
OA may be complicated
 Many societies who self-publish looking for
help on OA from commercial partners
AND
 Many societi...
Delivery Platform
 Platform questions often manifest
themselves as a concern over visibility of
content
– Libraries, and ...
Article of the Future

13 January, 2014

www.sic.ox14.com

17
Editorial Software
 Everyone wants access to the best
solution
 Concerns over reviewer discovery
 Concerns over open ac...
New Title Launches
 New OA titles
– Publisher owned and society supported
– Society owned but with commercial partner
– J...
Money
 Revenue share not profit share
 Societies usually want to protect revenues
to support society work
– But some rec...
Conclusions
 Gold OA is having a radical effect on how
societies think and their relationships with
partners.
 Societies...
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What Scholarly Societies Want from their Publishers

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Simon Inger Consulting and Renew Consulting for Societies undertake numerous strategic business reviews of publishers' and societies' journals business, often with a view to finding an appropriate publishing partner for a society that can keep up with a rapidly changing publishing environment. The impact of open access is significant, and has led many societies to rethink their publishing mission beyond making a surplus to support the society's charitable operations.

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Transcript of "What Scholarly Societies Want from their Publishers"

  1. 1. Simon Inger Consulting What Scholarly Societies Want from their Publishers – a Changing Landscape
  2. 2. My brands  Simon Inger Consulting Ltd – publisherfacing brand, often get asked to undertake strategic business reviews for journals including assessment of publishing partner options  Renew Consulting for Societies – aimed at societies who have already outsourced and who need education or help in renegotiation, tenders, etc. 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 2
  3. 3. Journal Brand Image Author Experience Funding Agencies Government Policy Review Process Full OA Journals Author Marketing Bucket OA Journal Scope and Coverage Submissions Subscriptions Finances Page Charges Platform Costs Composition Costs Impact Factor Mission Copyediting Costs Regional Journals Competitor Titles Publications Partnerships 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 3
  4. 4. Societies with Partner Publishers       Education Requirements Filtering Prioritisation – key objective RFP Objective Assessment versus Priorities Negotiation and Contract 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 4
  5. 5. What societies want to know about         Big deals and lock-in Reach, usage, impact factor Open Access Delivery Platform and Technology Financial Basis of Deals Backfile digitisation and ownership New title launches – freedom / ownership Editorial control 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 5
  6. 6. What self-published societies ask about  How to get to widest markets (compete with big deals)  Impact factor  Open Access  Delivery Platform and Technology  Editorial trade-off (speed vs quality) 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 6
  7. 7. Big deals and lock-in Usage of <TITLE> by access type (all libraries) Big deal Subscription to at least one title plus big deal Subscribed 13 January, 2014 7
  8. 8. Reach, usage, impact factor     Impact factor related to readership Readership related to big deals Big deals = lock-in Therefore a necessary trade-off 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 8
  9. 9. Open Access  OA = Author Market  Author Market = Community  Community = Society 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 9
  10. 10. OA as a Service Industry  If OA is the future, we have moved essentially from a product-based business model, to a service model. – Scalability and profitability – Cost control – Price point (for APCs) 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 10
  11. 11. 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 11
  12. 12. 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 12
  13. 13. Implications of Service Model  Author is King  Author experience – Ease of submission – Review fairness and speed – Value-added editorial process  Author relationships and marketing  Delivery platform features – “Article of the Future”  Cascading 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 13
  14. 14. Data  Who owns the author data? – Publisher or Society? – Society is free to change publisher, but what about its author relationship data (perhaps in a CRM)  Which department? – Even within a society, can be conflicts of data ownership over author data held by publisher and member data held by society 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 14
  15. 15. OA may be complicated  Many societies who self-publish looking for help on OA from commercial partners AND  Many societies who have a commercial partner want to do OA themselves 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 15
  16. 16. Delivery Platform  Platform questions often manifest themselves as a concern over visibility of content – Libraries, and discoverability and reach  Individuals, power users and features  Editorial Board, features and look  “Article of the Future” – a clear space between Gold OA and Green OA articles? 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 16
  17. 17. Article of the Future 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 17
  18. 18. Editorial Software  Everyone wants access to the best solution  Concerns over reviewer discovery  Concerns over open access, especially cascading 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 18
  19. 19. New Title Launches  New OA titles – Publisher owned and society supported – Society owned but with commercial partner – Joint venture – Self publish even if partnered with major publisher for subscription journals – Cascade and transfer 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 19
  20. 20. Money  Revenue share not profit share  Societies usually want to protect revenues to support society work – But some recognition that publishing mission best served by being flexible on revenue, especially in short term. 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 20
  21. 21. Conclusions  Gold OA is having a radical effect on how societies think and their relationships with partners.  Societies are increasingly understanding how they could be central to an authorcentric service-based publishing model. 13 January, 2014 www.sic.ox14.com 21

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