A Guide for MAP Academic Advisors
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Handbook for MAP Academic Advisors

Handbook for MAP Academic Advisors

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A Guide for MAP Academic Advisors Document Transcript

  • 1. maynooth access programme A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 2. CONTENTSWelcome from the Registrar ...................................................................................... 01Overview of Maynooth Access Programme (MAP) ................................................... 03Students with Disabilities and Their Supports ......................................................... 06Mature Students and Their Supports ........................................................................ 07Access Students and Their Supports ........................................................................ 08Role of MAP Academic Advisor .................................................................................. 09 How much Time is Required..................................................................................11 What Supports Are In Place for Me from MAP .....................................................12 Will I Get a List of The Students I Need To Meet ..................................................12 When Will I Get The LANEX ...................................................................................13 Do MAP Students Perform as Well Academically As Other Students .................13 Should I Meet With All MAP Students ...................................................................13 Do I Notify MAP of 1:1 Academic Meetings With Students...................................14 Who Do I Contact in the Access Office If I Have A Query ......................................14 How Will I Know About A Student’s Accommodations .........................................15 What Are my Responsibilities in Relation To Confidentiality................................15 What Is Accessibility...............................................................................................16 What is a Reasonable Accommodation for Students with Disabilities ................16 Which Legislation Provides for the Support of Students with Disabilities ..........18 Will There Be MAP Academic Advisors in Other Departments ............................19Overview of MAP Academic Advisor Role ................................................................. 20Development and Dissemination of Good Practice .................................................. 22 English Department – Supporting Students registered with the Access Office .....22 Access Office - Inclusion as a Guiding Principle ..................................................24 Applied Social Studies - Extensions and Other Academic Accommodations .....25Academic Issues Student Checklist .......................................................................... 26MAP Academic Advisors Moodle Space .................................................................... 28Case Studies................................................................................................................ 29 Access Student Failing Subject .............................................................................29 Mature Student Problems with a Subject .............................................................30 Disability Issues .....................................................................................................31 Dyslexia .............................................................................................................31 Possible Learning Difficulty .............................................................................33 Mental Health ...................................................................................................34 Hearing Impairment.........................................................................................36 Physical Disability ............................................................................................38 Visual Impairment ............................................................................................40MAP Access Team ....................................................................................................... 42MAP Academic Advisors List...................................................................................... 43Feedback on Meetings Form ...................................................................................... 45NUI Maynooth Useful Contacts Numbers ................................................................. 50Notes............................................................................................................................ 51
  • 3. NUI Maynooth prides itself on its diverse student population. The developmentof this handbook together with the embedding of academic supports withindepartments is most welcome. The handbook is a resource for lecturers andadministrators informing them on the learning supports available to identifiedunder-represented groups in NUI Maynooth.The last decade has seen NUI Maynooth respond positively to the challengeof widening participation among under-represented groups accessing highereducation. At national level a number of key pieces of legislation, including theUniversity Act 1997, the Equal Status Acts 2000-2004 and the Disability Act 2005;have enshrined basic rights to equality of support and access to education. TheHEA, in the National Access Plan 2008-13, have articulated the need for morecoherent, integrated approaches to the principle of institution wide approachesto mainstreaming.The development of this handbook is a valuable source of reference for all in theuniversity working to achieve these objectives in the coming years.I would like to wish both the Access Office and MAP Academic Advisors well inthe continued development of supporting students and embedding good practiceinto the university culture.Yours sincerelyDr David B. RedmondRegistrar A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 01
  • 4. The Access Office at NUI Maynooth, through the Maynooth Access Programme (MAP), supports students with disabilities, mature students, school leavers from socio-economic disadvantaged backgrounds, New Irish and members of the Travelling Community.THE ACCESS OFFICE AT NUIMHAS FOUR MAIN AIMS:• To embed accessibility and diversity issues into the culture of the University, thereby influencing the development of inclusive policies and practices;• To widen participation so that all groups in Irish society are fully represented in the higher education student population.• To address the delivery of specific supports to students, prospective students and staff; and• To work with the University so that students and staff with specific access and support needs are treated in an equitable way. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 03
  • 5. CONTINUED STUDENTS IDENTIFIED BY THE ACCESS OFFICE MAY NEED SUPPORT WITH: • Expectations of going to college and the general transition to Higher Education • Help applying to college and accessing admission routes • Financial support or advice • Academic support including the following: • Study skills focussed on helping the student to become an independent learner. • Assistive technology equipment and training. • Academic tuition if appropriate. • Personal supports such as note takers and personal assistants. • Examination support when appropriate. • Personal support and advocacy to ensure specific access and support needs are treated in an equitable way.NUIM recognises that studying at to take responsibility for getting theiruniversity is very different to the work done and organising their timeexperience of secondary school. Students effectively. The MAP Team plays a keyregistered with the Access Office may role in assisting students registered withhave a different learning style, may have the Access Office to develop these skillshad different experiences of education and become an independent learner whileand life and may require more support taking into account different learningto become an independent learner. styles, illness and disability related issuesUniversity students are encouraged and diverse needs.04 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 6. WHAT SUPPORTS AREIN PLACE FOR ALL MAPSTUDENTS?• MAP works with schools and communities raising expectations and supporting students applying to college.• MAP provides pre-entry general information and advice about how to become a student at NUIM and the supports a student may need.• MAP has developed admission routes to support mature students, students from disadvantaged backgrounds and students with disabilities to enter NUIM.• MAP delivers comprehensive orientation programmes that give students a head start on what life at NUIM is about.• MAP Learning Advisors provide financial advice and ongoing personal support.• MAP Learning Advisors coordinate the provision of academic and learning supports.• MAP provides a Peer Mentoring programme.• MAP students can access an Online Learning Support Resource.• MAP offers Student + - a unique study skills programme to help students become resourceful, independent learners.• MAP provides students with the opportunity to be screened for a specific learning difficulty.• MAP provides, in collaboration with the Academic Departments, additional Academic Tuition where appropriate.• MAP provides disability and diversity training for staff at the University. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 05
  • 7. CONTINUED STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES AND THEIR SUPPORTS Most students with disabilities apply for a place at NUIM through the CAO and indicate that they have a disability or specific learning difficulty at that point. Some students will also apply to DARE (Disability Access Route to Education) which is a supplementary admissions route specifically for students with disabilities (www. accesscollege.ie). However, students can disclose that they have a disability at any time in the academic year and many students will seek supports post-entry. Some students cross a number of areas in that they could be a student with a disability who is also mature for example. At NUIM in 2011 over 300 students, almost 5% of the NUI Maynooth student body, well above the national average, are people with disabilities. We recognise that a disability can impact upon a student’s capacity to participate in university life and we work with learners to help ensure that the impact is minimised and that students with disabilities are provided with every opportunity to reach their academic potential. The MAP Learning Advisors in the Disability Office coordinate the provision of a range of supports for students with disabilities: • MAP Learning Advisors complete a Needs Assessment for all students who register with the Disability Office. A Learning and Academic Needs report (LANEX), which outlines the academic and examination support to be provided by the Disability Office and the Academic Departments is then forwarded to the relevant Departments. • The Disability Office approves examination supports, when appropriate, such as extra time, smaller venue, Learning Disability Awareness, rest breaks, use of scribe or reader, use of PC or assistive technology when taking their examinations.06 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 8. • All students are offered access to Student + - a unique study skills programme to help students become resourceful, independent learners. Some students will also be offered one to one support in identified areas.• MAP offers students registered with the Disability Office access to and training in a range of assistive technology. Programmes such as Inspiration and Read and Write Gold are available campus wide.• MAP students registered with the Disability Office can access the Assistive Technology Centre which houses a range of assistive technology.• The Educational Technology Officer will support students to convert materials into Audio, Braille and other formats as required.• MAP provides personal supports such as academic/ personal assistants, note takers etc to students with disabilities when necessary.MATURE STUDENTSAND THEIR SUPPORTSMature students at NUIM (over 23 years of age) may have left school early orwere unable to fulfill their true potential in education due to financial, socialor family circumstances. Over the years their situation may have changed withfamily reared, children settled in school, they may wish to change their job ordevelop a more interesting career path. More recently the current economicclimate has forced many to revisit their career options and undertake acourse of study. Over 400 new mature students a year come to Maynooth todo a degree. Typically, they describe their experience here as academicallychallenging but hugely enjoyable and rewarding. The MAP Mature StudentOfficer coordinates the provision of a range of additional supports:• Mature Student Advisory Service – personal, financial, academic advice.• Essay Seminars in collaboration with Academic Advisory Office and the Writing Centre.• Liaison with Academic departments on extra academic supports.• Mature Student Society for peer support.• All students are offered access to Student+ – a unique study skills programme to help students become resourceful independent learners A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 07
  • 9. CONTINUED ACCESS STUDENTS AND THEIR SUPPORTS The NUI Maynooth Access Programme supports disadvantaged school leavers who enter NUIM through the Higher Education Access Route (HEAR) and Access 21 which is a supplementary admissions route specifically for disadvantaged school leavers (www.accesscollege.ie). Students typically come from areas of socio-economic disadvantage, Travellers and New Irish communities with low transfer rates to higher education. In 2011/12 there are 295 access students at Maynooth supported by MAP. The MAP Advisor coordinates the provision of a range of supports: • Financial Support to help with college expenses e.g. books and rent. • Social Support (Christmas Party, Mid-Semester and End-Of Year Review meetings). • Opportunities for students to participate as Leaders/ Volunteers with MAP • A texting /e-mailing system as well as Social Media (Twitter, MAP Area Forum on Moodle) is in place to update students regularly on relevant information and invite them to touch base with the MAP Advisor. • All students are offered access to Student+ – a unique study skills programme to help students become resourceful independent learners.08 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 10. WHAT DO IHAVE TO DO?MAP Academic Advisors have a specific clearly definedrole to assist students supported by MAP with academiccourse-related queries and concerns only. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 09
  • 11. CONTINUED A MAP ACADEMIC ADVISOR IS : 1. Source of support & advice for MAP students who have academic course related queries and concerns. 2. A link between academic departments and the Access Office on academic issues relating to students supported by MAP; 3. A referral point for academic departments on issues relating to specific groups of students; 4. A source of advice for Access Office on academic issues; 5. A source of support & advice for academic departments on supporting students from target groups (disability, mature, socio-economic, Travellers, New Irish); 6. A conduit to provide diversity/equality awareness raising in academic departments especially in relation to the Disability Act and legal obligations; 7. A conduit for the dissemination of the Learning and Academic Needs/Examination Accommodations (LANEX) Report to relevant staff in the department and also protecting the confidentiality of the LANEX; 8. The implementer of the LANEX and ensures that the support approved for students registered with Disability Office is put in place at departmental level. 9. A key person in the department to be aware of legal obligations relating in particular to disability within the department; and 10. A source of information for potential students on specific aspects of courses run in their department. 11. An advocate within your Department around accessibility and diversity issues.10 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 12. A MAP ACADEMIC ADVISOR IS NOT : 1. A student counsellor. Students in need of counselling should be referred to the campus counselling service and/or medical centre; 1. A financial or personal advisor to students. Students should be referred to the Access Office and/or Welfare Officer in the Students Union; 2. A retention officer. Students at risk of dropping out should be referred to the Access Office and/or Academic Advisor’s Office; 3. A person with sole responsibility to resolve all “access” issues brought to their attention; or 4. A disability advisor. Students with disabilities should be referred to the Disability Office.HOW MUCH TIME IS REQUIRED?You should attend the initial session which will outline the role of the MAP AcademicAdvisor before the start of semester one. At this session you will receive a pack thatincludes all the information you will need to smoothly integrate your role as MAPAcademic Advisor into your daily academic life.Following that you will be invited to attend brief end-of-semester review meetings(2 in total in an academic year). Meetings with students can be timed during yourstandard office hours.In addition you will be offered the opportunity to indicate your specific needs in thecontext of training and support and the Access Office will endeavor to respond asquickly as possible. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 11
  • 13. CONTINUED WHAT SUPPORTS ARE IN PLACE FOR ME FROM MAP? MAP will provide training, a support pack and end-of-semester review meetings. We will also provide a range of support materials in hard copy, online and in a dedicated Moodle space. You are also encouraged to contact MAP staff any time you have a query in relation to your role as MAP Academic Advisor. A list of MAP staff and their roles and contact details are available in the Handbook and on your Moodle Support Page.WILL I GET A LIST OF THESTUDENTS I NEED TO MEET?The supports offered to students from MAP is confidential and access to studentinformation and details varies depending on the student group.• You will not receive details about MAP students who have come through the HEAR programme. These students will be encouraged to self-advocate to have their own needs met. They may contact you directly or may be referred to you by a member of the MAP team.• In relation to mature students you can request a list of all mature students in your Department from the Mature Student Officer. Students will also be encouraged to self-advocate to have their own needs met. They may contact you directly or may be referred to you by a member of the MAP team.• In the case of students with disabilities, their individual support needs are always communicated to academic departments through the Learning and Academic Needs and Exam Report, known as a LANEX. This report is sent via email to speed up the communication process. In relation to students with disabilities it might be useful to have a meeting with the student to discuss items covered in the LANEX. This would be crucial if the disability was significant.12 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 14. WHEN WILL I GET THE LANEX?These reports are generally circulated at the beginning of the academic year.A LANEX can be updated if a student’s personal or medical circumstanceschange. Students who disclose a disability post-entry may register forsupports at any time so some reports will be circulated mid-semester.Only MAP Advisors in the Disability Office have the authority to change thesupports outlined on the LANEX. There are national guidelines that governthe coordination of reasonable and appropriate supports for students withdisabilities.All LANEX’s are circulated to the Heads of Department and MAP AcademicAdvisors. MAP Advisors should familiarise themselves with these documents.DO MAP STUDENTS PERFORM AS WELLACADEMICALLY AS OTHER STUDENTS?Yes, research over the past number of years has shown that MAP students, with theright support, perform as well, if not better, than other students.SHOULD I MEET WITH ALLMAP STUDENTS?No. At the beginning of each academic year all students will be advised byMAP that they should access a range of mainstream supports if they arehaving academic difficulties. Some students will feel that they need to discusstheir academic concerns with their Department’s MAP Academic Advisor toget specific guidance and support and will self-refer to you.In relation to students with disabilities it might be useful to have a meetingwith the student to discuss items covered in their LANEX. This would beparticularly crucial if the disability was significant. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 13
  • 15. CONTINUED DO I NOTIFY MAP OF 1:1 ACADEMIC MEETINGS WITH STUDENTS? You should record the meetings as you would with any student. MAP will provide you with a mechanism to record student meetings that will be used for evaluation purposes. This will be discussed at end-of-semester review meetings. Generally you will not be required to notify MAP of individual meetings with students. However, you should contact MAP immediately if you have any questions about your role, a concern about the level of support a student is receiving or concerns about a student’s welfare.WHO DO I CONTACT IF I HAVE A QUERY?• In general where you have a concern about a Mature Student, you should contact the Mature Student Officer, Emer Sheerin.• If you have a concern about an Access Student you should contact the Access Student Advisor, Loretta Mulvihill.• In relation to students with disabilities; • If you have concerns/queries in relation to students with Specific Learning Difficulties ( Dyslexia, Dyspraxia) you should contact Bridget Gormley, MAP Learning Advisor • If you have concerns/queries in relation to students with Mental Health Issues, Asperger’s Syndrome, Attention Deficit Disorder or Significant Ongoing Illness you should contact Ina Olohan, MAP Learning Advisor • If you have concerns/queries relating to students with a Visual Impairment, Hearing Impairment or Physical/Mobility issue, you should contact Maeve McCaldin, MAP Learning AdvisorContact details for all MAP staff are available in this Handbook, on your MAP AcademicAdvisors Moodle Support Page and on the Access Office website (access.nuim.ie).14 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 16. HOW WILL I KNOW ABOUTA STUDENT’S ACCOMMODATIONS?This applies only to students with disabilities. Any supports approved for a studentwill be outlined in the LANEX.WHAT ARE MY RESPONSIBILITIES INRELATION TO CONFIDENTIALITY?Yes this is very important. We encourage students with disabilities todisclose information on their disability/specific learning difficulty to the MAPTeam before they apply to college or at any point during their studies. Suchdisclosure is encouraged so that MAP staff and MAP Learning Advisorscan work with the student in ensuring that any reasonable accommodationrequired is identified and facilitated in conjunction with the student.Any documentation or information presented in disclosing a support need isheld by the Access Office and specific medical or other documentation will notbe disclosed to any third party.Once the assessment of need has taken place the LANEX, or report outliningappropriate supports for the student, is completed by the Disability Office.This report is disseminated at department level, usually to the Head ofDepartment and the Academic Advisor.When a copy of the report is received it is important that the information iscommunicated to all departmental staff who are involved with the student.We appreciate that individual departments will have their own proceduresfor communicating information. However, with the implementation of theDisability Act 2005, it is vital that the support requirements of students arecommunicated in an effective and confidential manner to all staff who areinvolved in teaching the student.It would also be best practice that the Department/Academic Advisor holds acopy of the report in individually created files for each student registered withthe Disability Office in their Department. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 15
  • 17. CONTINUED WHAT IS ACCESSIBILITY? Accessibility relates to a student’s ability to access and be fully involved in university life. While many MAP students learn in individual ways, a curriculum designed to be inclusive will reduce difficulties in the learning experienced by MAP students. There is no need to dilute the curriculum or to reduce course requirements for MAP students. Levelling the playing field does not affect the integrity of the degree. Appropriate accommodations may be needed as well as modifications in the way information is presented and in methods of testing and evaluation. MAP Academic Advisors can make college more accessible for their students by drawing on the student’s own prior learning experiences and using available college and department resources concerning best practice in Teaching and Learning. The LANEX will give specific guidance concerning accessibility for students with disabilities. Specific advice on how to support students with disabilities in the context of teaching and learning is provided in the DAWN handbook ‘Teaching Students with Disabilities: Guidelines for Academic Staff’. WHAT IS A REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION? “A student is disabled if he/she requires a facility which is outside of the mainstream provision of the college in order to participate fully in higher education and without which the student would be educationally disadvantaged in comparison with their peers.…an educational establishment will discriminate against a student with a disability if they do not do all that is reasonable to accommodate that student..” A reasonable accommodation is ‘any action that helps alleviate a substantial disadvantage’16 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 18. The purpose of providing a reasonable accommodation is to minimise theimpact of a disability on academic performance.Making a reasonable accommodation could involve changing procedures,modifying the delivery of a course, providing examination arrangements,altering the physical environment or providing additional supports such asassistive technology, materials in alternative formats or extra tuition.Examples of Reasonable Accommodations• Students with physical disabilities need to have classrooms and laboratories that are located in accessible locations.• Students who are visually impaired are unable to see materials in visual formats. Lecture notes in Braille or audio or digital formats allow them to access lectures in the same way as other students.• Lectures delivered orally are inaccessible to students who are hearing impaired. Providing interpreters, or written notes removes this barrier and is a reasonable accommodation• Lectures delivered orally can also be inaccessible to students who have significant learning issues. A student who has a mental health issue or dyslexia, for example, would benefit from lecture notes or handouts in advance of class.• Students who have disabilities/learning issues could be considered for an extension in which to complete an assignment. This could be a reasonable accommodation in the context of the impact of their disability/learning difficulty.• A reasonable accommodation during an examination could include extra time, rest breaks, the provision of an alternative examination venue, assistive technology or a scribe/reader.• A reasonable accommodation could be to provide educational support workers such as a personal assistant, laboratory assistant, note taker, academic tutor, reader/scribe etc.• Allowing students to demonstrate that they have achieved the learning outcomes of the course in an alternative manner. An example would be substituting a written assignment with an oral assessment.An inclusive curriculum will support the learning needs of all students andminimise the need for individual support. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 17
  • 19. CONTINUEDWHICH LEGISLATION PROVIDESFOR THE SUPPORT OF STUDENTSWITH DISABILITIES?The Disability Act 2005 sets out to make significant improvements to the everydaylives of people with disabilities. It forms part of the Government’s NationalDisability Strategy, which also includes the Employment Equality Act, 1998, theEqual Status Act, 2000, the Equality Act, 2004, the Education for Persons withSpecial Educational Needs Act, 2004 and the Comhairle (Amendment) Bill, 2004.In short, the Act places a number of statutory obligations on public bodies, whichinclude Higher Education Institutions, to:18 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 20. • Make public buildings accessible to people with disabilities - by 31st December 2015 all college buildings must comply with Part M of the Building Regulations which deals with accessibility of buildings for people with disabilities• Make public services and information accessible to people with disabilities• Be pro-active in employing people with disabilities - third level institutions are legally obliged, to reach a minimum 3% target for the employment of people with disabilities, under the Act’s definition of disabilityMore detailed information on college legislative obligations will be provided inhard copy and in your Moodle space. WILL THERE BE MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS SUPPORTING THE SAME STUDENTS? We aim to have a MAP Academic Advisor in every Academic Department on campus. MAP Academic Advisors will work individually within their subject areas with their own students during each semester as the issues you deal with for students will be academic and subject-specific in nature. The MAP team will create opportunities for Advisors across faculties to meet, namely at the initial training and again at the end of semester review meeting. MAP Academic Advisors are also welcome, but not obliged, to join in with any of our social events for students organised throughout the year. We will also supply a list of MAP Academic Advisors across campus and contact details on the MAP Academic Advisor Moodle Support Page to allow for peer support and collaboration throughout the year. WHAT HAPPENS IF I TAKE EXTENDED LEAVE OR CANNOT FULFIL MY ROLE AS MAP ACADEMIC ADVISOR? You should notify your Head of Department to arrange and nominate a suitable replacement. Please advise the Access Office in good time to enable briefing of the new appointee and their inclusion in the Moodle space. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 19
  • 21. OVERVIEW OF ROLE OF MAP ACADEMIC ADVISOR20 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 22. OVERVIEW OF ROLE OF MAP ACADEMIC ADVISOR Did the student 1 Yes: Discuss the issue bearing this fact in mind. disclose that they entered No: Discuss the issue as you would via the HEAR with any student. route? 2 Yes: Discuss the issue with student. ACCESS Is the issue No: Refer student to appropriate academic? service (Medical Counselling, Academic Advisory, Welfare) Is the action 3 Yes: Agree the action with the student. to be taken No: Contact the MAP Advisor clear? by e-mail (cc student). Do you feel that the student has an 1 Yes: Refer to the Disability Office. undiagnosed No: Discuss the issue as you would disability/ with any student. specific learning If necessary,Student difficulty record themakes 2 Yes: Consult the LANEX and discuss the issue. No: Refer meeting and emailcontact Is the issue DISABILITY student to appropriate service relevantwith MAP academic? (Medical, Counselling, Academic AccessAcademic Advisory, Welfare) OfficeAdvisors Advisor (cc Yes: Agree the action with the Is the action 3 student. student) to be taken No: Contact the MAP Learning clear? Advisor by e-mail (cc student) Is the 1 Yes: Discuss the issue bearing this fact in mind. student No: Discuss the issue as you would mature? with any student. 2 Yes: Discuss the issue with the student. No: Refer student to Is the issue MATURE academic? appropriate service (Medical Counselling, Academic Advisory, Welfare) Is the action 3 Yes: Agree the action with the student. to be taken No: Contact the Mature Student clear? Officer by e-mail (cc student). A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 21
  • 23. DEVELOPMENT ANDDISSEMINATION OF GOOD PRACTICE SUPPORTING STUDENTS REGISTERED WITH THE DISABILITY AND ACCESS OFFICE IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 1. In the first half of the semester I write to all students with a LANEX Report and invite them to meet with me. 2. At first meeting: • Introduce myself and let them know that I am available to appropriately support them as they need me throughout the year – but stress that it is each student’s responsibility to manage their own relationships with individual teachers in different class situations • Check the student feels appropriately supported in the department; if not what can we do to improve supports • Check whether the student has any physical needs that should be met asap (lift access, etc) • Check whether they need to record lectures and so forth • Check how well the assessment processes we have in place have been working for the student/or how the student anticipates them working • Remind the student that we can review this as the year goes on • Inform them about the sticker option for essays and for exams (they can collect a sticker from me or the Learning Resource Office to put on papers to highlight the need for Disability Awareness from the corrector) and give them the option of using it or not • Ask them to identify themselves to their seminar leaders/ tutors anyone who will be teaching/assessing them in a small group capacity; stress the importance of the student taking responsibility for this • Ask them to identify themselves to large group teachers if necessary 22 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 24. • Stress the importance of a student’s right to confidentiality. If I think it is wise or necessary to meet with and talk with other faculty members I always seek the student’s permission and check with the student that they are comfortable with me doing so.3. Before exams I meet with everyone in the Dept who is involved with correcting and assessing and go through the practice of Disability Awareness especially with regard to SLDs.4. I remind faculty at Departmental level of the importance of being familiar with the DAWN handbook.5. I also invite faculty to check with me if they are unsure how to support a student who has identified themselves; and I direct colleagues to the MAP website, and the DAWN document again.6. Before exams I write again to all students registered and ask them to check in with me if they have any changing needs or circumstances or if they simply just want general support.7. Periodically I write to the students throughout the year and check in with them, but again I stress that it is a student’s responsibility to manage their own needs and supports with my help.8. At Exam Meetings, student confidentiality is maintained; I am present as a representative of registered students and I only contribute on behalf of a student if there is a borderline or other issue, and in such an event the details of the student’s circumstances are not discussed.Moynagh Sullivan, Department of English A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 23
  • 25. DEVELOPMENT ANDDISSEMINATION OF GOOD PRACTICE CONTINUED GOOD PRACTICE IN SUPPORTING UNDER-REPRESENTED GROUPS IN NUIM The HEA Report “Towards The Best Education for All” (2006) states that …” every aspect of the institution’s life needs to be infused with a consciousness of social responsibility.” NUIM has a strong sense of this social responsibility. Students from under –represented backgrounds are steadily increasing in the university student population from the early days of the Access programme in 1998. This in turn has driven initiatives across departments and offices which may not be about doing extraordinary things but is more about doing ordinary things extraordinarily well. Ordinary things such as improving the quality of the learning experience, being aware of staff development needs, listening to what people say they need and recognising that implementing change for one benefits all. In recognition that much good practice already happens across departments and offices in the university the Access Office in partnership with The Centre for Teaching and Learning are devising an award for academic departments and administrative offices of the university. This award will recognise innovative inclusive practices across the university that support the learning of diverse student groups and will have mainstream benefits for the general student population. Further information available on Access Office website http://access. nuim.ie and MAP Academic Advisor Moodle space The Access Office as part of its own contribution to good practice sees the MAP Academic Advisors and this handbook as a model of good practice within NUIM and across the higher education sector. We look forward to hearing what you and your department do to in the area of inclusive learning and student engagement. We look forward to sharing these important practices with others and the possibility of mainstreaming across the university and the sector. Ann O’ Brien, Director of Access 24 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 26. APPLIED SOCIAL STUDIES - EXTENSIONSAND OTHER ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATIONSThe Department of Applied Social Studies has a policy of considering extensions tothe submission date for academic work. The purpose of this short piece is simplyto offer a reflection on the learning and implication that arise from the practice ofoffering extensions. The option of requesting an extension is open to all studentsof the Department. The extension policy is clearly outlined in Programme (Class)Handbooks. Aspects of the policy include: • Extensions should be requested from the subject lecturer at least 24 hours before the assignment deadline; • At their discretion, extensions may be granted of usually no more than 1 week from the original deadline; • The student should also communicate with their programme co-ordinator who will liaise with the subject lecturer to ascertain if an extension is appropriate. • If an extension is granted the programme co-ordinator will inform the Departmental administrator.Extensions are considered to be acceptable if they act to support the learning ofthe student. In many ways the student request for an extension can open a lineof communication with the student. In this communication the programme co-ordinator/advisor plays a key role. Reasons for extensions are normally linked tosickness, concerns about producing academic work, feeling overwhelmed by thedemands of university, family or wider life issues which impact on student abilityto produce work. It is interesting to note that after a conversation with a studentthe need for an extension often dissipates. However, the request for an extensioncan also be used as an opportunity for the co-ordinator/ advisor to encourage thestudent to avail of the support services of the university e.g. counselling services.Students who are registered with University Access/Disability Office follow thegeneral departmental guidelines for extensions. However, when deciding if anextension is appropriate for students registered with the Access/ Disability Officethe programme coordinator would also take into account the information outlined inthe “Learning and Academic Needs Report”. The challenges of offering extensionsare two fold, firstly that the granting of the extension does support student learning.For example, it is important to ensure that the granting of extensions does notbecome the pattern for a student. In such a situation extensions are merely dis-empowering students. Secondly, students are part of a larger class group and thebalance is responding to individual student concerns and also ensuring fairness tothe wider class group. However, from experience these challenges are manageableand as stated earlier the request for extensions can be an opportunity which cansupport learning and indeed wider student wellbeing.Brian Melaugh, Department of Applied Social Studies A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 25
  • 27. CHECKLIST WITH STUDENT It is preferable if students who contact a MAP Academic Advisor regarding an academic issue can be encouraged to attempt to resolve their situation themselves.26 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 28. Has the student… Yes No N/A Commentsalready approached the lecturer/ coursecoordinator/ tutor/ Head of Department todiscuss their difficulty?made contact with their Class Rep toadvise them of any relevant issues/difficulties?linked in with fellow classmates to set up astudy group or collaborate on notetaking,assignment, project, etc.?accessed the MAP Area on Moodle(enrolment key map02) to avail of a rangeof electronic learning resources?searched http://www.delicious.com tolocate recommended websites on a varietyof topics relevant to the skills needed atthird level?attended Student+, the blended learningsupport module available to all first yearMAP students, which combines classroomand online activities with a variety oftechnology enhanced learning, availablethrough the Student+ Moodle space?signed up for one of the Essay Writingseminars that runs throughout the year?logged into the Library Area on Moodle(no enrolment key) to complete theUndergraduate Information LiteracyTutorial online or the Avoiding PlagiarismTutorial or access a video series onResearch Skills.attended the Library Information SkillsTraining (LIST) sessions, which are 30-minute drop-in sessions (times listed on theLibrary Website) that cover a wide variety oflibrary and information literacy skills?contacted the Computer Centre to obtaina skills card and a login for the ECDL ifrequired?attended the Mathematics Support Centreif required?attended the Academic Writing Centre ifrequired? A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 27
  • 29. MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS SUPPORT PAGE ON MOODLE THIS SPACE CONTAINS: • Resources for inclusive teaching • Links to MAP Office contacts • Evaluation templates • Relevant Case Studies • Links to Mature/Disability Student handbook etc • Delicious links to recommended academic websites • MAP Academic Advisor handbook • Link to MAP Area on Moodle • Information about Maths Support Centre • Information about Academic Writing Centre28 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 30. CASE STUDIES FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISOR ACCESS ISSUESCASE 1. FAILING SUBJECTAn 18 year old student who did her Leaving Certificate in a DEIS school. Her GuidanceCounsellor in school suggested she apply through the HEAR route. The student feelsshe would not be in college if she hadn’t been helped out by her Guidance Counsellor.She received her place on MH101 on reduced points (320) through the HigherEducation Access Route. She is living at home. She is the first of her family going tocollege. Her mother is a carer and her Dad is unemployed. She is studying Business,Geography and English. She did well in Business in school and received a B1 in anhonours paper.The student is struggling with Business – it is very different from school. She hasalso missed some time from college due to family commitments – she has 2 youngersiblings. Her family do not know how to support her while she is in college. She failedone module in Business in Semester 1.As the student is struggling with a subject it would be necessary for her to meet withthe MAP Academic Advisor to find out where she is having trouble and how she mightbe supported. She will have to repeat her Semester 1 subject – but will need supportto make sure she understands Business in Semester 2. If the student had to repeatthe year – she more than likely wouldn’t come back to college.If she can get an understanding of Business in Semester 2 it will increase herconfidence in passing her Semester 1 exam in August.The Access Advisor has referred her to study skills support and may also providesome academic tuition. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 29
  • 31. CONTINUED MATURE ISSUES PROBLEMS WITH SUBJECT Mary is a 43 year old first year mature student. She is studying Anthropology, Greek & Roman Civilisation and Sociology. Mary arrived in NUIM having completed a FETAC Level 5 course in a Further Education college. She left formal schooling when she was 16 in order to get a job and contribute to her family’s finances. She married and has 3 children who are now in their late teens. Mary took the first step back into education just to see how she would get on. She had little confidence in her academic abilities. However she found that she did very well in Further Education, getting positive feedback and good grades throughout her course there. General Problem She began her degree in Maynooth feeling confident of her abilities. However she quickly found that she was struggling to meet the demands of third level. She found the course work very demanding. The language of academia was new to her and the level of critical analysis required in her essays was very different from what she encountered in her FETAC course. Specific Issue Mary has failed her first semester in Anthropology. She is now concerned about falling behind in her other subjects as she is now putting much more time into Anthropology. While working hard on Anthropology she feels she does not really understand the subject and what is required of a student of Anthropology. The Mature Student Office has referred her to study skills support including essay writing seminars. It is now necessary for the student to seek help from the MAP Academic Advisor about issues specific to the study of Anthropology.30 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 32. DISABILITY ISSUESCASE 1. DYSLEXIAMary is a 20 year old student studying Anthropology, History and Sociology.An educational psychologist carried out a psychological assessment recentlyand this confirmed that she has Dyslexia. Mary finds that her reading is slow,inaccurate and she frequently misreads words. In addition she finds that she hasshort term memory difficulties and can be easily distracted. She finds taking notesand listening at the same time very difficult. She also finds that organising herideas for written assignments is a real problem as is structuring her written work.Mary finds it difficult to prioritise work effectively and to manage deadlines. Shefeels that she can put in a huge amount of work but finds that the work that shesubmits does not reflect either the work that she puts in or her academic ability.She also finds revising for exams difficult and finds the examinations themselvesvery stressful. She can get confused when reading the examination questions.Mary is very bright and the psychological testing indicates very high verbalreasoning and comprehension scores.SupportMary is academically able and will succeed with the right support.• Through the Disability Office Mary may receive help with study skills which will focus on improving time management, meeting deadlines, effective reading and writing skills.• She may also receive assistive technology support and training may be provided in mind mapping software such as Inspiration which is available on all public access points on campus. This package could help improve her visual memory techniques. Mary may also receive training in Read and Write Gold which would help Mary to write and correct her work independently.• Mary would also have access to typing packages in the Assistive Technology Centre to improve her typing speed and may be provided with a Dictaphone so that she can record her lectures.• Mary was also granted a smaller venue for her examinations, extra time to complete her exams and Learning Disability Awareness (LDA). LDA comprises an awareness of difficulties with spelling and grammar as well as syntax, structure and cohesion. The examiner is asked to take these issues into account when marking the examination script.The Disability Office will prepare a Learning and Academic Needs (LANEX) reportfor Mary which outlines the support to be provided by the Disability Office and thesupports that would be appropriate from the Academic Departments. This reportshould be circulated to any staff who will be teaching Mary. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 31
  • 33. CONTINUED There are many teaching strategies that can be used to help Mary. See DAWN handbook Teaching ‘Students with Disabilities: Guidelines for Academic Staff’ for further and more detailed guidance and tips: • Provide written material in accessible formats keeping writing style clear and concise. • Use Moodle to make notes and overheads available on line. • At the beginning of lectures briefly review content of previous lecture and outline present one. • Help students to make choices about essential reading • Use practical multi sensory approach to cater to student’s learning style by presenting materials such as videos, flow charts, diagrams and audio tapes. • Allow students to use assistive technology devices during lectures. • Provide examination supports for in course assessments when requested. • Be aware of the impact of the issue on the student’s performance and confidence. • When marking examination or written work provide Learning Disability Awareness32 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 34. CASE 2. LEARNING DIFFICULTYI have a student in my class who may have a learning difficulty. He has a lot ofacademic ability but often his written work does not match my understandingof his academic ability. I would like him to get supports but am unsure as tohow to approach this sensitive issue.Many students with dyslexia may not have had their difficulties identified orsupported at school and so they can have had very frustrating or negativeexperiences at school which may have damaged their confidence. Most are likelyto have developed compensatory strategies for dealing with their memory andlanguage processing difficulties. At third level some of these strategies continueto be useful but other newer ways of learning may need to be adopted. Studentscan find their strategies under increasing pressure particularly when the academicdemands of the course increase and the volume of course material increases.Students as a result can find themselves increasingly under huge pressure. Inthis case it would be useful to have a chat with the student privately to talk aboutsome of the academic issues that you are aware of and to give the student theopportunity to articulate the challenges to their learning. It would be useful ifthey feel that they have an issue that is worth investigating to let them know thatthe Disability Office can support them. The Disability Office offers students theopportunity to be screened for a possible learning difficulty. This screening willconfirm the possible presence of a learning difficulty and if necessary students willthen be advised to proceed for a full assessment by an Educational Psychologist.In some cases students may not wish to disclose that they do have a learningdifficulty. Again the student should be reassured that disclosure is a positivestep which allows the University to support the student. Disclosure will never betreated negatively. You might give the student the Disability Handbook for furtherinformation and refer them to our website at http://access.nuim.ie where they canreview the supports available in their own time.The message to get to all students is that there are excellent supports withinthe University for students with learning difficulties but the student has the finalresponsibility for accessing them. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 33
  • 35. CONTINUED CASE 3. MENTAL HEALTH John is a 22 year old student currently completing first year of a degree in Social Science. John has a history of mental health problems and can experience panic attacks and high levels of anxiety particularly during examinations. He finds the examinations themselves very stressful and can be distracted by the noise of other students in exams and becomes worried about his ability to recall information. Therefore it is difficult for him to sit his exams in a large venue. John can appear lethargic and has a pattern of non attendance particularly with morning lectures. His lecturers have been surprised by the recent decline in his course performance as he is a very academically capable student. Support Mental health difficulties are very common and can include anxiety, depression, eating disorders and schizophrenia. Many difficulties are temporary and may respond to rest, counselling or medication. Individuals may also experience long term difficulties which are interspersed with periods of good and poor health. The most common symptoms of mental health difficulties are withdrawal,depression and anxiety. Students with mental health difficulties may have issues with concentration in class, organising and managing their academic work and meeting deadlines as well as issues with motivation and attendance. Symptoms of the illness itself and side-effects of medication may both have a negative impact on the student. As symptoms may fluctuate, the type and level of support may also fluctuate: the Disability Office is guided by the individual needs of the student. John is very bright and will succeed with the right support. • Through the Disability Office, John will be assigned a dedicated Learning Advisor, who can work with him to improve his study skills in areas such as improving time management, meeting deadlines, effective reading and writing skills. • He may benefit if mentored through a study plan designed to build internal motivation and to promote momentum in submission of assignments. • He will also be offered assistive technology support and training can be provided with mind mapping software like Inspiration which is available on all public access points on campus. • Other individualised strategies can also be explored with John to help improve his memory techniques and to assist him with anxiety management. • John will have access to typing packages in the Assistive Technology Centre to34 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 36. improve his typing speed and, as he has trouble concentrating, may be provided with a Dictaphone so that he can record his lectures.• He will also have the use of the Assistive Technology Centre, which is a quiet space for training and studying.• John may be granted a smaller venue for his examinations, extra time to complete his exams and rest breaks which he can use to manage his symptoms during his exams.The Disability Office will prepare a Learning and Academic Needs report (LANEX)for John which outlines the support to be provided by the Disability Office and thesupports that would be appropriate from the Academic Departments. This reportshould be circulated to any staff who will be teaching John.There are many teaching strategies that can be used to help John. See DAWNhandbook Teaching ‘Students with Disabilities: Guidelines for Academic Staff’ forfurther and more detailed guidance and tips:• Provide written material in accessible formats keeping writing style clear and concise.• Use Moodle to make notes and overheads available on line.• At the beginning of lectures briefly review content of previous lecture and outline present one.• Help students to make choices about essential reading• Use practical multi sensory approach to cater to student’s learning style by presenting materials such as videos, flow charts, diagrams and audio tapes.• In situations where the student has poor concentration audio taping of lectures may be beneficial• Provide examination supports for in course assessments• Provide extensions in which to complete written assignments or course work when appropriate and be flexible around deadlines.• The stress of oral presentations before a large group can sometimes cause an acceleration or relapse of symptoms. The students may be more at ease with a smaller group if a presentation is a course requirement.• Be aware of the impact of the issue on the student’s performance and confidence.• Be aware that the nature of mental health issues means that the student may experience times of particular difficulty when he will need support and encouragement.• If the student needs to be admitted to hospital or take time off, or has lost time due to illness, this does not necessarily mean that they need to defer or cancel their studies. The MAP Learning Advisor in partnership with the Academic Department may be able to assist in determining a contingency learning support plan.• Review the student’s academic progress regularly and refer them back to the Disability Office if their academic progress or participation is of concern. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 35
  • 37. CONTINUED CASE 4. HEARING IMPAIRMENT Daniel has a hearing impairment and is in 1st year of Arts Degree. He wears a hearing aid and is able to follow a face to face conversation providing that that environment is quiet and there are only one or two people present. He disclosed his hearing impairment before entering college and the supports provided are very effective although he has to work hard to keep up with his class. Staff are concerned to ensure that they are providing appropriate supports for Daniel. Support Daniel will succeed with the right support. Some of the difficulties that he is experiencing in the classroom include the fact that his hearing impairment means that he has a more limited vocabulary and he has difficulty producing written work without grammatical or spelling errors. He can also misinterpret written information and has some difficulty in absorbing new words or concepts. • Through the Disability Office Daniel will receive assistive technology support and training and may be provided with a Dictaphone so that he can record his lectures. • If Daniel has particular problems in accessing some lectures he may be provided with a note taker for those lectures.36 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 38. • Daniel may also be provided with additional subject specific academic tuition to help him to catch up on material that he may be missing in lectures or tutorials.• He could also be provided with specific study skills sessions to focus on his reading or writing issues.• Daniel has been provided with a smaller venue for his exams and extra time and the invigilator is aware of his hearing impairment.The Disability Office will prepare a Learning and Academic Needs report for Danielwhich outlines the support to be provided by the Disability Office and the supportsthat would be appropriate from the Academic Departments. This report should becirculated to any staff who will be teaching Daniel.There are many teaching strategies that can be used to help Daniel. See DAWNhandbook Teaching ‘Students with Disabilities: Guidelines for Academic Staff’ forfurther and more detailed guidance and tips:• Ensure in advance that lecture theatres are T loop enabled. Be prepared for a change of classroom or building if no other solution is available. In tutorial/small classroom situations if the venues are not loop enabled then contact the Disability Office to access a mobile system.• Provide written material in accessible formats keeping writing style clear and concise.• Use Moodle to make notes and overheads available on line.• At the beginning of lectures briefly review content of previous lecture and outline present one.• Help students to make choices about essential reading• Use practical multi sensory approach to cater to student’s learning style by presenting materials such as videos, flow charts, diagrams and audio tapes.• Allow students to use assistive technology devices during lectures.• Facilitate the use of the note taker during lectures.• Explain new words/terminology and use examples to explain new ideas.• Be aware that students who lip read can miss a lot of what is being said. Avoid moving around too much and when speaking always face the audience.• Provide examination supports for in course assessments when requested.• Provide extensions in which to complete written assignments or course work when appropriate and be flexible around deadlines.• Be aware of the impact of the issue on the student’s performance and confidence. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 37
  • 39. CONTINUED CASE 5. PHYSICAL DISABILITY I have been told that a student with a physical disability is starting my course. What can I do to make sure that they able to do well on the course? Physical disabilities can be caused by anything from arthritis to amputation to spinal cord injury. Some physical disabilities will be static and others can be progressive. The most common issues for students with physical disabilities is just physical access to the building/lecture theatre, bathroom etc. They may also have difficulty writing, holding or manipulating objects, decreased stamina, and difficulties getting to lectures etc within the time constraints imposed by timetables, periods of absence for hospital appointments or illness.38 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 40. There are many teaching strategies that can be used to help students withphysical disabilities. See DAWN handbook Teaching ‘Students with Disabilities:Guidelines for Academic Staff’ for further and more detailed guidance and tips:• Ensure in advance that lecture theatres, buildings bathroom etc are accessible. Be prepared for a change of classroom or building if no other solution is available.• Provide written material in accessible formats keeping writing style clear and concise.• Use Moodle to make notes and overheads available on line.• At the beginning of lectures briefly review content of previous lecture and outline present one.• Help students to make choices about essential reading• Use practical multi sensory approach to cater to student’s learning style by presenting materials such as videos, flow charts, diagrams and audio tapes.• Allow for the time and fatigue factors that may arise as student moves between lectures.• Allow students to use assistive technology devices during lectures.• Facilitate the use of educational support workers e.g. note takers or personal assistants during lectures.• Provide examination supports for in course assessments when requested.• Provide extensions in which to complete written assignments or course work when appropriate and be flexible around deadlines.• Be aware of the impact of the issue on the student’s performance. Student may tire easily and may require rest breaks.• Consider evacuation procedures in an emergency and ensure that if there are class trips that transport and venues are accessible. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 39
  • 41. CONTINUED CASE 6. VISUAL IMPAIRMENT I have a student who has a visual impairment on my course. What are the supports that we should provide to facilitate her academic progress? Many vision impaired people will have some sight. A minority of people can distinguish light but nothing else. Some people have no central vision, others have no side vision. It is important to be aware that everyone is different. Students with visual impairments may have difficulty seeing print and following lectures with heavy emphasis on visual aids e.g. diagrams, tables, pictures and overheads. Students may have a slower speed of reading, or difficulty reading for long periods. They will also have a slower speed of work when using magnification or specialist software. Students will be provided with examination supports including papers in alternative formats, use of computer with screen reading software, provision of a reader or scribe and extra time.40 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 42. There are many teaching strategies that can be used to help students withvisual impairments. See DAWN handbook Teaching ‘Students with Disabilities:Guidelines for Academic Staff’ for further and more detailed guidance and tips:• Reading lists may need to be provided well in advance as they may need to be converted into alternative formats. The Disability Office will work with you on this.• Consider the challenges that your course may present to students with visual impairments. Work with the Disability Office and the student to find solutions. Consider alternative assignments that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge of the subject matter if a specific task is impossible for them to carry out.• Provide course material in accessible formats keeping writing style clear and concise.• Use Moodle to make notes and overheads available on line.• At the beginning of lectures briefly review content of previous lecture and outline present one.• Help students to make choices about essential reading• Use practical multi sensory approach to cater to student’s learning style and convey information orally about what you have written on the board or shown on overheads.• Allow students to use assistive technology devices during lectures.• Facilitate the use of educational support workers e.g. note takers or personal assistants during lectures.• Provide examination supports for in course assessments when requested.• Provide extensions in which to complete written assignments or course work when appropriate and be flexible around deadlines.• Be aware of the impact of the issue on the student’s performance. Student may tire easily and may require rest breaks.• Regularly review student’s overall academic progress and participation.• Consider evacuation procedures in an emergency. A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 41
  • 43. MAYNOOTH ACCESS PROGRAMME ACCESS TEAM REGISTRAR ANN O’BRIEN Director of Access Extension: 4519 ann.obrien@nuim.ie ROSE RYAN LORETTA EMER SHEERIN CATHERINE Disability Officer MULVIHILL / Mature Student DOHERTY Extension: 6341 MARTHA BRANDES Officer Senior rosario.ryan@ Acting Outreach Extension: 3307 Executive nuim.ie Project Officer and emer.sheerin@ Assistant Access Student nuim.ie Extension: 6025 Advisor access.office@ Extension: 6614 nuim.ie loretta.mulvihill@ nuim.ie martha.brandes@ nuim.ie BRIDGET INA OLOHAN MAEVE SIMON AHERN MICHAEL GORMLEY MAP Learning MCCALDIN Educational MAGUIRE MAP Learning Advisor MAP Learning Technology Mature SupportAdvisor Specific Asperger’s Advisor Visual Officer Extension: 6724 Learning Syndrome, Impairment, Extension: 6722 michael. Difficulties Attention Deficit Hearing simon.ahern@ maguire@Extension: 6336 Disorder, Mental Impairment and nuim.ie nuim.iebridget.gormley Health Issues Physical/Mobility @nuim.ie and Significant issue Ongoing Illness Extension: 3721 Extension: 6543 maeve.mccaldin ina.olohan@ @nuim.ie nuim.ie42 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 44. MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS LISTDepartment MAP Academic Email Ext. AdvisorAdult Education Dr. Derek Barter derek.barter@nuim.ie 3948Adult Education Mary Corbally mary.e.corbally@nuim.ie 3784Ancient Classics Dr. Maeve O Brien maeve.obrien@nuim.ie 3807Anthropology Dr. Pauline Garvey pauline.a.garvey@nuim.ie 3587Applied Social Studies Ciara Shanahan ciara.shanahan@nuim.ie 3804Biology Dr. Christine Griffin christine.griffin@nuim.ie 3841Business Dr. Peter Robbins peter.robbins@nuim.ie 3647Chemistry Ria Walsh ria.walsh@nuim.ie 4530Computer Science Dr. Aidan Mooney amooney@cs.nuim.ie 3354Design Innovation Dr. Martin Ryan martin.ryan@nuim.ie 6346Economics Dr. Fabrice Rousseau fabrice.rousseau@nuim.ie 4568Education and Froebel Dr. Catriona O Toole catriona.a.otoole@nuim.ie 3445Electronic Engineering Andrew Meehan andrew.meehan@eeng.nuim.ie 3488English, Media and Dr. Moynagh Sullivan moynagh.sullivan@nuim.ie 4607Theatre StudiesExperimental Physics Gerard McMahon gerard.mcmahon@nuim.ie 3552French Dr. Kathleen Shields kathleen.m.shields@nuim.ie 3805Geography Dr. Chris Van Egeraat chris.vanegeraat@nuim.ie 4714German Dr. Arnd Witte a.witte@nuim.ie 3717 A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 43
  • 45. History Prof. Marian Lyons marian.lyons@nuim.ie 3729 Law Dr. Sibo Banda sibo.banda@nuim.ie 6630 Mathematical Physics Dr. Jonivar Skullerud jonivar@thphys.nuim.ie 3678 Mathematics Prof. Stephen Buckley head@maths.nuim.ie 3914 Music Dr. Jesse Ronneau jesse.ronneau@nuim.ie 3730 Nua Ghaeilge Dr. Eoghan O’Raghallaigh eoghan.oraghallaigh@nuim.ie 3715 Philosophy Cyril McDonnell cyril.mcdonnell@nuim.ie 3698 Psychology Dr. Bryan Roche bryan.t.roche@nuim.ie 6026 School of Celtic Prof. David Stifter david.stifter@nuim.ie 3710 Studies Sociology Prof. Sean O Riain sean.oriain@nuim.ie 3688 Spanish Dr. Jennifer Wood jennifer.wood@nuim.ie 611644 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 46. FEEDBACK ON MAP ACADEMIC ADVISOR MEETING1 Please enter the name of the student2 Please enter their student number3 Please enter the date and time of the meeting5 Please tick the relevant follow-up measures Student absence Lecturer-related issue Notetaking Tutor-related issue Subject specific queries In-class assessement query Extension request Additional Tuition request Missed assignment deadline Other6 Please describe the action that was agreed at this meeting7 The relevant follow up measure Email was sent to student to describe actions agreed Email required to be sent to relevant MAP Advisor Referred to non-academic student support (Medical Ctr, Counselling, Academic Advisory, Students Union) Referred to academic supports (Moodle, Maths Support Centre) Other A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 45
  • 47. FEEDBACK ON MAP ACADEMIC ADVISOR MEETING1 Please enter the name of the student2 Please enter their student number3 Please enter the date and time of the meeting5 Please tick the relevant follow-up measures Student absence Lecturer-related issue Notetaking Tutor-related issue Subject specific queries In-class assessement query Extension request Additional Tuition request Missed assignment deadline Other6 Please describe the action that was agreed at this meeting7 The relevant follow up measure Email was sent to student to describe actions agreed Email required to be sent to relevant MAP Advisor Referred to non-academic student support (Medical Ctr, Counselling, Academic Advisory, Students Union) Referred to academic supports (Moodle, Maths Support Centre) Other46 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 48. FEEDBACK ON MAP ACADEMIC ADVISOR MEETING1 Please enter the name of the student2 Please enter their student number3 Please enter the date and time of the meeting5 Please tick the relevant follow-up measures Student absence Lecturer-related issue Notetaking Tutor-related issue Subject specific queries In-class assessement query Extension request Additional Tuition request Missed assignment deadline Other6 Please describe the action that was agreed at this meeting7 The relevant follow up measure Email was sent to student to describe actions agreed Email required to be sent to relevant MAP Advisor Referred to non-academic student support (Medical Ctr, Counselling, Academic Advisory, Students Union) Referred to academic supports (Moodle, Maths Support Centre) Other A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 47
  • 49. FEEDBACK ON MAP ACADEMIC ADVISOR MEETING1 Please enter the name of the student2 Please enter their student number3 Please enter the date and time of the meeting5 Please tick the relevant follow-up measures Student absence Lecturer-related issue Notetaking Tutor-related issue Subject specific queries In-class assessement query Extension request Additional Tuition request Missed assignment deadline Other6 Please describe the action that was agreed at this meeting7 The relevant follow up measure Email was sent to student to describe actions agreed Email required to be sent to relevant MAP Advisor Referred to non-academic student support (Medical Ctr, Counselling, Academic Advisory, Students Union) Referred to academic supports (Moodle, Maths Support Centre) Other48 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 50. FEEDBACK ON MAP ACADEMIC ADVISOR MEETING1 Please enter the name of the student2 Please enter their student number3 Please enter the date and time of the meeting5 Please tick the relevant follow-up measures Student absence Lecturer-related issue Notetaking Tutor-related issue Subject specific queries In-class assessement query Extension request Additional Tuition request Missed assignment deadline Other6 Please describe the action that was agreed at this meeting7 The relevant follow up measure Email was sent to student to describe actions agreed Email required to be sent to relevant MAP Advisor Referred to non-academic student support (Medical Ctr, Counselling, Academic Advisory, Students Union) Referred to academic supports (Moodle, Maths Support Centre) Other A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 49
  • 51. NUI MAYNOOTH USEFUL CONTACT NUMBERS Service Availability Number Location Monday - Thursday Education House, Academic Advisory Office 9.45am to 4.30 pm 7083368 North Campus Closed 1pm to 2pm 9.30am to 1pm MAP Lodge, Access Office 7086025 2pm to 5pm North Campus 9.30am to 1pm Humanity House, Admissions Office 7083822 2.00pm to 5.00pm South Campus Monday – Friday 10am - 12.30pm (last query Arts Block, Career Development Centre 7083592 12.15) / 2.30pm - 4.30pm North Campus (last query4.15) Student Services 9.30am- 1pm Chaplaincy 7083320 Building 2.pm– 5pm North Campus Student Services Monday to Friday 9.30am Counselling Service 7083354 Building - 1pm / 2pm -5pm North Campus Term Hours: 8.45am - Rye Hall, Creche 7083319 6.15pm : North Campus 09.30am to 1.00pm Humanity House, Examinations Office 7083820 2.00am to 5.00pm South Campus 09.30am to 1.00pm Humanity House, Fees Office 7084747 2.00am to 5.00pm South Campus Student Services 9.30am to 1.00pm Health and Safety Office 7086251 Building 2.00am to 5.00pm North Campus 09.30am to 1.00pm Humanity House, International Office 7083868 2.00am to 5.00pm South Campus Monday _ Friday Student Services Medical Centre 9.30am to 12.30pm 7083878 Centre, North Campus 2.pm to 4.30pm 09.30am to 1.00pm Humanity House, Records Office 7083813 2.00am to 5.00pm South Campus Student Services 9.30am- 1pm Residence Office 7083322 Building 2.pm– 5pm North Campus Security Office 7083929 Arts Block 9.30am- 1pm Student Services Student Services 7084729 2.pm– 5pm Centre, North Campus50 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 52. NOTES A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 51
  • 53. NOTES52 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 54. NOTES A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS | 53
  • 55. NOTES54 | A GUIDE FOR MAP ACADEMIC ADVISORS
  • 56. NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND MAYNOOTHMAYNOOTH CO. KILDARE, IRELAND. TEL: +353 (1) 7086000 maynooth access programme