Everything You Wanted to Know About Email Marketing Silverpop

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Everything You Wanted to Know About Email Marketing Silverpop

  1. 1. Almost Everything You Wanted toKnow About Email Marketing
  2. 2. You have email marketing questions. So do we. We also have some answers. Lots of them. 2
  3. 3. How to use this document: 1. Browse from the start; or2. Go to a specific section of interest. 3
  4. 4. Permission 4
  5. 5. Permission is the foundation.
  6. 6. You are correct.The U.S. CAN-SPAM Act does not require permission to email.
  7. 7. See number 1.
  8. 8. Permission IS required by law in the EU, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, Canada.
  9. 9. The theory that relevance trumpspermission is just that – a theory.
  10. 10. Recipients will punish you hardwith SPAM complaints if you don’t have permission.
  11. 11. Recipients will still punish youwith SPAM complaints if they don’t remember giving you permission.
  12. 12. ISPs tell you to gain permission. They monitor/block by engagement and complaints.
  13. 13. Single, Double or Confirmed Opt-in?
  14. 14. Yes. Any approach will do.
  15. 15. Single opt-in = higher completion rate; lower quality.
  16. 16. The vast majority of companies use the single opt-in method.
  17. 17. Double Opt-in = An extra step, fewer opt-ins.
  18. 18. Use Double Opt-in when you useaggressive acquisition methods.
  19. 19. Confirmed Opt-in sends an email notifying the new subscriber they’ve opted in – and to unsubscribe if in error.
  20. 20. List Rental/Buying 20
  21. 21. Simple really. Don’t EVER buy email lists.
  22. 22. List rental? Work with a list broker with a stellar reputation.
  23. 23. Yes, there’s a difference in themeaning of the words “buy” and “rent.” Learn the difference.
  24. 24. Buy = someone sells you a list that you send.DON’T DO IT! You are a spammer.
  25. 25. Rent = a third-party sends your emailto people that have given permission.You must then convince them to opt- in to your program.
  26. 26. Don’t expect huge growth from list rental.
  27. 27. Focus on deeply qualified leadsthat will drive a higher percentage of opt-ins.
  28. 28. Map your offering to the originalreason for opt-in. Contest entrants probably don’t buy $200K timeshares.
  29. 29. Never risk your primary sending IP address with outside names.
  30. 30. Welcome Emails 30
  31. 31. Use a Welcome Email. Better yet, a Welcome Series.
  32. 32. Better yet – an onboarding program.
  33. 33. No welcome email? Then you are leaving to chance the new subscriber experience.
  34. 34. Explain your value. Link topreferences. Provide an incentive.
  35. 35. Welcome emails help setexpectations. Can solve problems.
  36. 36. Ask progressive survey questionsduring the Welcome Series to build your database.
  37. 37. Don’t lead with a coupon. Let full- price buyers act first!
  38. 38. Classify new users into active and inactive, and try incenting inactives with a small discount.
  39. 39. Clearly outline yourreturn, shipping and other key policies.
  40. 40. Ask for the first order in your final email of the series.
  41. 41. Deliverability 41
  42. 42. Email marketing is NOT DirectEmail. ISPs are NOT the same as the Post Office.
  43. 43. You the marketer are responsiblefor your email deliverability – notyour email service provider (ESP).
  44. 44. Your ESP helps you withinfrastructure and strategies – butthere is no magic bat phone to the ISPs.
  45. 45. Permission is the foundation tohigh engagement, low complaint rates.
  46. 46. Even the best email marketers receive spam complaints. The keyis to keep the complaint rate LOW.
  47. 47. Why do I receive spam or abuse complaints?
  48. 48. Your recipients think you send toomany emails; they are irrelevant; or they don’t remember subscribing.
  49. 49. Most ISPs will block/filter youremails if you receive more than 3 complaints out of 1,000 they receive from you.
  50. 50. How do we reduce spam complaints then?
  51. 51. Don’t Hide the Unsubscribe Link. Make it Easy to Unsubscribe.
  52. 52. Use a highly recognizable “from” name.
  53. 53. Use a consistent “from” name.
  54. 54. Don’t use spammy or potentially deceitful subject lines.
  55. 55. Authenticate your emails. DKIM. SenderID.
  56. 56. Shared/Pooled or dedicated IP addresses?
  57. 57. Companies that send infrequentlyand low volumes should probably be on a shared IP.
  58. 58. Like your toes in winter, yoursending IP addresses need to be ‘warmed’.
  59. 59. A tiny percentage of yourmessages will be ‘blackholed’ by ISPs.
  60. 60. Non-responders will slowly and silently kill your deliverabilitystats. Manage them proactively.
  61. 61. Test deliverability statistics of each new template using adeliverability monitoring service.
  62. 62. Opt-in Forms 62
  63. 63. Capture the data required to deliver relevant emails.
  64. 64. Move opt-in forms on the bottom of your home page to the top/above the fold.
  65. 65. Do it now. We’ll wait. Oh, IT,Ecommerce, etc. doesn’t want to give up that real estate?
  66. 66. Tell the roadblockers this:Companies that move their opt-in forms up typically see opt-inconversions increase 50% to 500%!
  67. 67. Allow users to opt-in with existing social network credentials, and capture that rich data!
  68. 68. From and Subject Lines 68
  69. 69. Yes, from or sender namesmatter? A lot. So choose wisely. 69
  70. 70. Use your most recognized andtrusted brand name. Don’t veer. 70
  71. 71. Yes, use different sender namesfor different email streams. But always incorporate your brand name. 71
  72. 72. Brand X(newsletters@brandx.com)Like that. Wasn’t that easy! 72
  73. 73. Resist the urge to use a person’s name. 73
  74. 74. But I see everybody doing thatthese days. Is that your reason for doing it – everybody is? 74
  75. 75. Do you know who John Doe is? I didn’t think so. So why use a person’s name? 75
  76. 76. Yes, there are exceptions. If theperson’s name is also a recognized brand in itself. 76
  77. 77. Personal names are also okay ifyoure automating email streams on behalf of a salesforce. 77
  78. 78. Subject lines can make a hugedifference. But your brand/sender name is still the most important thing.
  79. 79. Subject lines drive opens – AND clicks and conversions. 79
  80. 80. Short. Medium. Long. Any length subject line length works. 80
  81. 81. Research studies suggest thatlonger subject lines outperform short and medium length. 81
  82. 82. But, keep the key informationwithin the first 40-50 characters. 82
  83. 83. “Free” Use it. It works. Look inyour inbox if you don’t believe us.
  84. 84. Test subject lines all the time. It is the easiest thing to test. 84
  85. 85. ‘From’ names are just as easy to test, but DON’T. 85
  86. 86. Pay attention to automated SPAM scoring tools. 86
  87. 87. Creative 87
  88. 88. Use personality and a realhuman’s voice WITHIN the email body. 88
  89. 89. Feature pictures of actualemployees within the emails. 89
  90. 90. Related: Avoid cheesy stockphotos of perfect people, shaking hands, lightbulbs, globes, etc. 90
  91. 91. Use “alt” tags to provide contextwhen images don’t automatically load. 91
  92. 92. Use “bulletproof buttons” – HTML text and tables behind you CTA image. 92
  93. 93. Keep key customer actions in thesame location across templates. 93
  94. 94. Show more than you tell. 94
  95. 95. Designing Emails for Mobile 95
  96. 96. Take a “mobile first” approach. Goahead, Google what that means… 96
  97. 97. OK, so design your emails andlanding pages to be friendly for mobile devices. Period. 97
  98. 98. Smartphones are everywhere, andpeople have email in their pocket. 98
  99. 99. The finger is the new mouse, just 40 pixels wider. 99
  100. 100. Don’t make a user side scroll or zoom to read your content. 100
  101. 101. How Do We Measure Success? 101
  102. 102. Think in terms of “process” or“operational” and “output” or “success” metrics. 102
  103. 103. Output/Success: Measures against goals andobjectives, i.e., conversion, reven ue, retention, cost savings. 103
  104. 104. Process/Operational: Measures email tactics, i.e., opens, clicks, unsubscribes, s pam complaints. 104
  105. 105. Except perhaps if you are a publisher. 105
  106. 106. Open rates DON’T matter 106
  107. 107. Are you crazy? People have toopen their emails to click and take action. 107
  108. 108. You are correct. But just becauserecipients open an email, doesn’t mean they’ll take action. 108
  109. 109. Opens and clicks areirrelevant, conversion matters. 109
  110. 110. Did more people buy or sign up for your event? 110
  111. 111. Focus your email metrics on those that support achieving key company objectives. 111
  112. 112. Ever met someone that got a raise for increasing open rates? 112
  113. 113. I didn’t think so. Focus on: conversion; revenue;engagement; cost savings. These things matter. 113
  114. 114. Metrics Benchmarks 114
  115. 115. There are no average open rates. Industry matters. 115
  116. 116. Still want to know? OK.How does 23% sound? Happy now? 116
  117. 117. Go ahead, tell your boss you are “average.” We’ll wait. 117
  118. 118. Thought so.How’s that raise looking again? 118
  119. 119. There’s average, lower quartile and upper quartile in each industry. Higher is better. 119
  120. 120. Oh yeah, we have a benchmarkreport. You should grade yourself. 120
  121. 121. The real metric: interaction. 121
  122. 122. Frequency 122
  123. 123. The best frequency is the one that delivers the best combination of revenue, LCV and acceptable churn. 123
  124. 124. The more behavior-based thecontent, the less you need to worry about frequency. 124
  125. 125. Ignore frequency controls for your most behavior-driven emails. 125
  126. 126. Manage frequency across ALLcampaigns from your brand. See it from the customer’s viewpoint. 126
  127. 127. Test frequency. This is your only answer. 127
  128. 128. Re-test frequency every 90 days to keep your approach fresh. 128
  129. 129. When to Send 129
  130. 130. The best day to send email?Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday. Friday. Saturday. Sunday. 130
  131. 131. Everybody has their own opinion… 131
  132. 132. Send based on historical recipient open and click times. 132
  133. 133. Consider multiple time zones within a list. 133
  134. 134. Weekends rock for some brands. Give it a try… 134
  135. 135. Inactives / Reactivation 135
  136. 136. Inactives are a HUGE problem for almost every company. 136
  137. 137. The average company can expect that between 30%-50% of their email database is inactive. 137
  138. 138. So how do you define an inactive subscriber? 138
  139. 139. Inactives combine timeframe +email activity + purchase/offline behavior. 139
  140. 140. For example, no email opens andclicks or purchases for 6 months. 140
  141. 141. But every company must developa definition that makes sense for their business. 141
  142. 142. Determine who your Inactives are. Then target them differently. 142
  143. 143. ISP algorithms are watching whether your recipients are opening and clicking. 143
  144. 144. Sending “we want you back”emails to inactives typically only activates up a few percent. 144
  145. 145. Proactively re-engage or purge inactives while adding newrecords to maintain audience. 145
  146. 146. Wanna drive your metrics throughthe roof? Kill inactives mercilessly. 146
  147. 147. Reactivate via a 2-3 step programwith escalating offers. No action = purged record or, reduced frequency. 147
  148. 148. Tell the user youre taking themoff the list, and give them a way to prevent it. 148
  149. 149. Reactivation programs are not the answer. But do them anyway. 149
  150. 150. Preference Centers 150
  151. 151. Implement a world-class preference center.
  152. 152. Seriously. Implement a world- class preference center.
  153. 153. Ask for what you need tosegment, provide relevant content.
  154. 154. Empower new subscribers through choice. 154
  155. 155. Step 1) Capture birth date.Step 2) Send Happy Birthday emails. Step 3) Print Money. 155
  156. 156. What’s the right number of form fields? 8 156
  157. 157. Just kidding. Use common sense. Test It. Balance data needs with lower form completion rates. 157
  158. 158. Be radical. Consider a databasekeyed on something other than email. 158
  159. 159. Use existing social credentials during sign up. 159
  160. 160. Let users control whichcommunications they receive and each one’s frequency. 160
  161. 161. Support recipient choice, andknow that some will opt-out of everything if you act shady. 161
  162. 162. Don’t force a full opt-out. Offersubscribers the option to pause communications? 162
  163. 163. Testing 163
  164. 164. Test. Test Again.Test everything. Test, test, test.
  165. 165. But why? Because testing is theonly real answer to all your darn questions. 165
  166. 166. Where should I start? 166
  167. 167. Most email marketers start withsubject lines because of the ease of testing. 167
  168. 168. When testing, use your ultimate goal (revenue and other conversions) to determine winners. 168
  169. 169. What else can we test: pre-header text, layout, copy,personalization, offers, buttons,timing – pretty much everything. 169
  170. 170. Only conduct true A/B tests – random splits in parallel. 170
  171. 171. Test 10% of your list with eachvariant, then send the winner to the other 80%. 171
  172. 172. Use A/B testing to prove ordisprove pre-defined assumptions. 172
  173. 173. Don’t go crazy testing ‘from’names. In that case, consistency wins. 173
  174. 174. Misc./Resources/Final Notes 174
  175. 175. Stop saying (and thinking in terms of) ‘e-blast’. 175
  176. 176. ESPs are different. Find the one that is right for YOU.
  177. 177. Balance existing need with future plans, and pick a vendor who works for both. 177
  178. 178. Pay attention to 4-5 KPIs send-over-send, week-over-week and year-over-year. 178
  179. 179. Spend less time modifying lists in Excel, and more time building rules-driven programs. 179
  180. 180. There are no short cuts.
  181. 181. Don’t agree with these Slides?Then Yes, it depends and test it.
  182. 182. ContributorsLoren McDonald@LorenMcDonaldlmcdonald@silverpop.comDave Walters@_DaveWaltersdwalters@silverpop.com
  183. 183. Thank you! On Twitter: @Silverpopwww.slideshare.net/silverpop www.silverpop.com

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