Do We Have To Teach Naked?
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Do We Have To Teach Naked? Do We Have To Teach Naked? Document Transcript

  • image:
an
untrained
eye Students
are
decidedly
 underwhelmed

 by
their
Profs’
tech
skills.
 do we have to teach naked? an
ePaper
by
sidneyeve
matrix
  • .2. When
students
were
polled
in
a
 national
survey
last
fall,
 almost half said their profs do not understand how to use technology. 1 image:
kharied
(needs
a
cupcake)
  • .3. Call them the gamer generation, millennials, digital natives, image:
SimonWhitaker Gen Y these
computer‐savvy
(or
at
the
very
least,
connected
and
 techno‐curious)
kids
in
higher
educational
classrooms
today
 use,
and
expect
their
profs
to
use
digital
technology
to
 communicate
and
teach.
 And
for
the
most
part,
they
are
underwhelmed
with
both
the
 low
levels
of
edtech
uptake
and
digital
literacy
of
their
profs.

  • .4. image:
martinroell The feeling goes both ways of course with
professors
claiming
that,
beyond
Facebook
and
texting,
 students
are
not
digital
wizards
with
mad
skillz,
far
from
it
in
 fact,
despite
many
claims
to
the
contrary. Professors
also
disagreed
with
student
perceptions
about
 faculty
technical
fluency.
 In
the
same
survey,
two‐thirds
of
profs
self‐reported
that
they
 are
satisfied
with
their
level
of
personal
digital
tech
knowledge.

  • .5. image:
Andrew
Feinberg These
discrepancies
point
to
what
Henry
Jenkins
and
Danah
 Boyd
call
the
digital
technology
participation gap 2 that
emerges
between
generations.
It’s
another
approach
to
 understanding
the
digital
divides
that
separate
cohorts,
 classes,
and
demographics.
 Basically,
students
and
teachers
have
potentially
different
skill
 sets,
but
more
importantly,
it
seems
apparent
that
 we prefer different digital technologies to
communicate,
learn,
create,
connect,
and
participate
in
 culture.
  • .6. What kinds of technoteaching do students want? We
know
what
they
do
NOT
 image:
monica,
nic want:
more
bad
powerpoint.
 No
surprise.
Often
repeated,
 death‐by‐powerpoint
is
by
now
 part
of
our
cultural
idiom. Still,
presentations
read
aloud
 word‐for‐word
directly
from
 text‐heavy,
clip‐art
accented
 slide
decks
are
business‐as‐ usual
in
classrooms
and
at
 conferences.
 As
reported
in
The
Chronicle
of
 Higher
Education,
a
study
 published
in
the
April
issue
of
 British
Educational
Research
 Journal
found
59%
of
students
 surveyed
said: bad powerpoint interferes with their ability to focus, 3 retain, and learn.
  • .7. image:
Bonnaf In
response,
Southern
Methodist
University
Dean
José
A.
Bowen
 suggested
prohibiting powerpoint
from
the
lecture
 hall,
shifting
to
more
interactive
discussions
during
face‐to‐face
 meetings,
and
use
of
podcasts
for
lecture
delivery.
 Bowen called it teaching naked. 4
  • It's
unknown
how
many
 professors
followed
Bowen's
 advice,
swapping
powerpoint
 lectures
for
on‐demand
podcasts,
 .8. but
many
classes
are
 coursecasting.
 Students like Podcasts and
not
just
because
it
means
 they
don’t
have
to
go
to
class.
 image:
luc
legay For
visual
learners,
ESL
students,
special‐needs,
busy
 schedules,
or
exam
cramming,
a
course
that
comes
 packaged
with
audio‐video
digital
assets
can
be
a
bonus.
 This
is
especially
so
if
the
podcasts
are
truly
value‐added
 features,
not
replacing
the
prof,
P2P
discussions,
lecture
or
 slide
presentation.
  • .9. image:
Thomas
Hawk Early
adopters
at
York
University,
Carleton
and
Mount
Allison
 reported
that
student engagement was up considerably
when
they
put
their
lectures
online
in
audio
or
 video
format.
5 Instead
of
acting
as
a
deterrent
to
attending
class,
podcasts
 have
lead
to more student involvement.
6 “My
average
student
watches
120
percent
of
the
lectures,”
says
 one
professor
at
Carleton.
“Students
do
a
combination
of
 coming
to
lectures,
watching
them
on
TV
and
watching
them
on
 their
iPods.”
 This is learning on-demand.
  • .10. image:
bittermelon students also like social media technologies. Students
know
how
to
use
Facebook
and
are
generally
 interested
in
other
social
media
tools.
Those
pre‐existing
digital
 skills
can
be
leveraged
for
formal
learning
outcomes.
 Integrating
social
media
based
assignments
into
coursework
 pushes
the
digital
literacy
envelope.
In
the
process
students
are
 better
prepared
for
their
job
search
and
perhaps
even
future
 careers.
7 Using
social
media
tools
also
helps
to
connect
the
classroom
to
 the
world
off‐campus—making
courses
appear
more
 socially relevant.
  • However Nothing
illuminates
the
generational
 .11. participation gap
between
 many
faculty
and
their
students
 faster
than
social
media
 communication
technologies.
These
 tools
are
part
of
the
real‐time
web. The
velocity
of
an
instant‐ messaging,
status‐updating,
twitter‐ trending,
and
now
location‐aware
 and
mobile
digital
culture
is
shifting
 communications
and
connectivity
 habits
on
campus.
 The
connected
cohort
is
 accustomed
to
having
access
to
 instantaneous
information— including
ideally,
always-on image:
Pink
Sherbert
Photography profs.
Increasingly
students
 expect
their
professors
to
respond
 to
their
questions
immediately. 8 Faculty
contemplating
adoption
of
 social
media
technologies
should
set
 clear
expectations
about
online
 availability.
Design
a
set
of
social
 media
guidelines.
Distribute,
share,
 and
rotate
responsibility
for
 socmedia
moderation
among
 students
to
encourage
ownership,
 engagement,
&
authenticity.

  • In Review .12. Make
your
course
more
on‐demand,
social,
and
mobile
with
these
 online
tools. 1. Distribute video podcasts. Create
video
vodcasts
or
audio‐only
podcasts
of
lectures,
extra
 material,
or
of
FAQ
(answer
the
predictable
questions
once,
not
 repeatedly)
and
post
on
YouTube,
iTunesU,
and
Vimeo.
Get
some
 video
content
into
your
course
by
assigning
students
to
produce
a
 short
audio/video
interview
for
course
credit—then
share
them
 online. 2. Create a Facebook page for the course. Facebook
is
mobile‐ready
and
many
students
access
it
frequently
 everyday
on
their
smartphones.
Invite
students
to
join/fan
the
course
 on
Facebook
and
use
that
space
to
share
relevant
newsworthy
links
 and
videos
from
YouTube.
Assign
course
credit
for
this
content
 curation
(and
have
a
discussion
about
the
future
of
social
news‐ sharing
culture). 3. Post presentations on Slideshare.net Post
lecture
slides,
student
presentations,
or
design
standalone
slide
 decks
to
teach
material
not
covered
during
face‐to‐face
meetings.
 Create
a
course
account
and
favorite
other
designers’
slideshows,
ask
 students
to
review
and
assess.
This
kind
of
assignment
exposes
 students
to
a
variety
of
professional
and
amateur
information
 designers—and
creates
opportunities
to
discuss
best
practices
in
 knowledge
design.
Put
FAQ
into
a
deck.
  • .13. image:
Ladik Works Cited 1.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/11/05/survey 2.
http://www.studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Summer_2009/ DigitalDivide.html 3.
http://chronicle.com/article/Teach‐Naked‐Effort‐Strips/47398/ 4.
http://www.openeducation.net/2009/07/31/dean‐encourages‐ professors‐to‐teach‐naked/ 5.
http://www.universityaffairs.ca/how‐technology‐is‐ transforming‐the‐lecture.aspx 6.
http://campustechnology.com/articles/2005/12/students‐take‐ to‐podcasts.aspx?sc_lang=en 7.
http://mashable.com/2009/06/19/teaching‐social‐media/ 8.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/10/weekinreview/ 10stone.html?ref=todayspaper&pagewanted=all
  • .14. image:
.krish.Tipirneni about the author Sidneyeve
Matrix,
PhD.
 Queen's
National
Scholar,
Film
&
Media,
Queen's
 University,
Canada.
Professor
of
digital
culture,
mass
 communication
&
marketing,
pop
culture,
television,
 &
film
courses.
Website:
sidneyevematrix.net Attribution‐ Noncommercial‐Share
 Alike
3.0
License.