Resources & Citations  eMarketer - Marketers Value Social Media for Both Branding and Customer Acquisition - January  30, ...
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks
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Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks

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The only way to successfully determine priorities in the more tactical areas is to ensure that they are aligned with the broader company objectives. To do THAT you have take the broadest view of the organization and then BACK your way into your social media initiatives. Taking that approach means that you’re always supporting the most impactful items for the organization.
Due to formatting issues on slideshare we've had to put up the keynote file, you can still download the PDF at http://www.sideraworks.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Social-Media-Priorities-2-Dreamforce-12-.pdf

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  • Presentation given at Dreamforce 2012\nIntros:\n\nMatt Ridings is a business strategist, speaker, and writer who has worked in digital on both the agency and enterprise side since 1994. He ran interactive for the marketing agency of record for such established brands as Levi’s, Cisco, and British Airways as well as the launch of ventures such as Jet Blue and RedSpark. He has also been involved in his own ventures, including as a partner building out a 300+ person consultancy. His work over the last 10 years has focused primarily in developing innovation cultures, change management initiatives, and specialized market research using social channels.\n\nAmber Naslund is a business strategist with a strong focus on social, communication and community initiatives.\nHer expertise spans professional fundraising, corporate communications, marketing, professional services, and social business strategy. She’s successfully run multimillion dollar fundraising campaigns, built and led executive communication teams, and helped launch international brands. As the VP of Social Strategy for Radian6 (successfully acquired by Salesforce.com in 2011), she advised Fortune 500 companies on social business strategy, and built a renowned community and social media team.\nAmber is also the co-author of the highly regarded social business book, The NOW Revolution, and her blog has been recognized several times for excellence in social media and community related content. She speaks professionally about social business and strategy at dozens of industry conferences and private events every year\n\nI know that this says ‘social media’, but... the only way to successfully determine priorities in the more tactical areas is to ensure that they are aligned with the broader company objectives. To do THAT you have take the broadest view of the organization and then BACK your way into your social media initiatives. Taking that approach means that you’re always supporting the most impactful items for the organization. \n\nWe’re here to talk to you about how to set priorities for your social media and social business initiatives. We’re not going to tell you what to tweet or how often, and I’ll explain why at the end of this presentation. We are, however, going to address the infrastructure you need to support your social initiatives and make them easier to manage. Social can no longer simply be a disparate activity that gets left languishing in the marketing department. It’s got to be integrated into the business, and that’s what we’re going to talk about.\n\nIf you think through all of these things carefully, you’ll have a plan and a framework that will make your priorities - the ones unique to you and your business - much more readily apparent.\n\n(We do this at great depth for companies, but we’ve got 45 minutes here so we’re going to jam your brain full of a LOT of information). We’ll have time for questions at the end, and we’ll be over at Moscone North at the Expo after this talk if you want to swing by and chat some more.\n
  • The other bonus of looking at things through a social business lens is that there are finally real-world numbers coming in from those progressive organizations who started early....and they are both incredibly validating as well as useful for selling in your initiatives to your boss. To that end, let’s take a peek at a few. \nhttp://www.sideraworks.com/what-we-do/what-is-social-business/\n\n
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  • Just seeing if you’re paying attention.\n
  • This is my favorite one because it demonstrates the difference between ‘dabbling’ in social media, and fully integrating social as a social business.\n
  • Yet with all of that, only 17% of organizations have seen fit to coordinate social initiatives throughout the organization, and integrate social programs beyond marketing and into their overall business operations and culture. And 81% of the CEOs in this same study think it’s where they want to head.\n\nThe important part about that is that you can’t set your social media program priorities in a bubble. And if you’re patient enough to slow down, back up a bit and work your priorities from within a plan, those priorities will hold as your organization and goals change, flex, and have to adapt over time.\n
  • And that’s a problem, because we’ve run headlong into social media, and most of us weren’t remotely prepared for how it was going to impact the organization overall. As adoption increases, so too does the pressure, and the demands of evolving expectations. \n\nEmployees/talent expect innovative places to work, communities expect responsiveness and engagement from companies and the individuals inside them, customers want accountability and channel-agnostic customer service that kicks ass, partners want to collaborate and contribute.\n\nSo as that pressure has increased, it’s even more important that we’re not building our priorities in isolation but in concert with our organization as a whole. \n\nWe’ve started some deeper and very important conversations about just how we adapt to the implications of all of that social media activity and those changing expectations, how they can create a ripple effect across our entire organizations and how it harbors immense potential for more effective and successful business: culturally, operationally, and financially.\n
  • This the thing that’s done the least, but is needed the most. Why?\nBecause without knowing where you are there is no way to make a plan for how to get to where you want to be, nor is there a way to assess along the way whether your efforts are producing fruit.\n\nFor this particular session it’s so critical because you can’t do EVERYTHING. There are only so many add-on activities you can take on within your existing constraints. You have to be able to determine what you’re going to do ‘instead of’ vs. ‘and’. \n\nOne thing to understand is that when we say ‘audit’ in this context we’re not talking about “are you measuring your marketing activities”, that’s important, and we’ll speak to that in a moment, but a true audit is about a readiness assessment. Do I have the appropriate people in place with the right skills? Does my existing corporate culture support what I’m trying to do or will changing that culture become something that I need to address as well? Where are we as an organization when it comes to technology we have, technology we want, and our ability to integrate that technology effectively?\n\nWhat is the effectiveness of the activities you are already doing? Can you define that? If not how do you propose to be able to decide whether it should be replaced by some social business activity that performs better (or vice versa). How can you properly set your priorities without knowing this information about where your strengths and weaknesses are? Are you viewing your efforts from how they complement each other or simply in isolation?\nhttp://www.sideraworks.com/what-we-do/services/social-business-audit/\n\n
  • Cross-functional, voluntary coordination around social. Aligns social initiatives with overall business vision and goals, which helps determine departmental and business unit priorities within those goals, and provide some coordination across channels so that efforts aren’t conflicting or duplicated. Can be more formalized, like a council or a Center of Excellence. But if you’re just starting out, it can be as simple as walking next door to talk to your counterparts in other departments.\n\nThis is when you start setting goals for the actual social initiatives themselves, so the goals are specific, measurable, attainable with the resources you have, realistic, and timed - that’s SMART for you acronym folks - AND have been developed in light of the goals of the organization, business unit, or even department overall. Every set of goals needs to tie into the set above them.\n
  • Asking the “what if” questions, getting fears on the table, starting to create maps for solutions and processes that you’ll need to scale as well as assembling playbooks for your teams.\nA fantastic way to encourage that coordination and alignment since complete and repeatable solutions will require different points of view and cross-functional groups to work together.\nSee Social Scenario Modeling™ for more information: http://www.sideraworks.com/what-we-do/services/social-business-labs/social-scenario-modeling/\n\n
  • Brand, Competition, Industry. Expectations of community. Results and impact of your efforts. \n\nYou also need to use listening to determine where you need to be present and most importantly, where you don’t. First and foremost you need to be where your customers and community ARE ALREADY. That’s priority number one. If you aren’t at minimum covering all of those bases, don’t even think for a moment about doing some clever Pinterest campaign.\n\nFirst you have to meet the number one expectation for companies present in social media: be responsive in the channels that YOU have chosen to make available to your customers. If you’re on Twitter, you’d better be ready to use Twitter not just for YOUR purposes, but for the ones that your customers and prospects decide are useful for THEM.\n\nListening provides you with the business intelligence to determine what social media platforms will be most useful for you, if your customers are having dialogues already, where they’re doing that, and what they’re saying. It’s also key to determining where in the engagement cycle you are, which Matt will talk about next.\n\n
  • Responding: often reactive, in response only to direct inquiries. Goal is to create enough engaging personality outside of the things that you *have* to talk about in order to attract people TO your brand, your people, your company. We call this creating gravity. Your participation priorities should be in this order: triage, response for customer service purposes, engagement for the purpose of creating gravity (sharing content, developing dialogue, creating a point of view that your communities can identify with). \n
  • Repurposing content, content should answer the questions that your customers have about the challenges they have that your broad expertise can solve. Not about your products.\n\nEspecially B2B; content is about distributing, sharing, or adding value to knowledge\n\n\n
  • Think systematically, not in isolation. Technology as an enabler, NOT as a solution. Putting people first and tech second.\n\nFor example, automation has a very fine tipping point based on the expectations of your customers. You can automate distribution of information, but if you aren’t there to respond in near real-time, you’re not only missing opportunities but potentially frustrating the people who have chosen a fast-moving medium in hopes that you’ll have adapted to the speed and fluidity of these platforms.\n
  • You need them. Written from a place of empowerment and enablement, not control. If you don’t trust your people even with policies and guidelines in place, you have a hiring problem, not a social media management problem.\n
  • From onboarding, to policies and processes, to your executives, education and training is critical to be able to properly mitigate risks, to distribute values throughout the organization so that proper judgments can be made and greater independence and empowerment given. To achieve buy-in and budgets for your programs. When it comes to prioritizing where to start with education and training, use scenario modeling to determine the first audience for formalized education and training, and *always* include executive education but in the case of executives you *have* to approach from a business impact perspective not ‘show the ceo how to tweet’.\n\nMake people in your org smart about social media even if it’s not their direct responsibility.\n\nhttp://www.sideraworks.com/what-we-do/services/social-business-labs/executive-social-business-education/\n
  • First, understand what business goals social is supporting. 2nd, know what data you have available. 3rd, select *three* metrics that demonstrate progress toward your goals. They can change over time. The goal isn’t to measure, the goal is to make better decisions.\n\nMost of the excuses behind “we can’t measure” mean really that we don’t have the data, we don’t have the resources to spend the time gathering and sorting the data, or we don’t have the knowledge available to analyze the data and tell us what it means. Knowing which of those things apply to you will help you determine where you need to begin your measurement efforts. Is it about collecting the data in the first place? Making it available and accessible? Or is more about doing something with the data once you have it?\n
  • Best practices and maturity models are flawed. If you do x,y, and z then you’re at ‘stage 1’, do this and you’re at ‘stage 2’. It’s so ridiculous. They can be good sources of inspiration, but they’re based on averages, smoothed out basics that don’t consider the unique nuances of your own business. They can be great for initiating questions within your organization about how *you* would do it as compared to someone else. But don’t make the mistake of thinking they can be used as a roadmap. They didn’t have your resources, your people, your capabilities or lack thereof.\n\nThis is where Frameworks come into play, something that takes the items common to everyone that have proven themselves out and them makes them available to accelerate your process but leaves enough independence and flexibility to shape it to your unique organization.\n\nTake the time to have and build a plan specific to your organization - even if it means backing up and slowing down. It’s the only way to scale and be effective with social in the long run.establish new ones that complement and build on your existing efforts (rather than becoming a disparate set of efforts that becomes difficult to connect to anything else).\nhttp://www.sideraworks.com/what-we-do/services/social-business-strategy/\nhttp://www.sideraworks.com/our-approach/\n
  • We’ve had to adapt to every technological advance, from the phone to email. Now we integrate it into our work. If you want to be successful with social, it’s not an add-on. It’s fundamental to your business model.\n
  • Here’s the thing. Many of you are sitting there thinking “I work within a specific department, yet you’ve referenced several things about looking at the structure of the company overall. Why?”\n\nPut simply, social media activities evolve to a certain point and then by necessity have to be coordinated at a company-wide level. This isn’t a ‘maybe’, it *will* happen. Some of you are already at that point, some of you may be a few years away. We want *you* thinking in those terms because you only have two paths before you. You can either expand your point of view to start encompassing the impact on the organization and be the one who makes it happen, or you keep your focus just within your own purview and have it happen *to* you. Be the change, or be changed.\n\nThe good news: doing something is better than doing nothing at all. Many companies are still learning, and you aren’t alone.\n\nBut the truth is that you can be part of the legions that lead your department and your company into this next era. Or you can wait, and worry about what’s right in front of you today, your to-do lists, your campaigns. And you can be a participant later, led by others who will bring social business into the new generation of work. You can focus on the success of your business overall, and your personal success becomes an artifact of that. Or you can wait for all of this to happen to you instead. We don’t recommend the latter.\n\n
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  • Setting Your Social Media Priorities - SideraWorks

    1. 1. Resources & Citations eMarketer - Marketers Value Social Media for Both Branding and Customer Acquisition - January 30, 2012 http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1008802#OPTrMslhr5oK21Dl.99 Economist Intelligence Unit & PulsePoint Group - The Economies of the Socially Engaged Enterprise - March 2012 http://www.pulsepointgroup.com/staging.pulsepoint/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/AP-Presentation-3_22_12- final.pdf IBM - The Social Business: Advent of a New Age - February 2011http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/global/files/us__en_us__socialbusiness__epw14008usen.pdf McKinsey Quarterly - Rise of the Networked Enterprise: Web 2.0 Finds Its Payday - February 2011 http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Organization/Strategic_Organization/ The_rise_of_the_networked_enterprise_Web_20_finds_its_payday_2716?pagenum=2
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