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Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
Digital storytelling slideshow
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Digital storytelling slideshow

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  • 1. Digital Storytelling Providing New Insights Into What Students’ Know and Can Do Sid de Haan Consulting Services EPSB 1
  • 2. Speaking Listening Reading Writing Viewing Representing 2
  • 3. 3
  • 4. Changes in society and technology have affected, and will continue to affect, the ways in which people use language to think, to communicate and to learn. 4
  • 5. Viewing and representing are integral parts of contemporary life. These skills allow students to understand the ways in which images and language may be used to convey ideas, values and beliefs. 5
  • 6. Many of the comprehension processes involved in reading, such as previewing, predicting and making inferences, may also be used in viewing. Representing enables students to communicate information and ideas through a variety of media. 6
  • 7. Think-Pair-Share “If people aren’t taught the language of sound and images, shouldn’t they be considered as illiterate as if they left college without being able to read or write?” ~ George Lucas 7
  • 8. Learning Goals • Explore the power of story/digital expression • Develop a shared understanding of the term digital storytelling • Investigate two methods of digital expression • Discuss ways of formatively & summatively assessing these projects & products 8
  • 9. “Humans are not ideally set up to understand logic; they are ideally set up to understand stories.” ~ Roger C. Shank, cognitive scientist 9
  • 10. “Humans are not ideally set up to understand logic; they are ideally set up to understand stories.” ~ Roger C. Shank, cognitive scientist 10
  • 11. The Importance of Story Stories go beyond fact; they delve into the richness of details and emotion, and provide a context for our words. 11
  • 12. E.M. Forester observed that a fact is “The queen died and the king died.” A story is “The queen died and the king died of a broken heart.” That’s the difference. 12
  • 13. As Don Norman puts it in his book Things That Make Us Smart, “Stories are important cognitive events, for they encapsulate, into one compact package, knowledge, context, and emotion.” 13
  • 14. The story - from Rumplestiltskin to War and Peace - is one of the basic tools invented by the human mind for the purpose of understanding. There have been great societies that did not use the wheel, but there have been no societies that did not tell stories. ~ Ursula K. Le Guin 14
  • 15. For sale: Baby shoes. Never worn. 15
  • 16. 16
  • 17. Activity: 1.Reflect on your first year of teaching. Try to summarize that experience in 10 words or less (shoot for 6!). 2. Next, jot down some images or music that you could possibly use to add to your words to communicate this “story” to a partner. 17
  • 18. What is Digital Storytelling? Digital storytelling is using 21st century technology to tell our stories. Often this involves combining story, images, and audio to maximize emotional impact and effect. 18
  • 19. What is Digital Storytelling? “Digital Storytelling is the modern expression of the ancient art of storytelling. Digital stories derive their power by weaving images, music, narrative and voice together, thereby giving deep dimension and vivid color to characters, situations, experiences, and insights.” --Leslie Rule, Center for Digital Storytelling 19
  • 20. What is Digital Storytelling? Typically a digital story is personal Can also refer to interactive stories– games, hypertext, personal blogging, etc. “conversational media” 20
  • 21. My Grandma http://files.wlcsd.org/aal/ds/lakianbb.wmv 21
  • 22. Brain Dump What “worked” in the story you just watched? 22
  • 23. Why Might I Use Digital Storytelling in my Classroom? Digital Storytelling can be a very powerful medium, and one in which our students have a lot of experience and feel very comfortable. 23
  • 24. Why Might I Use Digital Storytelling in my Classroom? The current generation has grown up in a rich environment of image and sound. Communicating in this way is natural for them, and digital storytelling provides students with a “modern” way of telling their stories. 24
  • 25. Why Might I Use Digital Storytelling in my Classroom? Students are engaged through the use of technology and empowered by their ability to create a quality product. 25
  • 26. Why Might I Use Digital Storytelling in my Classroom? Digital storytelling is also powerful because it gives all students an equal voice. Students who tend to be marginalized or overlooked in literate, story rich settings are able to tell their stories – to feel valued and heard. 26
  • 27. The 21st Century Classroom Digital storytelling is a classic case of integrating technology in the classroom; it extends the writing and takes it to a place where it could not go alone. Students develop a keen sense of voice, audience, pacing, economy, and the interplay between story, image and audio. 27
  • 28. The 21st Century Classroom Students begin to develop visual literacy skills and they begin to think critically about the media they produce and consume. But most of all, they tell their stories. 28
  • 29. http://www.bringingtheoutsidein.com/ movies/threadsofgratitude.mov 29
  • 30. http://www.bringingtheoutsidein.com/ movies/connor_T1.mov 30
  • 31. Digital Storytelling: 6 Key Elements • Story • Use of Voice • Economy • Pacing • Use of Images • Music 31
  • 32. Story We live in an era of high velocity media, which creates the illusion of energy & vitality. Much of the content we encounter is malnourished (which is why it needs a barrage of image and audio). 32
  • 33. Story But well crafted stories DO NOT use malnourished content; rather, well crafted stories are rich and engaging. When crafting a strong digital story, we can slow down because we have strong content. 33
  • 34. Story Stories that are crafted strive to bring the audience to a place where their primary awareness is of the story. The author intentionally leaves “spaces” for the audience to fill in. In so doing, the audience becomes an active participant in the story (not a passive “recipient”). 34
  • 35. Use of Voice We can enhance the effectiveness of a digital story through the use of voice. Technology allows us to rehearse and edit our voice for maximum effect (something oral storytellers did not have the luxury of!). Pauses are very powerful when used properly. Make room for silence. 35
  • 36. Economy Less is more. Leave spaces which require closure from the audience. Allow the audience to use their imagination and to interact with the story to generate an understanding of it. 36
  • 37. Pacing Digital storytelling is like taking your audience on a journey. The preparation of your digital story is like packing for the trip. The delivery of your story is like unpacking. Unpacking the story slowly is like allowing the audience to relish the contents of the suitcase one item at a time. This is called pacing. 37
  • 38. Use of Images Let the images do some of the talking for you. Try to use images that will engage the audience. In a 2 minute digital story, you should use +/- 10 images. Less is more. 38
  • 39. Music The temptation is to have a soundtrack thundering through from beginning to end. To be effective, background music should only be used in one or two places. The music should never drown out the narrator. Your words are the focal point and the digital story shouldn’t make sense without your voice. 39
  • 40. Things to Keep In Mind Be cautious when using flashy transitions between images. “Overdone” transitions pull the viewer out of the story and into the “Oooh!” factor. 40
  • 41. Things to Keep In Mind A transition’s job is to be invisible. You always want the focus to remain on the story and the audio. Use only cross dissolve and maybe fade in/fade out. 41
  • 42. Things to Keep In Mind Avoid the use of sound effects (they sound “cheesy”), dramatic digital transitions, and an overenthusiastic soundtrack. 42
  • 43. Street Hockey http://video.google.com/videoplay? docid=-8642912020527176466&hl=en 43
  • 44. Rituals http://www.storycenter.org/stories/index.php?cat=4 44
  • 45. Digital Storytelling Process The process of digital storytelling can be broken into a series of steps. • Steps 1-3 are done in the classroom • Steps 4-5 are done in a computer lab • Step 6 can occur in the classroom, or any other venue, including online 45
  • 46. Step One: Prewriting: • Generating an idea for a story is the first step • Thinking maps or other graphic organizers are helpful 46
  • 47. Step Two: Writing: • The most effective digital stories have their genesis in good writing • Emphasize multiple drafts 47
  • 48. Step Three: The Storyboard: • Visual map of the story • Contains text + visuals + any other information necessary (camera angle, transitions…) • Essential step for making the connection between communicating meaning and for locating visuals 48
  • 49. Step Four: Locating Multimedia: • In this step, students use search tools to locate still frame pictures or video • Students may also use their own content (digital pictures, video footage, scanned images…) • Copyright needs to be discussed prior to locating media 49
  • 50. Step Five: Creating the Digital Story: • Demo the software to the class (+/- 40 minutes) • Students learn quickly • Online tutorials • MS Moviemaker • Photostory 3 • iMovie 50
  • 51. Step Six: Sharing: • This is a crucial step • Students are generally immensely proud of their creations • Can strengthen classroom relationships • Can be uploaded/shared globally • FOIP considerations 51
  • 52. Digital Storytelling Rubric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hen work is judged limited or insufficient, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve. 52
  • 53. Music Video Project: Expressing Understanding of the Text Using Visual Images 53
  • 54. Examples 54
  • 55. Imagine* *Unable to post student video due to FOIP and/ or copyright restrictions 55
  • 56. Where Were You When The World Stopped Turning?* *Unable to post student video due to FOIP and/ or copyright restrictions 56
  • 57. Music Video Project: Scope & Sequence 1. Introduce project • discuss communicating understanding in a variety of ways • share an exemplar • discuss what works/what doesn’t • build criteria 57
  • 58. Music Video Project: Scope & Sequence 2.Model the process • Choose a song and work through from start to finish • Ballads with a clear story work well, as well as lyrics centered around a clear event, theme or emotion • Discuss how mood is conveyed in music and how this affects the message; connect mood of music to mood of images used 58
  • 59. Music Video Project: Scope & Sequence 3.Classroom work • Find a suitable song; print off lyics • Read through lyrics several times. Determine theme, message, purpose, and identify figurative language. • Deconstruct lyrics and brainstorm images 59
  • 60. Music Video Project: Scope & Sequence 4.Meet with peers (small group) • Share ideas and receive feedback on project work • Students provide feedback that deals with criteria only • All comments must be phrased positively (ie. “If this were my project, I might...”) 60
  • 61. Music Video Project: Scope & Sequence 5.Storyboard • Create a storyboard that matches images with lyrics (MS Powerpoint) • Teacher/student conference to determine if ready for next step 61
  • 62. Music Video Project: Scope & Sequence 6. Computer Lab • search for images on reputable sites where copyright restrictions are clearly posted (ie. www.sxc.hu, www.wikimedia.com) • download appropriate images • “rip” music from cd and save to network drive • Use video editing software to create video (MS Moviemaker, MS Photostory 3, iMovie, etc.) 62
  • 63. Follow Up: Self-Reflection Question: How has your understanding of the song changed as a result of the work you did on this project? 63
  • 64. Follow Up: Self-Reflection Answer: "My understanding of this song has changed because when I listened to the song I didn't understand most of the questions in the song. When I researched it I understanded it like when Common (rapper) asked why is Bush acting like he's looking for Osama, we should impeach him and elect Obama. 64
  • 65. I didn't understand this question then I thought of it and asked myself why is Bush in Iraq instead of Saudi Arabia and Afghanistan and the part of the line where it says we should impeach him and elect Obama.I didn't know who he was so I searched his name and found out he was a senator of the USA. In conclusion, if I didn't do the project I wouldn't have understanded the song." 65
  • 66. Follow Up: Self-Reflection "I have gotten a much better understanding of the song and lyrics, thanks to the work with the storyboards. Breaking down the song line by line made it easier to understand. I also found out that words or phrases may have double meanings. "I'll give a little bit of my life for you" may not be talking about just sacrificing yourself for a family member or friend. It may mean something like donating blood. I also can't get this song out of my head because I memorized and listened to it almost everyday for a month." 66
  • 67. The End of War* *Unable to post student video due to FOIP and/ or copyright restrictions 67
  • 68. Digital Storytelling Resources Sid de Haan’s Blog: http://sdhedtech.wordpress.com sid.de.haan@epsb.ca 68

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