Pesi Manual 9.11.2011 Visual Stress

  • 2,454 views
Uploaded on

Irlen Method and Brain Gym presentation. Obtain the DVD of the webinar and earn CEUs for OT/OTA, PT/PTA, SLP, Psychologists, and Educators. Email info@aotss.com. See www.irlenvlcmd.com

Irlen Method and Brain Gym presentation. Obtain the DVD of the webinar and earn CEUs for OT/OTA, PT/PTA, SLP, Psychologists, and Educators. Email info@aotss.com. See www.irlenvlcmd.com

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
2,454
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Understanding Visual Stress & SensoryProcessing Dysfunction:Techniques for Learning, Behavior, & Daily Living Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA
  • 2. Understanding Visual Stress & Sensory Processing Dysfunction: Techniques for Learning, Behavior, & Daily Living Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA The Activity Planner and Shoshana Shamberg have indicated that the content being pre- sented at todays educational activity is without bias of any commercial product or drug.This manual was printed on 10% post consumer recycled paper ZNM060890 9/11 T/I
  • 3. INVALID FOR SELF-STUDY CREDIT Understanding Visual Stress & Sensory Processing Dysfunction: Techniques for Learning, Behavior, & Daily Living P.O. Box 1000 Seminar Evaluation Post-test Eau Claire, WI 54702 Please indicate below the city, state and date you are 800-844-8260 attending today. We invite your comments on our program. Seminar City & State: ______________________________ We review all evaluations so we can serve you better. Date: _________________________________________ Name (please print): ___________________ ___________________ _____ Signature: _________________________ First Last M.I. Address: _________________________________________________________ Daytime Phone: ______________________ City:_______________________ State: _______ Zip: _____________ Email: ______________________________________ PROGRAM OBJECTIVES At the completion of this seminar, I have been able to achieve these seminar objectives: Yes No Describe typical developmental progression of infants from birth to six months. O O Identify markers for atypical development. O O List components of assessment including standardized tests, clinical observations, criterion referenced tests. O O Describe ways to determine treatment priorities, partnering with parents. O O Review treatment ideas including handling and sensory processing. O O If you answered “no” to any of the above, please comment: ___________________________________________________ GENERAL COMMENTS Satisfied Dissatisfied Please fill in the circle indicating your satisfaction with the following items. 5 4 3 2 1 Relationship of objectives to overall goal of program O O O O O The teaching strategies were appropriate O O O O O Achievement of your personal objectives for completing this course O O O O O The program met the stated learning objectives O O O O O The physical facilities were conducive to learning O O O O O Overall, the seminar met my expectations O O O O O How much did you learn as a result of this CE program? (5 being a great deal-1 being very little) O O O O O Your satisfaction is our goal and our guarantee. I am dissatisfied, please contact me. Email address:__________________________ Please Comment:__________________________________________________________________________________________ PRESENTATION Please fill in the circle for your responses, rating and comment on the presenter. Presenter Excellent Poor Please Comment Shoshana Shamberg 5 4 3 2 1 Content O O O O O ______________________________ Delivery O O O O O ______________________________ Knowledge and Expertise O O O O O ______________________________1 (OVER) © CMI
  • 4. Did the Content Expert/Presenter share any conflicts of interest with attendees at todays program? Yes O No O This educational program was free from commercial influence or bias? Yes O No O Comments: _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________ PARTICIPANT PROFILE 1. The tuition for this seminar is being paid by: O myself O my employer 2. Please describe programs or products you might be interested in:__________________________________________ PLEASE MARK THE DESCRIPTION(S) THAT MOST ACCURATELY DESCRIBES TITLE (s) EMPLOYMENT SETTING (Check all that apply) (Check your major employment setting) ❑ AODA Counselor ❑ AODA Facility ❑ Audiologist ❑ Church ❑ Case Manager ❑ Clinic ❑ Counselor ❑ Community Mental Health ❑ Director/Manager ❑ Correctional Institution ❑ Educator (please specify) ____________ ❑ Government ❑ EMS ❑ Home Care ❑ Faculty ❑ Hospital ❑ Marriage & Family Therapist ❑ Human Service Organization ❑ Nurse ❑ Insurance ❑ Nurse Practitioner ❑ Residential Facility ❑ Occupational Therapist ❑ School ❑ Pastor/Clergy ❑ Shelter ❑ Probation Officer ❑ Not Currently Practicing ❑ Psychiatrist/Physician ❑ Other _________________ ❑ Psychologist ❑ Psychotherapist ❑ Physical Therapist ❑ Social Worker ❑ Speech-Language Pathologists ❑ Student ❑ Other _________________ Age _____; Years in Profession _____ POST-SEMINAR QUESTIONS – Periodically reviewed to assure learner outcomes. test Questions tbd2 For additional forms and information on other Premier Education Solutions products, contact: Customer Service; CMI Education Institute Inc.; P.O. Box 1000; Eau Claire, WI 54702 (Toll Free, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Central Time, 800-844-8260). www.cmieducation.org
  • 5. Copyright © 2011CMI EducationPO Box 10003839 White Ave.Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54702Printed in the United StatesCMI Education strives to obtain knowledgeable authors and faculty forits publications and seminars. The clinical recommendations containedherein are the result of extensive author research and review. Obviously,any recommendations for client care must be held up against individualcircumstances at hand. To the best of our knowledge any recommendationsincluded by the author reflect currently accepted practice. However, theserecommendations cannot be considered universal and complete. The authorsand publisher repudiate any responsibility for unfavorable effects thatresult from information, recommendations, undetected omissions or errors.Professionals using this publication should research other original sources ofauthority as well.CMI Education Institute, Inc. offers continuing education programs and products under the brand names CMI Education Institute,Premier Education Solutions, PESI, and MEDS-PDN. For questionsor to place an order, please visit: www.pesi.com or call our customer service department at: (800) 844-8260. 44pp 9/11
  • 6. Materials Provided ByShoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA, has over 30 yearsexperience in program management and providing consultationservices to elementary schools, educational institutions, businesses,community-service organizations, senior centers, and therapycenters. Shoshana is founder and president of Abilities OTServices and Seminars, Inc. (AOTSS) a consulting firm thatspecializes in accessibility, health and wellness, pediatric schoolbased interventions, and consumer and professional trainingseminars. She is a guest instructor at many universities and is aformer vice-president of the Maryland OT Association Board andLegislative Committee. She is AOTA representative to the ANSI117.2 Accessibility Design Guidelines Board and the MarylandIDEA Partnership. Shoshana has a masters degree is specialeducation with an emphasis on assistive technology, licensed BrainGym Instructor and Certified Irlen Diagnostician. She is directorof the Irlen Visual Learning Center with offices at RuscombeCommunity Health Center in Baltimore, MD and at the AmenClinic of DC in Reston, VA.
  • 7. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Sensory motor exercises such as Brain Gym, Yoga, Sensory motor exercises promote Tai Chi, Bal-A-VisX, and Dance Movements Bal- a assist in WHOLE- WHOLE-BRAIN INTEGRATION FOR reducing stress and promote THINKING, READING, SPEAKING, LISTENING, Integration of the hemispheres of the brain WRITING, FOCUSING, MOVING, PLAYING, to draw out our innate abilities WORKING AT THE COMPUTER, AND for full self-expression and learning potential self- PERFORMING MANY DAILY LIFE ACTIVITIES Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Benefits of Sensory Motor Exercises • Discover the joy of learning and remedy attention and learning difficulties Brain Gym Sensory Motor Exercises • Enhance skills in memory retention, math, reading, comprehension, and listening • Four simple “PACE” activities that prepare the individual’s physiology for learning • Create calmness in high stress situations sit ations • 26 Brain Gym movements to help facilitate whole-brain learning whole- • Raise confidence and self-esteem self- • Develop effective communication skills • Uses simple biofeedback techniques to help the learner become aware of his/her own learning state at any moment • Develop greater insight and intuition • A simple, yet profound, five step process (the Edu-K Balance) to set Edu- • Create comfort in risk-taking and managing change risk- and achieve personal goals • Experience a personal breakthrough in relationships and success Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Finding the challenges. Formulate solutions. When, Where, How, What Are the stressors? Introduction Sensory Motor Tools Neurobiology of StressTriune Brain Theory Kinesthetic Learning Stress Management Noticing Brain Gym Exercises Sensory ProcessingHigh Gear/ Low Gear Bal-A-VisX Accommodations Three Dimensions Irlen Method Learning and Working Goal Setting 1 1
  • 8. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Five Principles of Brain Gym PACE Brain Gym Basic Process 1. Draw Out: Intelligence is Inborn – Find Your PACE Out: Foundation for Learning and Balancing 2. Focus: Attention Follows Intention – Set a GOAL Focus: 3. Notice: We Learn What We Actively Experience – Notice: • Positive Hook Ups 4. Do Pre-Activities Pre- Move to Learn: Growth Is a Search for Balance, Imbalance is a Learn: • Active Cross Crawl Search for Growth – Choose From the Learning Menu • Clear Brain Gym 5. • Energetic Interconnect: Interconnect: Each of Us Is Affected by Every Other – Do Post-Activities Post- CELEBRATE! Water Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Brain Gym PACE Song Why Water? Take a drink of WATER Feeling Fine LEFT foot over RIGHT foot LEFT arm over RIGHT Take a drink of WATER Bring it to your body – Water conducts electrical energy It’s Brain Gym time Hold on tight – 2/3 or 70% of the human body is water Time to push your buttons Time to change – Chemical a d e ect ca act o s o b a a d C S depe d o C e ca and electrical actions of brain and CNS depend on Make a magic “C”C conductivity of currents between brain and sensory systems Put it on your chest just like me Fingertips together Breath in slow – Water absorbed in body efficiently and immediately Time to change Arms at your middle Let it flow – Lack of H2O causes daytime fatigue, STM, poor concentration Time to cross your body Let it go Arms to knees Let it flow – Address dehydration which affects all human functioning and One side to the other, just like me chronically 75% of Americans. Thirst is mistaken for hunger Brain Gym time is over Slow it down (4X) Feeling free – Weight divided by 3 = # oz, #oz divided by 8 = number of Now you are connected just like me glasses (Ex: 144# = 48 oz, 48 oz = 6 glasses of H2O per day RIGHT foot over LEFT foot RIGHT arm over LEFT Just like me (3X) Bring it to your body Feeling free (3X) Do your best Time to change 2 2
  • 9. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Goal Setting NOTICING Physical, Emotional, Mental, and Energetic States Creating Effective Goals and Goal Statements: • Notice HOW IT IS NOW • Notice WHERE you are experiencing it in your body i i i i i b d • Enables me to live and perform in a more effort-free manner • What WORD describes this inner experience? • Uses positive language and goal statements • On a scale of 1 to 10, how do you rate the intensity of the • Action orientated and situation specific related to life-long patterns experience? • Clear enough language for a child to understand • Does this serve you well? • Energetic and exciting for me • Is this how you WANT to feel? • Recognizes both high (verb) and low (adverb) gear elements • If ‘no”, what do you want? If it were ideal how would it be • Specific and measurable different? Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Noticing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living • State your name and one word to describe your feeling right now High and Low Gear • Statement: “I am ____ and I feel ____” Create a movement that Integrated and Unintegrated symbolizes this feeling. Switched –Off (one sided stuckness) - Stress • Tiredness Quotient using 0-5 with 5 being most tired 0- Homolateral a d Bilateral Movements o o ate a and ate a o e e ts • What stresses you out? Share with partner for 1 minute each Wh ? Sh ih f i h • State 2 truths and one lie and have partner guess the lie Balance and Repatterning • Noticing for pace – pull hair, touch buttons, zip up/down 3 Dimensions/ DLR and 3DLR • Reflex Rag – Eve Kodiak Learning Menu • Lazy 8 with eyes – have partner notice tracking smoothness near Pre and Post Activities and far Celebrate Home play Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Integrated Learning Integrated High Gear State : Learned (right hemisphere) the “dance” between what is not yet learned and what is learned Safe, familiar environment Low Gear State : Not Yet Learned (left hemisphere) hemisphere) Respond without thought, non-reational non- Survival instinct, non-verbal non- Unfamiliar i f U f ili information or environment ti i t Automatic movement, reflexive Think before responding Whole to parts Intentional movement, analytical Big Picture Parts to whole Familiar context – feels good Details Thinking and moving together Unfamiliar context – feels uncomfortable Efficient, concrete, holistic Stopping movement to think Able to move forward, feels safe Slow and thoughtful, abstract Diffuse, receptive, spatial, intuitive Moving forward with caution, temporal, logical , symbolic, verbal 3 3
  • 10. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Unintegrated High Gear State (right hemisphere) Unintegrated Low Gear State (left hemisphere) Busy, “trying hard” Frustrated Bored, procrastinates, doesn’t care Quits before finished “Why me?” and rule dominated Too many choices – can’t choose can t Automatic, inappropriate responses i i i Can’t cope Painfully self conscious and critical ADHD Spaced out, over focused, stuck Fearful, self-conscious, easily distracted, compulsive self- ADD and Depressed Perfectionist, dreamer Moves aimlessly, ideas blocked Confused, poor concentration Confused, short-term memory loss short- Manic Depression, over sensitive Tunnel vision, obsessive, inflexible Poor time management Can’t stop, poor self regulation Always up, chaotic Mechanical and stressed A man found a cocoon of a butterfly. One day a small opening appeared. He sat and watched the butterfly for several hours as it struggled to force its body through What the man in his kindness and haste did not that little hole. Then it seemed to stop making any understand was that the restricting cocoon and progress. It appeared as if it had gotten as far as it had the struggle required for the butterfly to get and it could go no further. through the tiny opening were Gods way of Then the man decided to help the butterfly, so he took a forcing fluid from the body of the butterfly into pair of scissors and snipped off the remaining bit of the its wings so that it would be ready for flight cocoon. The butterfly then emerged easily. But it had a once it achieved its freedom from the cocoon. swollen body and small, shriveled wings. The man small wings continued to watch the butterfly because he expected Sometimes struggles are exactly what we need that, at any moment, the wings would enlarge and in our life. If God allowed us to go through our expand to be able to support the body, which would life without any obstacles, it would cripple us. contract in time. We would not be as strong as what we could Neither happened! In fact, the butterfly spent the rest of have been. And we could never fly.(author its life crawling around with a swollen body and shriveled unknown) wings. It never was able to fly. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Hearing in an Integrated State Vision in an Integrated State Structures: R and L Temporal Lobes, Cochlea Structures: lateral geniculate ganglion, optic chiasm, optic nerve, eye structures Gestalt (right hemisphere dominant) Hears: rhythm, tone, dialect, emotions pitch, Hears: Gestalt (right hemisphere dominant) image, understanding, perception, patterns Sees: image, patterns, big picture, Logic (left hemisphere dominant) emotion, 3 dimensions, color, future possibilities Hears: words, syntax, covert speech, Hears: lyrics of music, specific notes, details, linear sequence, symbols, Logic (left hemisphere dominant) analysis, breaks sound into small parts Sees: details, analysis, linear sequencing, specific, symmetry, line, 2 dimensions, puts vision in context of past 4 4
  • 11. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Left Brain, Right Brain The Right brain loves movement The Right brain feels emotion By Jean Houston and modified by Carla Hanniford And the Right brain likes improvement. Left brain, right brain Get your head together Left brain right brain brain, Get your head together Left brain, Right brain * get your head together Get ***, Your head ***, Together Left brain, Right brain * get your head together Get *** your head *** together The left brain discusses what your eyes can see, Teaches you to read and the one, two , three The Right brain intuits things as a whole, The left brain helps you structure your day, Synthesizes, integrates, believes in the soul. If you didn’t have a left brain, you couldn’t say The Right brain visualizes patterns so strange, That the right brain sees the ocean If you didn’t have a Right brain, you’d never change Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living And the Left brain clock watches, The Left brain loves order. The Left brain hates blotches, and the Left brain makes borders. Brain Gym Learning Menu (26 Activities) Chorus: Left brain, Right brain get your head together Lengthening Activities And the corpus callosum acts live a road road, Th O l The Owl For the two brains to share the load. In one given second there’s a quadrillion things Arm Activation That the brain puts together and that’s how it sings. Footflex Calf Pump Whole brain wants teaching, Whole brain want learning. Whole brain’s out reaching, The whole brain is yearning. Gravity Glider Chorus: Left brain, Right brain get your head together The Grounder Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Brain Gym Learning Menu (26 Activities) Brain Gym Learning Menu (26 Activities) Midline Movements Energy Activities Think of an X Water Cross Crawl and Cross Crawl Sit-Ups C C l dC C l Sit- S Brain Buttons Lazy 8’s and Alphabet 8’s Earth Button Double Doodle Balance Buttons The Elephant Neck Rolls Space Buttons The Rocker Energy Yawn Belly Breathing Thinking Cap The Energizer 5 5
  • 12. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Brain Gym Learning Menu (26 Activities) Repatterning Dennison Laterality Repatterning (DLR and 3DLR) return to natural, integrated patterns imprinted in human development Deepening Attitudes Cook’s Hook-ups C k’ Hook- H k • P tt i (D Patterning (Doman & D l Delacato) – t ) Imprinting into the body’s physiology of a natural pattern via Positive Points prolonged repetition • Reciprocal Interweaving (Arnold Gesell) – Repatterning Walking with a rhythmic, contralateral gait to simultaneously stimulate L and R brain hemispheres Dennison Laterality Repatterning (DLR) • Repatterning (Dennison) – re-establish efficient, integrated re- Three Dimension Repatterning (3DLR) patterns in cross-lateral movements including vision and hearing by cross- strengthening core postural awareness Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Adapting Sensory Motor Exercises for Specific Functional Limitations, Classroom Learning, Personal Growth, and Creative Activities Brain Gym Exercise: Calf Pump Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Brain Gym Exercise: Brain Gym Exercise: Thinking Cap Energy Yawn 6 6
  • 13. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Brain Gym Exercise: Balance Buttons Brain Gym Exercise The Rocker Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Dennison Laterality Repatterning DLR Brain Gym Exercise • Look at X – Cross Crawl – Look at l l – Homolateral Crawl • Cross Crawl while humming and looking up Lazy 8 (usually to the left) • Puppet C P t Crawl while counting and looking down l hil ti d l ki d (usually to the right) • Integration Metaphor • Cross Crawl while looking in all directions • Puppet Crawl while looking in all directions • Look at X ROBOT (thinking) SWIMMER (feeling) PENGUIN (sensing) Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Additional Supports for Brain Gym Skull Tapping Core Activation Rhythmic, Continuous, Alternating Beat Between right and left using two finger from each hand Temple Positive Points (directly over eyebrows) Temple Temple Crown (over eyebrows up to the top of the head Temple Temple Bottom of the Occular Orbit directly under eyes Temple Temple Down jaw line to Space Buttons on upper lip Temple Temple Down jaw line to Earth Buttons on lower lip Temple Temple Over the ears to Balance Buttons on occiput Finish 3 Thinking Caps massage ear folds top to bottom 7 7
  • 14. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Vision Exercises Holding the head up, looking straight ahead: • Look to the directly to the right. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. Accesses the ability to create new sound forms • Look up and to the left. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. seconds. Strengthens visual recall and is spontaneously made when we want to recall • Look down to the end of the nose. Hold this fixed position for 15 a visual memory seconds. Accesses the ability to strengthen olfactory sense • Look down and to the left. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. Accesses auditory memory and is spontaneously made when we want to • Look down toward the tongue. Hold this fixed position for 15 recall a musical tune seconds. Accesses the ability to strengthen gustatory senses • Look up and to the right. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. Accesses the ability to create new visual forms • Look upward and inward trying to look at the space between the eyebrows. Hold for 15 seconds. seconds. • Look down and to the right. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. Accesses the ability to heighten intuition Accesses kinesthetic recall and is spontaneously made when we want to recall an experience of touch Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Add to the Learning Menu Goal Setting Cranial Sacral Vision Therapy and Eye Exercises Practice in Groups of Three Yoga Tai Chi • First person facilitates Qigong • Second person receives Acupressure • Third person oversees the process, provides guidance and feedback, and records information from receiver Therapy Ball Exercises Dancing and Drumming • Provide feedback to each other to refine the goal states to make them positive, active, clear, energetic and powerful, measureable, Therapeutic Listening and Hemi-Sync Music Hemi- and concise Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Where and When listen accurately Goal Statement Language Situations: read fluently move ll flexibly Home speak (present tense): clearly School write te I will _____ ______ (future) easily Work W k communicate I ___ ______ (present) openly Sports organize fairly Verb (High Gear) ** Adverb (Low Gear) Recreation focus globally Creative Activities manage honestly Travel empower fully Social Settings relate joyfully Public Speaking choose run powerfully intuitively relax sleep lovingly comfortably create drive Are you in PACE? Water, Brain Buttons, Cross Crawl, Hook Ups calmly smoothly play remember clearly effectively 8 8
  • 15. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living My Goal Is Positive in the Present Tense GOAL STATEMENT: • What do I want? PACE THE GOAL • What do I want to change in my life? • What would be different or what would I be doing differently? • What situation or issue is most challenging my in my life and that I am • This goal energizes and excites me? ready to change and let go of? • This goal is positive, active, clear and energetic? • How would my life be different if I did not have this issue in my life? • How would I feel? • This is the best goal for me? • What would I be doing then that I am not doing now? • Is this the most important goal? Prioritize the goals? • What observable behaviors are examples of this in my life? • This goal needs something more? • How will I know when I leave here that I got what I came for? (pre and • This goal need something to take away or change? post activities • How will you know when you leave here that you got what you came for (pre and post activities)? Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Balancing Brain Functioning 5 Step Brain Gym Balance • Prefrontal Cortex: attention, organization, impulse, and mood PACE control • Anerior Cingulate Gyrus: Goal gear shifter • B l G li movement and Basal Ganglia: Pre- Pre-Activity anxiety Learning Menu • Thalamus: integrator • Temporal Lobes: mood, Post- Post- Activity memory, learning • Parietal Lobes: sensory and Celebrate and Anchor the Goal! direction Home Play • Occipital Lobes: vision • Cerebellum: processing speed Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living 3 Dimensions and The Triune Brain 3 Dimensions for Whole Brain Learning Reflex Patterns Focus Comprehension Side to Side Lengthening Exercises Focus: Where Am I? Participation Midli P ti i ti Midline Centering Attention and Comprehension Organization Up and Down Energy Exercises Hindbrain, Brain Stem, Reptilian Brain Develops from conception to 15 months Fright and Freeze Laterality Controls Autonomic Nervous System: Respiration, CNS, Sweating, Digestion, Circulation Communication Side to Side Midline Movement Survival and Self Preservation Unemotional, Ritualistic, Territorial, Doesn’t Recognize Individuals DLR/3DLR – All Dimensions 9 9
  • 16. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living 3 Dimensions and The Triune Brain 3 Dimensions and The Triune Brain Reflex Patterns Reflex Patterns Centering: Where Is It? Laterality: What Is It? Who Am I? Stabilizing Midline Organization Communication Midline C i ti Midli Limbic System, Thalamus, Hypothalamus, Midbrain, Old Mammalian Brain Cooperation Connects cerebral cortex and brain stem Cerebral Cortex, Prefrontal Lobe, The New Mammalian Brain Develops from 15 months to 4 years Develops from 4 years and up Fight or Flight Reverts to Dominant Side (shuts down non-dominant side) non- Controls Sympathetic Nervous System: Controls Higher Level Thinking, Problem Solving, Reasoning, Language, Systematizing, Hormone Regulation and Cortisol levels,, Emotions, Response to Stimuli, Altruism, Noticing, Fine Motor Skills Short-term Memory, Relationship Short- Self Awareness and Self Actualization Playful, Loving, Emotional Creative, Innovative, Seeks Patterns and Order, Similarities/Differences Recognizes individuals Recognizes Self as Individual Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living 3 Dimensions and The Triune Brain 3 Dimensions and The Triune Brain Reflex Patterns Reflex Patterns Focus Centering STNR Moro Spinal Galant Landau Landau Leg Cross Flexion Flying and Landing Tonic Labyrinthine Bauer Crawling Trunk Extension Thomas Autonomic Gait Spinal Pereze Hands Supporting Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living 3 Dimensions and The Triune Brain 3 Dimensions and The Triune Brain Reflex Patterns Reflex Patterns Laterality Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex ATNR Preparation for creeping by raising up from stomach on all fours. Robinson Grasp Baby raises neck up, arms straighten automatically and legs bend. Unintegrated STNR hampers coordinated movement /postural control. Leg Cross Flexion Reading and writing problems, focusing challenges, Babinski Poor hand-eye coordination, directionality, posture, hand- Bonding Figety, daydreaming, clumsy, messy Hands Pulling 10 10
  • 17. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living 3 Dimensions and The Triune Brain Developmental Movement Patterns Reflex Patterns Early in Dance Homolateral crawl Clap hands Spinal Galant Reflex Moving head side to side Moving head up and down Assists fetus in reacting to sound Fall back and catch one’s self Swimming movement with arms Prepare position of fetus for birth Triggers cross lateral movements during birth with ATNR Later in Dance Unintegrated SGR results in: Cross lateral movements Poor concentration, posture, STM, coordination, Lazy 8 Movements Spinning Skip- Skip-along Spinning cross crawl Hip rotation to one side, bedwetting, fatigue, fidgeting, Group spinning or circling Hopping Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living Modifying Sensory Motor Exercises for Special Needs Six Dimensions Well Being to consider: • Sensory Stimulation/Modulation Techniques Prepare Body via Desensitization to Calm the Nervous System vibration, brushing, rocking, music, dim lighting • Physical • Passive Range of Motion and HOH/HUH Instead of AROM • Intellectual • Use Support For Back Or Sit/Lie Down • Social • Use Visual and Auditory Cues: color code hands/arms/legs/feet, lighted mirror, flashlight, black light , occlude • Emotional vision, verbal step-by-step cues, singing step-by- • Use Assistance for Holding Points • Cultural • Visualization • Vocational Effects of Visual Stress and Sensory Processing on Learning, Behavior, and Daily Living What is Irlen Syndrome ? Stress Reducers • Not visual • Recognize your symptoms of stress • Relaxation techniques and exercise • Not corrected with • Time management g glasses • Diet and nutrition • Rest and sleep / dream journal/ laughter • Not identified by vision • Talk to friends, professionals, support groups tests • Help others / Choose your battles wisely • Positive attitudes / Work off anger • Not a method of • Take a break to read, sing, dance, watch funny movies, instruction make something or engage in creative activity 11 11
  • 18. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. What is Irlen Syndrome? Irlen: A Piece of the Puzzle Correct problems of • Visual-perceptual disorder: neurologically-based, visual Visual- neurologically- cortex, transient or magnocellular deficit – Light Sensitivity • Genetic component: affecting males and females equally – Glare • Condition is varied and intermittent – Stress & Strain – Visual Distortions • Exists on a continuum from slight to severe – Visual Acuity • Enhanced by environmental stressors: lighting; contrast, – Adaptation Time colors, patterns; amount of print on page; demands for – Visual Performance continuous performance; demands for comprehension; print size, style and format – Field of Vision – Headaches & Discomfort • Not identified by standardized tests – Contrast Sensitivity • Not a method of instruction Symptoms LIGHT SENSITIVITY ATTENTION DEFICIT Bothered by glare, fluorescent lights, Problems concentrating while reading or bright lights, sunlight, or driving at doing school work. May have difficulty night. Discomfort or difficulty staying on task, take breaks, look away, concentrating or working under bright become restless, fidgety or tired. lights or fluorescent lights. INEFFICIENT READING STRAIN OR FATIGUE Difficulty reading print, numbers, or Feeling strain, tension, fatigue, sleepy musical notes. Problems may include or headaches with reading and other print that shifts, shakes, blurs, moves, perceptual activities. Strain can doubles, disappears, or becomes interfere with the ease of reading, difficult to perceive. studying or even listening. SLOW READING RATE POOR DEPTH PERCEPTION Inability to read letters, numbers, Inability to accurately judge distance or musical notes, or words in groups. spatial relationships. May be unsure or Problems tracking, correctly have difficulty with escalators, stairs, identifying words, or ability to ball sports or driving. skim/speed read. Problems • Light Sensitivity: Sensitivity: • Difficulties using fluorescent lights, bright chalkboards, overheads, lights, glare, night computers/typewriters, blindness maps, charts, books, music, • Physical Symptoms: Symptoms: scantron sheets dizziness, fatigue, • Sports Performance headaches/migraines, headaches/migraines • Depth Perception stomachaches • Eye Tracking • Academic Difficulties: Difficulties: • Driving handwriting, spelling, • Behavior Problems math, geometry, composition writing, note • Distractibility taking, copying, reading • ADHD maps 12 12
  • 19. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. The Environment Can Trigger Stress Affecting: – Brain’s Activity – Emotions – Immune System – Health & Well Being – Performance The Mind-Body-Learning Environmental Stressors Connection ENVIRONMENT VISUAL ACTIVITIES Lighting Contrast Reading Writing – Lighting Patterns Colors Copying Computer Use – Glare PERCEPTUAL STRESS – Bright Color Changes in – High Contrast Changes in Cortisol Serotonin Automatic System Endocrine System – Patterns and Stripes Brain Chemistry Dopamine Immune System Hormone Neuropeptide System – Details PROBLEMS – Sustained Attention Learning, reading, PROBLEMS • Physical symptoms • Sensory integration – Continuous (headache, migraine, fatigue, emotional, behavioral, or attitude problems • Depth perception Performance dizziness, stomachaches, eye strain, anxiety, irritability) ADD/HD Dyslexia • Vulnerability to stress • Attention & concentration Conduct Disorders • Diminished cognitive Psychologically • Learning (hypo/hyper reserves Disturbed sensitivity) SPECT Scans without and with Mind-Body- Mind-Body-Learning Connection Irlen Spectral Filters • Environment & Visual Activities can cause over and under activation • Causing imbalance and changes in – Brain – Autonomic NS (neurotransmitters) – Endocrine System (hormonal) – Suppresses Immune System 13 13
  • 20. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Spect Scans without and with Activities as Stressors Irlen Spectral Filters Before After • Sustained Attention/Concentration • Continuous Performance – Reading – Writing – Copying – Scantron Answer Sheets – Computer, T.V. – Other visually intensive activity Published Reading Studies Reading Studies • Fricker (1989) • Robinson & Miles (1987) Found significant gains after 12 months in rate, 42 subjects selected preferred overlay over accuracy, and silent reading (p<.01). random chosen overlay or clear overlay and performed better on word search letter search, recognition, and number recognition tasks. • Robinson & Conway (1990) 44 LD children showed significant improvement within 12 months. • O’Conner et. al. (1990) –Comprehension 36 months gain (p<.01) After one week, 67 subjects showed 6 months –Accuracy 23 months gain (p<.01) gain in reading rate and accuracy. 19 month gain in comprehension. comprehension. –Self-concept & attitude (p=.05) Self- Pioneer Valley Yakima Study 172 students were screened and 27% were identified with moderate to severe SSS. • Seventy-one 3rd graders with moderate to severe SSS. Seventy- Results after 3 months: • Those with SSS in school A were given overlays and in – 100% had statistically significant improvement in accuracy school B were not. and/or comprehension. Mean increases were 30 months in accuracy and 27 months in comprehension. comprehension • Pre/Post testing using GORT-4. Results after 3 months: / g g GORT- – 100% of special ed. students showed statistically significant • Overlay Group: gains of 14 months in rate, 17 months improvement in accuracy and/or comprehension. Mean in accuracy, 14 months in fluency, and 13 months in increases were 24 months in accuracy and 27 months in comprehension. comprehension. – 83% of students reading below grade level increased by 9 • No Overlays: gains of 1 month in rate & accuracy, 2 months to 49 months in accuracy. months in fluency, and lost 5 months in comprehension. – 67% of students improved at least 12 months in accuracy, comprehension, and passage fluency. 14 14
  • 21. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. New York City Schools A Six Year Follow-up Study Follow- • 26 RD students with SSS were randomly assigned to overlay or no overlay group. • Irlen Coloured Filters for Reading: A Six • Both groups given 4 months of reading remediation Year Follow-up by Whiting, Robinson, and Follow- • Pre/post testing using GORT-R and subtests from GORT- Parrott in Australian Journal of Remedial WRMT- WRMT-R Education, 199 . d i 1994 • SSS students who did not have an overlay showed no – 94% of 267 subjects reported continued growth in comprehension, speed, or efficiency. improvement • SSS students with overlays showed significant growth – 58% reported large improvements in at in all areas. least 3 areas Job Performance Survey Job Performance Survey American Journal of Learning Disabilities, 1996 • 136 randomly selected Irlen Filter users in Percent Improvement in Key the workplace. 8 Areas • A Skipped Words 95% found significant improvement in B Repeat Lines their ability to do their job. h i bili d h i j b C Lose Place • 94% found that their level of productivity % improvement D Glare Problems had been significantly improved. E Time on Task • 91% reported a substantial decrease in F Comprehension the factors for absenteeism. G Energy/Effort • 91% felt increased job satisfaction. H Increased Speed Colorado Inmates & Irlen Syndrome Journal of Correctional Education, September Understanding the Causal Mechanisms of Visual 2000by Whichard, J.A., Feller, & Kastner. Processing Problems: A Possible Biochemical Of 155 randomly selected subjects, 88.9% were moderately Basis for Irlen Syndrome? or highly Scotopic and reported moderate to considerable improvement with an Irlen colored overlay. Australian Journal of Learning Disabilities, Robinson, Roberts, McGregor, Dunstan, and Butt, Dec. 1999 Improvement with Colored Overlays (N=72) This study found a variety of biochemical anomalies in 143 subjects with CFS who had been identified as 100% likely to have symptoms of Irlen Syndrome. These 50% individuals all reported headaches, photophobia, and trouble concentrating. 0% none slight mode consi Series1 0.1 0.02 0.35 0.53 Degree of Improvement 15 15
  • 22. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. MEG Neuroimaging A Publication of Harvard Medical School FOCUS January 21, 1994 “Livingstone believes the colored lenses may be useful because they heighten the contrast between the • Results of brain scan study showed that letters and the background, thus colored Irlen Filters provided for altering the timing differences normalization and crystallization of visual between the [magno and information processing for those with parvocellular] systems. Some SSS people have come and sworn that wearing these glasses has changed their lives. Ive tested some of these people, and there are instances where we do see some differences. So I dont d t d it b t ith The Irlen Method • Irlen Colored Overlays • Irlen Spectral Filters • Environmental Modifications Irlen Spectral Filters Screening Process Irlen Reading Perceptual Scale (IRPS) • Overlays are an interim intervention • More comprehensive testing process • Different color than the overlay – Works for reading – Transmitted vs. reflected light – Limited color selection – Filters offending wavelengths of light – Cumbersome • Worn as lenses or contact lenses – Overlays scratch • Optimizes reading – Need to be replaced • Eliminates headaches and other physical symptoms • Changes in: depth perception, driving, copying, math, computers, light sensitivity 16 16
  • 23. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. 17 17
  • 24. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Classroom Modifications • Lighting – Reduce lighting – Incandescent or indirect natural lighting i di t t l li hti – warm white tubes, and SPX 2700 tubes – Gels over fluorescent http://www.rosco.com/us/fi lters/cinegel.asp – Visor or brimmed hat 18 18
  • 25. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Classroom Modifications Classroom Modifications • Clothing: • Test Taking: • Chalkboards: • Paper: – Tests duplicated on – Gray or brown – Recycled, off-white, off- – No bright or fluorescent colors colored paper – Colored non-glare non- – No stripes, plaids, or – Colored plastic marker/chalk (red – Different colors for polka dots overlays and yellow are different people – No large or glittery – Scantron answer hard to see) • Computer/Overhead jewelry or buttons sheets: use a ruler – Write in columns Projector: Projector: – Natural lighting – Use colored overlays Reading Modifications – Irlen tinted lenses – Dim lighting – Colored overlays – Incandescent – Magnifying bar M if i b lighting – Visor/brimmed – Markers (above, hat below, to the side – Bookstand of the line) – Avoid fluorescent lighting Recommended Reading Reading by Colors by Helen Irlen • Change Your Brain and Change Your Life by Dan Amen • A User’s Guide to the Brain by John Ratey • Teaching Outside the Box by LouAnne Johnson • The 7 Secrets of Learning Revealed by Dr. Laurence Martel • LD From the Inside Out: A Survival Guide for Parents by Carolyn Brubaker • Shoot For the Stars: Success in School and the Workplace by France Morrow 19 19
  • 26. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. A Summary of a Brain Gym Research Project on ReadingCecilia (Freeman) Koester, M.Ed. From Brain Gym Journal, December 2000 Given my deep desire to get Brain Gym into theschools, as well as the enormous amount of conversation about the need for longitudinal research on the effects of Brain Gym¨on academic skills, in 1998 I set out to do a year long research project at an elementary school.To accomplish this task, I engaged the assistance of Brain Gym Consultant Joyce B. Sherwood. The report for this pilot projectoffers data supporting the finding that students in grades three, four, and five who used Brain Gym throughout the year improvedtheir reading test scores on a statewide standardized test (the Stanford 9) twice as much as did the students in the control groupwho did not use Brain Gym as a part of their learning. These are remarkable results-both academically and statistically.Having formerly worked as a classroom teacher in a special day class for severely challenged students on this particular campus, Iapproached principal Paul Jablonowski at Saticoy Elementary School in Ventura, California, with the request to conduct thisproject with some of his students. I received his consent and was met with open arms and great enthusiasm for the project bythe twelve teachers whose classrooms would be involved. These teachers agreed to the following:1. To meet for one hour after school every Monday throughout the school year.2. To do a minimum of fifteen minutes of Brain Gym each day, integrated into the daily activities of the classroom rather than in afifteen-minute block of time.3. To allow students-selected by each teacher-to leave class one time each month for a thirty-minute session of Brain Gym withina small group, facilitated by a Brain Gym Consultant.4. To invite Brain Gym Consultants to do classroom consultations a minimum of two times during the school year.5. To allow students’ test scores to be gathered for data comparison. An equal number of student scores were gathered from theschool files to serve as a control group, with the permission of the teachers in those classrooms.Throughout the school year, enthusiasm and follow-through remained high. All of the above agreements were carried out. Wearranged a special Parents Night which drew an astonishing crowd of 120 to inform the parents about Brain Gym and explain howtheir children were using it in the classroom. In addition, the participating classroom teachers papered their walls with suggestedBrain Gym materials, instructed students in the task-appropriate use of the Brain Gym movements, and reminded the youngpeople about which Brain Gym activities to do prior to undertaking a homework assignment. The teachers learned the Brain Gymexercises and subsequently taught their students. As I passed through the halls when we were only three months into theproject, I saw children using Brain Gym throughout the school day, even without teacher direction.The students who continued to have difficulty with their reading skills were seen by a Brain Gym Consultant in small groups oftwo to four. In these groups, balances* were facilitated to remediate specific difficulties related to such areas as attention andcomprehension, fine- or gross-motor coordination, or specific academic skills. The results of this pilot project were phenomenal.Students self-esteem improved, the classroom climate became more calm, the students reported how much easier their readinghad become, and the teachers expressed deep gratitude for this simple, effective tool that enhanced their teaching strategies.I also gathered test data from the Stanford 9. The following graphs illustrate the effectiveness of the use of Brain Gym in theclassroom. Students in each grade level who experienced the Brain Gym activities improved their test scores twice as much as didthe students in the control group who did not practice Brain Gym. Given these results, I believe that all reading programs wouldbenefit by infusing Brain Gym into the school day. Whether the approach is phonics, guided reading, or Reading Recovery, testingshould inform instruction-rather than the other way around. Let us use this research to inform ourselves. We need to encourageclassroom teachers everywhere to add Brain Gym activities to their teaching strategies.One grateful parent volunteer summarized community responses with the following letter: "To Whom It May Concern: I amwriting in regard to the Brain Gym Program that is being taught at my child’s school. These small, but effective techniques havehelped my daughter excel in class immensely. Her ability to focus, concentrate and complete class assignments increase aftereach morning’s pace exercise. The class as a whole, in which I volunteer two times a week, seems to calm down and showimprovement with listening as well as performing the days’ tasks.I am sure as time goes by, the children will only benefit from this Educational Kinesiology brought to our schools. Each day adifferent exercise is introduced and children are evaluated individually to meet their own specific needs in class. Getting in touchwith your mind through the body sounds fantastic. What a wonderful way to begin a life‹positive, healthy and strong. The perfectway to create a successful adult."This report can be read to glean classroom ideas. It can also be shared with administrators or used to replicate Cecilia’s study. 20
  • 27. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. 1 Why Your Nose Knows By Dr. Jane Sorensen, OT, PhD, ND How Aromas Affect the PsycheTo calm anger: chamomile, ylang-ylangTo calm physical anxiety: benzoin, bergamot, cedarwood, fir, jasmine, lemon, lime, patchouli, pine,rosewood, spruceTo calm mental anxiety: lavender, marjoram, melissa, patchouli, rosemary, thyme.To build confidence: jasmineTo clear confusion: petigrainTo lift depression: bergamot, clary sage, geranium, jasmine, lavender, lemon, lime, melissa, peppermint,petitgrain, rose, rosemary, sage, sandalwood, spearmint, thyme, lemon thyme, ylang-ylangTo lift post-natal depression: clary sage, jasmineTo alleviate nightmares: mugwort, clary sageTo treat emotional shock: melissa, neroli, RoseTo alleviate nervous (intellectual) fatigue: basil, clove, juniper, nutmegTo soothe grief: melissa, neroli, roseTo calm hysteria: neroli, orange, tangerineTo improve poor memory: basil, clove, ginger, juniper, rosemaryTo ease mental fatigue: basil, caraway seed, ginger, peppermint, rosemary, sage, spearmintTo support the mind: frankincense, myrrh;To support the nervous system: bergamot, cedarwood, cumin seed, fir, lemon, lime, pepper, peppermint,pine, sage, spearmint, spruce, thymeTo ease nervous tension: geranium, lavender, marjoram, melissa, neroli, orange, rose, tangerine, ylang-ylangTo ease nervousness: orange, tangerine, lemon verbenaTo ease sadness: benzoin, jasmine, rose, rosewoodTo counteract the effects of stress: cedarwood, fir, pine, spruce, ylang-ylangTo ground: pepper, rue, vetivert 21
  • 28. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. 2 Aromas for Chakras (These are blends or synergies)1st or Root: lemon, narcissus, vetiver2nd or Sacral: cinnamon, myrrh, rose3rd or Naval: bergamot, jasmine, orange, ylang-ylang4th or Heart: frankincense, sandalwood, bergamot, lavender5th or Throat: rosewood, rose6th or Third Eye: bergamot, jasmine, lime, sandalwood7th or Crown: bergamot, jasmine, orris, rose Here are the scents that anciently were associated with astrological signsARIES: pepper, clove, coriander, cumin, frankincense, ginger, neroli, pine, woodruffTAURUS: apple, cardamom, honeysuckle, lilac, magnolia, atchouli, rose, thyme, ylang-ylangGEMINI: benzoin, bergamot, caraway, dill, lavender, lemongrass, lily of the valley, peppermintCANCER: chamomile, cardamom, jasmine, lemon, lily, myrrh, rose, sandalwood, yarrowLEO: bay, basil, cinnamon, frankincense, ginger, juniper, lime, neroli, orange, rosemaryVIRGO: caraway, clary sage, costmary, cypress, dill, fennel, lemon balm, honeysuckle, patchouliLIBRA: chamomile, daffodil, dill, eucalyptus, fennel, geranium, peppermint, pine, spearmint, vanillaSCORPIO: black pepper, cardamom, coffee, hyacinth, pennyroyal, pine, thyme, tuberose, woodruffSAGITTARIUS: bergamot, calendula, clove, hyssop, lemon balm, nutmeg, rosemary, saffron;CAPRICORN: cypress, honeysuckle, lilac, mimosa, myrrh, patchouli, tulip, vetivertAQUARIUS: costmary, lavender, lemon verbena, parsley, patchouli, pine, star anisePISCES: apple, camphor, cardamom gardenia, hyacinth, jasmine, lily, mugwort, sandalwood, vanilla, ylang-ylangSorensen, Jane (1998). Why Your Nose ‘Knows”, Advance for OT Practitioners, Merion Publications.December 7, 1998 Issue.http://occupational-therapy.advanceweb.com/Editorial/Search/AViewer.aspx?AN=OT_p7.html&AD=12-07-1998 22
  • 29. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. 1 Goal Setting Using Brain Gym Presenter: Shoshana Shamberg OTR/L, MS President of Abilities OT Services and Seminars, Inc. www.aotss.comPractice in Groups of Three. The first person facilitates, the second personreceives, and the third person oversees the process and provides guidanceand feedback.Effective Goals: 1. Enables a person to live and perform in more effort-free manner 2. Uses positive language and goal 3. Action orientated and situation specific related to life-long patterns 4. Clear enough language for a child to understand 5. Energetic and exciting for the person 6. Recognizes both high (verb) and low (adverb) gear elements 7. Specific and measurableGoal Statement Language present tense):To Verb (High Gear) Adverb (Low Gear)_____________VERB ADVERBlisten accuratelyread fluentlymove flexiblyspeak clearlywrite easilycommunicate openlyorganize fairlyfocus globallymanage honestlyempower fullyrelate joyfullychoose intuitivelyrelax comfortablycreate smoothlyplay effectivelyrun powerfullysleep lovinglydrive calmlyremember clearly 23
  • 30. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. 2Situations:HomeSchoolWorkSportsRecreationCreative ActivitiesTravelSocial SettingsPACE Are you in PACE? Water, Brain Buttons, Cross Crawl,Goal IS Positive in the Present Tense 1. What do you want? 2. What do you want to change in your life? 3. What would be different or what would you be doing differently? 4. What situation or issue is most challenging your in your life and that you are ready to change and let go of? 5. How would your life be different if you did not have this issue in your life? 6. How would you feel? 7. What would you be doing then that you are not doing now? 8. What observable behaviors are examples of this in your life? 9. How will you know when you leave here that you got what you came for? (pre and post activities)GOAL STATEMENT: ____________________________________________PACE 1. This goal energizes and excites you? 2. This goal is positive, active, clear and energetic? 3. This is the best goal for you? 4. This goal needs something more? 5. This goal need something to take away or changed in anyway?Noticing: 1. Notice HOW IT IS NOW 2. Notice WHERE you are experiencing it in your body 3. What WORD describes this inner experience? 4. On a scale of 1 to 10, how do you rate the intensity of the experience? 5. Does this serve you well? 6. Is this how you WANT to feel? 7. If ‘no”, what do you want? If it were ideal how would it be different? 24
  • 31. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. EYE EXERCISESThese eye exercises are taken from Dr. Chopras audio tape set Magical Mind. Magical Body. Tape 5 covers sensory inputto bring about changes in the physiology through the sense of sight. Research shows that what we take in through our sightprofoundly influences our physiology, i.e. heart rate, blood pressure, hormones, etc. Enhanced sensory perception canresult in improvement in memory, creativity, attention span, and learning ability. The following procedures are designed toimprove vision, the sense of color perception and access different information in consciousness. • Do everyday for 5 to 6 minutes. • Never go to a point of strain or fatigue. • Rest for 10 seconds in between exercises by closing eyes. • Do with corrective lenses removed. 1. Exercise to increase sensitivity to light by stimulating the rods and cones of the retina which are responsible for light perception. With eyes closed, look in the direction of the sun or a full spectrum light for 15 to 20 seconds. 2. Exercise to improve color perception, to make colors more vibrant and lively by stimulating cones for color perception. This exercise of watching the colors in the quantum mechanical body has a spontaneous healing effect. With eyes closed, look in the direction of the sun or a full spectrum light for 15 to 20 seconds. With eyes still closed, massage the eyeballs with the finger tips for another 15 to 20 seconds. Continuing to keep eyes closed gently turn the head away from the sun and back until the whole range of the color spectrum is exposed. 3. Exercise to prevent or decrease rigidity in the lens, ie decrease of fluid in the lens such as in cataracts. This exercise improves flexibility, pliability, and elasticity to the lens. Focusing - To change the focal length of the lens & improve the internal muscles of the eyeballs, look at an object up close and then at a distance. For example look at your hand 6 inches from your face and then look at an object on the horizon. Repeat this exercise for 15 times without straining. 4. Distant reading - Pin up on the wall some reading matter and every day move back a little bit to read it. 5. Close reading - Every day move up a little bit to read the pin-up on the wall. 6. Exercise to tone the eyelids - Blink eyelids hard and rapidly for 30 seconds. 7. Exercises using matras or fixed positions of the eye to strengthen the extra-ocular muscles (external muscles of the eyeball which are responsible for eye movement and coordination). This exercise allows us to access different information in consciousness. Holding these fixed positions increases brain wave coherence and strengthens memory, learning ability, increases attention span; all of which lead to a more stable physiology. Holding the head up, looking straight ahead: 1. Look up and to the left. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. This exercise strengthens the ability of visual recall and is spontaneously made when we want to recall a visual memory. 2. Look down and to the left. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. This movement accesses auditory memory and is spontaneously made when we want to recall a musical tune. 3. Look up and to the right. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. This movement accesses the ability to create new visual forms. 4. Look down and to the right. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. This movement accesses kinesthetic recall and is spontaneously made when we want to recall an experience of touch. 5. Look to the directly to the right. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. This movement accesses the ability to create new sound forms. 6. Look down to the end of the nose. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. This movement accesses the ability to strengthen olfactory sense. 7. Look down toward the tongue. Hold this fixed position for 15 seconds. This movement accesses the ability to strengthen gustatory senses. 8. Look upward and inward trying to look at the space between the eyebrows. Hold this position for 15 seconds. This movement accesses the ability to heighten intuition. © Copyright 1993 Maharishi Ayur-Veda Health Center All Rights Reserved 25
  • 32. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. THE TRIUNE BRAIN PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTIONSBRAIN NAME/characteristics SECTIONS FUNCTIONSHINDBRAIN Reticular Formation Wakes up the brain Brainstem Reticular activating system Alerts of incoming stimulus Reptilian (R.A.S.) Selects, screens out sounds Survival brain Cerebellum Motor structure/control of balance Bottom/back brain Position, movement in space “Receiver” Pons Relays info to and from cerebellum (“Bridge”) Receives sensory input from Responds to Stimuli ears, eyes, nose, mouth, face Territorial/Ritualistic Medulla Oblongata Helps regulate breathing, pulse, Self-Preservation blood pressure, digestion Controls head-turning, gagging, Develops Conception - 15 mo. coughing, swallowing, sneezingMIDBRAIN Hypothalamus Regulates eating, drinking, pulse, Limbic System (Pea-sized) sleep/wake, temperature, sex, Paleomammalian hormones, emotions Emotional brain Hippocampus Processes short-term memory Middle (“Sea Horse”) Inhibits or activates R.A.S. “Integrator” Amygdala Moderates fear, anxiety Responds to stimuli Pituitary Gland Master gland Mediates mood/emotion Controls hormonal systems Develops 15 mo - 4 yFOREBRAIN Neocortex Controls motor, sensory, association Cerebrum Occipital Lobe Vision - receives info from eyes Neomammalian Analyzes orientation, position, Rational brain movement, color Top brain Temporal Lobe Hearing, smell, perception, memory “Processor” Translates words into thoughts Frontal Lobe Oversight of brain activityControls higher mental function Connects to limbic, survival Intellectual/creative Thinks, plans, decides, assesses Reasons, Innovates Parietal Lobe General sensory area: touch, heat, Recognizes similarities cold, pressure, pain Develops 4 y & up Monitors our world; Spatial Corpus Collosum Bridge connecting L & R hemispheres Myelination 9y - 12y Thalamus “Valve” for incoming sensory stimuli Classifies/relays information Basal Ganglia Cell network connected with cortex Initiates & controls movement Lateral Ventricles Spaces filled with cerebrospinal fluid Fom Brain Gym® for Physical Education, Athletics & Movement Arts Student Manual ©1995 by The Educational Kinesiology Foundation Written and Compiled by Carol Ann Erickson andShirley Miekka 26
  • 33. Light Up for Learning page 2 of 3Observed Behavior Behavioral Goal Brain Gym Activities Possible Developmental BlockCan’t sit still for long To sit calmly and attentively while learning Bouncing/jumping/spin, Homologous movement not developedAlways moving To transition easily between standing/sitting then Balance Buttons Limited natural bouncing activities in early years Earth & Space Buttons Vestibular (balance) system not fully integrated Brain Buttons Cross Crawl HookupsBecomes dull/spacey from sitting To maintain attention while learning Energizer Under developed sit/turn musclesSlumps, lies on desk, poor posture To have good posture/sitting habits Rocker & Cross Crawl Sit-ups Limited large muscle development Arm Activation Gravity GliderLacks coordination/body awareness To be coordinated, comfortable and Cross Crawl Natural deep breathing not integrated capable in own body Be an “X”. including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International.Is easily distracted To hear instructions and own voice clearly Thinking Cap One ear blocked for lengthened time periodsUnable to easily discriminate/prioritize. To process information and think of answers Elephant Owl 27Can’t remember/comprehend/express To remember what has been taught Calf Pump Body flooded w/ adrenalin, brain with cortisol what he/she knows To comprehend new learning Grounder Activated tendon guard reflex, "fight or flight" Gravity GliderCannot perform tasks in sequence To see individual numbers & letters Puppet Crawl Under developed "alligator"/"commando crawl"Rushes To follow instructions 1 step at a time prior to regular crawlOverlooks key information To stay alert/relaxed while learningHolds breath, breathes shallowly To breathe fully/easily while learning Belly Breathing w/ new learning Lack of large muscle activity while learning Natural deep breathing not integratedIs disorganized, scattered To become coordinated and centered Cross Crawl, elbow to knee Under developed turn/sit musclesDoes not think before acting To move with purpose Cross Crawl Sit-upsNervous when testing To be calm when testing Hook-Ups Under developed Moro (startle) reflexBecomes upset with transitions To handle transitions well Positive Points Under developed Fear paralysis reflexStartles easily Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,Brain Gym® is a registered trademark of Brain Gym® Internatinal. <www.BrainGym.org>Activities correlated by Amy Arrendell, M.Ed., Brain Gym® Consulting (828) 285-8859, waterfall@mindspring.comFormat by Geri Lubash, RN, Brain Gym® Instructor/Consultant (704) 896-6248, gklubash@juno.com
  • 34. Light Up for Learning page 3 of 3Observed Behavior Behavioral Goal Brain Gym Activities PossibleDevelopmental BlockTurns head or covers one eye To have right eye track each word & line Brain Buttons; Lazy 8s Eyes have not learned to focus/work togetherEyes do not ‘team’. To have left eye team with right for Space Buttons w/ eye trackingUses one eye only comprehension and tone Earth Buttons w/ eye movementsHolds book/paper left or right of midline To hold book/paper at midline while Neck Rolls Eyes/brain hemispheres not working as a team reading and writing Cross Crawl Lazy 8sChallenged by standard learning To learn easily in school Cross Crawl Brain hemispheres not easily exchanging activities Cross Crawl Sit-Ups information Lazy 8sAttention deficit To be able to pay attention. Lengthening Activities Body flooded w/ adrenalin, brain with cortisol Energy Exercises/ Activated tendon guard reflex, "fight or flight" including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Deepening Attitudes Midline MovementsReverses numbers and/or letters To have eyes team to see letters/words clearly Alphabet 8s Underveloped eye muscles 28 Brain Buttons while eye trackingAwkward writing position To write easily Owl Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (ATNR)Awkward pencil grip Arm Activation not inhibited Lazy 8sReads one word at a time To read with comprehension and expression Calf Pump Body flooded w/ adrenalin, brain w/ cortisol Gravity Grounder Activated tendon guard reflex; “flight or fight” Grounder Processing with one brain hemisphere Cross Crawl Lazy 8sTight jaw inhibits pronunciation To have lips/mouth/tongue coordinate Energy Yawn Limited/unusual development of mouthDoes not hear/pronounce sounds To accurately/easily hear/pronounce sounds Thinking Cap and/or facial muscles of letters accurately of letters and letter combinations Elephant OwlDifficulty reading aloud To read easily Owl Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (ATNR) Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, Arm Activation not inhibited Lazy 8sBrain Gym® is a registered trademark of Brain Gym® Internatinal. <www.BrainGym.org>Activities correlated by Amy Arrendell, M.Ed., Brain Gym® Consulting (828) 285-8859, waterfall@mindspring.comFormat by Geri Lubash, RN, Brain Gym® Instructor/Consultant (704) 896-6248, gklubash@juno.com
  • 35. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Simple, Low-Cost Learning Accommodations Tips for Teachers and Parent by Shoshana Shamberg OTR/L, MS, FAOTA President, Abilities OT Services and Seminars, Inc. Irlen Visual Learning Center of MD Baltimore, MDWhy are reading and attention span difficulties, migraines, and stress-related sensory processing problemsincreasing among school-aged children? Why are adults increasingly complaining of stress-relatedconditions? Could it be because both children and adults are spending most of their time sitting still for longperiods under artificial lighting, working at their school desks or computer screens? The lack of movement,as well as auditory and visual stress, can affect our ability to listen, understand, and remember what we reador hear. It can also affect our ability to relax and use our bodies comfortably. Such stress may even lead toillness and learning disabilities, and then to low self-esteem, chronic depression, pain, and anxieties.These issues often follow a person into the college and work environment, and affect his or her ability tosuccessfully sustain employment and personal relationships. Many of these people are intelligent, but theirperformance and test scores do not indicate their abilities, and they often give up in despair and seethemselves as stupid without really understanding why. Many people with unexplained or excessiveanxieties are actually experiencing visual stress and they are not aware of it since the symptoms are notobviously visual or they have experienced them all their life and do not know of any other way to function.For parents, it is frustrating and overwhelming to weed through the maze of resources and interventions inorder to address each child’s unique challenges, not to mention the high cost involved. For society, the taxdollars going into prisons, drug rehabilitation, and unemployment is rising even though modern medicineand technology has been trying to find answers for decades.Simple SolutionsFortunately, there are some simple assessments that can be tried first. For over 30 years, I have researchedthese simple solutions and implemented them in public and private schools, at jobsites, and in my privatepractice. Many were introduced to me by my friends and clients, rather than the professional trainingprograms within my career track. They include Brain Gym sensory-motor exercises, simple mental exercises,nutritional interventions over medications, and visual perceptual technologies like the Irlen Method.No one intervention works for everyone, and that is why careful assessment is recommended. However, thefollowing suggestions can be implemented by anyone in a school, home, or work environment, and mayminimize or eliminate the need for support services, therapies, specialized schooling, and long-term tutoring.Math and reading can become enjoyable learning experiences, with less fidgeting and discomfort whileincreasing fluidity, accuracy, focus, and memory. 1) Positioning and movement: When students or workers sit at a desk with proper alignment, it is lessfatiguing on the neck, shoulders, back, and eyes. They are more relaxed and able to attend to their tasks. Feetshould be flat on the floor, with hips and knees at 90-degree angles and the back supported by a chair withback support. Forearms should rest on the desk comfortably, not too high or low. (Diagrams for properpositioning are available upon request.) Periodic stretching and vision-exercise breaks release tension andenhance mental function. 2) Lighting: Many people are sensitive to glare and fluorescent lighting. The discomfort is perceivedthrough the symptoms like eye strain, headaches/migraines, neck and back pain, fidgety behavior or fatigue. 29
  • 36. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International.The light sensitive person may prefer to read in darker than normal lighting, and may read better at homeunder incandescent lighting than at school or work. Help this person by lowering the intensity of the light,and/or allowing natural lighting into the room. Wearing a sun visor or baseball cap helps filter out adverseglare from fluorescent lighting or bright daylight. In addition, a tabletop cubicle made from a decorated boxprovides an enclosed space to minimize visual distraction, as well as glare.In many cases, light sensitivity is caused by a visual perception issue known as Scotopic SenstivitySyndrome, or the Irlen Syndrome. This syndrome, which often mimics dyslexia and ADD/ADHD, isdetected through an evaluation by a professional trained and certified in the Irlen Method. Those with thissyndrome can get relief by using simple color overlays ($7) or lenses that filter out adverse light frequencies.Reading with the specially prescribed color overlay minimizes glare and visual distortions considerably. 3) Written materials and writing: Some children simply need larger print materials or a way to reduce thediscomfort of reading black letters on a white shiny paper. The teacher can photocopy text on differentcolored papers from any office supply store and ask the student which color is more comfortable and makesthe letters easier to read. Reading aloud can also help the teacher determine which color is easier for thestudent to read from. • For math assignments, use graph paper to ensure that columns line up accurately, which prevents needless mistakes. • For proper letter and number formation, use specially lined paper to minimize visual confusion. (The Handwriting Without Tears company sells lined paper resembling Hebrew notebook paper, which is ideal.) • An angled desktop or easel, like a large tabletop shtender, provides ergonomic positioning and comfortable vision when copying from a blackboard or reading and writing in an upright position. Make one yourself from notebooks, rubber bands, and a clip. (Directions are available upon request.) • Use a tiny pencil to facilitate pincer grasp or, alternatively, try a variety of pencil grippers to see which one is best for the student. • Soft pencils make a darker mark than regular pencils and are less fatiguing to the hands. • Shorten writing assignments to test for knowledge without the stress of too much handwriting or keyboarding. Instead of sentences and essays, use methods like circling the answer or filling in the blank. 4) Math skills: Check to see if has trouble reading math symbols, numbers, and columns, especiallyduring sustained attention. If the child is accurate in the beginning of an assignment of the same level ofdifficulty but makes progressively more mistakes, and has difficulty sustaining attention, it is likely due tofatigue and possibly visual distortion, not lack of knowledge. This must be addressed by a vision specialist orappropriate professional, or the child may be at risk for greater levels of learning problems. While the childmay compensate somewhat, he will be under undue mental and emotional stress. Try copying work ontocolor paper, with more spacing and larger type, to see if accuracy and attention improve. Other writtenmaterials, like musical scores, standardized test sheets, and computerized assignments, may also be verydifficult to decipher and use. 5) Visual perception and motors skill strategies: Have the child close one eye and read; then switch eyes.If the child states that reading and seeing the type are more comfortable with one eye, this may indicate avision problem related to how the two eyes work together (binocular vision). If impaired, it can affectperformance in reading, writing and other activities involving seeing up close. If a child has trouble following an object or looking across and up and down the page without moving hishead – or if the eyes look jerky as they move and he has trouble finding and keeping the place, or if hecannot accurately catch a ball – there may be a visual motor deficit that can adversely affect academic 30
  • 37. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International.learning and sports performance. Visual stress in childhood as well as adulthood can be mistakenlydiagnosed as a learning disability, like dyslexia, or various mental conditions related to anxiety, attentiondeficit and more. But when the visual stress is addressed successfully, other sensory systems, such asauditory processing and tactile sensitivities, are helped as well. A traditional eye exam may not pick upthese problems. A developmental optometrist, educational psychologist, or specially trained occupationaltherapist is trained to assess these issues and will also have ideas for intervention. 6) Behavioral and psychological challenges: Children and adults may exhibit symptoms resemblingADD/ADHD, oppositional defiance disorder, and severe depression or manic behavior. Their behavior mayactually be due to stress overload caused by the inability to process sensory information and to balancemental, physical and emotional skills. Compensation techniques may increase functioning, but the person isstill working much too hard to accomplish what others do with much less effort. Specialized sensory-motor exercises and controlling the environment can make a huge difference inbehavior. A trained specialist can assess the person and provide ideas for implementation at home andschool. Some of these might be extended time for assignments and test taking, books on tape, using acomputer, shorter assignments, a less distracting environment, ear phones to block noise, periodic sips ofwater to address dehydration, healthy snacks to prevent low blood sugar, and scheduled breaks to recharge. These are just a few of the many problems and solutions that can be easily implemented without unduecost or time. They may save thousands of dollars in specialized services and help maximize the performanceof students and adults in school and work environments. For a list of resources and more ideas, emailShoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, at info@IrlenVLCMD.com, or call the Irlen Visual Learning Center ofMD at 410-358-7269. I am offering free phone screenings and free in-service training for parents, teachers,and therapists in assessment and implementation of low-cost learning accommodations.Mrs. Shamberg is a Special Education Consultant and Certified Irlen Screener/Diagnostician and BrainGym Consultant. She is president of Abilities OT Services and Seminars, Inc. and co-director of the IrlenVisual Learning Center of Maryland.How to Track ImprovementAs you implement the strategies in this article, use the following list of adverse symptoms to track anyimprovement. First eliminate the symptoms that do not apply, then track those that do, using the scoring keyat the end of the list. • Comfort level with lighting indoors • Comfort level with lighting outdoors • Strain or fatigue • Attention span • Endurance/tolerance for reading • Glare • Blurriness • Words moving, jumping, flickering • White stands out/sparkles • Black stands out • Spacing • Error rate • Fluidity of reading - smoothness/hesitation • Memory for what is read • Comprehension 31
  • 38. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permission from the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors, including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. • Loosing place/skipping lines • Skip words/add words • Reading for pleasure • Effort to keep place • Using finger to hold place • Blinking/opens eyes wide/squinting • Move up or away from page • Eyes hurt, ache, itchy • Rubbing eyes • Dizziness or nausea • Fatigue, drowsiness • Headaches • Reading musical notes/ scores • Reading numbers and words • Writing reports • Repeats what is read • Stress tolerance • Fidgeting • Problems with stair climbing • Problems with driving/changing lanes • Problems looking at the computer screen • Problems with depth perception, such as parking your car • Color overlays or lenses feel too light, dark, change the colors you see, or cause discomfort afterusing for a few days Score on a scale of 0-5: NA (not applicable), 0 (no improvement), 1 (slight improvement butinconsistent), 2 (slight improvement consistently), 3 (moderate improvement), 4 (moderate to considerableimprovement but inconsistent), 5 (excellent, consistent improvement most or all of the time). 32
  • 39. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. Irlen Filters and Migraine: A Preliminary Study D.W.Riley M.A.,Adv.Dip.SEN, F.E.A.I.D and A. Wright F.E.A.I.D. October 2000 83% Report Positive Results Irlen- Filters have proved to be effective in treating the perceptual distortions experienced by people with Irlen Syndrome. This preliminary study found that those suffering from migraines associated with light sensitivity and perceptual stress from the environment, were helped by the use of individually prescribed Irlen™ Filters. Studies in the U.K. have shown that 8% of the adult population and 10.6% of children aged 5-15 suffer from migraine. It has also been estimated that because of migraine, 4 million working days per year are lost at an economic cost of £750 million among men alone. In addition children aged 5-15 with migraine lost more than twice as many days from school through illness than a control group of non-migraine children. It can be deduced, from these figures that the social and physical effects of migraine are significant. Classic migraine varies from person to person and in severity and duration. Symptoms may include: Headaches nausea Visual disturbances sensitivity to light and/or sound Some people suffer from headaches or migraine caused by strain and stress from the environment i.e. factors such as: Bright light, particularly fluorescent; reflected light; and sunshine Bright colours high contrast especially black and white Stripes or other patterns T.V. and/or computer screens The study comprised 30 people ranging in age from 10 to 60+. Diagnosis of migraine was by doctor or specialist for 21 of the subjects with the remaining 9 being self- diagnosed. All were given the SNONMD International Migraine Questionnaire. All the subjects had been assessed for Irlen Syndrome by fully trained and licensed Irlen Diagnosticians. They had been wearing Irlen Filters for 6 months to 5 years or more. Frequency of migraine attacks varied from two to four per week to one per month. Results: Effects of Wearing Irlen Filters Number % a) No migraines since wearing Irlen Filters 11 36.5% b) Fewer migraines and reduced in severity and duration 14 46.5% Total of a + b 25 83% c) Same frequency but reduced in severity and duration 3 10% d) No change 2 7% As 83% of people in the study reported positive effects and the need for less medication, the results suggest that (i) Irlen Filters can reduce the frequency and severity of migraines caused by perceptual stress in the environment; and (ii) a significant number of people could be helped if Irlen Filters were more widely known about and prescribed. This would result in improved quality of life for migraine sufferers; fewer days lost to industry due to illness and stress; and reduced spending by the National Health Service on medication and visits to doctors surgeries. This study reinforces previous studies which have identified fluorescent lighting as a trigger for headaches and migraine and have shown the effectiveness of Irlen Filters in reducing the symptoms of eyestrain, headaches and migraine. 33
  • 40. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. SCENIHR & Light Sensitivity Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR) Request for an opinion on “Light Sensitivity” June 5, 2008 Health Concerns associated with Energy Efficient Lighting and their Electromagnetic Emissions Dr. Magda Havas Associate Professor, Environmental and Resource Studies Trent University, Peterborough, ON, Canada mhavas@trentu.ca Table of Content Introduction page 1 UV Radiation 3 Radio Frequency Radiation 4 ElectroHyperSensitivity (EHS) 6 Conclusions 8 References Cited 9 Appendix A: Biographical Sketch of the Author 10 Appendix B: Health Canada and UV Radiation 11 Tables & Figures Table 1. Symptoms of Electrohypersensitivity or Radio Wave Sickness (7). 6 Figure 1. Electromagnetic frequencies generated by various types of light bulbs. 3 Figure 2. Intermediate frequencies generated by an incandescent light bulb and 5 a compact fluorescent light bulb. Input A: 0.5 meters from bulb. Input B: on wire after passing through a ubiquitous filter that removes the 60-Hz cycle. Figure 3. Responses to an electronic survey on self-proclaimed 7 electrohypersensitivity and to various types of lighting (n=168). mhavas@trentu.ca 34
  • 41. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. SCENIHR & Light Sensitivity Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR) Request for an opinion on “Light Sensitivity” June 2008 Health Concerns associated with Energy Efficient Lighting and their Electromagnetic Emissions Dr. Magda Havas1 Associate Professor, Environmental and Resource Studies Trent University, Peterborough, ON, Canada mhavas@trentu.ca I write this mini report in response to your request for information about Light Sensitivity as it relates to energy efficient light bulbs. It is based on research we are currently conducting that has not yet been peer-reviewed. For this reason I am able to share only a small portion of our results with you at this time. Governments around the world are banning energy inefficient light bulbs in an attempt to reduce consumption of fossil fuels and the emission of greenhouse gases. However, the energy efficient light bulbs that are currently available may be harming both the environment (mercury content of bulbs is high) and human health (electromagnetic pollution). The main function of light bulbs is to generate light, which is part of the electromagnetic spectrum (see Figure 1). The original incandescent light bulbs also generate heat (infrared radiation, also part of the EM2 spectrum), which makes them energy inefficient. The newer compact fluorescent light bulbs generate radio frequency radiation as well as ultraviolet radiation (see Figure 1) and many still generate heat although less of it. These frequencies (RF3 and UV4) have been associated with adverse health in numerous peer-reviewed scientific studies and a growing number of people are complaining that these bulbs make them ill. Instead of promoting compact fluorescent light bulbs, governments should be insisting that manufacturers produce light bulbs that do not produce radio frequency or UV radiation and that are safe for the environment and for human health. Alternative light bulbs are available that are much more energy efficient than CFL, do not contain mercury, do not produce radio frequencies or UV radiation, and do not make people sick. Unfortunately these bulbs are still too expensive for residential use (CLED lights produced by www.realuvcorp.com). 1 For a biographical sketch of the author please refer to Appendix A. 2 EM: electromagnetic 3 RF: radio frequency 4 UV: ultraviolet mhavas@trentu.ca 35
  • 42. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. SCENIHR & Light Sensitivity Figure 1. Electromagnetic frequencies generated by various types of light bulbs. UV Radiation: Fluorescent light bulbs contain mercury, which emits UV radiation when it is electrically excited. This UV radiation then interacts with the chemicals on the inside of the bulb to generate light. Tube fluorescent bulbs have diffusers that filter the UV radiation. The new compact fluorescent light bulbs do not have these diffusers and hence people using CFL are exposed to UV radiation. UV radiation has been linked to skin cancer and mhavas@trentu.ca 36
  • 43. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. SCENIHR & Light Sensitivity various skin disorders. Those who have skin problems may be particularly sensitive to this radiation. Global News in Canada did a Special Report in April 2008 on energy efficient light bulbs. Health Canada provided them with some information about these bulbs (see Appendix 2). According to Philippe Laroche, Media Relations Officer for Health Canada, compact fluorescent light bulbs, unlike tube fluorescent bulbs, do not have prismatic diffusers to filter UV radiation. “Therefore, there may be skin sensitivity issues, especially in people with certain skin diseases.” Health Canada and other government agencies responsible for ensuring that products sold have no adverse health effects need to make this information readily available to the public. Radio Frequency Radiation: According to General Electric (GE) their typical electronically-ballasted CFL operate in the 24-100 kHz frequency range. This range is within the radio frequency band of the electromagnetic spectrum (Figure 1) and is classified as Intermediate Frequency (IF5) by the World Health Organization. There is concern about electromagnetic interference (EMI) associated with IF and recently studies have shown that IF are biologically active and can have adverse health effects (1,2). We used a Fluke Scope meter to measure the waveform generated by light bulbs through the air (at a distance of 0.5 meters) and on the wire (after it had passed through a ubiquitous filter to remove the 60 Hz cycle). We also measured power quality using a microsurge meter, which measure the frequency range between 4 and 100 kHz. Figure 2 shows the waveform through the air (blue) and on the wire (red) for a Sylvania 60 watt incandescent light bulb and for a 15 watt CFL produced by General Electric. The GE bulb emits radio frequencies directly through the air (blue) and generates IF on wires which causes dirty electricity. Background values for power quality (dirty electricity) were between 63 and 67 GS units. The incandescent bulb did not contribute to dirty electricity but the CFL did and raised the readings to 298 GS units. This was not the “dirtiest” light bulb we tested. Several gave readings above 1000 GS units. A recent study of cancer clusters in a school in California associated the increased risk of cancer among teachers to dirty electricity (2). Teachers who taught in classrooms where the dirty electricity was above 2000 GS units had a 5-fold increase risk of cancer (risk ratio 5.1) that was statistically significant. Teachers who never taught in those classrooms had a risk ratio of 1.8. 5 IF: Intermediate Frequencies within the Radio Frequency band of the electromagnetic spectrum. Generally in the kHz range (thousands of cycles per second). mhavas@trentu.ca 37
  • 44. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. SCENIHR & Light Sensitivity In a different school study in Toronto, improvement in power quality was associated with improved health among teachers and improved behaviour among their students (3). This study has been repeated at 3 Minnesota schools with similar results (4). Dirty electricity in schools contributes to ill health of teachers and behavioural problems among students. We have conducted studies with diabetics and people who have multiple sclerosis and found that when the dirty electricity in their home is reduced their symptoms diminish. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetics have lower blood sugar and type 1 diabetics require less insulin when they are in an electromagnetically clean environment. People with MS have fewer tremors, improved balance, less fatigue, and several have been able to walk unassisted after the dirty electricity in their home was reduced (5). Figure 2. Intermediate frequencies generated by an incandescent light bulb and a compact fluorescent light bulb. Input A: 0.5 meters from bulb. Input B: on wire after passing through a ubiquitous filter that removes the 60-Hz cycle. mhavas@trentu.ca 38
  • 45. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. SCENIHR & Light Sensitivity ElectroHyperSensitivity (EHS) According to the Swedish Association for the ElectroSensitive (www.feb.se) approximately 3% of the population have severe symptoms of electrohypersensitivity. These symptoms include sleep disorders, chronic fatigue, chronic pain, cognitive dysfunction, dizziness, skin disorders, among others (see Table 1). The Swedish government recognizes EHS as a functional impairment rather than a disease (6). Table 1. Symptoms of Electrohypersensitivity or Radio Wave Sickness (7). Neurological: headaches, dizziness, nausea, difficulty concentrating, memory loss, irritability, depression, anxiety, insomnia, fatigue, weakness, tremors, muscle spasms, numbness, tingling, altered reflexes, muscle and joint paint, leg/foot pain, flu-like symptoms, fever. More severe reactions can include seizures, paralysis, psychosis and stroke. Cardiac: palpitations, arrhythmias, pain or pressure in the chest, low or high blood pressure, slow or fast heart rate, shortness of breath Respiratory: sinusitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, and asthma Dermatological: skin rash, itching, burning, and facial flushing Ophthalmologic: pain or burning in the eyes, pressure in/behind the eyes, deteriorating vision, floaters, and cataracts Others: digestive problems; abdominal pain; enlarged thyroid, testicular/ovarian pain; dryness of lips, tongue, mouth, eyes; great thirst; dehydration; nosebleeds; internal bleeding; altered sugar metabolism; immune abnormalities; redistribution of metals within the body; hair loss; pain in the teeth; deteriorating fillings; impaired sense of smell; ringing in the ears. We conducted a survey on line to determine how electrically sensitive people respond to different types of lighting. This survey was circulated among different groups include those with electrohypersensitivity, migraines, lupus and other health concerns. Since migraine sufferers respond to bright light we eliminated them from this part of the analysis. We asked participants to identify their degree of electrohypersensitivity and to identify their symptoms when they were exposed to various types of lighting. Figure 3 shows their results for headaches. The highest percentage of headaches was reported for exposure to both tube and compact fluorescent light bulbs among those who classify themselves as either moderate sensitive to extremely sensitive. Results for other symptoms were similar. mhavas@trentu.ca 39
  • 46. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. SCENIHR & Light Sensitivity Headaches, EHS, and Lighting 100% Self-Proclaimed EHS not at all (n=55) Percent of Response (per EHS category) a little (n=45) 80% moderately/quite (n=44) very/extremely (n=23) 60% 40% 20% 0% sunshine incandescent halogen light emitting tube compact diodes fluorescent fluorescent Lighting Figure 3. Responses to an electronic survey on self-proclaimed electrohypersensitivity and to various types of lighting n=168. The World Health Organization held an international seminar on EHS in Prague, October 25-27, 2004 and at that seminar they defined EHS as follows: “. . . a phenomenon where individuals experience adverse health effects while using or being in the vicinity of devices emanating electric, magnetic, or electromagnetic fields (EMFs). . . . Whatever its cause, EHS is a real and sometimes a debilitating problem for the affected persons . . . Their exposures are generally several orders of magnitude under the limits in internationally accepted standards.” Medical doctors and scientists around the world are asking governments to establish stricter guidelines for electromagnetic exposure. These guidelines are for both extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields and for radio frequency radiation (RFR) (8). We also need stricter guidelines for Intermediate Frequencies. These appeals include: 2002: Freiburger Appeal: German Physicians request tougher guidelines for radio frequency exposure, endorsed by 6,500 practioners. 2004: World Health Organization, EHS Workshop, Czech Republic, Oct 2004. mhavas@trentu.ca 40
  • 47. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. SCENIHR & Light Sensitivity 2005: Irish Doctors’ Environmental Association (IDEA): EHS increasing. 2005: Helsinki Appeal: Finland, call for new safety standards, reject ICNIRP, apply Precautionary Principle to EMFs. 2006: Benevento Resolution: International Commission for Electromagnetic Safety (ICEMS), Italy, Precautionary Approach. 2007: Bioinitiatives Report: reviewed 2000 studies, calling for biologically based exposure guidelines. www.bioinitiative.org While 3% of the population may be severely affected by EHS, another 35% of the population in developed countries has many of the symptoms of EHS (5). With continued exposure this number is likely to increase. If we extend these percentages to the population of Europe (728 million as of 2005), then approximately 21.8 million people in the EU are severely affect by EHS and another 254 million have moderate symptoms of EHS. Even if these values are in error by more than 50% we have a serious emerging and newly identified health risk that requires immediate attention. Conclusion The energy efficient compact fluorescent lights that are commercial available generate radio frequency radiation and ultraviolet radiation, they contain mercury-a known neurotoxin, and they are making some people ill. Instead of promoting these light bulbs governments around the world should be insisting that manufactures produces light bulbs that are electromagnetically clean and contain no toxic chemicals. Some of these are already available (CLED) but are too expensive for regular use. With a growing number of people developing electrohypersensitivity we have a serious emerging and newly identified health risk that is likely to get worse until regulations restricting our exposure to electromagnetic pollutants are enforced. Since everyone uses light bulbs and since the incandescent light bulbs are being phased out this is an area that requires immediate attention. mhavas@trentu.ca 41
  • 48. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. SCENIHR & Light Sensitivity References Cited: 1. Havas, M. and D. Stetzer. 2004. Dirty electricity and electrical hypersensitivity: Five case studies. World Health Organization Workshop on Electricity Hypersensitivity, WHO, Prague, Czech Republic, 25-26 October, 2004. 2. Milham, S. and L.L. Morgan. 2008. A New Electromagnetic Exposure Metric: High Frequency Voltage Transients Associated With Increased Cancer Incidence in Teachers in a California School. American Journal of Industrial Medicine. 8 pp. 3. Havas, M., M. Illiatovitch, and C. Proctor. 2004. Teacher and student response to the removal of dirty electricity by the Graham/Stetzer filter at Willow Wood School in Toronto, Canada. Biological Effects of EMFs, 3rd International Workshop, Kos, Greece, 4-8 October, 2004, pp. 311-317. 4. Havas, M. and A. Olstad. 2008. Power quality affects teacher wellbeing and student behavior in three Minnesota Schools. Science of the Total Environment, in press. 5. Havas, M. 2006. Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity: Biological effects of dirty electricity with emphasis on diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine, 25: 259-268, 2006 6. Johansson, O. 2006. Electrohypersensitivity: State-of-the-Art of a Functional Impairment. Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine, 25: 245–258, 2006 7. Firstenberg, A. (Editor). 2001. “No Place To Hide” vol. 3, no. 1, April 2001, “Special Issue on Russian and Ukrainian Research”, The Cellular Phone Taskforce. 8. Havas, M. 2007. Analysis of Health and Environmental Effects of Proposed San Francisco Earthlink Wi-Fi Network, Commissioned by SNAFU (San Francisco Neighborhood Antenna Free Union) and presented to Board of Supervisors, City and Country of San Francisco, 51 pp. mhavas@trentu.ca 42
  • 49. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. SCENIHR & Light Sensitivity Appendix A: Biographical Sketch of Author Magda Havas is Associate Professor of Environmental and Resource Studies at Trent University where she teaches and does research on the biological effects of electromagnetic fields, dirty electricity, ground current, radio frequency radiation and electrical hypersensitivity. She is working with diabetics and those with multiple sclerosis who are responding adversely to power quality issues in their homes. Dr. Havas received her B.Sc. and Ph.D. from the University of Toronto and did Post-Doctoral Research at Cornell University before returning to Canada. She has co-edited 3 books and has more than 100 publications. Dr. Havas provides advice to the public and expert testimony on radio frequency radiation from wireless telecommunication antennas and electromagnetic fields from power lines in the United States and Canada. She helped draft Resolution 15 for the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) cell phone antennas on fire halls. She also helped draft the Private Member’s Bill on Ground Current Pollution in Ontario that received unanimous approval at its Second Reading in the House. The Ontario Energy Board is currently reviewing that Bill. Magda Havas is science advisor on EMF-related issues to non-profit organizations including: WEEP Initiative in Canada; the Council on Wireless Technology Impacts and the EMR Policy Institute in the US; HESE and the EM Radiation Trust in the UK; and the Nationaal Platform Stralingscrisico’s in the Netherlands. mhavas@trentu.ca 43
  • 50. Copyright 2011 Shoshana Shamberg, OTR/L, MS, FAOTA. May not be copied or changed in any way without written permissionfrom the author/presenter. Portions of this presentation are used for educational purposes with permission from respective authors,including Helen Irlen/PDC and Brain Gym International. SCENIHR & Light Sensitivity Appendix 2: Health Canada and UV Radiation Here are Health Canadas answers given to Allison Vuchnich (avuchnich@globaltv.com) of Global TV:  What enquiries has Health Canada received regarding the bulbs? On 08-04-11, at 15:10, Philippe Laroche philippe_laroche@hc-sc.gc.ca wrote: Since 2002, the Department has received 31 consumer complaints surrounding CFLs.  The majority of these complaints are with regards to the bulbs’ end-of-life failure, which can include flickering, a bright orange or red glow, popping sounds, an odour or browning of the ballast enclosure. The following Web sites include additional information on this process: http://www.esainspection.net/pdf/Safety_Alerts/07-03-AL.pdf http://www.esainspection.net/pdf/Safety_Alerts/06-03-AL.pdf As well, Health Canada’s Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau has received questions about increased UV and colour rendering from CFLs use in the Canadian household environment.  Contrary to ordinary fluorescent tubes used in luminaires, the CFLs are not provided with a prismatic diffuser that filters ultraviolet radiation out.  Therefore, there may be skin sensitivity issues, especially in people with certain skin diseases. According to the Canadian Electrical Code, CFLs are required to be certified by testing and certification organizations such as Underwriters’ Laboratories Canada (ULC) or the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) to ensure they meet their requirements for safety.  If consumers have a safety-related concern with a CFL, that is marked by a certification body such as ULC or CSA, they can report the details directly to these bodies by contacting them at the following: Underwriters’ Laboratories of Canada:         Tel: 1-866-937-3852 Email: customerservice@ulc.ca Canadian Standards Association:                Tel:  1-800-463-6727 The Canadian Advisory Council on Electrical Safety also notes that Regional Electrical Safety Associations are able to follow up on any incidents where there is no information on the certifying body. Je vais recommuniquer sous peu avec vous concernant votre requête pour une entrevue avec un expert. Merci. Philippe Laroche Media Relations Officer/Conseiller, Relations avec les médias Health Canada/Santé Canada Tel.: (613) 946-4250 Fax.: (613) 952-7747 philippe_laroche@hc-sc.gc.ca www.healthcanada.gc.ca/www.santecanada.gc.ca Gouvernment of Canada/Gouvernement du Canada mhavas@trentu.ca 44
  • 51. NOTES
  • 52. NOTES