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Eating disorders

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Transcript of "Eating disorders"

  1. 1. By: Shina Joseph Argosy University
  2. 2. Eating disorder is very popular among teens because people began to notice their body around their teens. This concern can grow into an obsession that can become an eating disorder. Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa cause dramatic weight fluctuation which interfere with normal daily life, and damage vital body functions (Wilson, Grilo & Vitousek, 2007). A number of studies have identified weight concerns influence eating disorders. To better understand the link between body dissatisfaction and eating disorder symptomatology, additional research need to be done.
  3. 3. It is a diet that never ends which is taken to the extreme. It is a negative thoughts and feelings about body weight and food and eating habits that disrupt normal body function and daily activity.
  4. 4.  Anorexia Nervosa People that have a real fear of weight gain and a distorted view of their body size and shape. As a result, they can't maintain a normal body weight (Tylka, 2004).  Bulimia Nervosa People that restrict their food intake by dieting, fasting, or excessive exercise (Tylka, 2004). They hardly eat at all and the small amount of food they do eat becomes an obsession.
  5. 5.  Weight concerns  Physical appearance  Societal norms link beauty, success, and happiness  Peer Pressure Weight and body shape play a role in most eating disorders; therefore, weight concerns influence the development of eating disorder (Shisslak, Crago, Neal & Swain, 1987). Societal norms link beauty, success, and happiness to a thin body shape produce pressure to maintain a slender physique that can lead to the development of excessive dieting and other unhealthy weight regulation practices (Killen et, al., 1996).
  6. 6. Study Those that are concerned how they look to others and those who perceive the thin-ideal societal stereotyped were tested. Result those that are concerned how they look to others have less regards for their bodies, they are not likely to use weight control techniques that are harmful to attempt to lose weight. Those with high level of body dissatisfaction due to society norms are more likely to use harmful weight control techniques. A study was conducted to test whether poor impulse regulation and social insecurity intensify the relation between body dissatisfaction and eating disorder symptomalotology (Tylka, 2004). Those that are concerned how they look to others and those who perceive the thin-ideal societal stereotyped were tested. The result show that those that are concerned how they look to others have less regards for their bodies, they are not likely to use weight control techniques that are harmful to attempt to lose weight when dissatisfied with their weight and shape.
  7. 7.  Weight concerns influence the development of eating disorder.  Additional research need to be done better understand the link between body dissatisfaction and eating disorder. Those who think of their bodies as object by focusing on their outer appearance rather than internal experiences are more likely to use drastic and harmful weight control techniques (Tylka, 2004). Therefore, body dissatisfaction repeatedly has been shown to be a strong disorder across studies. To better understand the link between body dissatisfaction and eating disorder symptomatology, additional research need to be done.
  8. 8. Reference Almeida, L., Savoy, S., & Boxer, P. (2011). The role of weight stigmatization in cumulative risk for binge eating. American Psychologist, 67(3), 278-292. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/857128016?accountid=34899 McFarlane, T., Urbszat, D., & Olmsted, M. P. (2011). “i feel fat”: An experimental induction of body displacement in disordered eating. American Psychologist, Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/853484149?accountid=34899 Shisslak, C. M., Crago, M., Neal, M. E., & Swain, B. (1987). Primary prevention of eating disorders. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 55(5), 660-667. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/614374025?accountid=34899
  9. 9. Reference Con’t… Chavez, M., & Insel, T. R. (2007). Eating disorders: National institute of mental health's perspective. American Psychologist, 62(3), 159-166. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/614466446?accountid=34899 Striegel-Moore, R., & Bulik, C. M. (2007). Risk factors for eating disorders. American Psychologist, 62(3), 181-198. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/614464023?accountid=34899 Park, D. C. (2007). Eating disorders: A call to arms. American Psychologist, 62(3), 158-158. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/614469284?accountid=34899 Wonderlich, S. A., Joiner, T. E., Keel, P. K., Williamson, D. A., & Crosby, R. D. (2007). Eating disorder diagnoses: Empirical approaches to classification. American Psychologist, 62(3), 67-180. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/614461940?accountid=34899
  10. 10. Reference Con’t… Wilson, G. T., Grilo, C. M., & Vitousek, K. M. (2007). Psychological treatment of eating disorders. American Psychologist, 62(3), 199-216. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/614461993?accountid=34899 Franko, D. L., Mintz, L. B., Villapiano, M., Green, T. C., Mainelli, D., Folensbee, L., . . . . (2005). Food, mood, and attitude: Reducing risk for eating disorders in college women. Health Psychology, 24(6), 567-578. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/614443365?accountid=34899 Killen, J. D., Taylor, C. B., Hayward, C., Haydel, K. F., Wilson, D. M., Hammer, L., . . . . (1996). Weight concerns influence the development of eating disorders: A 4-year prospective study. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 64(5), 936-940. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/614317417?accountid=34899
  11. 11. Reference Con’t… Celio, A. A., Winzelberg, A. J., Wilfley, D. E., Eppstein-Herald, D., Springer, E. A., Dev, P., & Taylor, C. B. (2000). Reducing risk factors for eating disorders: Comparison of an internet- and a classroom-delivered psychoeducational program. Journal of Consulting +and Clinical Psychology, 68(4), 650-657. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/614347510?accountid=34899 Tylka, T. L. (2004). The relation between body dissatisfaction and eating disorder ymptomatology: An analysis of moderating variables. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 51(2), 178-191. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/614462345?accountid=34899
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