Public safety and intellectual capital

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Being "effective" in supporting national security and challenging terrorism means a whole new approach to managing information and knowledge

Being "effective" in supporting national security and challenging terrorism means a whole new approach to managing information and knowledge

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  • The “calm” is that information and knowledge time before the events of 9/11. The “storm” is now – and about how we need to learn, improve and be prepared.
  • This presentation seeks to address the theory and practice of KM in the context of government and national security: noting that there are clear expectations being expressed for all levels in the institution of government arising from the September 11 – and subsequent - events.
  • Many KM entrepreneurs think of workgroup KM as a “start point.” But the real needs are more probably at a much higher level. They could well be at the level of the institution itself – workgroup KM initiatives then become far too little, and far too late. One could argue that the time is just not there for piloting and prototyping. What we need are business-driven solutions that, if they don’t work – we discard or fix.
  • And there seems to be a good deal of dialogue around competencies, the value of learning and experience; modern comptrollership; system, process and practice integration; quality and knowledge; and collaboration.
  • A quote from Jim Woodruff about the movement away from “traditional” Information Management driven by the records and library science disciplines
  • The cover of the April 1993 Firehouse Magazine featured the WTC bombing of 26 February 1993. This event (1) served as heads up for WTC management who instituted significant safety procedures following the bombing including installing emergency lighting in the stairways. It (2) identified serious deficiencies in disaster control plans, communications, inadequate role definition (such as for floor fire wardens), building access issues and disaster recovery plans. That 1993 bombing may have saved hundreds of even thousands of lives in 2001.
  • (Mark Addleson, Director M.S. in Organizational Learning - School of Public Policy, George Mason University)
  • September 11, 2001 was a defining moment for all of us, but it differed in a very significant way from several others that are in living memory. We continue to speak of “since September 11” while with these other events we speak of “when”. Too, they were events that occurred as part of an ongoing process or series of events (i.e. they were not completely out of context or unprecedented) Pearl Harbor – 7 December, 1941. Lorraine Motel – site of Martin Luther King killing – 4 April 1968Dealey Plaza – the assassination of JFK – 22 November 1963
  • “Security experts admit the US disaster could have occurred because of a lack of technology needed to analyse and integrate data from disparate sources. Federal officials are now investigating the future use of business intelligence and enterprise application integration (EIA) technologies.” INFOWORLD 13 September 2001
  • Borrowed in part from Johanna Ambrosio in Computerworld, July 2000http://www.computerworld.com/cwi/story/0,1199,NAV47_STO46693,00.html
  • Partnering – and accelerated decline in sector distinctionsReal performance – and reduced tolerance for self serviceProgram – scope wider, focus tighter
  • “Intellectual capital is intellectual material -- knowledge, information, intellectual property, experience -- that can be put to use to create wealth.” Tom Stewart in Intellectual Capital: The New Wealth of Organizations (Currency Doubleday).

Transcript

  • 1. Intellectual Capital to Intellectual Capitalism:The Calm and the Storm
  • 2. A CHALLENGE – ARISING FROM A REVIEW OF THE EVENTS OF 9/11To speak to what was “normal” definition and process and what appears to be the new norm since September 11;To present illustrative models for managing intangibles;To help position the individual within the context of his/her work environments and new missions
  • 3. THE SCOPE ISSUE “Enterprise” Knowledge Management “Community” of Practice “Corporate” information “Business” data Teams and groups
  • 4. EVOLUTION IN THE INFORMATION AND KNOWLEDGE COMMUNITIES:• New program delivery processes and objectives that build on quality, continuous learning and continuous improvement• Valuation for experience, understanding and competence as well as achievement (visible results)• Succinct, transparent and cooperative decision and delivery processes• A new bottom line that includes economic and environmental sustainability as well as profitability / performance• Emerging appreciation of needs in the areas of horizontal and vertical integration; or at the least, harmonization
  • 5. THE “KM COMMUNITY” IS MOVING BEYOND SEEING IM SOLELY AS ARECORDS FUNCTION: “Intelligent organizations do „corporate think‟ - they capitalize on making tacit knowledge part of their infrastructure. They automatically process and deliver information necessary for the achievement of objectives across the entire organization. Combining raw data, facts and figures with validating insights and making the results available enterprise-wide enables an IM paradigm shift.”
  • 6. A POST 9 / 11 CALL TO ACTIONThe events in North America should have caused us to embark on a major shift in the way we work, with:• new strategic frameworks• new management structures• new management approaches emphasizing “performance management”• new models, tools, processesBut did that really happen? Or are we, organizationally and functionally, just doing more of the same?
  • 7. FOCUSING ON ONE OF THOSE TOOLSIn the information and knowledge age, should we not be exploring what benefits can be derived from exploitation of information and knowledge assets….. what is commonly known as “Knowledge Management”?In my view, KM is the “enterprise-wide definition, establishment, operation and continuous improvement of the organization and its capability; its information and knowledge; and its collaborative information technologies – all directed towards ensuring the organization remains firmly focused on operational effectiveness.”
  • 8. I AM IN AGREEMENT WITH MARK ADDLESON’S VIEW:˜ KM is embedded in (communities of) practice – It is the way we do things. It is not an add-on. You become a „knowledge centered‟ organization.˜ Everyone does KM - from mail rooms to board rooms and police officers to city hall.˜ Much of what is important in KM cannot be measured and trying to make it measurable means we pay attention to the wrong things˜ We understand better what KM is not: it is neither simply „improved communications‟, „better training‟, nor „new technology‟.
  • 9. ICONS OF UNDERSTANDING
  • 10. WTC – SEPTEMBER 11, 2001
  • 11. ON SEPTEMBER 11,The “Storm” did four things:• It accelerated new trends already in process• It established a new set of rules and requirements• It placed heavy expectations on security and protective services• It brought forward new legislation
  • 12. WE SAW NEW, IMPROVED, COMPREHENSIVE LEGISLATION ALLOWINGFOR: Reduced ambiguity and discontinuity between mission and activityChange in organization, in process, in practices New collaborative methodologies A whole lot more focus on Partnering / Performance / Program scope Paradigm shifts in business, and function-specific information models, to support:  learning and “network-based, knowledge-intensive, global service society.” (Skandia) Initiative and intellectual entrepreneurship
  • 13. BUT THERE ARE OTHER REQUIREMENTS “National Security” needs to involve (among other things)…. 1. Establishing institutional and constituency objectives 2. Enterprise strategies for getting there – without delay… 3. And that involve shattering the stovepipes 4. Moving on from an historical focus to one that is adaptive and responsive to need 5. Learning to use the tools, technologies, work and program development and delivery practices that we have developed and acquired Bottom Line: We don‟t need yet more linear, single process, non- interoperable “solutions”
  • 14. WE NEED AN INTELLECTUAL CAPITALISM” MENTALITY, THAT ……means Linking and Leveraging Intangible AssetsInformation / Function Knowledge / Mission “New intelligence”
  • 15. PERHAPS WE HAVE TO BECOME …. ”INTELLECTUALCAPITALISTS”!• Personal and group initiatives (risk taking)• An enterprise view• A focus on mission objectives• Exploiting all resources• Doing what pays off• Managing for sustainability in a stakeholder context
  • 16. GETTING THERE INVOLVES A LOT OF WORKTo become intellectual entrepreneurs (on the road to becoming an intellectual capitalist), we need to do a whole lot of fundamental work…….on the definition of good data (and getting rid of bad or irrelevant data); structuring data and valued added data (or information); and linking together that data and information with business needs (preferred outcomes) to create a knowledge regime.Following is a sample work template that illustrates what sort of information organization needs to be worked through.
  • 17. Element Application ContextData Program prioritization / statistical Operations and reporting outputInformation and best Operations and administration Functional requirements / learningpractices and qualifications – working smarterIntelligence Mission Analysis, prevention, conviction, correctionIntelligent operations Performance / quality Performance management and measurement; risk and value managementKnowledge Managing relations People, projects and informationManagement flowIntellectual property Asset management Business comptrollershipEnhanced sharing and Legal, security and international National and international securitystandardization communities IM/KM/IC Horizontal Axis
  • 18. Level Activity IssuesData Program prioritization / statistical Operations and reporting outputInformation and best Operations and administration Functional requirements / learningpractices and qualifications – working smarterIntelligence Mission Analysis, prevention, conviction, correctionIntelligent operations Performance / quality Value and performance management and measurementKnowledge Managing relations People, projects and informationManagement flowIntellectual property Asset management Modern ComptrollershipEnhanced sharing and Justice, security and international National securitystandardization communities IM/KM/IC Vertical Axis
  • 19. DAVID G. JONESSHIBUMI.MANAGEMENT@GMAIL.COM