March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
mmbiztoday.com March 20-26, 2014 | Vol 2, Issue 12MYANMAR’S FIRST ...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
2LOCAL BIZ
MYANMAR’S FIRST BILINGUAL BUSINESS JOURNAL
Board of Edi...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
3LOCAL BIZ
Myanmar Summary
W
ork on the
$ 1 . 1 - b i l l i o n
Ha...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 4
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
Centurion Starts
V
anc...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 5
Myanmar Summary
M
alaysian agri-
business giant
Felda ...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 6
Myanmar Summary
M
alaysia External Trade
Development C...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
7LOCAL BIZ
Myanmar Summary
S
ingapore-listed Yoma
Strategic Holdin...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 8
Myanmar Summary
I
n her bare-bones classroom,
Daw Myat...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 9
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
T
he Myanmar Rice Indu...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 10
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
U
-
win Leighton Pais...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
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LOCAL BIZ 11
Myanmar Summary
Contd. P 28... Contd. P 28...
Danny C...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 12
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
Myanm...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
REGIONAL BIZ 13
Myanmar Summary
Contd. P 20...
Mishap could spur m...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
REGIONAL BIZ 14
Bankregulatorapproves10firmsforprivatebankpilot
C
...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
REGIONAL BIZ 15
Myanmar Summary
W
hen Typhoon Hai-
yan (locally na...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
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INTERNATIONAL BIZ 16
T
he world must in-
crease its food pro-
duct...
March 20-26, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
INTERNATIONAL BIZ 17
Myanmar Summary
Fund could blacklist firms fo...
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12
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Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12

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Myanmar Business Today is Myanmar’s first and the only bilingual (English-Myanmar) business newspaper, distributed in both Myanmar and Thailand. MBT covers a range of news encompassing local business stories, special reports and in-depth analysis focusing on Myanmar’s nascent economy, investment and finance, business opportunities, foreign trade, property and real estate, automobile, among others. MBT also provides detailed coverage of regional (ASEAN) and international business stories. For more information please visit www.mmbiztoday.com.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/MyanmarBusinessToday Twitter: @mmbiztoday
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/107379179269023670071/posts
Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/company/myanmar-business-today

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Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 12

  1. 1. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com mmbiztoday.com March 20-26, 2014 | Vol 2, Issue 12MYANMAR’S FIRST BILINGUAL BUSINESS JOURNAL Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary Contd. P 19... Contd. P 19...Contd. P 6... Contd. P 6... Investments by $130 Million Aims to diversify into agriculture, logistics and education sectors Nwe Zin S ingapore-listed Yoma Strategic Holdings (YSH) last week an- nounced its plans for a massive expansion of its business interests in My- anmar in a bid to diversify its portfolio and income stream in the frontier mar- ket of the Southeast Asian country. The company, which mainly deals in real estate and property, will bolster its push into Myanmar by branching out into educa- ucts, cold storage and logistics businesses, with an estimated total invest- ment of $130 million. The moves are part of the company’s push to lio in Myanmar, Andrew Rickards, chief executive of YSH, said at a press conference in Singapore. YSH said these devel- opments are in line with its “long-term vision and planning” as it “leverages on its solid foundation to develop sectors of My- anmar’s economy” with strong potential for future growth. Yoma tied up with the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the private sector lending arm of the World Bank Group, to secure a debt and eq- its venture into the agri- culture and logistics sec- tors in Myanmar, which is subject to completion of IFC’s appraisal, environ- mental and social impact assessment. The company has formed a new investment holding company, Yoma Agricultural & Logistics Holding Pte Ltd (YALH), which is intended to hold the group’s interests in cold storage and logistics businesses. IFC will invest up to 20 percent equity in YALH with the remaining 80 percent held by Yoma Strategic Investment Ltd, a wholly-owned subsidi- ary of YSH. YSH signed an agree- ment with UK-based ED&F Man Holdings Ltd (EDFM), an agricultural commodities trader, to plant and produce low- in the group’s plantation land at the Maw Tin Es- tate in Ayeyarwaddy divi- sion of Myanmar. SMIDB Plans to Lend $21 Phyu Thit Lwin S tate-owned Small and Medium Indus- trial Bank (SMIDB) plans to lend K20 billion ($20.6 million) to small and medium entrepre- year, starting April 1, of- The Central Department of Small and Medium En- terprises Development (CDSMED) under the Ministry of Industry will administer the loans to entrepreneurs at 8.5 per- cent interest rate, CDS- MED Director Daw Aye Aye Win said. Germany’s development Small and medium enterprises in Myanmar comprise about 90 percent of the Southeast Asian country’s economy, according to different estimates. UAung/Xinhua pufrI0efBuD;|me? tao;pm;ESifh tvwfpm;vkyfief;rsm;zGHUNzdK;wdk; wufa&;A[dk|metaejzifh jynf wGif; SMEs u@zGHUNzdK;wdk;wuf a&;twGuf &nf&G,fí pD;yGm;a&; vkyfief;&Sifrsm;tm; twdk;EIef; 8 'or 5 &mcdkifEIef;jzifh aiGrsm; pifumylpawmhtdyfcsdef;wGifpm &if;oGif;xm;aom Yoma Strategic Holdings (YSH) onf vGefcJhonfhtywfu jrefrm EdkifiHwGif YSH vkyfief;rSwdk;csJU aqmif&GufoGm;vdkaompD;yGm; a&;tpDtpOfrsm;udkxkwfazmf ajymMum;cJhNyD; ta&SUawmiftm&S tzGJU0ifEdkifwpfEdkifiHjzpfaom jrefrm EdkifiHwGif vkyfief;trsKd;t pm;rsm;pGmudkvkyfEdkifvmEdkif&efESifh 0ifaiGwdk;wufvmap&eftwGuf jzpfaMumif; od&onf/ tdrfNcHajrvkyfief;rsm;tm; t"d uvkyfaqmifaom YSH tae jzifhynma&;u@? aumfzDpdkuf ysKd;xkwfvkyfrI? EdkUxGufxkwfukefrsm;? tat;cef;odkavSmifrI? axmufyHhydkY aqmifa&;vkyfief;rsm; wGifwdk;csJU &if;ESD;jr§KyfESHoGm;rnfjzpfNyD; pkpk
  2. 2. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com 2LOCAL BIZ MYANMAR’S FIRST BILINGUAL BUSINESS JOURNAL Board of Editors Editor-in-Chief - Sherpa Hossainy Email - sherpa.hossainy@gmail.com Ph - 09 42 110 8150 Editor-in-Charge - Wai Linn Kyaw Email - linnkhant18@gmail.com Ph - 09 40 157 9090 Reporters &Writers Sherpa Hossainy, Kyaw Min, Wai Linn Kyaw, Shein Thu Aung Phyu Thit Lwin, Daisuke Lon, Yasumasa Hisada, Zayar Phyo, Pann Nu, Nwe Zin Art & Design Zarni Min Naing (Circle) Email - zarni.circle@gmail.com Ph - 09 7310 5793 Ko Naing Email - nzlinn.13@gmail.com Ph - 09 730 38114 DTP May Su Hlaing Translators Shein Thu Aung, Phyu Maung, Wai Linn Kyaw Advertising Seint Seint Aye, Moe Hsann Pann, Htet Wai Yan, Zin Wai Oo Advertising Hotline - 09 420 237 625, 09 4211 567 05, 09 31 450 345 Email - sales.mbtweekly@gmail.com Managing Director Prasert Lekavanichkajorn pkajorn@hotmail.com 09421149720 Publisher U Myo Oo (04622) No. 1A-3, Myintha 11th Street, South Okkalapa Township, Yangon. Tel: 951-850 0763, Fax: 951-8603288 ext: 007 Shwe Naing Ngan Printing (04193) Printing Subscription & Circulation Aung Khin Sint - aksint2008@gmail.com 09 20 435 59 Nilar Myint - manilarmyint76@gmail.com 09 4210 855 11 Khaing Zaw Hnin - snowkz34@gmail.com 09 4211 30133 Business News in Brief Local Thukhayadana Co Ltd and Singapore’s Mega One Investment Pte Ltd will invest $267.88 million to develop hotels, serviced apartments and retail busi- ness under build-operate-transfer (BOT) system on a 7.5 acre plot owned by the defence ministry, in Dagon township at the centre of commercial city Yangon, lo- Investment Commission. property purchases with illegal money, local media re- ported, quoting Lower House law maker Win Oo. A 3 percent tax will be levied on property worth up to K50 million, 10 percent on property worth K50 million to K150 million, 25 percent on K150 million to K300 mil- lion, and 30 percent on property worth more than K300 million, he said. Earlier, properties purchased with il- legal money were taxed 30 percent regardless of value. The Myanmar Parliament last week turned down a proposal of law maker Khin San Hlaing to increase duty and taxes on alcoholic drinks, cigarettes and other to- bacco products by 200 percent, local media reported. The duty and taxes will remain at 100 percent on ciga- rettes and 50 percent on alcoholic drinks and other to- bacco products. Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) will have to pay 3 percent premium as Credit Guarantee Insurance percent for the following years, Deputy Finance Min- ister Maung Maung Thein said. State-owned Myanmar Insurance Enterprise will introduce Credit Guaran- tee Insurance for SMEs on an experimental scale for companies are allowed to do it, he said. There are over Some foreign investors are buying shares in local pub- Daiwa Securities Exchange, which is helping the gov- ernment launch the bourse, said. However, the compa- nies selling shares are not abiding by the company law according to earlier reports. Myanmar Vice President U Nyan Tun has called for a comprehensive environmental management system as tion on the environment in Myanmar. He urged the law enforcement bodies to take action against those who are exploring natural resources illegally and businesses which do not follow rules and regulations protecting the environment. Myanmar Union Parliament has approved two tax- related bills, amending the Income Tax Law and the Commercial Tax Law during the ongoing ninth regular sessions in Nay Pyi Taw. The newly-approved income Myanmar’s exports of marine products will drop 15.64 March 31, compared with $652 million in 2012-13, local media reported, quoting Myanmar Fishery Federation Vice-Chairman Han Tun. Han Tun attributed the fall to Myanmar waters. However, Deputy Minister of Fishery Khin Maung Aye had earlier said that the drop in ex- ports of aqua-products was because of a rise in domes- tic consumption. okc&wemukrÜPDvDrdwufESifh pifumylEdkifiHMega One Invest- ment Pte Ltd wdkYonfpD;yGm;a&;NrdKUawmf&efukef&Sd'*HkNrdKUe,fwGifumuG,f a&;0efBuD;XmerSydkifqdkifaomtus,ft0ef; 4.5 {u&SdonfhajruGuf wGif [dkw,frsm;? tqifhjrifhwdkufcef;rsm;ESifhvufvDqdkifcef;rsm;tm; bD tdkwDpepfjzifhaqmufvkyfoGm;&eftwGuftar&duefa':vm267'or 88 oef;udk&if;ESD;jr§KyfESHoGm;rnfjzpfaMumif; od&onf/ w&m;r0ifaiGaMu;jzifhtdrfNcHajr0,f,lrIrsm;twGuftaumufcGef EIef;xm;topfrsm;udkjrefrmhvTwfawmfrSjyifqifrIjyKvkyfcJhaMumif; jynfwGif;owif;rD'D,mrsm;azmfjycsuft& od&onf/ usyfaiGoef; 50 txdwefzdk;&SdaomtdrfNcHajr0,f,lrI rsm;twGuftaumufcGefEIef; tm; 3&mcdkifEIef;?usyfaiGoef;50rSusyfaiGoef;150txdwefzdk;&Sdonfh tdrfNcHajr0,f,l rIrsm;twGuf taumufcGef 10 &mcdkifEIef;? usyfaiG oef; 150 rS oef; 300 txdwefzdk;&SdonfhtdrfNcHajr0,f,lrIrsm;twGuft aumufcGef 25 &mcdkifEIef;? usyfaiG oef; 300 txuf ydkrdkwefzdk;&Sdonfh tdrfNcHajr0,f,lrIrsm;twGuf taumufcGef30&mcdkifEIef;txdudk aumufcH oGm;rnfjzpfaMumif; od&onf/ Myanmar Summary
  3. 3. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com 3LOCAL BIZ Myanmar Summary W ork on the $ 1 . 1 - b i l l i o n Hanthawaddy International Airport in Myanmar faces additional delays because the four short-listed competitors for the job will have to submit new bids because of “a major change in project policy”, a senior cial told Reuters. “Our government has agreed to seek ODA (of- tance) for implementing the project,” the senior of- he was talking to the me- dia without authorisation. “So, to make the com- petition fair ... we decided to invite the four short- listed bidders to send in their tenders again. The deadline is on April 22,” he added. “Originally, the project 2018, but it would now take some more time.” Aung Hla Tun In August, a consorti- um led by South Korea’s Incheon International Airport Corp was named as the preferred bidder to build Hanthawaddy In- ternational Airport, but those discussions were said to have broken down. Other bidders include a consortium made of up Singapore’s Changi Air- port Planners, Yongnam Holdings and Japan’s JGC Corp and a consorti- um made up of Vinci Air- port of France and Taisei Corp of Japan. Incheon and Yongnam had come up with sugges- ing the project with de- velopment assistance and the government took that into consideration. Located near Bago, the Hanthawaddy Interna- tional Airport is about 60 miles (96 km) away from the international airport in the commercial capital of Yangon. Only three of about three dozen airports op- erating in Myanmar are considered international airports. Yangon Inter- national Airport is being upgraded and expanded and Mandalay Interna- tional Airport is awaiting upgrades. Spurred by political and economic reforms in the past few years, tour- ist arrivals to the country have almost exceeded the capacity of existing facili- ties in Yangon, Mandalay and the capital of Nay Pyi Taw. Reuters tar&duefa':vm 1.1 bDvD,H yrmPtm; ukefuscHum wnf aqmufoGm;&rnfh jrefrmEdkifiH&Sd [Hom0wDtjynfjynfqdkif&m avqdyfpDrHudef;wnfaqmufa&; rl0g'ajymif;vJrIBuD;BuD;rm;rm; wpfck&SdvmonfhtwGuf ,if;pDrH udef;tm; taumiftxnfazmf aqmif&Guf&eftwGuf yPmr a&G;cs,fxm;aom vkyfief;BuD; 4ckrSmaemufxyfvkyfief;tqdkjyK avQmufxm;rIudkjyefvnfwifoGif; oGm;&rnfjzpfonfhtwGuf MuefY MumrIrsm; xyfrHBuHKawGUvm&OD; rnfjzpfaMumif; ydkYaqmifa&;0efBuD; XmerStBuD;wef;trIaqmifwpfOD; u ½dkufwmowif;XmeodkY ajym Mum;cJhonf/ tpdk;&taejzifh pDrHudef;tm; taumiftxnfazmfaqmif&Guf &eftwGuf w&m;0ifzGHUNzdK;wdk;wuf a&;taxmuftyHhrsm;udk &SmazG oGm;&ef oabmwlnDcJhaMumif; tm;taumiftxnfazmfaqmif &GufcGifh&&Sd&eftwGuf yPmr pm&if;&Sd vkyfief;BuD; 4 cktm; wif'gavQmufxm;rIrsm;udkxyfrH jyKvkyf&eftwGuf qHk;jzwfcJhNyD; rQwaom,SOfNydKifrIjzpfvmap&ef ESifh wif'gavQmufxm;&ef aemuf qHk;owfrSwf&ufrSm {NyDv 22 &ufaeYjzpfaMumif;vnf; od&onf/ ,cifowfrSwfarQmfrSef;xm;csuf rSm pDrHudef;tm; 2018 ckESpfwGif tNyD;owfaqmif&GufoGm;&efjzpf aomfvnf; ,cktcg tcsdefydkrdk MumvifhoGm;zG,f&SdaMumif;od&onf/ Yangon International Airport. Files T he Myanma Petrochemical Enterprise (MPE) un- der the Ministry of Energy has invited tenders for the supply of high speed diesel (HSD) and Jet A1, according to an announcement. The bid winner will have to supply 1.645 million bar- rels of HSD and 752,000 barrels of Jet A1 type aviation fuel. The tender will close on April 2 at 12pm and opened on the same day at 1pm, MPE said. The delivery time for the aviation fuel is between April 1, 2014 and March 31, 2015. Tender documents and detailed information were made available since Thursday last week at the Depart- hours on payment of K100,000 ($100) per set. The MPE said only bidders who has purchased ten- evaluation. Kyaw Min Myanmar Summary pGrf;tif0efBuD;Xmevufatmuf&Sdjrefrmha&eHESifh"mwkvkyfief;rS tqifhjrifh'DZ,fESifhav,mOfqDrsm;tm;axmufyHhay;&eftwGufwif 'gac:qdkrIjyKvkyfcJhaMumif;xkwfjyefaMunmcsuft& od&onf/ wif'gatmifjrifonfh vkyfief;taejzifh tqifhjrifh'DZ,fpnfaygif; 1 'or 645 oef;ESifh JetA1 trsKd;tpm; av,mOfqD pnfaygif; 752000 tm;axmufyHhay;oGm;&rnfjzpfonf/ {NyDv 2 &ufaeY aeYvnf 12 em&DwGifwif'gydwfoGm;rnfjzpfaMumif; jrefrmha&eHESifh"mwkvkyfief;rSajymMum;csuft&od&onf/wif'gESifh ywfoufonfh tao;pdwfowif;tcsuftvufrsm;udk aejynfawmf&Sd jrefrmha&eHESifh"mwkvkyfief;b@ma&;OD;pD;XmewGif ½Hk;tcsdeftwGif; &&SdEdkifaMumif; od&onf/
  4. 4. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 4 Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary Centurion Starts V ancouver-based Centuri- on Minerals Ltd has ini- tiated a reconnaissance (phase 1) exploration program on its slate belt concession in central Myanmar, the company said. The exploration program will include geological mapping, stream sediment geochemis- try, and evaluation of historical gold occurrences, the Canadian miner said. Subject to receipt of all regu- latory approvals, Centurion will hold an 80 percent interest in the concession with 20 percent held by its Myanmar partner, Crown Minerals Company. Myanmar’s exploration and mining permits are issued by the central government and al- low for a mineral concession to followed by a 25 year produc- tion period. Centurion said that through Phase 1 exploration program the company is aiming to prior- itise targets within the conces- Pann Nu sion and, as part of the Myan- the location of the slate belt concession boundaries. The “slate belt” concession is located south of Mandalay city and covers an area of approxi- mately 692 square kilometres. The Moditaung gold mine and the Lebyin gold-antimony mine are within a few kilometres south and east, respectively, of the slate belt concession bound- aries. The slate belt concession is road accessible and explora- tion activities can be carried out year round, Centurion said. The Moditaung and Lebyin mines were discovered and evaluated by another Canadian mining giant Ivanhoe Mines Ltd during the late 1990s and early 2000s; a phase of explo- ration which also included the discovery of a number of gold occurrences within the slate belt concession. The current program on the slate belt will include the explo- ration of geological and struc- tural environments similar to those hosting the Moditaung Aeful;Am;tajcpdkuf Centurion Minerals Ltd onf jrefrmEdkifiH tv,fydkif;ü owåKwGif;xGufypönf;rsm; tm; &SmazG&eftwGuf reconnaissance (phase 1) &SmazGrItpDtpOfudk ueOD; tpjyKvkyfaqmifaeNyDjzpfaMumif; ukrÜPD rS ajymMum;cJhonf/ tqdkygpDrHudef;tm; aqmif&Guf&ef twGuf cGifhjyKcsufrsm;udk &,l&efvdktyfNyD; Centurion taejzifh ,if;pDrHudef;wGif vkyfief;&S,f,m 80 &mcdkifEIef;ydkifqdkif tusKd;wlvkyfief;jzpfonfh Crown Minerals ukrÜPDrS vkyfief;&S,f,m 20 &mcdkifEIef;ydkifqdkifoGm;rnf[kod&onf/ and Lebyin mines, Centurion said. Centurion is involved in ex- ploration and development of gold and other precious metal projects in Southeast Asia. Villagers pan for gold at the Irrawaddy river near the town of Myitkyina in northern Myanmar. SoeZeyaTun/Reuters J apanese shipping com- pany Mitsui OSK Lines (MOL) is eyeing more business beyond its existing container shipping business in Myanmar, the company an- nounced. Apart from future expansion on the container business in Myanmar, MOL may expand its other businesses to cover bulk- ers, tankers and car carriers, the company said in a release. “As Myanmar continues to open up and expand, we see the country standing in front of a new world – a world of grow- ing economic opportunities of trade, infrastructure develop- ment and regional strategic hub position for maritime transpor- tation,” said MOL president Koichi Muto. “MOL is pleased to work to- gether with the country to seize the growth opportunities by further expanding our contain- ership businesses in time,” he said. MOL’s presence in Myanmar dates back to 1898 when the called at the Port of Yangon. Since March 2012, a direct ser- vice linking Singapore and Yan- gon has been established. In October 2012, MOL established Zayar Phyo MOL Myanmar Ltd, a wholly- owned subsidiary of MOL. “I am grateful to the Myan- mar government, customers and partners for their contin- ued support in MOL’s business development. Over the years, MOL has grown in tandem with Myanmar and we have long be- come one of the country’s clos- est partners,” Koichi said at a reception MOL hosted for gov- ernment leaders, customers, partners and MOL employees in Yangon. The shipping giant said that as a multi-modal transport group MOL will continue to “ac- tively seize opportunities that contribute to global economic growth by constantly monitor- ing our performance and meet- ing customer needs.” Putraventure.com *syefEdkifiH oabFmukrÜPDjzpfaom Mitsui OSK Lines (MOL) onf jrefrmEdkifiHwGif;ü vuf&Sd uGefwdefem wifydkYrIvkyfief;xuf tjcm;vkyfief;rsm; udk ydkrdkpdwf0ifpm;aeaMumif; od&onf/ jrefrmEdkifiHwGif uGefwdefemvkyfief; tm; csJUxGifaqmif&GufoGm;rnfhtpm; MOL taejzifh bulker rsm;? tanker rsm;ESifh um;wifydkYo,faqmifonfh vkyfief;rsm;tm;wGif csJUxGifaqmif&Guf oGm;zG,f&SdaMumif; od&onf/
  5. 5. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 5 Myanmar Summary M alaysian agri- business giant Felda Global Ventures Holdings Bhd (FGV) has inked a joint venture agreement to set up a $15-million rub- ber processing plant and in Myanmar, the compa- ny said. FGV’s subsidiary FGV Myanmar (L) Pte Ltd en- tered into the deal with local Pho La Min Trad- ing Co Ltd (PLM) to form FGV Pho La Min Co Ltd. FGV will subscribe to a 51 percent stake in the joint venture entity and PLM will hold the rest. FGV and PLM will build a modern rubber process- ing plant in Myeik with a target capacity of 24,000 tonnes a year, FGV said. The plant in Myeik in southeastern Myanmar is scheduled to be complet- next year. “We have high ambi- tions for this company to excel as a big player in Myanmar in the rubber- related industry,” FGV Group President and Mohd Emir Mavani Ab- dullah told the media dur- ing the signing. “The joint venture com- pany plans to be involved in many areas but this year we will concentrate on the rubber industry,” Kyaw Min Emir said. FGV has been aggres- sively pursuing opportu- nities in Myanmar since 2011. It signed a memo- randum of understanding with PLM in 2012 to de- velop a complete supply chain in palm oil, rubber and sugar in Myanmar. It is already exporting palm oil products such as SAJI cooking oil, Adela indus- trial margarine, Mariana shortening and SunBear bread spread range to Myanmar. “We want to further ex- pand our product distri- bution in Myanmar and we hope once we reach 20,000 metric tonnes of supply, we can open a small packaging plant here,” he said. Last year, FGV export- ed about 14,000 met- ric tonnes of cooking oil products to Myanmar. The joint venture com- pany also plans to open another plant in Mon state and develop 30,000 and 10,000ha of brown- However, the green- be done in stages as the Myanmar government only allows a 70-year land lease for foreigners, he added. He also said the com- pany would also consider the possibility of ventur- ing into the downstream business. “It could be anything like slippers or maybe a small factory making tyres. We will continue to look into all possibilities and opportunities in the rubber industry here,” he said. Emir said FGV is also looking to venture into the sugar industry since Myanmar still has a sugar shortfall. “The country only has 12 to 14 sugar mills ... there is a lot of growth poten- tial here. We are looking into the possibility of how we can co-invest with the government, either in raw He said the company is keen to work with local smallholders and might later look into the possi- bility of acquiring a sugar mill in the country. Emir said the group also plans to venture into Cambodia, focus- ing on rubber plantation and processing. He said FGV group was looking Indonesia and Africa. PLM has expanded its business portfolio in re- cent years and is current- ly looking at new markets around the world. PLM mostly deals in the export of assorted types of My- anmar rubber. rav;&Sm;EdkifiH pdkufysKd;arG;jrL a&;vkyfief;BuD;jzpfaom Felda Global Ventures Holdings Bhd (FGV) onf jrefrmEdkifiH wGif tar&duefa':vm 15 oef; wefzdk;&Sdonfh a&mfbmpdkufysKd;rIvkyf ief;udk wnfaxmifNyD; tusKd;wl yl;aygif;vkyfudkif&efvufrSwfa&;xdk; cJhaMumif; od&onf/ FGV vkyfief;cGJjzpfaom FGV Myanmar (L) Pte Ltd onf jynfwGif;vkyfief;wpfckjzpf aom Pho La Min Trading Co Ltd (PLM) ESifhyl;aygif;í FGV Pho La Min Co Ltd udk wnfaxmifcJhaMumif; od&onf/ tqdkygtusKd;wlvkyfief;wGif FGV rS &S,f,m 51 &mcdkifEIef;udk ydkifqdkifrnfjzpfNyD; PLM rS usef&Sd aom&S,f,myrmPudkydkifqdkifoGm; rnfjzpfaMumif; od&onf/ FGV ESifh PLM wdkYonf NrdwfNrdKUwGif wpfESpfvQif a&mfbmrufx&pfwef csdef 24000 xkwfvkyfEdkifrnfh a&mfbm puf½HkudkwnfaxmifoGm; rnfjzpfaMumif; FGV rS ajym Mum;cJhonf/ Reuters A plantation worker scrapes rubber latex at a rubber plantation.
  6. 6. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 6 Myanmar Summary M alaysia External Trade Development Corp (MATRADE) will be targeting various construction projects for Malaysian com- panies worth RM400 million ($122 million) in Myanmar, the trade agency said. These projects include resi- dential, commercial, industrial parks and mixed development buildings and shopping malls. The owners of these projects, - TRADE, are Myanmar govern- ment-related agencies and the private sector, it said. MATRADE said Malaysian contribute to the development of the country due to its prov- en track record in undertaking various construction and infra- structure projects internation- ally.” various construction sector in- cluding building construction, property and township devel- opment, infrastructure, roads and highways, water-related services as well as consultancy services such as engineering, architecture, project manage- ment and specialised research services. Last year, MATRADE said, Zayar Phyo projects worth RM330 million business potential and oppor- tunities, especially in the infra- structure and property develop- ment sector. Reforms undertaken by the Myanmar government have im- pacted positively to the coun- try’s economy and enhanced within the country, it added. “There is a surge in demand for modern residential and commercial properties due to the people’s changing lifestyles into the country,” said MAT- RADE. Infrastructure development has been given a priority by the government to facilitate the rapid economic activities taking place in Myanmar. Nine Malaysian construction companies will be joining MA- TRADE for a Specialised Mar- keting Mission to Myanmar from 17–21 March to meet the project owners and assess the Programs arranged by MAT- Since Myanmar opened up IN 2011, construction sector has experienced a massive boom. Now, MATRADE eyes to bag about $122 million worth of construction projects in the country. OliverSlow bank KfW and Japan In- ternational Cooperation Agency (JICA) are expect- the project, she said. The move comes as Myanmar tries to des- perately strengthen its estimated 120,000 SMEs ahead of the ASEAN Eco- nomic Community (AEC) goods and labour in AEC challenges before the ill- funded Myanmar SMEs who will be competing against their superior ri- vals in the region. “We have already re- ceived about 100 appli- cations. We will examine the applicants and visit their businesses and fac- tories to see whether they are following rules and regulations, and if their businesses have the po- tential to boom,” Daw Aye Aye Win said. “We don’t want to waste the state’s money. We will recommend businesses that will have better pros- pects to the SMIDB for loans.” Myanmar’s SMEs cur- rently depend for loans an interest rate of 8.5 percent, lower than the commercial banks. How- ever, SMIDB only gives loans to businesses from the manufacturing sector. “The small enterprises their productions. If we will become more com- petitive and will be able small entrepreneur Daw Toe Toe Mar said. “There is a need for more capital in the mar- ket to secure more raw materials and increase outputs. The new loans - mand,” businessperson U Tun Myint said. SMIDB has already granted K10 billion ($10.2 million) to 62 My- anmar entrepreneurs, sources said. The lender, which now has 12 branch- es across the country, will open four more branches soon. The SME bill has cur- rently been brought to the parliament and is expect- ed to be enacted soon. S ingapore-based oil and gas exploration company Interra Re- sources Ltd said its jointly controlled entity, Gold- petrol Joint Operating Company Inc, has started drilling development well YNG3267 in the Yenang- - mar. YNG 3267 is drilled as oil producers which have been completed over the previous six months at rates as high as 176 bar- rels of oil per day, Interra sad. The company said the targeted depth is 4,000 feet with the primary ob- jective of accelerating production from the oil Kyaw Min reservoirs that produce from wells in this fault block. Interra has a 60 percent interest in the Improved Petroleum Recovery Con- tract of the Yenangyaung percent of Goldpetrol which is the operator of YNG3267 is being drilled using Goldpetrol’s ZJ 450 rig, thus drill- ing costs are expected to be relatively low, Interra said, and its share of the cost of drilling is funded from existing funds on hand. Interra estimates that the results of the drilling and completion should be available in approximate- ly six weeks. Myanmar Summary acs;ay;vsuf&SdaMumif; tao;pm; ESifhtvwfpm;vkyfief;rsm;zGHUNzdK; a&;A[dk|merS ñGefMum;a&;rSL; a':at;at;0if;u ajymonf/ jynfwGif; tao;pm;ESifh tvwfpm;vkyfief;rsm;zGHUNzdK;wdk;wuf a&;twGuf EdkifiHwumrS enf; ynmtultnDrsm;&,lumaqmif &Gufvsuf&SdNyD;? *smreDEdkifiH KFW tzGJUtpnf;?*syefEdkifiHrS Japan International Cooperation Agency wdkUrS acs;aiGrsm;ay; tyfrnfjzpfaMumif; rwfv 10 &ufaeYujyKvkyfcJhaom Financial Management tvkyf½HkaqG;aEG; yGJrS od&onf/ pifumyltajcpdkuf a&eHESifh obm0"mwfaiGU&SmazGa&;ukrÜPD jzpfaom Interra Resources Ltd cGJjzpfaom Goldpetrol Joint Operating Company Inc onf rauG;wdkif; a&eHacsmif;NrdKU e,f&SdvkyfuGuftrSwf YNG3267 a&eHwGif;tm; wl;azmfrIrsm;udk pwifjyKvkyfaeNyDjzpfaMumif; Interra Resources Ltd u ajymMum;cJhonf/ tqdkyga&eHwGif;tm; owfrSwf xm;onfhteufrSm ay 4000 jzpfNyD; a&eHavSmifuefrsm;rS xkwf vkyfrIrsm;udkt&Sdefjr§ifhum aqmif &GufoGm;Edkif&eftwGuf t"du &nf&G,faMumif;vnf; od&onf/ rav;&Sm;EdkifiH jynfyukefoG,fa&; zGHUNzdK;wdk;wufrIaumfydka&;&Sif;BuD; (MATRADE) onf jrefrmEdkifiHwGif rav;&Sm;ukrÜPDrsm;twGuf &if;*pf oef; 400(tar&duefa':vm 122 oef;)txd wefzdk;&Sdonfh aqmufvkyfa&;pDrHudef; trsKd;rsKd;udk ypfrSwfxm;um aqmif&Guf oGm;rnfjzpfaMumif; tqkdygukefoG,f a&;at*sifpDBuD;rS ajymMum;cJhonf/ tqdkygpDrHudef;rsm;wGif vlaetdrf&m rsm;? pD;yGm;a&;qdkif&mtaqmufttHkrsm;? pufrIZkefrsm;? [dkw,fESifh½Hk;taqmuf ttHkrsm;ESifh a&Smhyif;arm(vf)wdkYuJhodkY pDrHudef;rsm;vnf; yg0ifaMumif; od&onf/ MATRADE azmfxkwfajymMum; csuft& tqdkygpDrHudef;rsm;tm; ydkifqdkif olrsm;rSm jrefrmtpdk;&ESifhqufpyfaom at*sifpDrsm;ESifhyk*¾vduu@wdkYjzpfaMumif; od&onf/rav;&Sm;vkyfief;rsm;onf aqmufvkyfa&;vkyfief;trsKd;rsKd;ESifhtajccH taqmufttHkpDrHudef;rsm;pGmudk tjynf jynfqdkif&mpHcsdefpHñTef;rsm;ESifhtnD taumif;qHk;aqmif&GufEdkifcJhonfhrSwf wrf;aumif;rsm;&SdaeonfhtwGuf jrefrm EdkifiHaqmufvkyfa&;pDrHudef;rsm;twGuf taumif;qHk;aomtaetxm;wGif&Sdae aMumif; MATRADE rSajymMum;cJhonf/ include meetings with project owners and participation in the Myanmar Infrastructure Sum- mit and Exhibition, organised in Yangon, Myanmar’s com- mercial capital.
  7. 7. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com 7LOCAL BIZ Myanmar Summary S ingapore-listed Yoma Strategic Holdings Ltd plans to set up what it says could become tion in Myanmar, hoping the frontier economy has the potential to develop a The Myanmar-focused property conglomerate, led by Chairman Serge Pun, said it has signed a deal to set up a joint ven- business with ED&F Man, a global agricultural trad- er. Yoma will hold an 85 percent stake in the ven- ture, which is expected to require up to $20 million of investment over four years. Its target will be to plant 3,700 acres of cof- fee. “We think this will prob- ably become the biggest country, and could start Rujun Shen from Myanmar,” Andrew Rickards, Yoma’s chief analysts and reporters. “The main thrust of this is likely to be exports.” Myanmar is geographi- cally well situated to be- is in its early days and fragmented, with a num- ber of small plantations. In 2012, it produced about 8,000 tonnes of hectares (29,652 acres) of land, according to es- timates of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations. In 2011, the country exported By comparison, Vi- etnam, the world’s top producer of the strong- churned out nearly 1.3 in 2012, exporting most of that. Rickards declined to give details on the planta- tion’s production target, but said a yield of one tonne per acre per year would be a reference for early years of the planta- tion. The plan is part of Yo- It also announced it had signed an agreement with the Myanmar government to set up a dairy plant to supply milk to schoolchil- dren, as well as a cold stor- age and logistics business with Japan’s Kokubu & Co Ltd. Yoma garnered over 90 percent of its income from property business in Myanmar in 2013, and would like to see the con- tribution from non-prop- erty businesses to rise to at least 50 percent, com- pany chairman Pun said. In addition to property, it also owns a car service department store and a hot air balloon tour op- erator. Yoma shares rose more week high of S$0.72 last week. Reuters pifumyltajcpdkuf Yoma Strategic Holdings Ltd onf jrefrmEdkifiHwGif xdyfwef;aumfzD pdkufysKd;onfhvkyfief;wpfckjzpfvm &ef pDpOfaeNyD; jrefrmEdkifiHü aumfzD vkyfief;atmifjrif&eftwGuf tvm;tvmaumif;rsm;&Sdaeonf [karQmfvifhxm;aMumif;vnf;od& onf/ Ouú|Serge Pun OD;aqmif onfh tdrfNcHajrvkyfief;tiftm;pk BuD;rS tqdkygaumfzDvkyfief;tm; tusKd;wlyl;aygif;vkyfaqmif&ef twGuf urÇmhpdkufysKd;arG;jrLa&; ukefoG,frIrsm;udk aqmif&Gufae onfh ED&F Man ESifh oabm wlnDcsufwpfckudkvufrSwfa&;xdk; cJhaMumif; od&onf/ ,if;ukrÜPDonfjrefrmEdkifiHwGif aumfzD{uaygif; 3700 cefY pdkuf ysKd;oGm;&ef arQmfvifhxm;aMumif; od&onf/ T he Hydro Power Generation Enterprise under the Ministry of Electric Power (MEP) has invited a tender for underground works at Yeywar Hy- dropower project on Myit Nge river in northern Shan state. Interested companies may obtain tender forms at Of- Completed forms has to be submitted to the same of- 2pm on the same day. Further information can be obtained by phone at +95 067411415 or by fax at +95 067411081. Also, the Procurement Branch under MEP has invited Plant from Tichit Area for a lengthy period. Tender forms can be obtained starting from May 11 at Completed forms have to be submitted before May 8. Further information can be obtained by phone at +95 067411168 and +95 067411154. Phyu Thit Lwin Myanmar Summary A worker dries coffee beans. YTHaryono/Reuters pGrf;tif0efBuD;Xmevufatmuf&Sd a&tm;vQyfppfxkwfvkyfa&;vkyf ief;u&Srf;jynfe,fajrmufydkif;jrpfi,fjrpfwGifaqmufvkyfvsuf&Sdonfh &J&Gma&tm; vQyfppfpDrHudef;wGif underground work rsm;twGuf wif'gac:qdkrIwpfck udkjyKvkyfcJhaMumif; od&onf/ pdwf0ifpm;aomukrÜPDrsm;taejzifh wif'gyHkpHrsm;udk aejynfawmf&Sd ½Hk;trSwf (38) wGif {NyDv 1 &ufaeYrwdkifcif&,loGm;EdkifaMumif; od&onf/vdktyfonfhtcsuftvufrsm;udkjznfhoGif;NyD; jynfhpHkaom wif'gazmifrsm;tm;tqdkyg½Hk;odkYZlvdkifv 9 &ufaeYeHeuf 10 em&Dr wdkifcifwifoGif;&rnfjzpfonf/aemufxyfowif;tcsuftvuf rsm; udktao;pdwfod&Sdvdkyguzkef;eHygwf +95 067411415?odkYr[kwf+95 067411081 odkYzufpfay;ydkYEdkifaMumif; od&onf/
  8. 8. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 8 Myanmar Summary I n her bare-bones classroom, Daw Myat Marlar makes a wish for her young students from Myanmar’s densely popu- lated but energy-starved Aye- yarwady Delta. “I want them to be educated so they have more opportunities, and life won’t be as hard for them as it is now.” evolving belief that a better fu- ture is possible in Myanmar. Since 2011, a wave of political and economic reforms has be- gun to change Myanmar and initiate its transition from con- government to a democracy, and from a closed to an open economy. Amid growing international Bank President Jim Yong Kim recently announced a $2 billion program to help Myanmar de- liver universal health care to all citizens by 2030 and dramati- cally improve access to energy – seen as key to improved living conditions, job prospects, and economic growth. “Expanding access to electric- ity in a country like Myanmar can help transform a society – children will be able to study at night, shops will stay open, and health clinics will have lights and energy to power life- saving technology. Electricity helps bring an end to poverty,” country on January 26. Myanmar, also known as Burma, is one of the poorest countries in East Asia. About 70 percent of Myanmar’s popu- lation – about 40 million peo- brownouts, and rationing are common among those who have access. A very small per- centage of the national GDP has been spent on education and health care, and some 32 country is ranked 182nd out of 189 economies on the ease of doing business. But Myanmar is trying to turn things around. Economic growth was 6.5 percent last year as gas production, services, construction, and commodity exports rose. The country is ex- pected to grow at a 6.8 percent rate this year. The government is working with the interna- tional community, including the World Bank Group, to im- prove infrastructure, education, health care, and the business climate. “The country is in a hurry to catch up to its neighbours,” in- cluding India, China, and other high-growth emerging nations, says Kanthan Shankar, the World Bank’s country manager in Myanmar. “There is a lot to do.” In the 18 months since the World Bank Group opened an two projects and has several in the pipeline, he says. The Bank from its fund for the poorest countries, the International Development Association, with sector and encourage invest- insurance. The fund for the poorest will provide $200 million to help Myanmar achieve universal health coverage by 2030. The funding will increase access to essential health services for women and children and help to remove out-of-pocket pay- ments as a barrier to health care for the poorest people. An- other $80 million in grants are already helping people in rural communities invest in schools, roads, water and other projects. Other pending projects include: $31.5 million to expand access to telecommunications in rural areas; $30 million to support modernisation of the country’s systems; and $60 million to expand a government program providing grants to schools and poor students. To increase energy access, the - lion project to modernise and expand an electric power plant in Mon State. The revamped plant will produce 250 per- cent more electricity with the same amount of gas, with the areas around cities and the na- tional grid. Longer term, a national elec- by the Sustainable Energy for All Initiative, will guide deliv- sustainable electricity services to the population of around 60 million. In rural areas, the strategy probably will include energy and renewables such as wind power, says Shankar. IFC, the arm of the Bank Group focused on the private sector, has invested $2 million - ing about 200,000 micro and small businesses, mostly run by women, and is helping three other institutions build the ca- The investment is part of an - trepreneurship and bring pri- vate investment to sustainably develop key sectors like telecom and energy that could help close the poverty gap. “It’s about providing essen- tial, basic services to the people of Myanmar,” says Vikram Ku- mar, IFC’s resident representa- tive in Myanmar, of IFC’s role. “If small and medium enter- prises have more power avail- able to operate throughout the day, they’re improving their competitiveness and contribut- ing to job creation – which is what we focus on and funda- mental to the goals of ending poverty and promoting shared prosperity.” IFC is advising the Myanmar Ministry of Electric Power on partnering with the private sec- tor to generate and distribute power, with the goal of creating a basic framework for agree- ments. In telecom, recent regu- latory reform is easing the way for investors to participate in years, Myanmar has a “massive opportunity” to learn from the experience of other countries to develop a mobile-banking sec- tor that would greatly increase As of December 2013, previ- - nancing is badly needed to de- velop the private sector and fuel reform can gain political risk in- surance from the Bank Group’s Multilateral Investment Guar- antee Agency. “The people of Myanmar are eagerly looking forward to the reform dividend, and satisfy- ing those aspirations will be the government’s challenge and op- portunity,” says Shankar. WB “To increase energy access, the Bank is financ- ing a $140 million project to modernise and ex- pand an electric power plant in Mon State. The revamped plant will produce 250 percent more electricity with the same amount of gas.” Myanmar, also known as Burma, is one of the poorest countries in East Asia. About 70 percent of Myanmar’s population – about 40 million people – lives off-grid. Reuters jrefrmEdkifiHonf 2011 ckESpfrSpí EdkifiHa&;ESifh pD;yGm;a&;jyKjyifajymif;vJrI rsm;pGmudktaumiftxnfazmfaqmif&Guf cJhaomaMumifhvmrnfhrsKd;qufopftwGuf ydkrdkaumif;rGefaomtem*wfopfwpf&yf udk vSrf;jrifvmae&NyDjzpfonf/y#dyu© rsm;rSonf Nidrf;csrf;a&;qDodkY? ppftpdk;& tkyfcsKyfrIrSonf 'Drdkua&pDpepfqDodkY? wHcg;ydwf0g'rSonf wHcg;zGifh0g'qDodkY ponfh jyKjyifajymif;vJrIrsm;jzifh jrefrm EdkifiHonf tvm;tvmaumif;rsm;&Sdae aom EdkifiHwpfckjzpfvmcJhonf/ jrefrmEdkifiH jyKjyifajymif;vJrIESifh BudK;yrf;aqmif&GufrIrsm;aMumifh tjynf jynfqdkif&mrS todtrSwfjyKvmcJhMuNyD; urÇmhbPf Ouú| Jim Yong Kim uvnf; jrefrmEdkifiHtaejzifh EdkifiHom; rsm;tm;vHk;udk 2030 ckESpfwGif usef;rm a&;apmifha&SmufrIrsm;udk axmufyHhay;Edkif &ef? vlrIaexdkifrIb0rsm; ydkrdktqifh jrifhwdk;wufvmap&ef vdktyfaom pGrf; tif&&SdrIydkrdkwdk;wufvmap&ef? tvkyf tudkiftcGifhtvrf;rsm;ESifh pD;yGm;a&;zGHUNzdK; wdk;wufrIwdkYtwGuftar&duefa':vm 2 bDvD,HyrmP&Sdonfh tpDtpOfwpfck udk xkwfjyefaMunmay;cJhonf/jrefrm EdkifiHwGif vQyfppf"mwftm;ydkrdk&&Sdvmjcif; onf jrefrmEdkifiHvlrItzGJUtpnf;tm; ydkrdkaumif;rGefaom vlUtzGJUtpnf;wpf&yf tjzpfodkYajymif;vJ&mwGifvGefpGmrSta&; ygaeNyD;vQyfppf"mwftm;ydkrdk&&SdvmcJhygu uav;oli,frsm;taejzifh ntcsdefwGif pmoifMum;avhvmEdkifovdk qdkifrsm;tae jzifhvnf; nydkif;wGifzGifhvSpfEdkifrnfjzpf onfhtjyif usef;rma&;aq;ay;cef;rsm; twGufvnf; rsm;pGmtaxmuftuljyK vmEdkifrnfjzpfonf/ vQyfppf"mwftm;ydkrdk&&SdrIonf qif;&J EGrf;yg;rIed*Hk;udk,laqmifay;vmEdkifrnfh tcsufwpfckjzpfaMumif; Kim u jrefrm EdkifiHodkY yxrOD;qHk;c&D;pOftjzpf a&muf&Sd vmpOfu ajymMum;cJhonf/ jrefrmEdkifiH onf ta&SUtm&SwGif tqif;&JqHk;EdkifiH rsm;teufrSEdkifiHwpfEdkifiHjzpfNyD; jrefrmhvlOD;a&70&mcdkifEIef; (oef; av;q,feD;yg;)onfvQyfppf"mwftm; r&&SdMuaMumif; od&onf/EdkifiHbwf *sufwGifvnf;usef;rma&;apmifh a&SmufrIu@ESifhynma&;u@wGif toHk;jyKrIvGefpGmenf;aeao;ovdk touf 5 ESpft&G,f uav; 32 &mcdkifEIef;onf tm[m& csKdUwJhrIudk cHpm;ae&onf/pD;yGm;a&;vkyfief;rsm;a qmif&Guf&eftwGuf 0ef;usif aumif; wpfcktjzpftqifh owfrSwf&mwGifv nf; jrefrmEdkifiHonf EdkifiHaygif; 189 EdkifiHwGif tqifh 182 om&Sdae onf/
  9. 9. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 9 Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary T he Myanmar Rice Indus- try Association (MRIA) expects the country to Aung Hla Tun export 300,000 tonnes of par- starting April 1, up from 30,000 Demand for Myanmar par- boiled rice is growing in Eu- ropean markets, said MRIA Chairman Chit Khine. My- anmar exported most of the - cal year to European markets, mainly to Russia. Myanmar’s total rice exports, however, fell 28.6 percent to 1 hurt by a fall in demand from China and political turmoil in Thailand. “We have already built mod- ern mills and factories with total capacity of over 1,000 tonnes of parboiled rice per day while some more are still under construction,” Khine said. “Our (parboiled rice) fetches very competitive prices as it is processed with modern tech- nology. We got up to $505 per tonne this year,” Khine said. He expects Myanmar to ex- port up to 1.5 million tonnes of total rice this year. jrefrmEdkifiHqefpyg;toif;BuD;onf ,ckb@ma&;ESpfwGif wifydkYvsuf&Sdonfh aygif;qefrufx&pfwefcsdef 30ç000 rS vmrnfhb@ma&;ESpfwGif jrefrmEdkifiHrS aygif;qef rufx&pfwefcsdef 300ç000 txdudk wifydkYoGm;Edkifrnf[k cefYrSef;xm; onf/jrefrmEdkifiHrSaygif;qeftm; Oa&my aps;uGufrsm;rS 0,fvdktm;jrifhwufae aMumif; jrefrmEdkifiHqefpyg;toif;Ouú| jzpfol OD;cspfcdkifu ajymMum;cJhonf/ ,ckb@ma&;ESpftwGif; jrefrmEdkifiHrS aygif;qeftrsm;pkudk Oa&myaps;uGufrsm; odkY wifydkYcJhNyD; t"dutm;jzifh ½k&Sm;odkY jzpfaMumif; od&onf/ odkYaomfvnf; ,ckb@ma&;ESpftwGif; w½kwfEdkifiHrS 0,fvdktm;usqif;rIESifh xdkif;EdkifiHwGif EdkifiHa&;rwnfrNidrfjzpfrI rsm;aMumifh jrefrmEdkifiH pkpkaygif;qef wifydkYrIyrmPonf 28.6 &mcdkifEIef; (rufx&pfwefcsdef 1 oef;) txd usqif; cJhaMumif;vnf; od&onf/wpfaeYvQif aygif;qef rufx&pfwefcsdef 1000 ausmf BudwfcGJxkwfvkyfEdkifonfh acwfrD BudwfcGJpufrsm;ESifh puf½Hkrsm;udk wnf axmifxm;NyD;jzpfaMumif;vnf; OD;cspfcdkif u qdkonf/ Demand for Myanmar parboiled rice is growing in European markets. The country exported most of the parboiled rice during RomeoRanoco/Reuters Shein Thu Aung S ingapore-based ZICOlaw, a network of independent legal and related profes- sional service providers in the ASEAN region, hosted a forum in Yangon to discuss the im- pending implementation of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) in less than two years. Commentators from across the ASEAN region joined local Myanmar stakeholders to ex- change views on the challenges the AEC. Chew Seng Kok, ZICOlaw Regional Managing Partner, said: “There are challenges in realising the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) and hence regional economic integration is pivotal. “With ASEAN’s economic blueprint outlining a wide- ranging series of goals for economic integration and the urgency to act early, ZICOlaw aims to be part of this inte- gration success for ASEAN by working with businesses in the public and private sectors.” John Pang, senior advisor, Hakluyt & Co and former CEO of CIMB Asean Research Insti- tute, said: “Time is running out as ASEAN is facing competition from other regions.” ASEAN needs to institutional- ise its decision-making process, dispute resolution mechanisms and try to harmonise its nation- al laws and regulations to facili- tate investments by the private sector, Tony Kinnear, manag- ing director, ASEAN & North Asia, Thomson Reuters said. K Kesavapany, former di- rector, Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Ong Keng Yong, Singapore High Commissioner in Malaysia and former Secre- tary General, ASEAN, U Moe Kyaw, managing director, My- anmar Marketing Research De- velopment (MMRD), Raman Narayanan, executive director, AirAsia Asean, and Dr Naoko Kumada, research scholar, Ur- banization Project, New York University, also spoke at the forum. pifumylEdkifiHtajcpdkuf tmqD,Ha'o twGif; Oya'a&;&mudpö&yfrsm;ESifh qufpyf0efaqmifrIrsm;ay;aeonfh uGef&ufwpfckjzpfaom ZICOlaw onf ESpfESpftwGif; taumiftxnfazmf aqmif&GufoGm;rnfh tmqD,HpD;yGm;a&; todkuftNrHK tvm;tvmrsm;tm; aqG;aEG;cJhonfh zdk&rfwpfckudk &efukef NrdKUü jyKvkyfusif;ycJhonf/ ,if;zdk&rfwGif tmqD,Ha'oESifh jrefrmEdkifiHwGif;rS yk*¾dKvfrsm;u tmqD,HpD;yGm;a&;todkuf tNrHKtwGuf &ifqdkifBuHKawGU&rnfh pdef ac:csufrsm;ESifh tcGifhtvrf;aumif; rsm;tay:½Ijrifonfhtjrifrsm;tm; zvS,fcJhMuaMumif;vnf; od&onf/
  10. 10. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 10 Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary U - win Leighton Paisner (BLP) has ventured into Myanmar through a non- exclusive tie-up with local out- (LNC), joining a slew of foreign Myanmar’s recently opened economy. LNC will now be a member of BLP’s newly-launched Asia net- work, a vehicle BLP has created in a bid to form relationships with local players in emerg- ing markets in Southeast Asia, allowing it to tap the growing number of deals happening in the region. LNC is headed by Khin Mar Aye, who has 20 years of legal and commercial experience. - The Law Chambers. With the new partnership it plans to work closely with LNC and head of BLP’s Singapore have set out to be a leader in Kyaw Min Myanmar and are very excited and positive about this new de- velopment and our relationship with LNC. “For us, Myanmar presents a whole horizon of huge opportu- nities particularly in the power, oil and gas, mining, infrastruc- ture and real estate sectors which play to our strengths.” Until the deal, BLP has been servicing Myanmar out of Sin- gapore, with a practice led by Cheung and energy and pro- jects partner Nomita Nair. arbitration, compliance and business establishment work, targeting regional and interna- tional multinationals looking to invest in the country. BLP is one of the several in- to have expressed an inter- est in Myanmar in the last two years, including Gibson Dunn & Crutcher, Hogan Lovells, Al- len & Overy and Herbert Smith Freehills. Baker & McKenzie opened in Yangon in February, Duane Morris Selvam, signed leases in both Yangon and Nay Pyi Taw in Rouse launched with a team of two partners in November. - in Yangon in February, while Mori Hamada & Matsumoto also moved to Yangon in Janu- ary. However, partners say the market remains challenging Earlier this month BLP hired Ward from Norton Rose Ful- bright to join its Hong Kong - rently focused on China but he is expected to complement the projects BLP is working on in Myanmar and Indonesia. - cated in Singapore, Hong Kong and Beijing. H ong Kong’s textile man- ufacturers have signed an agreement to set up an industrial park in Yangon in a bid to cut down their produc- tion costs by at least half. Workers at the 200-hectare facility in Myanmar’s commer- of those employed in mainland Phyu Thit Lwin factories, South China Morning Post reported. Hong Kong’s Liberal Party lawmaker Felix Chung Kwok- pan, representing the textiles and garment constituency, made the deal on behalf of 12 manufacturers to rent half of the 400-hectare Thilawa Spe- cial Economic Zone, which is being built by Myanmar and Japan. “We will start the construc- tion work in mid-2015 and hope the factories can start operating by the end of next year,” Chung was quoted as saying. The land has been rented for $52 million annually for 50 years. Chung said the Hong Kong manufacturers planned to em- ploy at least 30,000 Myanmar workers at the market salary of $100 to $120 a month. “The salary level is only one- All products exported from My- anmar enjoy duty-free access to all EU countries after [Western counties lifted] economic sanc- tions on the country,” Chung said. Chung said the manufactur- ers – who will invest $2 million to $3 million in the industrial park – could break even in one to two years. LegalWeek a[mifaumifEdkifiH txnftvdyf xkwfvkyfa&;vkyfief;rsm;rS &efukefwGif pufrINrdKUawmfwpfckudk wnfaxmifoGm; &eftwGuf oabmwlnDcsufwpf&yfudk rIukefusp&dwfrsm;taejzifh tenf;qHk; xuf0ufcefYoufomvmrnf[kvnf; od&onf/ jrefrmEdkifiH&Sd txnftvdyfvkyfom;rsm; twGuf tcaMu;aiGay;aqmif&rIonf a[mifaumifvkyfom;rsm; ig;yHkwpfyHk om&SdvdrfhrnfjzpfaMumif;vnf;od&onf/ aqmufvkyfrIrsm;udk 2015 ESpfv,fwGif pwifjyKvkyfoGm;rnfjzpfNyD; puf½Hkrsm; taejzifh vmrnfhESpfukefwGif pwifvnf ywfoGm;Edkif&ef arQmfrSef;xm;onf/ ,lautajcpdkufOya'vkyfief;jzpfaom Berwin Leighton Paisner (BLP) onf jynfwGif;vkyfief;wpfckjzpfaom Legal Network Consultants (LNC) ESifh vkyfief;yl;aygif;cJhNyD; rMumao;rDu wHcg;zGifhaqmif&Gufvmaom jrefrmEdkifiH odkY 0ifa&mufvmMuaom jynfyOya' vkyfief;rsm;teufrS vkyfief;wpfckvnf; jzpfvmcJhonf/ LNC onf ,cktcg BLP topfaqmif&GufcJhaom tm&S uGef&uftzGJU0ifwpfOD;jzpfvmNyD; BLP taejzifh ta&SUawmiftm&S zGHUNzdK;qJaps;uGufrsm;wGif jynfwGif;vkyf ief;rsm;ESifhqufqHa&;tajctaeaumif; rsm; &&Sd&eftwGuf &nf&G,fí tqdkyg tm&SuGef&ufopfudk taumiftxnf azmfaqmif&GufcJhjcif;vnf;jzpfonf/ LNC tBuD;tuJjzpfaoma':cifrm at;onf Oya'vkyfief;ydkif;wGif vkyf oufjrifhrm;olwpfOD;yifjzpfonf/jrefrm EdkifiHwGifOya'vkyfief;üxdyfwef;vkyfief; wpfckjzpfvm&ef &nf&G,fxm;NyD; ,ckuJh odkY LNC ESifhyl;aygif;vkyfaqmif&rnf jzpfonfhtwGuf tvGef0rf;ajrmuf0rf;om jzpfrdNyD; tcGifhtvrf;aumif;rsm;&&Sdvm rnf[k arQmfvifhaMumif; BLP rS tBuD;tuJwpfOD;jzpfol Alistair u qdkonf/
  11. 11. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 11 Myanmar Summary Contd. P 28... Contd. P 28... Danny Crichton I t can be hard for even the strongest entrepreneurs to succeed in cutthroat Silicon Valley. But throw in simmering istent Internet infrastructure, a military junta that is still in the early phases of transitioning to democratic rule, and develop- ers more familiar with ColdFu- sion than Ruby on Rails, and one might reasonably think that it would be nearly impos- sible for any company, let alone an Internet startup, to succeed in such an environment. For Rita Nguyen, though, this is the everyday life of building anmar. Nguyen is no stranger in Vietnam during the war and with her family after the Re- public of Vietnam fell. Nguyen would eventually study at the University of British Colum- bia, and worked in a variety of marketing roles early in her ca- reer including Electronic Arts, where she led the community management team. While at EA, she was ap- proached by a leading video game executive in Vietnam, who showed her the burgeoning startup scene underway there in 2009. After spending much of her life in Canada, Nguyen de- cided she wanted to spend more time in the country of her birth. “I decided to spend a year away from my career, knowing that it would not be my career long-term.” She wanted to build her own company, but didn’t know exactly what that would be and decided to go exploring. Something must have clicked, because Nguyen has been work- ing from Southeast Asia ever since. Vietnam is a “marketer’s dream” according to Nguyen. While Western consumer mar- kets are saturated with mes- sages, markets like Vietnam are much earlier in their develop- ment, and thus, a lot of prod- ucts have never even been seen by the public before. This was even more the case in Myan- mar, which Nguyen visited after the suggestion of a friend. like the kind of place to build Rita Nguyen’s startup dream, but her interactions with locals propelled her to build a busi- ness in the country. “There was so little infrastructure,” she ob- served, “but there was so much passion and interest in technol- ogy, and so much of it was un- tapped and unfocused.” Back during the military junta, which controlled the country from 1962 to 2011, much of the inter- net was blocked, particularly to websites outside of Myanmar. That meant that the only way to access the internet was using subversive tools to get around tion of hackers that are now key to Myanmar’s startup hopes. That hacker culture, though, remains quite elite. Total inter- net penetration in the country hovers around 1 percent of the population, much of it con- centrated in the largest city of Yangon. And while prices for mobile services have declined dramatically, they remain out of reach for most consumers in the country. Today, one of the few popular websites is Facebook, which is used less for commu- nications (since so few friends and family are members), but more to share controversial are still shared via Bluetooth on mobile devices. Yet, the new government has deep optimism that it can increase access levels to greater than three-quarters of the population over the next few years. Given such a gestating mar- was a challenge. A nationwide consumer culture does not exist in Myanmar, so there is a lack of guidelines and best practices on consumer tastes like in the West. Plus, “there were clones of everything, from Eventful to Yelp,” Nguyen notes, mak- of determining what consumers wanted was precisely the sort of problem that could be solved through technology. Nguyen ended up developing Squar, a social platform that aims to create a community around content while actively collecting data on users and sharing analytical insights with advertisers. “There are 60 mil- lion people in the country, and no one knows anything about them,” Nguyen points out. Such a model is of course com- mon in the West, but it broke new ground in Myanmar. She brought in two engineer friends and developed an MVP in May of last year, and a few short weeks later, Squar was in the Google Play store for Android. One gauntlet facing startups ing the necessary funding to continue operating. Venture capitalists in Silicon Valley of- ten perceive startups even from Portland and Boulder to be ex- otic, let alone from cities like Yangon or Karachi. This reality tends to encourage a culture of bootstrapping and a focus on in more developed innovation markets like Singapore and Ko- rea. Nguyen’s experience fund- raising is typical of other fron- tier entrepreneurs who perceive a real culture clash between investors attuned to emerging markets, and those who are not. “If you talk to investors who do a lot in frontier markets, they very rarely ask how you are when you talk to people from tion. They often think in terms of comparables, but the mar- ket just isn’t ready for it yet.” Nguyen notes that she didn’t have competitors in the market- place when she started, and that tiation. “It’s actually just an awareness thing” in these early days. Nguyen’s startup remains one of the few venture-backed startups in the country. Another misperception of frontier markets is that there is little money to be made out- side the developed world. While the WhatsApp acquisition last week may change those views, it remains likely that VCs in the West will continue to focus on the American and European markets. Yet, there is incredible that target emerging consum- ers properly. Nguyen notes that Starbucks and Korea’s Lotteria brands are now in the country, and are packed even at prices out of reach for most inside the country. There is of course billions of ing into the country, much of it going to utilities and other na- tion building priorities. There were more than $1.8 billion foreign investment projects ap- proved just during the spring and summer of 2013. But that money is failing to connect into the local startup scene. Nguyen is disappointed with the current these kids who are passionate, and there is all of this money coming in, but it is not connect- ing.” One bright spot, which might be surprising to those in the United States, is that the tel- ecommunications companies have been in the vanguard in Myanmar, assisting with in- novation and partnering with entrepreneurs to produce more apps and content. Most con- “There are 60 million people in the country, and no one knows anything about them.” Rita Nguyen at Squar Youth Festival in Yangon. RitaNguyen q,fpkESpfaygif;rsm;pGmMumatmif oD;jcm; &yfwnfcJh&onfh jrefrmEdkifiHonf zGHUNzdK; wdk;wufrIaemufuscJh&ovdk jynfwGif; y#dyu©rsm;? tajccHtaqmufttHku@ vdktyfcsufrsm;vnf;&SdaeNyD; ,ckvuf&Sd tcsdefwGif jyKjyifajymif;vJqJ&Sdaeonfh twGuf pGefYOD;&if;ESD;jr§KyfESHolrsm;twGuf tcuftcJrsm;&SdEdkifonf/Rita Nguyen onf xdkuJhodkYtcuftcJrsm;ESifh pdrf;ol r[kwfbJ AD,uferfwGif ppfyGJumv ESifhtwl uae'godkY xGufajy;cJh&olvnf; jzpfonf/RitaNguyen onf University of British Columbia wGif ynm oifMum;cJhNyD; Electronic Arts tyg t0if marketing u@rsm;wGif tvkyf vkyfudkifcJhonf/Rita Nguyen tae jzifh olrb0tcsdeftawmfrsm;rsm;tm; uae'gwGif ukefqHk;cJhNyD;aemuf olrarG;zGm; cJhonfh AD,uferfEdkifiHwGif tcsdefrsm;tm; qufvufjzwfoef;&eftwGuf qHk;jzwf ukrÜPDudk wnfaxmifvdkcJhNyD; xdktcsdef uolrtaejzifh rnfonfhvkyfief;tm; aqmif&Guf&rnfudk wdwdususrod&SdcJhay/ taemufEdkifiHrSpm;oHk;olaps;uGufrsm; wGif enf;ynmxkwfukefrsm;rSm atmifjrif aecsdefwGif AD,uferfuJhodkYaps;uGufrsm; taejzifh tapmydkif;umvzGHUNzdK;wdk;wufrI tqifhrSmyif&Sdaeao;onf/jynfoltrsm;pk onf xkwfukeftawmfrsm;rsm;udk awGU jrifzl;jcif;r&SdMuao;onfhtcsdeftcg vnf;jzpfonf/xdktcsufu jrefrmEdkifiH tajctaexufyif vdktyfcsufydkrdk &SdaecJhaomtajctaewpf&yfyifvnf; jzpfonf/jrefrmEdkifiHwGiftajccHtaqmuf ttHku@wGif vdktyfcsufrsm;&Sdaeaomf vnf; enf;ynmtay:pdwf0ifpm;rIrSm tvGefaumif;rGefonfhtaetxm;wGif &SdaeaMumif; olru odjrifoabmayguf
  12. 12. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 12 Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary A sia’s largest budget car- rier AirAsia has teamed up with The Suu Foun- dation, which was launched re- cently at the Co-operative Busi- ness Centre in Yangon, in a bid to improve healthcare and edu- cation in Myanmar. AirAsia Berhad CEO Aireen Omar said, “AirAsia applauds the initiative by the Suu Foun- dation in bettering healthcare and education opportunities in Myanmar and we are proud to support its cause.” Nobel Peace Prize laureate and the foundation’s creator Aung San Suu Kyi said her foun- dation aims to raise the stand- ard of health and education in Myanmar and thanked AirAsia for the company’s support. Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former US supporting the foundation and both are honorary co-chairs of the Suu Foundation. Nwe Zin A Norwegian social busi- ness organisation has started teaching an Eng- lish course to Myanmar’s tour- ism and hospitality workers in a bid to help them leverage the large number of tourists country. The program, sponsored by the Partnership for Change, is a six week intensive English course for the Inle people work- ing in hospitality and tourism, Kyaw Min the New York Times reported. The pilot course proved so popular that 120 people signed up to join the next one in July 2014. The program includes teach- ing Myanmar workers how to give directions and how to un- derstand English grammar. The program is run by Teach- ers Across Borders and is ex- pected to run more courses help the professional development of the Myanmar tourism indus- try if the English course is suc- cessful. Pork from Myanmar D istrict magistrates of border districts of the India’s northeastern state of Mizoram have ordered to ban import of pigs and pork from Myanmar until August fearing fresh incidents of the Porcine Reproductive and Res- piratory Syndrome (PRRS). Authorities of districts adjoining Myanmar, Champhai, Lunglei, Serchhip, Lawngtlai and Saiha have been instructed to issue prohibitory orders, Director of the state Animal Hus- bandry and Veterinary LB Sailo told the Press Trust of India. Though there has been no fresh infection, he said, but the state government was taking preventive measures. “The Centre has issued a stern warning to Mizoram on the import of pigs from Myanmar which shares a 404 km inter- national border as PRRS is always present in the neighbour- ing country,” Sailo was quoted as saying. Hundreds of pigs were killed when the PRRS hit Mizoram early last year, prompting the state government to seal the border. Phyu Thit Lwin T wo universities from Singapore and two from Myan- mar signed two memoranda of understanding (MOU) on cooperation in legal education, Singapore’s Minis- try of Law said. The MOUs were signed during the visit of Singapore’s Sen- ior Minister of State for Law and Education Indranee Rajah to Myanmar last month. The National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Faculty of Law and the Singapore Management University’s (SMU) School of Law signed an MOU with the Department of Law of the University of Yangon, and another with the University of Mandalay’s Department of Law. The MOUs aim to promote cooperation in legal educa- tion between the universities, the ministry said. Key areas of cooperation will include faculty exchanges, study visits, curriculum planning and design, cooperation in legal educa- tion pedagogy, as well as enhancement of legal research and development resources, it added. Dean of SMU School of Law, Professor Yeo Tiong Min, said, “Myanmar and Singapore share the same common law tradition, and face many similar issues in adapting and ap- plying it in an Asian society. “There is much that the universities can learn from one an- other on issues of law and legal education. The memoran- dum of understanding will enable the signatory universities Shein Thu Aung Fishermen at Inle Lake, one of Myanmar’s top tourist destinations. SherpaHossainy Aung San Suu Kyi addresses the launching ceremony of Suu Foundation at the Co- operative Business Centre in Yangon. UAung/Xinhua tm&StBuD;qHk;bwf*sufavaMumif; vdkif;jzpfonfh AirAsia onf pkazmifa'; &Sif;ESifhyl;aygif;í &efukefwGif yl;aygif; aqmif&GufrIqdkif&mpD;yGm;a&;pifwmwpfck udk rMumao;rDu zGifhvSpfcJhNyD; jrefrm EdkifiHwGif usef;rma&;apmifha&SmufrIESifh ynma&;tajctaewdk;wufvmap&ef twGuf &nf&G,faMumif; od&onf/ ydkrdkaumif;rGefaomusef;rma&;apmifh a&SmufrIESifhynma&;tcGifhtvrf;rsm;udk jrefrmEdkifiHwGif &&Sdvmap&eftwGuf pkazmifa';&Sif; rS aqmif&GufaerIrsm;udk AirAsiaESifhyl;aygif;vkyfaqmif&onfht wGufvnf; *kPf,l0rf; ajrmuf aMumif; Aireen Omar u ajymMum; cJhonf/ aemfa0;EdkifiH vlrItusKd;pD;yGm;tzGJU tpnf;rS jrefrmEdkifiHc&D;oGm;vkyfief; u@wGif tvkyfvkyfudkifaeMuolrsm; tm; t*Fvdyfpmoifwef;ay;rIrsm;udk pwifjyKvkyfcJhNyD; jrefrmEdkifiHodkY urÇm vSnfhc&D;oGm;rsm; a&muf&SdvmrIudk ydkrdk tultnDrsm;ay;vmEdkif&eftwGuf &nf &G,faMumif; od&onf/ tqdkygt*Fvdyfpmoifwef;tpDtpOf onf &ufowåywfajcmufywfoifwef; ay;rnfhtpDtpOfwpf&yfjzpfaMumif; od& onf/ tdEd´,EdkifiH ta&SUajrmufa'ojzpfaomrDZdk&efjynfe,fc½dkifw&m;ol BuD;rsm;ujrefrmEdkifiHrS0ufrsm;ESifh0ufom;wifoGif;rIudkMo*kwfvrwdkifcift xd wm;jrpfoGm;&eftwGuf qHk;jzwfcJhNyD; Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) a&m*gtm;aMumuf&GHUonfhtwGufaMumifh jzpfaMumif; od&onf/ pifumylEdkifiHrSwuúodkvfESpfckESifhjrefrmEdkifiHrwuúodkvfESpfckwdkYonf Oya' ynma&;u@wGifyl;aygif;aqmif&Guf&eftwGuf em;vnfrIpmcRefvTmudkvuf rSwfa&;xdk;cJhaMumif;pifumylEdkifiHOya'a&;&m0efBuD;XmerSajymMum;csuf t& od&onf/ pifumylEdkifiHOya'a&;&mESifhynma&;qdkif&mtBuD;wef;0efBuD; Indranee Rajah onfjrefrmEdkifiHodkYvGefcJhonfhvua&muf&SdcJhonfhtcsdef wGiftqdkygem;vnfrIpmcRefvTmtm; vufrSwfa&; xdk;cJhjcif;jzpfonf/,ckem; vnfrIpmcRefvTmt& ESpfEdkifiHwuúodkvfrsm;tMum; Oya'ynma&;qdkif&myl; aygif;aqmif&GufrIrsm;udkwdk;wufvmap&ef &nf&G,fjcif; jzpfonf/
  13. 13. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com REGIONAL BIZ 13 Myanmar Summary Contd. P 20... Mishap could spur management changes T he disappearance of the Malaysian Airline System (MAS) jet could dent the national carrier’s plan to return analysts said. Flight MH370 disappeared early March 8 about an hour Lumpur after climbing to a cruising altitude of 35,000 feet (10,670 metres). MAS, which saw its net loss expand 171 percent to 1.17 bil- lion ringgit ($359.12 million) in Yantoultra Ngui 2013 from 2012, could see a loss in bookings due to the missing airliner and some analysts be- lieve it could lead to a change in management. “We do not discount the pos- sibly of changes to MAS top management, given the existing and the severity of the current incident,” Daniel Wong, equity analyst with Kuala Lumpur- based Hong Leong Investment Bank, wrote in a note last week. - ment on any possible changes to management, saying their primary focus was to care for the families of the passengers on the missing jet. The latest incident is the sec- ond mishap for MAS after a Twin Otter aircraft belonging to MASWings, a unit of MAS, crashed while attempting to land in October 2013, killing two. “This could last for some time, even months,” said Pong Teng Siew, head of research at Kuala Lumpur-based Interpac Securities. “There will be some apprehension among travellers whether they should take MAS “Passengers and regular trav- ellers of MAS will watch care- fully how the top management handles this crisis situation. It means a lot to the future of the carrier.” MAS has been aiming to turn around since it last posted an ringgit in 2010, but loss-making routes and competition from budget airlines like AirAsia have hurt the company. It is only recently that it start- ed to see its turnaround plan gain traction after a series of corporate exercises that helped The airline also gained the support of its 20,000-strong employee union following an aborted share swap with AirA- sia in May 2012. Eleven out of 12 analysts who cover the stock have either a strong sell or sell rating, while one recommended a hold, ac- cording to data compiled by ThomsonReuters. The shares have slumped al- most 66 percent since 59-year- old power industry veteran, Ah- mad Jauhari Yahya, joined the state-controlled airline in 2011. Reuters rav;&Sm;avaMumif;vdkif; av,mOf aysmufqHk;rIaMumifh 2014 ckESpftukef wGif,if;avaMumif;vdkif;tusKd;tjrwf &&SdrIrSm usqif;EdkifaMumif; uRrf;usifol rsm;u ajymMum;cJhMuonf/ MH370 av,mOfonf rwfv 8 &ufaeYwGif uGmvmvrfylrS c&D;pOfxGufcGmNyD;aemuf xl;qef;pGmaysmufqHk;oGm;cJhjcif;jzpfonf/ MAS onf 2012 ckESpfrS 2013 ckESpf twGif; tom;wift½HI;ay:rIrSm 171 &mcdkifEIef;txd jrifhwufvmcJhNyD; yrmPtm;jzifh rav;&Sm;&if;*pf 1.17 bDvD,H (tar&duefa':vm 359.12 rDvD,H) txd&Sdonf/ ,if;av,mOf aysmufqHk;rIaMumifhavaMumif;vdkif;tae jzifhav,mOfvufrSwfBudKwifrSm,lrIrsm; usqif;rIudk BuHKawGU&EdkifNyD; tcsKdUpdppf olrsm;u pDrHcefYcGJrIudk ajymif;vJoGm;ap vdrfhrnf[k ,HkMunfxm;Muonf/ pDrHcefYcGJ rItydkif;ESifhywfoufí ajymif;vJrIwpfpHk wpf&mudkrQ MAS rS trIaqmifrsm;u tm½Hkpdkuf&mrSm aysmufqHk;oGm;aom av,mOfay:wGif ygoGm;aomc&D;onf rsm;rdom;pkrsm;tm; *½kpdkufay;&efom jzpfaMumif; ajymMum;cJhMuonf/ MAS c&D;onfrsm;ESifhyHkrSefc&D;oGm; vmolrsm;taejzifhvnf; ,cktajctae udk rnfuJhodkYaom pDrHcefYcGJrIrsm;jzifh xdef;odrf;oGm;rnfudk apmifhMunfhaeMu aMumif;vnf;od&onf/ C bank sees 2014 GDP growth at lower than 3pc Orathai Sriring & Kitiphong Thaichareon T hailand’s central bank cut its benchmark inter- est rate by 25 basis points last week in a bid to spark growth in a sluggish economy hurt by months of political un- rest. Highlighting the problems facing Thailand’s economy, the Constitutional Court earlier in the day blocked government plans to allocate 2 trillion baht ($62 billion) for infrastructure projects. The Bank of Thailand’s Mon- etary Policy Committee (MPC) voted 4-3 to cut the one-day re- purchase rate to 2.0 percent, a level last seen in late 2010. “We don’t think that today’s rate cut will do much to boost GDP growth,” said Gundy Cahyadi, an economist with DBS Bank in Singapore. - dence has been triggered by the political stalemate and we doubt that rate cut will do anything In any case, loan growth has re- mained strong, with household loan growth still in the double- digit territory,” he said. At its last meeting on Jan. 22, the committee unexpect- edly voted 4-3 to keep the rate unchanged while warning of substantially increased risks to growth from the turmoil. The committee said in a statement: “Downside risks to growth have risen in the wake of prolonged political situation. remains subdued. Monetary policy has some scope to ease, in order to lend more support to the economy and ensure con- - tion.” It also said that “prolonged political uncertainties would continue to impede recovery of private consumption and in- vestment”. The committee said the three members who opposed the cut felt existing policy was accom- modative “while the main head- - cial in nature”. The central bank said econom- ic growth was now expected to be less than 3 percent this year. At the start of 2014, it expected growth of about 4 percent. Scaled-back protests Last week’s meeting took place at a time protesters trying to unseat Prime Minister Yin- gluck Shinawatra have scaled back their action, but political tension and uncertainty still is taking a toll on Southeast Asia’s second-biggest economy, after Indonesia. - dence tumbled to a 12-year low in February, a survey showed - to Beijing and was presumed to have crashed. Stringer/Reuters
  14. 14. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com REGIONAL BIZ 14 Bankregulatorapproves10firmsforprivatebankpilot C hina will launch pilot programmes testing the development of privately- owned banks in Tianjin, Shang- hai, Zhejiang and Guangdong, the country’s bank regulator Shang Fulin said last week. The pilot, which was approved by China’s government in Janu- the country to open its closely- guarded banking sector to pri- vate investors. The China Banking Regula- tory Commission named 10 companies it has approved to participate in the pilot project. These include e-commerce gi- ants Alibaba and Tencent Hold- ings Ltd – both of which are already competing with banks for depositors by selling high- yielding wealth management products online. established, each with two com- panies as joint investors, the CBRC said. The other private companies that CBRC approved are: auto parts manufacturer Wanxiang China Holdings Co Ltd; airline operator JuneYao Group; di- International Ltd; Shenzhen Baiyetuan Investment Co Ltd, the largest shareholder of Join- care Pharmaceutical Industry Group Co; Tianjin Shanghui In- vestment Co Ltd, a subsidiary of pharmaceutical conglomerate Tasly Holding Group Co Ltd; copper materials producer Hua- bei Group; power plant equip- ment producer Chint Group; petrochemical and plastics con- glomerate Huafeng Group. Alibaba is applying for the - vices Group, which includes on- line payment unit Alipay as well as its shareholding in Alibaba’s Insurance, and Tianhong Asset Management Co. “The Small and Micro Finan- cial Services Group will apply for the license together with China Wanxiang Holding Co. Ltd; we are currently preparing the relevant application materi- als so have no further informa- tion to share at this time,” an Alibaba Small and Micro Fi- nancial Services Group spokes- woman told Reuters via email. Wanxiang Holdings is part of Hangzhou-based Wanxiang Group, China’s biggest auto parts company built by billion- aire Lu Guanqiu. Tencent was not available for immediate comment. Economists have long decried the tendency of China’s state- dominated banking system to grant loans primarily to large and medium-sized-enterprises (SMEs) account for 60 percent of gross domestic product and around 75 percent of new jobs. that even if regulators move ag- gressively to permit privately- owned banks, it won’t provide an immediate solution to SME Reuters Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary w½kwfEdkifiH wD&efusif;? &Sef[dkif;? ZD*sif; ESifh *Gefa'gif;NrdKUrsm;wGif yk*¾vduydkifbPf rsm; zGHUNzdK;wdk;wufrItajctaersm;udk prf;oyfppfaq;&eftwGuf bPfvkyfief; ydkif;qkdif&m xdef;odrf;rItpDtpOfrsm;udk jyKvkyfoGm;rnf[k bPfvkyfief;ydkif;qdkif &mtBuD;tuJwpfOD;jzpfol Shang Fulin u vGefcJhonfh&ufowåywfu ajymMum; cJhonf/ tqdkygtpDtpOfudk w½kwftpdk;&rS Zefe0g&DvwGif twnfjyKcJhjcif;jzpfNyD; ,cktpDtpOfrsm;onf w½kwfEdkifiH bPfvkyfief;u@wGif yk*¾vdu&if;ESD; jr§KyfESHolrsm;twGuf wHcg;zGifhaqmif&Guf rI ajcvSrf;aumif;wpf&yfyifjzpfonf/ w½kwfEdkifiH bPfvkyfief;ydkif;qdkif&m BuD;Muyfppfaq;a&;aumfr&SifrS tqkdyg xdef;odrf;vrf;jyrItpDtpOfrsm;wGif yg0if&eftwGuf ukrÜPD 10 ckudk xkwfazmfaMunmcJhNyD; tqdkygukrÜPDrsm; wGif vkyfief;BuD;rsm;jzpfaom Alibaba ESifh Tencent Holdings Ltd wdkYvnf; yg0ifaMumif; od&onf/ tqkdygtpDtpOfwGif bPf 5 ckudk wnfaxmifoGm;rnfjzpfNyD; bPfwpfck csif;pDtm; ukrÜPDESpfckrS tusKd;wltjzpf zGJUpnf;wnfaxmifoGm;&rnfjzpfaMumif; w½kwfEdkifiH bPfvkyfief;ydkif;qdkif&m BuD;Muyfppfaq;a&;aumfr&SifrS ajymMum; cJhonf/ Number of people in work at highest level on record S outh Korea’s seasonally adjusted unemployment spiked to a three-year high in February as job seekers the number of people in work hit its highest level in 15 years in an encouraging signal for the country’s economy. Data from South Korea’s sta- tistics agency showed last week that the unemployment rate for the month rose to 3.9 percent from 3.2 percent in January. An additional 308,800 peo- ple entered the jobs market in February – the highest monthly increase on record dating back to June 1999 – whereas only 112,800 jobs were newly cre- ated. The rate of people in employ- ment out of the total population Choonsik Yoo & Se Young Lee aged 15 or older rose to 60.6 percent in February, also the highest since June 1999, from 60.4 percent in January, the Statistics Korea data showed. - sonal patterns. While the February unem- ployment rate hit its highest since touching a same 3.9 per- cent in March 2011, “The data suggests that the job market overall is starting to improve as the economy rebounds,” said HI Investment economist Park Sang-hyun. The government of President Park Geun-hye is pushing to boost employment, particularly among women and the youth, recovery in domestic demand. The central bank currently forecasts economic growth to accelerate to 3.8 percent this year from an estimated 2.8 per- cent last year, in line with the expected global economic re- covery. Reuters awmifudk&D;,m;EdkifiH tvkyfvufrJh EIef;xm;onf oHk;ESpfqufwdkuf jrifhwuf cJhjcif;rSm vkyfom;aps;uGufwGif tvkyf tudkif&SmazGoltrsm;tjym;&Sdvmonfh twGufjzpfNyD; tvkyfvkyfudkifaeMuaom vkyfom;ta&twGufrSmvnf; 15 ESpf wmtwGif; tjrifhqHk;taetxm;wpf&yf udk a&muf&SdvmNyD; xdktcsufu wdkif;jynf pD;yGm;a&;zGHUNzdK;twGuf cGeftm;wpf&yf jzpfaMumif;vnf; od&onf/ awmifudk&D;,m;EdkifiH pm&if;tif; at*sifpDu xkwfjyefaomtcsuftvuf rsm;t& tvkyfvufrJhEIef;xm;onf Zefe0g&DvwGif 3.2 &mcdkifEIef;rS azazmf 0g&DvwGif 3.9 &mcdkifEIef;txd jrifhwuf vmaMumif; od&onf/ Reuters Job seekers look at help-wanted advertisements at a job fair in Seoul. LeeJae-Won/Reuters
  15. 15. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com REGIONAL BIZ 15 Myanmar Summary W hen Typhoon Hai- yan (locally named as “Yolanda”) swept across the Philippines late last year, killing more than 6,000 people, displacing more than 4 million, and causing nearly $1 billion in damage, it became the third massive tropical storm to hit the island nation in less than 12 months. The ferocity of the typhoon sparked speculation among the media, politicians, and experts that such extreme weather is a direct consequence of climate change (Haiyan is the most powerful storm of its kind to make landfall on record). “The Philippines is no stran- ger to the adverse weather. Droughts, heavy rainfall, land- slides, and earthquakes regu- larly disrupt day-to-day life,” said HyoYoul Kim, country rep- resentative, Philippines, Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI). “In this context, it is rec- ognised as being among the world’s most vulnerable coun- tries to climate change.” In recent years, the Philip- pines government has taken action on this issue, passing the Climate Change Act of 2009. This legislation established the Climate Change Commission (CCC) as a centralised policy- making body on issues related to climate change. The CCC helped the national government adopt the Nation- al Climate Change Adaptation - ity areas to focus on for climate change resilience. It has also been tasked with assisting lo- cal governments to prepare Lo- cal Climate Change Adaptation needs. been working with the GGGI on a project – Demonstration of Eco-town Framework in the Philippines. project was designed to dem- onstrate how at-risk munici- palities can become ecologically stable and economically resil- ient to climate change. The bulk of GGGI’s work took place in the town of San Vicente in the province of Palawan, one of the westernmost islands in the Philippines. San Vicente is a municipal- ity of about 30,000 inhabit- ants and has a total land area Mike Sullivan of 165,798 hectares. The town is highly vulnerable to sea-level - ing, and, conversely, drought. farming make up nearly 60 per- cent of all economic activity, the increasing threat of climate change has drastic implications for its economy and food secu- rity. The CCC and GGGI conduct- ed climate change vulnerability and risk assessments and envi- ronmental and natural resource accounting in multiple sectors, including agriculture, coastal and marine, forestry and health. These analyses found, among other things, that climate change will likely cause de- creased crop yield for farmers, increased deaths among about 4,000 work animals, higher lev- els of coastal erosion and sedi- mentation that will threaten the livelihoods of around 8,000 increased water-borne and vec- tor-borne diseases. The analysis also found that San Vicente needs to strengthen its response to climate change. There are few locally-based ag- to help farmers introduce al- ternative, more resilient crops. has not modernised its methods and processing facilities, mak- ing it all the more vulnerable to the increasing pressures on coastal and marine resources. Based on the analysis, the CCC-GGGI team, through con- sultation with local and foreign stakeholders and experts, sug- gested an array of adaptation measures for the town. Accord- ing to a forthcoming report, these measures were based on feasibility, social and cultural feasibility, required time, and sustainability and overall im- pact.” Some of the recommendations include modernising farming practices to include weather stations and small-scale irriga- tion facilities, introduction of more climate-resilient crops, establishing sea walls and dikes, setting up an early warning system, involving the private sector in coastal planning and management, conducting train- ing on disaster risk reduction and management, and provid- ing a clean and adequate water supply system. “The suggested measures were presented to the munici- pal government of San Vicente to incorporate them into their development planning,” said Kim. “This process is the so-called - nomic development. In other words, as San Vicente attempts to grow and diversify its econo- my – in recent years there has been a great push to attract more tourism – it must take these adaptation measures into account into every aspect of its economic planning. Doing this, according to the analysis car- ried out by the CCC and GGGI, will reduce the town’s vulner- ability to climate change.” On February 5, the Assembly of San Vicente passed a resolu- tion adopting the results of the analysis undertaken by CCC and GGGI, including the sug- gested adaptation measures. The Assembly also passed a further resolution “expressing thanks and appreciation” to the CCC and GGGI for their work in San Vicente. The CCC and GGGI are now taking the lessons learned from the Eco-town Framework and applying them at the provin- cial level. Dubbed the Eco-town Scale-up, the project began in late 2013 and will enhance cli- mate resilience and promote green growth in four provinces, which could then be replicated in provinces nationwide. The Eco-town Framework ef- fort received the support of the Philippines, Benigno Aquino III at a meeting January 22. vGefcJhonfhESpfu [dkif,ef;wdkif;zGef; rkefwdkif;zdvpfydkifEdkifiHodkY wdkufcwfcJhNyD; aemuf zdvpfydkifwGif vlaygif; 6000 ausmfaoqHk;cJh&NyD; tdk;rJhtdrfrJhjzpfoGm;ol 4 oef;eD;yg;&SdcJhum xdkwdkif;zGef;rkefwdkif; aMumifh xdcdkufysufpD;cJh&onfrSm tar &duefa':vm wpfbDvD,HeD;yg;&SdcJhNyD; 12 vwmumvtwGif; wwd,tBudrf ajrmuf zdvpfydkifEdkifiHtm; wdkufcwfcJh onfh tiftm;BuD; tylydkif;rkefwdkif;wpfck vnf;jzpfcJhonf/ wdkif;zGef;rkefwdkif;aMumifh xdcdkufrIonf rD'D,mrsm;? EdkifiHa&;orm;rsm;ESifh uRrf; usifolrsm;tay: oufa&mufrItrsm; tjym;jzpfay:cJhNyD; ,ckuJhodkY qdk;&Gm;vS aom obm0ab;tEÅ&m,fuyfqdk;onf &moDOwkajymif;vJrIaMumifhjzpfaMumif; oHk;oyfMuonf/[dkif,ef;wdkif;zGef;rkefwdkif; onf tiftm;tjyif;xefqHk;rkefwdkif;wpfck tjzpfvnf; owfrSwfcJh&onf/ zdvpfydkifEdkifiHonf &moDOwkazmufjyef rIrsm;ESifhtuRrf;w0ifaeNyDjzpfum rdk;acgif jcif;? rdk;tvGeftuRH&GmoGm;jcif;? ajrNydK jcif;rsm;ESifhajrivsifvIwfcwfrIrsm;onfh aeYpOfqdkovdkyHkrSefjzpfysufaeavh&SdvmNyD jzpfaMumif; Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) rS zdvpfydkifEdkifiH udk,fpm;vS,ftzGJU0ifwpfOD;jzpfol Hyo Youl Kim u ajymMum;cJhonf/ xdktcsufrsm;aMumifh zdvpfydkifEdkifiHonf urÇmh&moDOwkrwnfNidrfqHk;EdkifiHwpfckjzpf rMumao;rDESpfrsm;twGif; zdvpfydkiftpdk;& u tqdkygjyóemudk ajz&Sif;&eftwGuf 2009 ckESpfwGif &moDOwkajymif;vJrI qdkif&m tufOya'wpfckudk xkwfjyefcJh NyD; ,if;Oya'tm; &moDOwkajymif;vJ rIqdkif&maumfr&SifrS pwifaqmif&GufcJh jcif;jzpfonf/&moDOwkajymif;vJrIqdkif&m aumfr&SifrSzdvpfydkiftpdk;&tm; National ClimateChangeAdaptation tpDtpOf udk aqmif&GufEdkif&ef taxmuftyHhay;cJh NyD; tqdkygtpDtpOfu &moDOwkajymif;vJ rIrsm;twGuf t"duxm;aqmif&GufoGm; &rnfh {&d,mrsm;udk owfrSwfazmfxkwf ay;cJhonf/xdkYjyifjynfwGif;tpdk;&rsm;tm; Local Climate Change Adaptation tpDtpOftm; vufcH&eftwGufvnf; taxmuftulay;cJhaMumif; od&onf/ “As San Vicente attempts to grow and di- versify its economy – in recent years there has been a great push to attract more tourism – it must take these adaptation measures into account into every aspect of its economic planning.” - port, the Philippines. DamirSagolj/Reuters
  16. 16. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com INTERNATIONAL BIZ 16 T he world must in- crease its food pro- duction by 60 per- cent by mid-century or risk serious food shortag- es that could bring social unrest and civil wars, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said last week. Demand for food will rise rapidly over the next few decades as the world population surpasses 9 billion and increasingly wealthy people improve their diets, consuming more calories, said Hiroy- uki Konuma, the assistant director-general of FAO launched a one-week re- gional food security con- ference in Ulan Bator. But as the need for more food increases, the world is spending less and less money on agricultural re- search, causing many sci- entists to doubt whether food production can keep up with demand growth. “If we fail to meet our goal and a food short- age occurs, there will be a high risk of social and Stian Reklev political unrest, civil wars and terrorism, and world security as a whole might - ma. The challenge is espe- cially demanding in de- veloping nations, which need to boost crops by a staggering 77 percent, he said. be left with more than half a billion chronically hungry people even if the region meets its millen- nium development goal of cutting that number to 12 percent of the population, he said. Despite progress made the world still has 842 million undernourished people, according to FAO, of which nearly two thirds One in four children un- stunted due to malnutri- tion. The UN body outlined two main options: in- crease arable land areas and boost productivity rates. But available arable land is almost fully ex- ploited, and production growth rates have been lacklustre for the past two decades. During the green revo- lution in the 1980s, pro- ductivity rates for rice and wheat increased by 3.5 percent annually, but for the past 20 years the rate has been stuck at 0.6 to 0.8 percent. The growth rate needs to be stable at around 1 percent if the world is to have a theoretical chance to avoid serious shortag- es, said Konuma. Water scarcity in big food-producing nations like China is worsening, and many farmers are increasingly tempted to shift production from food to bioenergy, a pop- ular option to cut emis- sions of climate-changing greenhouse gases. Climate change is wors- ening the situation, as more frequent extreme weather events devastate crops. In the past three years, Australia, Canada, China, Russia and the United States have all suf- fered big harvest losses Cost is an additional threat to food security, according to the UN body. High and volatile food prices restrict poor peo- ple’s access to food, while high crude oil prices in- Reuters Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary ukvor*¾pm;eyf&du©mESifhpdkufysKd; a&;tzGJUtpnf;BuD; (FAO) vGefcJhonfhtywfwGifajymMum;csuf t& urÇmBuD;twGuf q,fpkESpf 0uftwGif; pm;eyf&du©mtm; 60 &mcdkifEIef; ydkrdkwdk;jr§ifhxkwfvkyfoGm; &rnfjzpfNyD; pm;eyf&du©mrvHkavmuf rIu vlrIrwnfrNidrfjzpfrIrsm;ESifh jynfwGif;ppfyGJrsm;udkzefwD;vdrfhrnf jzpfaMumif; od&onf/ urÇmhvlOD;a&rSm 9 bDvD,H ausmfvGefvmNyDjzpfonfhtwGuf vmrnfhq,fpkESpfrsm;twGif; pm;eyf&du©mvdktyfrIvnf; tvGef vsifjrefpGmjrifhwufvmrnfjzpf aMumif; FAO tm&Sypdzdwf qdkif&m vufaxmufñTefMum;a&; rSL;csKyfjzpfol Hiroyuki Konuma u Ulan Bator wGifjyKvkyfcJhaom pm;eyf&du©mqdkif&mawGUqHkaqG;aEG; yGJwpfckwGif ajymMum;cJhonf/ pm;eyf&du©mvdktyfrI ydkrdkjrifhwuf vmNyDjzpfaomfvnf; pdkufysKd;a&; u@qdkif&mokawoejyKvkyfrIrsm; twGufurÇmBuD;wGifaiGaMu;tukef uscHum oHk;pGJrIrSm enf;oxuf enf;vmaMumif;ESifh xdktcsufu urÇmhpm;eyf&du©mxkwfvkyfEdkifrI onf pm;eyf&du©mvdktyfrIudk jznfh qnf;Edkifygrnfavmqdkonfhar;cGef; rsm;udk jzpfvmapaMumif;vnf; od&onf/ pm;eyf&du©mydkrdkvdktyf vmrIrSmtxl;ojzifhzGHUNzdK;qJEdkifiH rsm;wGifBuHKawGUae&aompdefac:rI wpfckjzpfNyD;pdkufysKd;rIrsm;udkwdk; jr§ifhvkyfaqmif&ef vdktyfaMumif; F our of the big- gest US technology groups collectively hold an estimated $124 billion in US Treasury earning them tax-free in- terest, the UK’s Bureau of Investigative Journalism (BIJ) said. - ple Inc, Microsoft Corp, Google Inc and Cisco Systems Inc hold a large proportion of the $254.9 billion held in their for- eign subsidiaries in US Treasuries, according to by the London-based BIJ, - ganisation. Bringing the money home would trigger a tax bill, so the companies fund foreign expansion but also, executives say, to avoid a tax hit. Democratic party Sena- tor Carl Levin, who has campaigned for years against tax avoidance, was quoted saying by the BIJ that if US corpora- funds in US government debt, this income should face US taxes. “Those funds ought to be treated as having been repatriated and subject to US tax,” Levin said. Corporations including Apple have lobbied for changes so they would not have to pay US tax on income earned out- side the United States and brought home. Many other countries, including Britain, only tax income earned within their bor- ders, though some inter- national companies have been accused of reducing their bill via sophisticated - rangements. Some US companies say a “territorial” type of tax system would avoid double taxation and en- sure all businesses com- pete on equal terms. Tax campaigners say it would encourage companies to Google said it responded by governments while fol- lowing tax rules in every country where it operates. The other companies de- clined comment, but have previously said they pay all the tax they should. Reuters AjayVerma/Reuters Reuters tar&duefenf;ynmvkyfief; BuD;av;ckonf tar&duefaiG wdkufXmewGif aiGwdkufpmcsKyf cefYrSef;yrmPtar&duefa':vm 124 bDvD,Htm; twdk;EIef;ryg bJ &&SdcJhjcif;jzpfaMumif; ,lau Bureau of Investigative Journalism (BIJ) rS ajymMum; cJhonf/ ukrÜPDrsm;taejzifh aiGvHk;aiG &if;rsm;tm; jynfwGif;ü xm;&SdrI aMumifh taumufcGefay;aqmif onf jynfyvkyfief;rsm;wGifaiG aMu;rsm;xm;&SduEdkifiHjcm;vkyfief; cGJrsm;tm;csJUxGif&eftwGuf aqmif&GufMuaMumif; od&onf/
  17. 17. March 20-26, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com INTERNATIONAL BIZ 17 Myanmar Summary Fund could blacklist firms for corruption, environmental damage this year N orway’s sovereign wealth fund is ex- amining the oper- Western Sahara, a disput- ed region of North Africa with a history of human rights abuses, to ascer- tain whether its activities there are unethical. The $850-billion fund, which invests Norway’s revenues from oil and gas for future generations, in- vests only in companies it considers ethical, and has - cluding makers of nucle- ar arms, anti-personnel landmines, cluster bombs and tobacco. It is one of the world’s largest investors, with holdings in 8,200 com- panies, including a 2.06 percent Total stake worth about $3 billion, which makes it the French com- pany’s fourth-biggest in- vestor. “We are following the work of Total in Western Sahara closely,” said Ola Mestad, a law profes- sor who has headed the Norwegian fund’s ethics council since 2010. Total told Reuters its Western Sahara, as in other places where we operate, are in line with the applicable interna- tional laws and standards mentioned in our Code of Conduct, in particular those related to human Gwladys Fouche rights”. Mestad said the main is- sue with Western Sahara, which Morocco and Al- geria-backed separatists both claim, was ensuring that the interests of the local population, such as the Sahrawis – many of whom are either exiled or in refugee camps – are protected. Total was awarded a li- cence to explore for oil - hara in 2011 by Morocco, which annexed the re- gion in 1975 after colonial power Spain withdrew, and fought a war with the separatists. In 1991, was reached on the un- derstanding that a ref- erendum would be held on the region’s fate. That vote never took place. Media reports and hu- man rights organisations say the dispute has result- ed in frequent abuses, in- cluding the displacement of tens of thousands of Sahrawi civilians. The fund’s council on ethics, which published its 2013 annual report last week, has recommended the fund drop its invest- ments in companies in the past because of their involvement in Western Sahara. In 2005 the fund sold its stake in oil company Kerr McGee, since the council exploration work there strengthened the claims of Morocco to sovereignty over the territory, a claim not recognised by the United Nations. Kerr Mc- Gee did not renew its con- tract the following year. In 2011 the fund sold Corporation of Saskatch- ewan and FMC Corpora- tion for buying phosphate from Western Sahara. In December Total signed a joint declaration with Morocco’s National Bureau of Petroleum and Mines in which the latter emphasises its commit- ment to complying with the principles of the Char- ter of the United Nations. Total also signed a mem- orandum of understand- ing setting out corporate social responsibility prin- ciples for the reconnais- sance period and any sub- sequent phases. at the University of Oslo, lined with tomes on prop- erty, trade and EU law, Mestad said investors should be more aware of human rights issues when investing in a company, both for ethical reasons and because it can pose a risk to their investments. In 2014 he said the council on ethics would also be looking at oil and countries presenting a risk of corruption and could sell out of textile companies that violate workers’ rights. He said multinationals would probably not be di- rectly responsible for the worst labour conditions, but their supply chains could harbour abuses. “That is where there could be a relation be- tween really bad condi- tions and a company in which we are invested in,” he said. Reuters Ayesha Rascoe & Valerie Volcovici T he United States test sale of crude from its emergency oil stockpile since 1990, of- fering a modest 5 million barrels in what some ob- servers saw as a subtle message to Russia from the Obama administra- tion. The Energy Department said the test sale had been planned for months, timed to meet demand of annual maintenance cycles. But oil traders to take over the Crimea region from Ukraine has prompted calls for use of booming US energy resources to relieve de- pendence on Russian natural gas by Europe and Ukraine. Oil prices dipped to their lowest levels in a month after news of the test sale. would ensure that oil stored in vast salt caverns could still reach local re- changes in pipeline infra- structure. “Due to the recent dra- matic increase in domes- tic crude oil production, system have occurred,” department spokesman Bill Gibbons said. The test sale was needed to “ap- propriately assess the sys- tem’s capabilities in the event of a disruption,” he added. Surging US shale oil production has upended the logistics of US crude markets. Major pipelines that traditionally moved oil from the Gulf to the Midwest have reversed course, moving a glut of shale oil from places like North Dakota to points south. Analysts say President Barack Obama has been more willing than his pre- decessors to tap the stra- tegic reserve. Reuters The logo of the French oil giant Total SA is seen at the entrance of the company headquarters in the La Defense business district, west of Paris. JacquesBrinon aemfa0EdkifiH sovereign wealth fund rS vlUtcGifhta&; csKd;azmufrIjyóemrsm;&SdcJhaom tmz&duajrmufydkif;a'o taemufydkif;qm[m&wGif a&eH ukrÜPD Total vkyfief;aqmif &GufaerIrsm;udk ppfaq;rIrsm; jyKvkyfaeNyD; vlUusihf0wfESifhtnD aqmif&GufaerI&Sdr&Sdudk aocsm ap&efjzpfaMumif; od&onf/ tqdkyg&if;ESD;jr§KyfESHrItzGJUtpnf; BuD;&efyHkaiGyrmPonf tar &duefa':vm 850 bDvD,Htxd &SdaeNyD; aemfa0EdkifiHrS a&eHESifh obm0"mwfaiGUa&mif;csrIrS&&Sd onfh0ifaiGrsm;tm; vlom;usifh 0wfESifh udkufnDpGmjzifh vkyfief; aqmif&GufrIrsm;jyKvkyfaeaom vkyfief;rsm;wGifom &if;ESD;jr§KyfESH aMumif; od&onf/ xdk&if;ESD;jr§KyfESHrI&efyHkaiGtzGJU tpnf;BuD;wGif EsL;uvD;,m; vufeufjyKvkyfolrsm;tygt0if trnfysufpm&if;wGif yg0ifaom vkyfief;aygif; 63 ck txd&Sdae aMumif;vnf;od&onf/sovereign wealth fund onf urÇmhtBuD; qHk;&if;ESD;jr§KyfESHolrsm;xJrS &if;ESD; jr§KyfESHolwpfOD;jzpfNyD; ukrÜPDaygif; 8200 wGif &if;ESD;jr§KyfESHxm;ovdk Total wGifvnf; &S,f,m 2.06 &mcdkifEIef; ydkifqdkifNyD; tar&duef a':vm 3 bDvD,H eD;yg;wefzdk;&Sd aMumif; od&onf/ urÇmay:wGif a&eHtrsm;qHk; odkavSmifxm;&SdonfhEdkifiHrsm;teuf ta&;ay:tajctaersm;wGif vdktyfaompGrf;tifudkjywfawmuf rIr&Sdap&eftwGuf a&eHodkavSmif xm;rIudkjyKvkyfxm;NyD; tu,fí om tjcm;EdkifiHrsm;rS tar&duef odkYa&eHa&mif;csrIrjyKonfhtcgwGif tar&dueftaejzifh xkdjyóem udktaumif;qHk;udkifwG,fEdkifrnf avm[lonfhtcsuftm; od&Sd&ef tar&duefEdkifiHa&eHodkavSmif xm;rIrS yxrOD;qHk;tBudrftjzpf a&eHpdrf;prf;oyfa&mif;csrIudk jyKvkyfoGm;rnfjzpfaMumif;od&onf/ Myanmar Summary

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