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Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions
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Art NACO Pasadena 2013-04-29: Works and Expressions

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This material was prepared by the Program for Cooperative Cataloging and the Library of Congress.

This material was prepared by the Program for Cooperative Cataloging and the Library of Congress.

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  • [RLM: changed to “Describing” parallel to the other modules, added footedr]
  • In this module, we use the attributes of works and expressions recorded according to the instructions in Chapters 5 and 6 to create authorized and variant access points for works and expressions. Some types of works and expressions require specialized instructions and are most pertinent to select communities; constraints of time and expertise cause us to pass over those topics.[RLM: reworded]
  • Presenter: have class think of examples of works and expressions.[RLM: added new slide parallel to other modules]
  • [RLM: added new slide parallel to other modules]
  • “Piedra de Sol” is an example of a work. It is a poem written by Octavio Paz in 1957.The publication (manifestation) to the left contains an example of an expression: the first Spanish expression of the work.The publication (manifestation) to the right contains two expressions: the original Spanish text and an English translation. Note: The Spanish text is identical in these two publications, so they each contain the same Spanish expression. Represented on this slide are two expressions. The Spanish expression is in both publications; the English expression is only in the publication to the right.[RLM: added slide with examples]
  • This diagram might make this a little clearer. There is one Spanish expression. The same expression is in both publications (to the left of the screen). The publication titled “Sun stone” also has an English expression in it (to the right of the screen). This diagram shows how this might work in an entity-relationship database: we’d have one description of the work, one description of the (original) Spanish expression, and one description of this English expression, all linked by relationship links.[RLM: added slide]
  • The introduction to ChapterZ1 of the Descriptive Cataloging Manual, after laying out the conditions under which LC will create name-title or title authority records, states that “NACO participants may contribute name authority records for names or name/titles ... as needed for cataloging.”BIBCO requires all access points in a BSR (Bibco Standard Record) to be supported by authority records.[RLM: added “The introduction to” at beginning of speaker notes]
  • [RLM: added slide to parallel other modules]
  • [RLM: added slide parallel to other modules]Open to 5.3, looking for the core elements for works (click through as they find them)Note again that core elements are required, but do not necessarily wind up in the authorized access point for the work.Reminder: We are not covering music or legal works in this module.
  • [RLM: added slide parallel to other modules]
  • [RLM: added slide]
  • [RLM added slide to parallel other modules]Open to 5.3, find the core elements for expressionsThis module does not cover cartographic works.
  • Everyone go to RDA 5.8
  • Two examples. These 670s show the important information that needs to be recorded for works and expressions: presentations of the title, names of creators, names of contributors (e.g. translators).
  • [RLM: reworded bullets slightly]Note the three-step procedure: title of the work preferred title authorized access point. Note too that RDA divides titles into preferred titles and variant titles.
  • [RLM added slide parallel to other modules]Review 1.7; LOOK at A.3-A.4 together.The instructions here on Capitalization, Numbers, Diacritical Marks, Initial Articles Spacing of Initials and Acronyms, and Abbreviations are intended to “set up” the candidates for preferred title. Note the LC/PCC PS for the alternative in 6.2.1.7. Unlike AACR2, where 25.C2 called for initial articles to be omitted unless intended to be filed on, RDA posits initial articles as being part of the title, preferred or variant; the alternative may be serving as a bridge until more agencies make use of software that can allow initial articles to be disregarded in the filing of name-title access points—or until character strings are no longer the principal means of conveying the name of a work or expression.
  • [RLM: repositioned slide (formerly titled “Recording the preferred title for a work”) to follow slide about transcription]Second bullet point: it isn’t clear (yet) whether we correct inaccuracies in titles proper of non-series.
  • Refer to A.1; A.3; A.4; A.52.
  • [RLM: removed bullet point about musical works, etc. — We’ve already said we’re not covering musical and legal works; we’ll add in the religious works when we get to them]RDA follows AACR2 in using a dividing point for the date of creation of a work rather than that of its embodiment in a resource. There are several likely reasons for this: 1) works created after 1500 are more likely to be disseminated through publication, which brings a greater standardization; 2) most works created before 1501 do not exist in embodiments that decisively convey the creator’s own name for the work. In both cases, the principal aim is to choose as the preferred title a title by which a work is most commonly known.
  • [RLM: reworded]
  • An example of the first condition would be the preferred title “Hamlet” for the play by William Shakespeare. The play has become far better-known by the title “Hamlet,” as exemplified both by numbers of embodiments and by citations in reference sources.
  • [RLM: reworded, moved third bullet to next slide (goes with LCPS explanation)]
  • On first bullet point: this is a practical solution. The cataloger does not need to try to decide which title is better known or which one is the original language. Just choose based on which one comes to you first. However, if you have evidence about which title is the original, you should choose that title following the basic instruction at the beginning of 6.2.2.4. The LCPS tells what to do if the language editions are issued together and the original language cannot be determined.The second sentence of the PS refers to situations where the same text is found in two or more languages *in the same resource* and it cannot be determined that any of the languages present or another language represents the author’s original language.For individual works of art, the preference for English-language reference sources is tempered by the advice to avoid a reference source that gives all titles in the same language.
  • “Piedra de sol” is the title in the original language by which the work has become known.
  • Notice that reference sources take priority over embodiments of the work, although we still choose a title in the original language in most cases. This reinforces the “commonly-known” criterion as being the overarching principle behind the instructions.
  • The LC/PCC PS to 6.2.2.5 designates English as the preferred language and the Latin alphabet is the preferred script. Neither RDA nor the LC/PCC PS attempts to quantify “well-established.” Take this as a matter of cataloger judgment. If there is more than one English title, choose the one that in your opinion is the best known.For Anonymous works, a reminder that the “preferred script” for NACO is the Latin alphabet. Also, if multiple English-language versions of a title exist, with none “established,” the title in the original language is chosen.
  • A pre-1501 Greek work--we’re supposed to go to reference works.Exercise: Begin a worksheet (or open an OCLC workform) for this work. Record a 670 for each source as we look at the slides.
  • A pre-1501 Greek work--we’re supposed to go to reference works.
  • A pre-1501 Greek work--we’re supposed to go to reference works. This reference work refers in the main body of the article as Iliad. Because “Iliad” is the well-established English title, that is the title we choose as the preferred title of this work.
  • What constitutes a “generally-accepted” title is again a matter of cataloger judgment. The instruction contrasts cycles considered to have a title with situations where a descriptive phrase has been employed that may or may not take in a defined body of literature.
  • [RLM: revised the slide; did not revise the speaker notes. Suggest deletion of the speaker notes—probably more detail than the general NACO audience needs]Theinstruction as written invites some confusion because of its opening phrase: “For works contained in a manuscript or manuscripts …”. The preferred title being chosen here is that of the manuscript as a physical object, not of its intellectual content. The reference to the general instructions means that the instructions here are going to be applied to manuscripts or manuscript groups that do not name themselves.The LC/PCC PS for this instruction makes manifest what is implied in the sequence of the instructions. It’s important to track the language that the PS uses to distinguish between the manuscript as object (the “physical manuscript”) and its intellectual content (the “work”). The first step is to apply the general instructions at 6.2.2.4-6.2.2.6 Those instructions are applicable to the *work*. Many times, applying these instructions will produce a preferred title that would be combined with a name to form an authorized access point. The instructions at 6.2.2.7 are meant to name the physical manuscript when the work it contains has no title or has the same title as the physical manuscript, and when there is no creator to include when naming the work. The PS explains that the name of a physical manuscript is typically a phrase containing a generic term such as “codex,” “book,” “stone,” or other such term, or a phrase conbining a location with a term indicative of the manuscript’s content. (RDA examples: Codex Madrid I; Lindisfarne Gospels). The PS places priority on using names that can be shown to be in common use. Condition a) of 6.2.2.7 is the situation where the intellectual content has been given a title subsequent to the manuscript’s creation or compilation. That title is chosen as the preferred title.Condition b) of 6.2.2.7 is the situation where the physical manuscript has acquired a name, but the intellectual content has not. The physical manuscript name is then given as the preferred title. Condition c) of 6.2.2.7 is the situation where the intellectual content does not have a title nor the physical manuscript a name. A title is devised consisting of the authorized access point for the manuscript’s repository followed by the form subdivision Manuscript. The repository’s designation is added, even down to foliation for a manuscript within a collection.6.2.2.7 is unusual in having instructions for variant titles included. It provides for recording a devised title when the preferred title is either the title of the work or the name of the physical manuscript. The PS includes more instructions on variant titles, encouraging variant access points for previous repositories, variant forms of manuscript designations, and depository references in authority records for manuscripts whose authorized access point is the name of the physical manuscript.
  • [RLM: suggest deleting this slide; probably taken care of by final bullet point on previous slide]Thisinstruction has to do with authorized access points for component works in a manuscript or manuscript group—not with physical sections of the same. The first sentence of the PS ensures that the authorized access point for the physical manuscript will never be the “larger work” in an authorized access point for a component work—even when the authorized access points for the physical manuscript and the work are the same. “Selections” is treated a bit differently. It can be added to the authorized access pointfor the work contained in the manuscript or manuscript group, but not to the authorized access point for the physical manuscript, when those authorized access points differ. When they are the same, however, “Selections” may be used.
  • [RLM: revised slide]Notethat the instructions distinguish between part titles and part designations. Designations are defined as “a general term, with or without a numeric or alphabetic designation.” The instructions for part titles are the basic instructions found at 6.2.1. The instructions for designations call for recording the designation as found, but recording any numeric designation as a numeral. The general rule calls for part designation to be recorded as the preferred title only when it is the only way in which the part is identified
  • [RLM: added slide]REMEMBER none of these is the complete authorized access point. We shall see that the authorized access point begins with the authorized access point for the creator, which is a link to the description of that person/family/cb. We’re JUST recording the title attribute here.
  • [RLM: revised slide—removed last three bullet points because dealt with on previous slide]Note the example in RDA (reproduced here) only gives the preferred title for the part, not the full access point (which begins with the preferred title for the work as a whole).
  • [RLM: Split the slide into several]LCpractice, here, as in creating authorized access points for parts of a work, is to favor using the conventional collective title with “Selections” added.
  • Note carefully “Works. Selections.” This is a major change. “Selections” cannot stand alone as a preferred title.
  • [RLM: moved to be with other preferred title slides.]
  • [RLM: moved to be with other preferred title slides.].
  • [RLM: moved to be with other preferred title slides.]
  • [RLM: moved to be with other preferred title slides, revised slightly; removed last bullet point—this instruction is the same for the Bible and other scriptures, e.g. “Lord’s Prayer,” “Ten Commandments”.][REMOVED: RDA 6.23.2.19 (Other sacred scriptures)—also record part title as subdivision, but if a part is commonly identified by its own title rather than its designation as part of the larger scripture, record the title directly]
  • [RLM: moved to be with other preferred title slides; also split slide.]One of the major changes in RDA for naming works and expressions is its treatment of the Bible. AACR2 and previous cataloging codes demonstrate a Christian bias in using the term “Bible” to name not only the collection of books sacred to the three major branches of Christianity (Orthodox, Catholic, and Protestant), but those sacred to Jews. The division of these books into the “Old Testament” and the “New Testament” is another Christian concept. A further complication comes from a group of books that differ in their canonical status among the three branches of Christianity, some of which are regarded by Protestant traditions to be “Apocrypha” In AACR2, in addition to being names of major subdivisions of the Bible, “Old Testament” and “New Testament” were also interposed between “Bible” and the titles of individual books. Thus books from the Hebrew canon, such as Joshua, were named using titles reflecting the Christian organization of the scriptures. The two terms were also abbreviated.RDA, in addition to spelling out “Old Testament” and “New Testament,” limits their use to naming the collections of books so identified in Christian Bibles. Names of individual books canonical in all three Christian traditions are now subdivisions of “Bible.” This softens, but does not eliminate, the Christian slant of the instructions.
  • [RLM: split part 2.]It’s important to distinguish between “the Apocrypha” and “apocryphal books.” The former is a discrete group of books that are canonical in the Catholic and Orthodox Christianity, but are not in Protestant Christianity. Individual books of the Apocrypha are named as a subdivision of “Bible. Apocrypha.” The preferred title “Apocrypha” is only used with the books listed in 6.23.2.9.4. All other books that are held or were once held to be part of the Bible are treated under “apocryphal books” (6.23.2.6).
  • [RLM: moved to be with other preferred title slides.]
  • [RLM: moved to be with other preferred title slides.][RLM: added “Selections” — 2013 RDA change]
  • [RLM: added slide]LOOK AT MARC authority format 100, 110, 111, 130 field.
  • [RLM: Added slide]The preferred title element is bolded. Parts preceding the preferred title are not part of the RDA work description. They are links to the creator of the work, as seen in module I (NACO Foundations)Take the two authority worksheets or OCLC workforms. Record the preferred title for the Homer and the Octavio Paz work in subfield $t of the 100 field. Leave space to the left, we’ll be putting something there.
  • Variant titles are not a core element, so cataloger judgment governs what is recorded.“Significantly different” takes the place of “difference in first 5 words”
  • [RLM: added examples]
  • [RLM: added examples]
  • [RLM: added slide to show MARC coding]LOOK AT MARC authority format 400 field.
  • [RLM: added slide to show MARC coding]The variant title element is bolded. Parts preceding the preferred title are not part of the RDA work description.Take the two authority worksheets (or the OCLC workforms you’ve already been working on). Record any variant titles for the Homer and the Octavio Paz work in subfield $t of the 400 field. Leave space to the left, we’ll be putting something there.
  • [RLM: simplified slide]
  • Form of work is not further defined beyond 6.3.1.1. Useful controlled vocabularies for form of work: LCSH, Art and Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/vocabularies/aat/
  • Note you can record more than one. So for the Iliad it might be appropriate to record both “Poems” and “Epics” from the Art and Architecture Thesaurus.380 Poems $a Epics $2 aat
  • [RLM: split slide]Despite the definition of “earliest date associated with a work,” a range of dates may be recorded if appropriate.There are special instructions for recording dates for musical works and legal works. [is it kosher to give only an ending date? Wording for $l in MARC21 is ambiguous: “Ending date of the date range for which the beginning date is recorded in $k.”]
  • [RLM: split slide part 2]
  • Speaker note: click after they’ve added the field to their record.
  • Explain about BC dates.Speaker note: click to make answer appear after they’ve recorded the information.
  • [RLM: Split the slide]Speaker note: It seems unlikely that a place of origin would have a start and end date, but if necessary the subfields are available.
  • [RLM: Split the slide]Speaker note: The place does not need to be established in LC/NACO Authority File to record it in 370. If not established, record in the form it would have taken had it been established.
  • CLICK to see answer
  • CLICK to see answer
  • “Qualified genre/form terms” would be something like “Anglo-Saxon poem”, which would differentiate one poem from another poem with the same preferred title that was in a different language, like “Middle High German poem.” The surnames of the directors might be used as a differentiating element for two films with the same title that were released in the same year. For an example of a “miscellaneous” characteristic, consider “Unnumbered,” which is used for differentiation when a body issues an unnumbered serial and a numbered serial under the same title.[RLM: removed characterizing words (“motion picture”) example because “motion picture” is an example of form, not “other distinguishing characteristic”; but I couldn’t think of a replacement. Anybody?
  • Note also the date and the form of work in this example. All three elements were required in this case to distinguish this work from other works with the same title.
  • Note also the dates, the place of origin, and the form of work in this example. In this case other distinguishing characteristic was not needed to distinguish this work from others, but it may be included in the record anyway.Note: if speaker wishes to comment on this, no LCSH term was adequate for the form, so controlled vocabulary was not recorded.
  • History of the work is not recorded as part of an access point. An example of the last point under the narrative bullet would be the example in RDA of the Book of the Dead, where this access point is used to name a corpus of works that varies in size and content from one manifestation to the next.
  • ISTC = International Standard Text CodeISWC = International Standard Musical Work CodeISAN = International Standard Audiovisual Number
  • LC also does not follow RDA practice for musical arrangements, but this NACO training does not cover music.
  • See Mail Carrier example in LC-PCC PS 6.27.3.
  • The following slides will discuss both practices.
  • [RLM: simplified slide, moved to expressions section]Note:LC/PCC PS policy currently does not permit recording content type as a separate element in a record for an expression.
  • [RLM: I split the slide][RLM: I recommend removing the summary of the TG’s reasoning. The issue is not settled yet and it is not clear that PCC will conclude that “LC’s practice is the best route at present.”]ThePCC Access Points for Expressions Task Group considered the question of whether content type was a suitable attribute to record in an authority record. The Task Group concluded that at this juncture, it was not suitable for two reasons: 1) in many cases, the authorized access point in an expression authority record could stand for multiple expressions of different content types; 2) Content type is not one of the expression attributes LC has authorized for use in access points (LC/PCC PS 6.27.3); it was the Task Group’s conclusion that LC’s practice was the best route at this point.
  • [RLM: I split the slide]PCC currently does not allow content type (336) in authority records. You may find authority records with content type recorded. These were created before PCC created the current policy. Do not remove content type from these records, but do not add new 336 fields to records undil the policy is changed.Do not record content type in any case if the authority record represents different expressions with different content types.
  • Open to 6.9. Remember, there are two expressions represented here. What is the content type of these two expressions? Take a worksheet or open a new OCLC workform to begin creating an expression description for the English translation. Record the “source consulted” in 670 and the content type in 336.Remember, until the PCC prohibition on using 336 in authority records is lifted, do not record 336 in records in the LC/NACO authority file.
  • What is the content type for these two expressions? The one on the right is an audiobook. Take two worksheets or OCLC workforms to begin an expression description for each expression. Record the source consulted element (670) content type element (336) on each. (Each was published in 2011)Remember, until the PCC prohibition on using 336 in authority records is lifted, do not record 336 in records in the LC/NACO authority file.
  • Separate element, part of access point, or both.
  • Note: in fact the manifestation in which the Rukeyser translation was first published is undated; 1963 is a conjectural date, as can be seen on slide 16. Since people will have included the question mark on their 670 for this expression, they will probably notice. Remember that we’re using the evidence we have to record a date of expression; the “real” date of expression is the date the expression (e.g. a translation) was created, but usually the only evidence we have is the date of publication, which we can record. In this case we only have a conjectural date. We can still record this as the date of expression. It would be possible to record a date with a question mark in 046 using the EDTF format, but it is recommended simply to record the year that in your best judgment is the date of expression, without a question mark (in this case 1963).
  • The underlining reinforces that in FRBR and in RDA, language is an expression-level attribute of a resource. Until or if FRBR and/or RDA incorporate a concept of Language of Work, this element will be recorded only in authority records for expressions. For more information about recording information in the 377 field, see the NACO Foundations module.
  • [RLM: added slide]Speaker note: This applies both to LC practice and possible expanded PCC practice. We’ll come back to this when we get to creating the authorized access point.
  • CLICK for answer
  • [RLM: split off from previous slide and expanded]
  • [RLM: One of our workshop participants thought the grammar of the second bullet should be “There is more than one spoken word expression of the Iliad.]
  • On the spoken word version of the Iliad, there are both more than one spoken word expression and there are more than one spoken word expression in English so you might need more than one other distinguishing characteristic
  • [RLM: new slide]
  • [RLM: added slide]NOTE: the instruction for the Bible seems to contradict the scope of this element. The year of publication is an attribute of the manifestation, not the expression. Recommend recording the actual date of the expression.
  • [RLM: new slide]Once you’ve recorded all the elements, creating the authorized access point for a work is quite easy. It is simply a matter of taking elements already recorded or found and combining them in a particular order.
  • This workshop does not deal with subject usage, but most authorized RDA access points for works and expressions can be used as subjects.[Subject usage—in music, if a resource is about a portion of a composer’s output in a certain form, say Verdi’s late operas, current practice would be to give a name-title subject heading with the collective title “Operas,” but not adding “Selections.” Is this true for other disciplines or types of material? And would we understand this to be true in RDA as well?)
  • [RLM: new slide]Have workshop participants carefully think about the difference between a collaborative work and a compilation. Have examples if possible.
  • [RLM: revised the wording, added MARC]
  • [RLM: reworded slide]THIS IS A SLIGHT CHANGE FROM AACR2: No rule of three; so the person, family, or corporate body with principal responsibility is usually the first named author, no matter how many there are. This means there will be more works entered under an author’s name than there were in AACR2.The takeaway here is that with the exception of most moving-image material, collaborative works will by and large include a name in the authorized access point.
  • [RLM: New slide]Read together 19.2.1.1.1
  • [RLM: New slide[
  • [RLM: new slide]Contrast compilation with collaborative work
  • [RLM: revised, removed bullet points about motion pictures and compilations (because dealt with in earlier added slides)]Speaker note: This is a matter of cataloger judgment. If the creator of the work is unknown, the authorized access point is the preferred title. If the work is attributed to a variety of creators and there is no consensus, the authorized access point is the preferred title. If there is consensus in reference sources (including works embodying the work) about the probably creator, record the creator’s authorized access point as the beginning of the autorized access point for the work. Consensus does not need to be unanimous, and it just needs to indicate probably authorship. Because this is so judgment-laden, it is recommended that variant access points be made leading from name-title access points to title access points and vice versa.
  • [RLM: split slide]Compare with discussion above at 6.2.2.9.
  • Compare with discussion above at 6.2.2.9.[RLM: split slide][RLM: one of our workshop participants suggested that using “King of the hill” with the Simpsons example was unnecessarily confusing because there is another program called King of the hill; so I found a different episode for the example. Should slide 36 also be changed? That one is probably even more confusing.]
  • Compare with discussion above at 6.2.2.9.LC practice for non-consecutive/unnumbered parts is to follow the alternative. PCC catalogers may follow either practice.NOTE CAREFULLY: If you choose to follow the alternative, use caution. Different compilations of “selections” from Homer’s Odyssey are different aggregate works (parts of work) and their authorized access points will need to be distinguished from each other. See following section.
  • [RLM reworded slightly]
  • If you’ve been recording these attributes as elements as you’ve been building up the record it is a simple matter to choose one or more of them to finish the authorized access point.All of the examples are for works that have the same title as another work, and in these particular cases, they are not linked to a creator (as part of the access point). That is why they need qualifying.
  • The previous slide showed examples of authorized access points based solely on the preferred title that needed qualifying because they conflicted with another title. This slide shows some examples of authorized access points created by combining the authorized access point for the creator with the title; these still conflict with another work, so need qualifying. Flowers for Algernon was a short story before the author revised it to become a novel. Since the novel was established first, its authorized access point is not qualified. Later on an authorized access point was needed for the short story, a separate work. It is qualified by the form (short story)In the second example the author wrote the novel Ender’s game and subsequently rewrote the text for a graphic novel.This normally wouldn’t happen with a graphic novel because the adaptor is usually different from the original author and the adaptor would be considered the creator of the graphic novel, but in this case the adaptor and the original author are the same.In each case since both the creator and preferred title are identical something needs to be added to differentiate. Following PCC practice, the authorized access point that was created first was not changed; the newly-needed authorized access point is qualified to differentiate it from the existing one.
  • Selected short fiction / Charles Dickens ; edited with an introduction and notes by Deborah A. Thomas (Harmondsworth : Penguin, 1976). Contains: The story of the goblins who stole a Sexton -- The Baron of Grogzwig -- A Confession found in a prison in the time of Charles the Second -- To be read at dusk -- No. 1 Branch line. The Signalman -- The election of Beadle -- Seven dials -- Meditations in Monmouth-Street -- A visit to Newgate -- A Christmas tree -- A flight -- Our school -- Lying awake -- His general line of business -- Refreshments for travellers -- Travelling abroad -- City of London churches -- Shy neighbourhoods -- Dullborough Town -- Nurse's stories -- Arcadian London -- The Calais night-mail -- His leaving it till called for -- His brown-paper parcel -- His wonderful end -- How Mrs. Lirriper carried on the business -- How the parlours added a few words -- Mrs. Lirripier relates how she went on, and went over -- Mrs. Lirriper relates how Jemmy topped up -- To be taken immediately -- To be taken for life -- Main line. The boy at Mugby.The supernatural short stories of Charles Dickens / edited with an introduction by Michael Hayes (London : John Calder ; Dallas : Riverrun Press, 2010). Contains: A madman's manuscript. -- The bagman's story. -- The story of the goblins who stole a sexton. -- The story of the bagman's uncle. -- The Baron of Grogzwig. -- A confession found in a prison in the time of Charles the Second. -- To be read at dusk. -- The ghost in the bride's chamber. -- To be taken with a grain of salt. -- No. 1 branch line: the signalman.Christmas stories / Charles Dickens (New York: The University Society, 1908). Contains: The poor relation’s story -- The child’s story -- The schoolboy’s story -- Nobody’s story -- The seven poor travellers -- The Holly-Tree Inn -- The wreck fo the Golden Mary -- The perils of certain English prisoners -- Going into society -- The haunted house -- The message from the sea -- Tom Tidler’s ground -- Somebody’s luggage -- Mrs. Lirriper’s lodgings -- Mrs. Lirriper’s legacy -- Doctor Marigold’s prescriptions -- What Christmas is as we grow older.
  • We could distinguish them by the title of the manifestation
  • We could distinguish them by the editor (compiler) or publisher (in the last case the publisher is the compiler and we don’t know who the editor is)
  • We could distinguish them by the date of the work. This is possible but doesn’t seem very helpful to the user.
  • [RLM to TG: I’m not absolutely sure that different collections of an author’s complete works are different aggregage works. Is one collection of an author’s works the same “work” in the FRBR sense as another collection of an author’s works or are different compilations different works? On the other hand, they don’t seem to be different expressions of the “work” constituting an author’s complete works. These slides are made under the assumption that we are treating different collections of an author’s works as different aggregate works. This seemed the least tricky way to deal with it.]
  • The great works of Thomas Paine, complete, political and theological (New York : D.M. Bennett, 1878)The complete works of Thomas Paine (Chicago and New York : Belford, Clarke & Co., 1885). Note, this collection was first published, however, in 1880. The 1885 manifestation is a republication of the same collection, compiled by Calvin Blanchard for Belford, Clarke & Co.The works of Thomas Paine, secretary for foreign affairs to the Congress of the United States in the late war (Philadelphia: Printed by James Carey, 1797)
  • Discuss here. Form will not work because all three have the same form. Date could be used but would it really help the user find the compilation he/she wants? Place of origin? What is the place of origin? Other characteristic? This could include compiler (either an editor or a publisher that compiled it) or the title of the manifestation, or something else.The great works of Thomas Paine, complete, political and theological (New York : D.M. Bennett, 1878)Complete works of Thomas Paine containing all the political and theological writings (Chicago and New York : Belford, Clarke & Co., 1885). Note, this collection was first published, however, in 1880. The 1885 manifestation is a republication of the same collection, compiled by Calvin Blanchard for Belford, Clarke & Co.Note, this collection was first published, however, in 1880. The 1885 manifestation is a republication of the same collection, compiled by Calvin Blanchard for Belford, Clarke & Co.The works of Thomas Paine, secretary for foreign affairs to the Congress of the Uniged States in the late war (Philadelphia: Printed by James Carey, 1797)
  • Note on this and the following slides. Each slides presents several options. Only one can be chosen for each as the authorized access points. Others could be recorded as variant access points if thought useful.NOTE! This manifestation was published in 1885, but the collection, the aggregate work, was first published in 1880, so the date of the work is 1880.Could differentiate by name of compiler (either the person or the publisher of the compilation), by date of work, by title of manifestation, by place of publicationComplete works of Thomas Paine containing all the political and theological writings (Chicago and New York : Belford, Clarke & Co., 1885). Note, this collection was first published, however, in 1880. The 1885 manifestation is a republication of the same collection, compiled by Calvin Blanchard for Belford, Clarke & Co.
  • Could differentiate by name of compiler, by name of compiler (here, the publisher), by date of work, by place of publication, by title of the manifestation.The great works of Thomas Paine, complete, political and theological (New York : D.M. Bennett, 1878)
  • Could differentiate this one by name of compiler, by place of publication, by date of the work, by title of manifestationThe works of Thomas Paine, secretary for foreign affairs to the Congress of the Uniged States in the late war (Philadelphia: Printed by James Carey, 1797)
  • The Norton Shakespeare / Stephen Greenblatt, general editor ; Walter Cohen, Jean E. Howard, Katharine Eisaman Maus, [editors] ; with an essay on the Shakespearean stage by Andrew Gurr (New York: W.W. Norton, 1997)NOTE CAREFULLY: The problem of using AACR2 forms in RDA for authorized access points with conventional collective titles applies to all conventional collective titles and “Selections”, not just “Works”. On the one hand, the AACR2 authority record may represent more than one compilation, and on the other, more than one AACR2 authority record may have been used to represent what is considered in RDA to be the same aggregate work (e.g. because the date of manifestation was added to the heading). In RDA each compilation (aggregate work or part) should be represented by its own record and authorized access point because each is a different work.
  • Read 9.19.2 together.
  • Begin filling out the 1XX fields in your authority worksheets or OCLC workforms by recording the form of the authorized access point for the work. We already did these in the previous module.
  • Begin filling out the 1XX fields in your authority worksheets/OCLC workforms by recording the form of the authorized access point for the work. We just finished creating records for these.
  • Do the exercise together for one or two (or more), on the board.The last one could be formed in other ways. Note again, currently OCLC isn’t permitting $h in authority record access points. Hopefully this will change soon.
  • Premodern literatures are fields where it is important to distinguish between editions in the original language because there are often many different editions or versions in the original language for these texts.Note: Best practices have not yet been established for original-language expressions, so more than one practice is shown in these slides, but from a collocation standpoint it seems best to add the original language as the first expression element when creating an authorized access point for an expression in the original language. This also parallels practice for expressions in languages other than the original language (i.e. translations).
  • This particular expression was published in at least two manifestations: Ulysses: a critical and synoptic edition, prepared by Hans Walter Gabler with Wolfhard Steppe and Claus Melchior (New York: Garland, 1984) and Ulysses: the corrected text, edited by Hans Walter Gabler with Wolfhard Steppe and Claus Melchior (New York: Random House, 1986)
  • Since this workshop is on NACO authority records we are not talking about bibliographic records, but note that these would be recorded in a pair of 700 fields in the bibliographic record. These fields, whether following LC practice or not, would be authorized by separate authority records.
  • In the first instance, the cataloger knew that this particular expression of Blade Runner was known both as the “final cut” and as the “25th anniversary edition”. “Final cut” was chosen as the distinguishing attribute for the authorized access point, but to help users that might think of this expression by the edition statement, the cataloger used that to create a variant access point.The second type of variant is very common with translations. In this case the Hebrew title, technically a variant title for the work, is obviously closely associated with this expression, and inclusion of it as a variant access point will help guide the user to the expression.
  • On date of expression, recommend using the date of EXPRESSION, which is not necessarily the same as the date of the manifestation you have in your hand. RDA is ambiguous: 6.30.3.2b iii says to add the date of the expression, but 6.24 says to record the year of publication (which may not be the date of the expression).
  • [RLM: new slide]
  • [RLM: new slide]
  • Similarly, other types of relationships to an expression may be recorded (for example, to a related expression), as appropriate.
  • Some suggested answers for the expressions worksheets/workforms.In this case “other distinguishing characteristic” is core because it is needed to distinguish this English expression from another English expression--there are more than one translation.
  • In this case “other distinguishing characteristic” is core because it is needed to distinguish this English expression from another English expression--there are many more than one translation.
  • In this case we’ve added content type to distinguish this expression from other English expressions, but still further differentiation is needed because there are more than one English spoken word expression of the Iliad. There are probably other ways this could be done. So we added “Molina” as an “other distinguishing characteristic”.It’s not clear whether LC would distinguish between text and spoken word expressions in the same language. This is more than just a translation, it’s a new expression of a translation. So LC might add elements to distinguish …
  • [RLM: recommend that slides for official communications and following not be included—too narrow in scope for general NACO training]The “short title” is usually the first word or several words of the text of the communication, most commonly Latin.
  • Examples of the religious communications would include an order, decree, pastoral letter, bull, encyclical, constitution, or an official message to a council or synod.It is important to distinguish between works in which the creator is speaking or writing in an official capacity and those in which he or she is not. It is the former category that is being covered here. For example, these instructions would be applied to the text of a President’s State of the Union Address, but not to that person’s autobiography, even if written and published while in office.The instructions are not applied to subsidiary officials, e.g. members of a city council or of Congress.
  • Fong might know about what “etc.” would describe.Recommendation—move all this into notes of 6.31.1.2 and tell trainer what to say if someone asks. But ask Fong first.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Describing Works AndExpressions
    • 2. Pertinent instructions• RDA Chapters 5 and 6• Other RDA chapterswhen constructingaccess points thatinclude apersonal, corporate, orfamily name as acreator (chapters 8-11)2
    • 3. Scope• The purpose of this module is to learn how todescribe works and expressions• This workshop does not cover– Music– Legal works– Series3
    • 4. Definitions (5.1.2)• The term work refers to a distinct intellectual orartistic creation (i.e., the intellectual or artisticcontent).• The term expression refers to the intellectual orartistic realization of a work in the form of alpha-numeric, musical or choreographicnotation, sound, image, object, movement, etc., orany combination of such forms.4
    • 5. Definitions (5.1.2)• The terms work and expression should beread, where applicable, to include not only anindividual entity, but also aggregates andcomponents of such entities (i.e., the term workshould be read to include aggregate works andcomponents of works as well as individualworks, etc).• So throughout this presentation “work” and“expression” can refer to collections and parts, aswell as individual works or expressions5
    • 6. Work and Expressions6
    • 7. Works and ExpressionsWork: Piedra de solPerson: Muriel RukeyserPerson: Octavio PazExpression: EnglishExpression: Spanishrealized throughtranslated bycreatedby7
    • 8. When do you have to create a record?• PCC Practice—as needed for cataloging• BIBCO—to support access points8
    • 9. MARC Coding• Works and expressions are coded inX00, X10, X11, and X30• If the authorized access point begins with theauthorized access point for the creator, use thesame tag as the creator uses (X00, X10, or X11)• If the work/expression does not have an explicitcreator, use X30• As with other authority records, RDA records forcorporate bodies are coded “z” in 008/10(“Rules”) and “rda” in 040 subfield $e.9
    • 10. Identifying Works: Core Elements• Preferred title for the work• Identifier for the work• Musical works with non-distinctive titles– Medium of performance– Numeric designation– Key• Bilateral treaties– Signatory10
    • 11. Identifying Works:Core if needed to distinguish• Form of work• Date of work• Place of origin of the work• Other distinguishing characteristic of the work• Musical works with distinctive titles– Medium of performance– Numeric designation– Key11
    • 12. Identifying Works: Core Elements• The author / creator is not a core element ofthe work entity.• Authors can be persons, families, or corporatebodies, and they are separate entities, relatedto the work entity--an author has arelationship with a work• However, the access point will contain thename of the author, if there is one. This is alink, not an element of the work entity.12
    • 13. Identifying Expressions:Core Elements (5.3)Core in all cases• Identifier for the expression• Content type• Language of expression• Horizontal scale (maps)• Vertical scale (maps)Core if needed to distinguish• Date of expression• Other distinguishing characteristic13
    • 14. RDA 5.8. Source Consulted• Record in 670 field, or 3XX $u/$v• Always include one 670 for the resource beingcataloged• Others included if needed to justifyinformation in the description• Suggested format:670 Title proper, date: $b location within source(data found)14
    • 15. Exercise: Source Consulted• Add the SourceConsulted element forthe original edition ofPiedra de sol (published1957?) to a worksheet oran OCLC authorityworkform15
    • 16. RDA 5.8. Source Consulted670 Piedra de sol, 1957?: $b title page([by] Octavio Paz)670 Sun stone, 1963?: $b title page(Sun stone = Piedra de sol; [by]Octavio Paz, translation by MurielRukeyser)16
    • 17. Attributes of Works17
    • 18. Titles (6.2.1)• Information about titles of a work can betaken from any source (6.2.1.2)• Sources of information for the preferred titleare found in 6.2.2.2.• Creating the authorized access point is afurther step (6.27)18
    • 19. Transcription and Capitalization• Follow 1.7. General guidelines on transcription (not thealternatives)• 6.2.1.4. Capitalization. Follow Appendix A.3 and A.4.• 6.2.1.6. Diacritical marks: record them as they appear;add them if it is certain that they are integral to thetitle but were omitted in the source• 6.2.1.7. Omit initial articles (NACO follows thealternative)• 6.2.1.9. Abbreviations. Record only abbreviations thatare found in the source.• 5.4. Language and script. NACO policy = Romanizevernacular scripts.19
    • 20. Transcription and Capitalization• LC-PCC PS 6.2.2.8:– Do not routinely omit introductory phrases (e.g. “Herebeginneth …”). Decide whether or not to omit basedon evidence for the most common form of the title– Correct inaccuracies in titles proper of series– Pre-modern forms of letters (i/j, u/v)I/J vowel = i (ITER = iter; ILIAS = Ilias)I/J consonant = j (IVS = jus; IVLIVS = Julius; MAJOR = major)U/V vowel = u (VRSA = ursa)U/V consonant = v (UOX = vox)UU/VV = w (VVINDELIA = Windelia)20
    • 21. Transcription exampleForms found for title:Piedra de SolPIEDRA DE SOLManipulation of capitalization according toAppendix A:Piedra de sol21
    • 22. Choosing the preferred title• RDA 6.2.2.4-6.2.2.7• Two instructions:– Works created after 1500 and works createdbefore 1501– Based on date of creation, not of publication22
    • 23. Choosing the preferred title—workscreated after 1500• Conditions (6.2.2.4):– Choose the most commonly known title in theoriginal language (but not necessarily the originaltitle)– The title can be found in resources embodying thework OR in reference sources.23
    • 24. 24
    • 25. Choosing the preferred title—workscreated after 1500• If no title is identified as being best-known orin case of doubt, choose the title proper oforiginal edition• An alternative title is not included in thepreferred title25
    • 26. Choosing the preferred title—workscreated after 1500• If a work is simultaneously published indifferent languages: choose the title proper ofthe first publication received by agency– LC/PCC PS: If more than one language expressionis issued in a compilation and the original cannotbe determined, use the first title proper• Individual works of art: LC/PCC PS: useEnglish-language reference source26
    • 27. ExerciseWhat is the preferred title?27
    • 28. Choosing the preferred title—workcreated before 1501• RDA 6.2.2.5. Choose the title– In the original language– By which the work is identified (i.e. commonly known)– As found in reference sources• If reference sources are inadequate, use formsfound in (in this order)– Modern editions– Early editions– Manuscript copies• Special rules for Greek and anonymous works28
    • 29. Choosing the preferred title—before1501• Exceptions (6.2.2.5)– Classical Greek, Byzantine Greek (pre-1453).Choose, in this order:• A well-established title in language of cataloging agency(English for NACO)• The Latin title of the work• The Greek title of the work– Anonymous works, neither in Greek nor in thepreferred script of the cataloging agency• A well-established title in language of cataloging agency(English for NACO)• If there is none, use the transliterated form of the originaltitle29
    • 30. Exercise: Preferred title?Modern translation,published 201130
    • 31. Exercise: Preferred title?Modern referencesource: Oxfordclassical dictionary,1996, p. 71831
    • 32. Exercise: Preferred title?Brill’s new Paulydictionary of Greekand Latin authors andtexts, 2009, p. 325-326Iliad (English)?Ilias (Latin)?Ἰλιάς (Greek)?32
    • 33. Cycles & stories with many versions• Cycles (6.2.2.6)– Choose the “generally-accepted” title– Lacking that, use the title of the first-receivedresource– Title vs. descriptive phrase• Story with many versions– Choose the title in English found in referencesources33
    • 34. Manuscripts/Manuscript Groups• RDA 6.2.2.7: instructions for treating themanuscript as an object (vs. the work containedin it)– Use the title or name by which the manuscript iscommonly identifiedBook of Kells– If none, devise a title:• [Authorized access point for the repository]. Manuscript.*Repository’s designation for the manuscript+British Library. Manuscript. Arundel 384• Apply general instructions (6.2.2.4-6.2.2.6) todescribe the work contained in the manuscript34
    • 35. Manuscripts/Manuscript Groups• Works that are parts of manuscripts (LC/PCC PS)– Single component work: do not construct access pointusing the authorized access point for physicalmanuscript.– Groups of component works: “Selections” can beadded to the authorized access point for the work, butnot to an authorized access point for the physicalmanuscript unless …– The authorized access point for work and physicalmanuscript is the same—then “Selections” may beadded35
    • 36. Recording the preferred title for one ormore parts of a work (6.2.2.9)• One part - choose preferred title as already shownTwo towersKing of the hillCan be generic (append to the preferred title of the work)Episode 2, e.g.Downton Abbey. Season 1. Episode 2Note: always record the numeric designation as a numeral, e.g. notDownton Abbey. Season one. Episode twoPreface, e.g.This side of paradise. Preface• Exceptions:– Music: 6.14.2.7– Legal works: 6.23.2.9—6.23.2.2036
    • 37. Recording the preferred title for one ormore parts of a work (6.2.2.9)• Parts of works (6.2.2.9)– More than one part• Numbered consecutive parts: give the general term in the singularwith the number (append to the preferred title of the work)Book 1-5, e.g.Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans. Book 1-5• Unnumbered or nonconsecutive parts: either– Record each part separately (i.e. treat each as a single part)– Or append “Selections” to the preferred title of the work as awhole, e.g., for a compilation called “Soliloquies from Hamlet”Hamlet. Selections37
    • 38. Recording the preferred title for one ormore parts of a work (6.2.2.9)• Exception for serials and integrating resourceswith both part designation and part title:record both, with designation first, andseparated by a commaSeries C, Traditional skills and practices, e.g.Marshallese culture and history. Series C, Traditional skills andpractices38
    • 39. Compilations of works by oneperson, family, or corporate body(6.2.2.10)• Basic instruction: follow the general instructionsfor choosing preferred titles of works– If the compilation is known by a title found in resourcesembodying it or in reference sources, choose that titleas the preferred title– Use the following instructions for conventionalcollective titles only if the compilation is not known bya title of its own39
    • 40. Compilations of works by oneperson, family, or corporate body(6.2.2.10)• Conventional collective titles (6.2.2.10.1-6.2.2.10.2)– If the compilation purports to be the complete works ofan author, use Works– If the compilation purports to be the complete works ofan author in a single form, use one of the following:CorrespondenceEssaysNovelsPlaysPoemsProse worksShort storiesSpeeches• Or another appropriate specific collective title such as “Fragments” “Architecturaldrawings” etc.40
    • 41. Compilations of works by oneperson, family, or corporate body(6.2.2.10)• Conventional collective titles (6.2.2.10.1-6.2.2.10.2)– If the compilation is less than the complete works of theauthor• Either record each work separately• and/or append the term “Selections” to the appropriateconventional collective title, e.g.Works. SelectionsPlays. SelectionsSpeeches. Selections– NOTE: “Selections” can no longer stand alone.41
    • 42. Special Rules for Religious Works• Additional instructions to those found earlierin Chapter 6• RDA 6.23:– Title of a Religious Work42
    • 43. Title of Religious Work (6.23)• Principally concerned with 4 categories:– Sacred scriptures (6.23.2.5)– Apocryphal books (6.23.2.6)– Theological creeds, confessions of faith, etc.(6.23.2.7)– Liturgical works (6.23.2.8)43
    • 44. Sacred Scriptures• RDA 6.23.2.5• Preferred title for a sacred scripture from “areference source that deals with the religiousgroup or groups to which the scripturebelongs”• Record title most commonly found in English-language reference sources (LC/PCC PS)44
    • 45. Parts of Sacred Scriptures• RDA 6.23.2.9-6.23.2.19• Specific instructions for some scriptures—mostelaborate for the Bible• The preferred title for a part is recorded as asubdivision of the larger work (6.23.2.9.1-4, 6.23.2.19)Bible. MarkUrantia Book. Central and Superuniverses• If a single selection is commonly identified by its owntitle, record that directly (6.23.2.9.5, 6.23.2.19)Ten commandmentsAllegory of Zenos45
    • 46. Parts of the Bible• Things to remember– “Old Testament” and “New Testament” are nowsubdivisions of the title “Bible” and nothing elseBible. Old TestamentBible. New Testament– Preferred title for Individual books: “Bible. [title ofbook+”Bible. GenesisBible. Mark46
    • 47. Parts of the Bible• Things to remember– Groups of books (6.23.2.9.3)—also recorded assubdivision of “Bible”Bible. Minor ProphetsBible. Gospels– Apocrypha (6.23.2.9.4)—special group of books;recorded as subdivision of “Bible”Bible. Apocrypha– Individual books from the Apocrypha—recordedas subdivision of “Bible. Apocrypha”Bible. Apocrypha. Song of the Three Children47
    • 48. Parts of the Bible• Single selections (6.23.2.9.5)– Record title directly if commonly identified by its owntitleLord’s prayerTen commandments– Otherwise, follow 6.23.2.9.2– Optionally, record the title of the selection formulatedaccording to 6.23.2.9.2 as a variant titleBible. Luke, I, 46-55Search underMagnificat48
    • 49. Parts of the Bible• Two or more selections (6.23.2.9.6)– Two or more discrete selections that can be namedprecisely by two preferred titles—record each ofthose titlesBible. GospelsBible. ActsBible. Revelation• Other selections (6.23.2.9.7)—record the mostspecific title appropriate to the collection plusSelections.Bible. New Testament. Selections49
    • 50. Recording the Preferred Title (MARC)• Most RDA entity attributes have a discrete place inMARC to record them. Preferred title does not. It canonly be recorded as part of the authorized accesspoint for the work.• Record in the MARC authorities format 1XXfield, indicators as appropriate to the field• Record the preferred title in subfield $t(100, 110, 111) or subfield $a (130). Other subfieldsmay be appropriate50
    • 51. Preferred Title (MARC examples)The preferred title is bolded in each example100 1 $a Carter, Jimmy, $d 1924- $t Living faith100 1 $a Smith, Joseph, $c Jr., $d 1805-1844. $t King Follett discourse100 0 $a Elizabeth $b I, $c Queen of England, $d 1533-1603. $tCorrespondence100 1 $a Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus, $d 1756-1791. $t Works. $kSelections110 2 $a Banco de Bilbao. $t Informe y memoria110 1 $a United States. $b Department of Defense. $t Militarycommission order130 0 $a Beowulf130 0 $a Primary colors130 0 $a Planet of the apes (Motion picture : 1968)51
    • 52. Variant title(s) for work (6.2.3)• Definition: Any version of the title that differsfrom the form chosen as the preferred title.• Can be recorded from any source• Record using basic instructions for recordingtitles (6.2.1)• Not core. Record if you think it would help auser, e.g.,– Significantly different from preferred title– Reasonable as a search string52
    • 53. Variant titles• Alternate linguistic form (6.2.3.4)– LanguageAnnual report and accounts vs. Informe y memoria– ScriptἸλιάς vs. Iliad– SpellingBjowulf vs. Beowulf– TransliterationSun-tzu ping fa vs. Sunzi bing fa [Wade Giles vs. Pinyintransliterations of 孫子兵法]53
    • 54. Variant titles• Other variants (6.2.3.5; inferred fromexamples)– Introductory phraseShakespeare’s Macbeth vs. Macbeth– Title of larger work. Title of partLord of the rings. 3, Return of the king vs. Return of theking– Numbers vs. wordsEleven eyes vs. 11 eyes54
    • 55. Recording a Variant Title (MARC)• Like the Preferred Title element, the Variant Titleelement (RDA 6.2.3) does not have a discrete place inMARC. It can only be recorded as part of the variantaccess point for the work.• Record in the MARC authorities format 4XXfield, indicators as appropriate to the field• Record the variant title in subfield $t (400, 410, 411)or subfield $a (430). Other subfields may beappropriate55
    • 56. Variant Title (MARC examples)The variant title is bolded in each example400 1 $a Carter, Jimmy, $d 1924- $t Personal beliefs of Jimmy Carter400 1 $a Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus, $d 1756-1791. $t Best ofMozart410 2 $a Banco de Bilbao. $t Annual report and accounts410 1 $a United States. $b Department of Defense. $t Department ofDefense military commission order430 0 $a Bjowulf430 0 $a Primary colors430 0 $a Monkey planet (Motion picture)56
    • 57. Other Identifying Attributes of Works• There are many attributes of works aside fromtitle• All may be recorded as separate elements• Some may also appear as part of theauthorized access point• LC/PCC PS limitations apply to some57
    • 58. Other Identifying Attributes of Works• Work attributes:– Form of Work (6.3)– Date of Work (6.4)– Place of Origin of the Work (6.5)– Other Distinguishing Characteristic of the Work(6.6)– History of the Work (6.7)– Identifier for the Work (6.8)58
    • 59. Form of Work (6.3)• Core if needed to differentiate but can berecorded whether or not core• Definition: Class or genre to which a workbelongs• Record in MARC field 380• Prefer controlled-vocabulary terms• Capitalize the first word59
    • 60. Exercise: Form of workWhat is the form of work for Piedra de sol and Iliad?Each work is a poem. The Iliad is an epic poem.Possible answers:380 Poem or380 Epic poem380 Poems $2 aat and/or380 Epics $2 aat380 Poetry $2 lcsh or380 Epic poetry $2 lcshAdd form of work to your authority records.60
    • 61. Date of Work (6.4)• Definition: Earliest date associated with a work– Date work was created– If the date of creation is unknown, use the date thework was first published or released– Can include ending date if work existed over a periodof time (e.g. a series)• Date is core only if needed to differentiate between awork and other entities with the same name.• The element may be recorded whether needed todistinguish or not.61
    • 62. Date of Work (6.4)• Record dates according to the Gregoriancalendar (LC/PCC PS)• Generally YYYY (treaties add month and day)• Date is recorded in MARC 046– Beginning date or single date = $k– Ending date = $l62
    • 63. ExercisePiedra de solThis work was first published in 1957. Thecataloger has no other information about thedate of the work.046 $k 1957Exercise: add this field to the appropriate RDAauthority record.63
    • 64. ExerciseIliadAccording to Brill’s New Pauly this work wascreated in the second half of the 8th centuryBC.046 $k -07Exercise: add this field to the appropriate RDAauthority record.64
    • 65. Place of Origin of the Work (6.5)• Definition: country or other territorial jurisdiction fromwhich a work originated• Not the setting of the work (what the work is “about”)• Information may be taken from any source.• Place of origin is core if needed to differentiate.• Whether core or not, the element may be recorded.• Place of origin is recorded in MARC 370 subfield $g• Associated dates may be recorded in MARC 370subfields $s (start) and $t (end)65
    • 66. Place of Origin of the Work (6.5)• Form governed by RDA 16.2.2.4– Begin by finding the authorized form in LC/NACO Authority File: Paris (France)– Generally manipulate by removing parentheses and adding comma:370 $g Paris, France– Abbreviate if the place is in Appendix B.11370 $g U.S.– For details see Module 1 (NACO Foundations)• LCSH place names may also be used. Record in the exact form found, andadd $2 lcsh370 $g Pompeii (Extinct city) $2 lcsh66
    • 67. ExercisePiedra de solThe cataloger only knows that the place of origin ofPiedra de sol is Mexico.This place is established as Mexico370 $g MexicoExercise: Record place of origin in the authority record67
    • 68. Work Authority RecordIliadAccording to Brill’s New Pauly, this work was created inIonia (Asia Minor).This place is established as Ionia; Asia Minor isestablished as Turkey370 $g Ionia $g TurkeyExercise: Record place of origin in the authority record68
    • 69. Other Distinguishing Characteristic ofthe Work (6.6)• A characteristic other than form, date, place of origin• Core if needed to differentiate• May be recorded, whether needed to distinguish or not• Examples—corporate bodies, qualified genre/formterms, names of persons, characterizing words• MARC coding:– 373 (associated body or group)– 381 (anything else)69
    • 70. Other Distinguishing Characteristics046 $k 1965130 _0 Harlow (Motion picture : 1965 : Segal)380 Motion picture381 Segal500 1 $w r $i Film director: $a Segal, Alex, $d 1915-197770
    • 71. Other Distinguishing Characteristics046 $k 1495˜ $l 1497 $2 edtf100 0_ Leonardo, $c da Vinci, $d 1452-1519. $t Last supper370 $g Milan, Italy373 Santa Maria delle Grazie (Church : Milan, Italy)$2 naf380 Mural678 Fresco depicting the Last Supper as told in theGospel of John, begun about 1495 and completed in 1497by Leonardo da Vinci in the monastery of Santa Maria delleGrazie in Milan, Italy.71
    • 72. History of the Work (6.7)• Not core• Intended for public• Record a brief a narrative concerning– Publication history(dates, publishers, places, awards)– Relationships with other works– Variant titles• MARC field 678, no indicators72
    • 73. History of the Work046 $k 1495˜ $l 1497 $2 edtf100 0_ Leonardo, $c da Vinci, $d 1452-1519. $t Last supper370 $g Milan, Italy373 Santa Maria delle Grazie (Church : Milan, Italy)$2 naf380 Mural678 Fresco depicting the Last Supper as told in theGospel of John, begun about 1495 and completed in 1497by Leonardo da Vinci in the monastery of Santa Mariadelle Grazie in Milan, Italy.73
    • 74. Identifier for the Work (6.8)• RDA 6.8• MARC field 010 (system-assigned)• MARC field 024—some examples– ISTC (text)– ISWC (music)– ISAN (audio/visual)– ISRC (recordings) (expression)74
    • 75. Attributes of Expressions75
    • 76. RDA and LC Practice• RDA (and FRBR) expect separate expressiondescriptions to be distinguished from one another, justas any other entity description is distinguished fromothers• Basic core elements for expression descriptions (5.3):– Identifier for the expression– Content type– Language of expression• Core if needed to differentiate (5.3):– Date of expression– Other distinguishing characteristic of expression• LC follows this practice except for translations76
    • 77. RDA and LC PracticeLC Practice for translations (LC-PCC PS 0.6.3, 6.27.3)• LC catalogers do not record elements in authorityrecords or add elements to authorized access points todifferentiate separate expressions in the samelanguage• For example, Shakespeare’s Hamlet in Frenchwould, for LC, be represented by a single authorityrecord and a single authorized access point eventhough there are more than one translationShakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Hamlet. French= all French translations of Hamlet.77
    • 78. RDA and LC PracticeLC Practice for expressions in the original language• LC does not describe the original languageexpression separately from the work.• For LC, expressions in the original language arerepresented by the authorized access point forthe work, which will be used for any expression inthe original languageHomer. Iliad= the work Iliad and all original Greekexpressions of the Iliad78
    • 79. RDA and LC Practice• Exception to LC practice: If there is a nameauthority record with an authorized accesspoint for an expression that includes anadditional characteristic LC would not haveadded, LC catalogers will use that establishedauthorized access point for that specificexpression.79
    • 80. RDA and LC Practice• PCC Catalogers may follow this LC practice, ormay apply RDA and describe distinctexpressions in separate authority records andassign them distinct authorized access pointsdepending on the needs of their users.80
    • 81. Attributes of Expressions• Expression attributes:– Content Type (6.9)– Date of Expression (6.10)– Language of Expression (6.11)– Other Distinguishing Characteristic of theExpression (6.12)– Identifier for the Expression (6.13)81
    • 82. Content Type (6.9)• Content type is a core element (5.3)• Definition: Content type is a categorizationreflecting the fundamental form ofcommunication in which the content isexpressed and the human sense throughwhich it is intended to be perceived.• Terms are from a controlled vocabulary listedin 6.9.1.3, Table 6.182
    • 83. Content Type (6.9)• Content type is recorded in MARC 336• Record the term in subfield $a; record “rdacontent” insubfield $2336 spoken word $2 rdacontent336 text $2 rdacontent• NOTE: PCC has (probably temporarily) asked catalogers notto record content type in NACO expression authorityrecords. Because the prohibition may be temporary, we willrecord it in this workshop as a core element.83
    • 84. Exercise: Content Type84
    • 85. Exercise: Content Type85
    • 86. Date of Expression (6.10)• Definition: “earliest date associated with an expression;”if that date is unknown, record the date of the earliestmanifestation• Not core unless needed to distinguish betweenexpressions; but may be recorded as an element whetheror not core• Special instructions for religious works (6.24) and for theBible in particular (6.30.3.2)• Use the 046 field– Beginning or single date created: 046 $k– Ending date created: 046 $l86
    • 87. Exercise: Date of Expression• The Rukeyser translation of Piedra de sol was firstpublished in in 1963.• The Mitchell translation of the Iliad was firstpublished in 2011.• The Alfred Molina performance of the Mitchelltranslation of the Iliad was first published in 2011.Exercise: Record the date of expression element in theauthority record87
    • 88. Language of Expression (6.11)• Language of expression is a core element (see 5.3)• Definition: “language in which a work is expressed”• RDA 6.11.1.3. “Record the language or languages ofthe expression using an appropriate term or terms inthe language preferred by the agency creating thedata.”• Preference of NACO: Record in MARC 377, using theMARC language codeshttp://www.loc.gov/marc/languages/language_name.html88
    • 89. Language of Expression (6.11)• Note: Bilingual or polyglot editions representmore than one expression. Unlike AACR2practice, we will never use a single authorityrecord or authorized access point torepresent such a resource in RDAShakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Hamlet. French &English89
    • 90. Exercise: Language of Expression• Record the language of expression in 046 fieldson the expression worksheets or OCLC workformsyou’ve started.377 eng• NOTE: Do not record any language on theworksheets/workforms representing works.Language is not an attribute of the Work entity.90
    • 91. Other Distinguishing Characteristic ofthe Expression (6.12)• Definition: “characteristic other than contenttype, language of expression, or date ofexpression that serves to differentiate anexpression from another expression of thesame work”• Core when needed to differentiate• Special instructions for religious works (6.25)• MARC field 373 (corporate body) 381(anything else)91
    • 92. Other Distinguishing Characteristic ofthe Expression (6.12)• Use whatever distinguishes the expressions best.– the surname of an editor or translator– the name of a version– the name of a publisher closely associated with theexpression– etc. ...• If it makes more sense, the language, the date of theexpression, or content type can be used todistinguish instead (RDA 6.9-6.11)92
    • 93. Exercise: Other DistinguishingCharacteristic of the Expression• There are more than one English expression ofPiedra de sol and the Iliad.• There are more than one spoken wordexpression of the Iliad.93
    • 94. Exercise: Other DistinguishingCharacteristic of the Expression• What might you use to distinguish theseexpressions?• Record your choice in 381– Possible answers381 Rukeyser381 Mitchell381 Molina or381 Mitchell $a Molina94
    • 95. Special Rules for Expressions ofReligious Works• Additional instructions to those found earlierin Chapter 6• RDA 6.24– Date of Expression of a Religious Work• RDA 6.25– Other Distinguishing Characteristic of theExpression of a Religious Work95
    • 96. Date of Expression of a Religious Work(6.24)• Definition: the earliest date associated with anexpression of a religious work• If that date is unknown, the date of theearliest manifestation may be substituted• Bible: Record the year of publication• Use 046 (as described above)96
    • 97. Other Distinguishing Characteristic of theExpression of a Religious Work (6.25)• 6.25.1.4 gives some expression attributes unique tosacred scripture. If appropriate, record– A brief form of the name of the version• Authorized• Vulgate– If the version is known by the name of the translator, record it• Lamsa• Smith-Goodspeed• Gordon and others• See 6.25.1.4 for details and other possibilities• Record in 38197
    • 98. Authorized Access Points
    • 99. Creating the authorized access point• Follow 6.27 except:– Musical works (6.28)– Legal works (6.29)– Religious works (6.30)• Series—a different workshop• Subject usage—most authorized access pointscan be used as subjects in LCSH99
    • 100. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for a Work (RDA 6.27.1)• In order to create the authorized access point for awork you must first ask yourself what kind of work itis:– A work created by one person, family, orcorporate body (6.27.1.2)?– A collaborative work (6.27.1.3)?– A compilation of works by differentpersons, families, or corporate bodies (6.27.1.4)?100
    • 101. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for a Work (RDA 6.27.1)• Works created by one person, family, or corporatebody (6.27.1.2)a. Record the authorized access point for theperson, family, or corporate body (this serves as a link tothe record for the creator)b. Record the preferred title of the work• Use MARC 1XX field.– Authorized access point for creator identical to form in itsown record, with identical subfield coding– Preferred title of work in subfield $t, $n, $p, $k101
    • 102. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for a Work (RDA 6.27.1)• Collaborative works (6.27.1.3)a. Record the authorized access point for theperson, family, or corporate body with principalresponsibility for the work (this serves as a link to therecord for the creator) [NOTE: No “rule of three”]b. Record the preferred title of the work• Use MARC 1XX field.– Authorized access point for principal creator identical toform in its own record, with identical subfield coding– Preferred title of work in subfield $t, $n, $p, $k102
    • 103. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for a Work (RDA 6.27.1)• Collaborative works (6.27.1.3)– Corporate bodies can be creators (19.2.1.1.1)a. Works of an administrative nature dealing with the body itselfb. Works that record the collective thought of the bodyc. Works that report the collective activity of ameeting, expedition, or eventd. Some works that result from the collective activity of aperforming groupe. Cartographic works originating with a corporate bodyf. Certain legal worksg. Named works of art by two or more artists acting as a corporatebody103
    • 104. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for a Work (RDA 6.27.1)• Collaborative works exception (6.27.1.3)– Moving image worksThe access point is created by recording the preferredtitle alone (does not begin with access point for acreator)– NOTE: this applies to most motion pictures, which are usuallycollaborative works. If a motion picture is the work of a singleperson, family, or corporate body, its access point is createdaccording to 6.27.1.2 (authorized access point for creator +preferred title of the work)104
    • 105. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for a Work (RDA 6.27.1)• Compilations of works by differentpersons, families, or corporate bodies (6.27.1.4)– The access point is created by recording the preferred titlealone (does not begin with access point for a creator)– The preferred title is the collective title for the compilation(an aggregate work)– If there is no collective title, separate access points areconstructed for the individual works in the compilation105
    • 106. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for a Work (RDA 6.27.1)• Works of unknown or uncertain attribution(6.27.1.8)– The access point is created by recording thepreferred title alone (does not begin with accesspoint for a creator)– If reference sources indicate that there is aprobable creator, however,a. Record the authorized access point for the person, family, orcorporate body (this serves as a link to the record for thecreator)b. Record the preferred title of the work106
    • 107. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for Part of a Work• Generally formed in the same way as for thework as a whole• One part (6.27.2.2)– Authorized access point for person/body/familyresponsible for part (if any)– Preferred title for partProust, Marcel, 1871–1922. Du côté de chez Swann107
    • 108. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for Part of a Work• One part (6.27.2.2)– Exceptions:• Non-distinctive title. Combine the authorized access pointfor the work with the preferred title for the partHomer. Iliad. Book 1• Serials/integrating resources. Combine the authorized accesspoint for the work with the preferred title for the partActa Universitatis Upsaliensis. Studia musicologica Upsaliensia• Television/radio programs. Combine the authorized accesspoint for the work with the preferred title for the partSimpsons (Television program). Bart gets an elephant108
    • 109. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for Part of a Work• Two or more parts (6.27.2.3)– Consecutive numbering. Combine the authorizedaccess point for the work with the preferred title forthe sequence of partsHomer. Odyssey. Book 1-5– Unnumbered or non-consecutive numbering.Construct an access point for each partHomer. Odyssey. Book 1Homer. Odyssey. Book 3Homer. Odyssey. Book 5• Alternative. Combine the authorized access point for thework (or part) with the term SelectionsHomer. Odyssey. Selections109
    • 110. Additions to Authorized Access Pointsfor Works• When to make additions (6.27.1.9)– If a different work has the same/similar title andthe same creator (if any)• Looking for conflicts (LC/PCC PS)– Where to look? The “catalog” (e.g. localcatalog, LC, OCLC). This is required.– Any resource the cataloger searches, whether in acatalog or not. This is optional.– Do not predict conflicts110
    • 111. Additions to Authorized Access Pointsfor Works• Other considerations (LC/PCC PS)– Resolve conflicts by adding qualifier to the newauthorized access point, not the old one (with someexceptions)– Use an authorized access point to represent aresource when it is referred to in other authorizedaccess point, or related to another resource by a note– For reproductions, use the authorized access point ofthe original (because it’s the same work/expression)111
    • 112. Additions to Authorized Access Pointsfor Works: What to Add• Not a priority order—add what is appropriate• Add what you’ve already recorded as elements. Do not addany subfield coding before the qualifier– form of work (6.3) (MARC 380)Charlemagne (Play)– date of the work (6.4) (MARC 046 $k and/or $l)Dublin magazine (1762)– place of origin of the work (6.5) (MARC 370 $g)Advocate (Boise, Idaho)• and/or– another distinguishing characteristic of the work (6.6) (MARC381 or 373)Bulletin (Geological Survey (South Africa)) [from 373]Journal (Choreographic work : Falco) [from 381]112
    • 113. Additions to Authorized Access Pointsfor Works100 1_ Keyes, Daniel. $t Flowers for Algernon100 1_ Keyes, Daniel. $t Flowers for Algernon(Short story)100 1_ Card, Orson Scott. $t Ender’s game100 1_ Card, Orson Scott. $t Ender’s game(Graphic novel)113
    • 114. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• Reminder: the term work is read, in RDA, toinclude aggregates (collections) and components(parts) of works as well as individual works (5.1.2)• Therefore the provisions for additions toauthorized access points for works (6.27.1.9)apply to aggregates and components as well asindividual works• Because the preferred title of such collections isoften a conventional collective title, there willfrequently be conflict114
    • 115. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• Different collections or selections of parts aredifferent aggregate works115
    • 116. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• Each of these short story collections is adifferent aggregate work: they containdifferent stories, in different arrangements116
    • 117. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• The conventional collective title for collections suchas these is “Short stories” (6.2.2.10.2)• Because none of these collections contains allDicken’s short stories we add “Selections”(6.2.2.10.2)• The preferred title is: Short stories. Selections117
    • 118. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• The preferred title is: Short stories. Selections• Remember, these are three separate works.• The access point for each beginsDickens, Charles, 1812-1870. Short stories. Selections• 6.27.1.9 says to add something to the access pointfor a work that is the same or similar to that ofanother work118
    • 119. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• We could use form, date, place of origin, orsomething else to distinguish• Possibilities: Other distinguishing characteristic (titleof the collection)Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870. Short stories. Selections (Selected shortstories)Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870. Short stories. Selections (Supernaturalshort stories of Charles Dickens)Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870. Short stories. Selections (Christmasstories)119
    • 120. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• We could use form, date, place of origin, orsomething else to distinguish• Possibilities: Other distinguishing characteristic(compiler of the collection)Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870. Short stories. Selections (Thomas)Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870. Short stories. Selections (Hayes)Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870. Short stories. Selections (UniversitySociety)120
    • 121. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• We could use form, date, place of origin, orsomething else to distinguish• Possibilities: Date of the workDickens, Charles, 1812-1870. Short stories. Selections. 1976Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870. Short stories. Selections. 2010Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870. Short stories. Selections. 1908121
    • 122. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• The AACR2 headings for such collections may not beappropriate for use in RDA because they usuallyrepresented more than one work• If authorized access points are needed in RDA, theyshould be established on separate records122
    • 123. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective TitlesThis AACR2 heading cannot be used as an RDA authorized accesspoint because it represents different aggregate works123
    • 124. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• “Works”– Conventional collective title for a compilation thatpurports to be the complete works of aperson, family, or corporate body– Different compilations are treated as differentaggregate works– If a creator’s works have been compiled morethan once, the access point usually needs anaddition under 6.27.1.9 to distinguish betweenthe aggregage works124
    • 125. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• “Works”– The pre-RDA NACO practice was always to add thedate of publication to the conventional collectivetitle “Works”– This is not required under RDA– Addition only necessary if the preferred title“Works” would conflict (i.e. if the creator’s workshave been compiled more than once)– Addition should be what makes most sense todistinguish, not necessarily the date of publication125
    • 126. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• Three different aggregate works126
    • 127. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• All three will have the same preferred title:Works• How can they be differentiated?– Form of work?– Date of work?– Place of origin of work?– Other characteristic?127
    • 128. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective TitlesPossible RDA authorized access pointsPaine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works (Blanchard)Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works (Belford, Clarke& Co.)Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works. 1880Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works (Completeworks of Thomas Paine containing all the politicaland theological writings)Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works (Chicago, Ill.)128
    • 129. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective TitlesPossible RDA authorized access pointsPaine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works (D.M. Bennett)Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works. 1878Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works (NewYork, N.Y.)Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works (The greatworks of Thomas Paine, complete)129
    • 130. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective TitlesPossible RDA authorized access pointsPaine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works (Carey)Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works(Philadelphia, Pa.)Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works. 1797Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809. Works (The works ofThomas Paine, Secretary for Foreign Affairs)130
    • 131. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• Problem: Because NACO conventions were different previous toRDA, more than one AACR2 heading may be found for the sameaggregate work. These should be consolidated for use in RDA.Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Works. 1974Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Works. 1997• These were used for two different manifestations of the aggregatework called The Riverside Shakespeare, published in differentyears. Only one authorized access point is appropriate in RDA.131
    • 132. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• Possible RDA authorized access points:Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Works. 1974[differentiate by date the aggregate work was first published]Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Works (The Riverside Shakespeare)[differentiate by title by which the aggregate work is known]Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Works (Evans)[differentiate by the chief editor/compiler, G. Blakemore Evans]132
    • 133. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles• Additional problem: Because NACO conventions were differentprevious to RDA, one AACR2 heading may be found that representsdifferent aggregate works. These should be split for use in RDA.Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Works. 1997• In addition to The Riverside Shakespeare, this heading was usedfor at least three other compilations, all published in 1997. Theseneed to be differentiated because they are separate aggregateworks.133
    • 134. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective Titles134
    • 135. Additions to Authorized Access Points forWorks: Conventional Collective TitlesPossible RDA authorized access points for oneof these:Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Works (TheNorton Shakespeare)[differentiate by title by which the aggregate work isknown]Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Works(Greenblatt)[differentiate by the chief editor/compiler, StephenGreenblatt]Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Works.1997[differentiate by date the aggregate work was firstpublished—unless this access point has already beenused by one of the others. This is probably the leastuseful since it does not differentiate from otherspublished the same year]135
    • 136. Authorized Access Point for a Work(MARC)100 1 $a Carter, Jimmy, $d 1924- $t Living faith100 1 $a Smith, Joseph, $c Jr., $d 1805-1844. $t King Follett discourse110 2 $a Banco de Bilbao. $t Informe y memoria130 0 $a Beowulf130 0 $a Primary colors130 0 $a Planet of the apes (Motion picture : 1968)130 0 $a Encyclopaedia Britannica130 0 $a Bible. $p Genesis130 0 $a Bible. $p New Testament130 0 $a NuTCRACKER (Computer file)136
    • 137. Variant Access Points for a Work(RDA 6.27.4)Variant access points are not core. Include them ifin your judgment they would help the user find oridentify the work.– Begin with a variant title (6.2.3)– Record in appropriate 4XX fields– Construct the variant access point by combining the authorizedaccess point for the creator with the variant title or by giving thevariant title alone– Make further additions to the access point if you consider themto be important for identification in the same way such additionswould have been added to a preferred title. These additions arenot required.137
    • 138. Exercises• Complete worksheet or OCLC workformdescriptions of the works Iliad and Piedra desol• Create authority records for works thatworkshop participants have brought138
    • 139. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for an Expression (6.27.3)• The authorized access point for an expressionalways begins with the authorized accesspoint for the work. Record it in 1XX exactly asit was recorded in the description of the work.139
    • 140. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for an Expression (6.27.3)Exercise: Begin to create the authorized accesspoint for the three expressions we’re working onby recording the authorized access point foreach one’s work.140
    • 141. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for an Expression (6.27.3)• RDA 6.27.3 says to add at least one other element• Other elements beyond the first may be added as needed todistinguish the expression from others. These may alreadyhave been recorded in the record as elements– Content type (6.9)– Date (6.10)– Language (6.11)– Other distinguishing characteristic (6.12)• Cataloger’s judgment about which element(s) to add. Whatbest distinguishes between the expressions?141
    • 142. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for an Expression (6.27.3)• Translations– Always begin by adding the language in subfield $l– Reminder: LC practice stops there, even though there may be morethan one expression in the language– There are two English-language expressions of Piedra de sol– There are scores of English-language expressions of The Iliad– If your library chooses to differentiate between these expressions, addanother element following the language element.• Content type – precede by period and subfield $h [note: not currently validating inOCLC]• Date of expression – precede by period and subfield $f• Other distinguishing characteristic – enclose in parentheses and precede bysubfield $s• Other possible combinations and orders142
    • 143. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for an Expression (6.27.3)• For this exercise, assume our library does distinguishbetween expressions in the same language• Let’s start by adding language to the access pointsfor each expression to see if that’s enough todistinguish them from other expressions of the work.• Is it? If not, we can add something more.Possible answers (expression additions in red):100 1 $a Paz, Octavio, $d 1914-1998. $t Piedra de sol. $l English $s (Rukeyser)100 0 $a Homer. $t Iliad. $l English $s (Mitchell)100 0 $a Homer. $t Iliad. $l English. $h Spoken word $s (Molina)143
    • 144. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for an Expression (6.27.3)• Original language editions– Reminder: LC practice is to use the authorized access point forthe work to represent any expression in the work’s originallanguage– PCC catalogers may follow this practice, but in some cases mayfind it necessary to distinguish between expressions in theoriginal language– 6.27.3 says to begin with the authorized access point for thework and then add one or more elementsContent type (6.9)Date (6.10)Language (6.11)Other distinguishing characteristic (6.12)– Best practices have not yet developed (stay tuned!)144
    • 145. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for an Expression (6.27.3)• In some fields it is important to distinguishbetween editions in the original language.Premodern literatures are such fields.– Some possibilities:• Begin with language, add further elements as needed100 0_ Homer. $t Iliad. $l Greek $s (Murray)500 1_ $w r $i Editor: $a Murray, A. T. $q (Augustus Taber), $d1866-1940• Begin with some other element100 1_ Langland, William, $d 1330?-1400? $t Piers Plowman $s(Z-text)145
    • 146. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for an Expression (6.27.3)• This can happen in modern language editions as well. JamesJoyce’s Ulysses appeared in many versions, and it may beimportant to your library to bring this out– Some possibilities:• Begin with language, add further elements as needed100 1_ Joyce, James, $d 1882-1941. $t Ulysses. $l English $s (Critical andsynoptic edition)500 1_ $w r $i Editor: $a Gabler, Hans Walter, $d 1938-500 1_ $w r $i Editor: $a Steppe, Wolfhard500 1_ $w r $i Editor: $a Melchior, Claus• Begin with some other element100 0_ Joyce, James, $d 1882-1941. $t Ulysses $s (Critical and synoptic edition)500 1_ $w r $i Editor: $a Gabler, Hans Walter, $d 1938-500 1_ $w r $i Editor: $a Steppe, Wolfhard500 1_ $w r $i Editor: $a Melchior, Claus146
    • 147. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for an Expression (6.27.3)• Bilingual and Polyglot resources– Never combine expressions in a singledescription/access pointHomer. Iliad. English & Greek147
    • 148. Constructing the Authorized AccessPoint for an Expression (6.27.3)• Bilingual and Polyglot resources– LC practice: record authorized access point for thework and authorized access point for the language ofthe translationHomer. IliadHomer. Iliad. English– PCC catalogers may follow LC practice or maydistinguish between expressions within the samelanguageHomer. Iliad. Greek (Murray)Homer. Iliad. English (Murray)148
    • 149. Constructing a Variant Access Point foran Expression (6.27.4.5)• No variant access points are core. The decision rests with thecataloger: would it help a user find the expression?• Recorded in 4XX• Two kinds of variants– Variants created by adding different expression attributes130 0 $a Blade runner (Motion picture : Final cut)430 0 $a Blade runner (Motion picture : 25th anniversary edition)– Variants based on a variant title for the work closely associated with aparticular expression100 1 $a Dickens, Charles, $d 1812-1870. $t Old curiosity shop. $l Hebrew400 1 $a Dickens, Charles, $d 1812-1870. $t400 1 $a Dickens, Charles, $d 1812-1870. $t - -ʻ ot149
    • 150. Constructing the Authorized Access Point for anReligious Expression (6.30.3.2) (Bible)• Begin with the authorized access point for thework (Bible) or part of the work• Several mandatory expression-relatedadditions– Language (subfield $l)– Other distinguishing characteristic, e.g. version(subfield $s)– Date of expression ($f)150
    • 151. Constructing the Authorized Access Point for anReligious Expression (6.30.3.2) (Bible)• Examples130 0 $a Bible. $p Amos. $l English. $s Andersen-Freedman. $f 1989130 0 $a Bible. $p Old Testament. $l English. $sNETS. $f 2007130 0 $a Bible. $p Acts. $l Arawak. $s Shultz. $f1850151
    • 152. Related Works (RDA 25)Related works are recorded in 5XX fields, and mayinclude a relationship indicator in subfield $i (fromRDA Appendix J), with $w r.130 0_ Doctor Zhivago (Motion picture : 2002)500 1_ $w r $i Motion picture adaptation of (work): $aPasternak, Boris Leonidovich, $d 1890-1960. $t Doktor Zhivago130 0_ 3 men and a baby (Motion picture)530 0_ $w r $i Remake of (Work): $a Trois hommes et uncouffin (Motion picture)152
    • 153. Related Expressions (RDA 25)Related expressions are recorded in 5XXfields, and may include a relationship indicatorin subfield $i (from RDA Appendix J), with $w r.100 1_ Jackson, Joe, $d 1955- $t Thief at the end of theworld. $l Portuguese500 1_ $w r $i Translation of: $a Jackson, Joe, ǂd 1955- ǂtThief at the end of the world153
    • 154. Related Persons, Families, orCorporate Bodies (RDA 30-32)Related persons, families, or corporate bodiesare recorded in 500 or 510 fields, and mayinclude a relationship indicator in subfield $i(from RDA Appendix I), with $w r.100 1_ Tolstoy, Leo, $c graf, $d 1828-1910. ǂt Voĭna i mir. $l English $s(Pevear and Volokhonsky)400 1_ Tolstoy, Leo, $c graf, $d 1828-1910. $t War and peace500 1_ $w r $i Translator: $a Pevear, Richard, $d 1943-500 1_ $w r $i Translator: $a Volokhonsky, Larissa154
    • 155. RDA authority record core and non-core: expression record040 $a UPB $b eng $e rda $c UPB046 $k 1957100 1 $a Paz, Octavio, $d 1914-1998. $t Piedra de sol. $l English $s (Rukeyser)336 $a text $2 rdacontent [not used in current PCC practice]377 $a eng381 $a Rukeyser400 1 $a Paz, Octavio, $d 1914-1998. $t Sun stone500 1 $w r $i Translator: $a Rukeyser, Muriel, $d 1913-1980670 $a Sun stone = Piedra de sol, 1957: $b title page (translation by Muriel Rukeyser)Note: LC would use the following form for this and all English expressions of Piedra de sol, unless they are copycataloging a record that differentiated the expression. Other catalogers may apply RDA (as above)100 0 $a Paz, Octavio, $d 1914-1998. $t Piedra de sol. $l English155
    • 156. RDA authority record core and non-core: expression record040 $a UPB $b eng $e rda $c UPB046 $k 2011100 0 $a Homer. $t Iliad. $l English $s (Mitchell)336 $a text $2 rdacontent [not used in current PCC practice]377 $a eng381 $a Mitchell500 1 $w r $i Translator: $a Mitchell, Stephen, $d 1943-670 $a Iliad, 2011: $b title page (translated ... by Stephen Mitchell)Note: LC would use this form for this and all English expressions of the Iliad, unless they are copy cataloging arecord that differentiated the expression. Other catalogers may apply RDA (as above)100 0 $a Homer. $t Iliad. $l English156
    • 157. RDA authority record core and non-core: expression record040 $a UPB $b eng $e rda $c UPB046 $k 2011100 0 $a Homer. $t Iliad. $l English. $h Spoken word $s (Molina)336 $a spoken word $2 rdacontent [not used in current PCC practice]377 $a eng381 $a Molina500 1 $w r $i Narrator: $a Molina, Alfred, $d 1953-500 1 $w r $i Translator: $a Mitchell, Stephen, $d 1943-670 $a The Iliad, 2011: $b container (translated by Stephen Mitchell ; read by Alfred Molina)Note: LC would probably use this form for this and all English expressions of the Iliad, unless they are copycataloging a record that differentiated the expression. Other catalogers may apply RDA (as above)100 0 $a Homer. $t Iliad. $l English157
    • 158. Exercises• Update or add authority records forexpressions workshop participants havebrought158
    • 159. RLM: recommend ending here159
    • 160. Preferred Title for an OfficialCommunication• RDA 6.26.2• Choosing the source of information and thepreferred title: same as 6.2.2.2-6.2.2.7 withtwo exceptions:– Official communication of the Pope– Official communication of the Roman Curia• Pope and Curia—a “short title” in the originallanguage by which communication is generallyknown and cited160
    • 161. Variant Titles for OfficialCommunications• RDA 6.26.3• Nothing particularly different161
    • 162. Access Points for OfficialCommunications• RDA 6.31.1• Scope—official communications– By heads of state– By heads of government– By ruling executive bodies– By heads of international bodies– By governors of dependent or occupied territories– From a pope, patriarch, bishop, etc.• For other works, see 6.27.1162
    • 163. Communications of a Single Official• 6.31.1.2• authorized access point combines– authorized access point representing the official(11.13.1)– Preferred title for the work (6.26.2)163
    • 164. Letters of Transmittal, etc.• 6.31.1.3• Subsidiary to another document—generallyserves as an introduction to that document• authorized access point combines– authorized access point for the corporate bodyresponsible for the accompanied document– Preferred title of the letter of transmittal164
    • 165. Compilations of OfficialCommunications of More than OneHolder of an Office• 6.31.1.4• authorized access point combines– authorized access point for the office (11.2.2.21 or11.2.2.29)– Preferred title for the work (6.26.2)165

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