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World IPv6 Launch Singapore - 4. i pv6 made easy don tan

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  • 1. IPv6 Made Easy Don Tan Regional Director - South Asia & India dtan@bluecatnetworks.com BlueCat Networks, Inc.Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 2. We are no longer an IP enabled world. We are IP dependent.Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 3. The Idea that Changed the WorldSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 4. Early 1970s — ARPA NET (1971) — FTP (1971) — TELNET (1972)Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 5. 1980s — 1981: TCP/IP — 1982: SMTP — 1983: Domain Names — 1987: RFC 1035 (DNS Protocol)Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 6. 1990s — 1991: HTTP — 1992: Class Structure Fails — 1993: CIDR — 1994: NAT — 1995: IP-NG (IPv5)Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 7. 2000 - — 2000: Dot-com crash — 2003: BlackBerry Phone — 2007: iPhone — 2010: iPad — 2011: IANA IPv4 Pool Depleted — 2011: APNIC Last /8 AllocatedSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 8. It’s a Numbers GameSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 9. It’s a Numbers Game 4,294,967,296 5,000,000,000 7,000,000,000Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 10. IPv4 RIR Distribution ARIN 44% RIPE NCC 22% LATNIC 5% APNIC 27% AfriNIC 2%Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 11. IPv4 RIR Distribution Pop: 0.5 B ARIN Pop: 0.8 B 44% RIPE NCC 22% LATNIC 5% APNIC Pop: 0.6 B 27% AfriNIC 2% Pop: 1 B Pop: 3.8 BSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 12. RIR IPv4 End Date Predictions AfriNIC Oct 2014? LACNIC Jan 2014? ARIN Dec 2013? RIPE NCC July 2012? APNIC April 15, 2011Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 13. What Next?Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 14. Think about changeSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 15. “By 2015, 17% of global Internet users will be IPv6, with 28% of new Internet connections running the protocol.” Gartner, Dec 2010Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 16. The World is Changing 17% 419,000,000 Users (based on 2011 data)Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 17. Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 18. AddressesSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 19. 340 282 366 920 938 463 463 374 607 431 768 211 456Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 20. How Big? 340 282 366 920 938 463 463 374 607 431 768 211 456 undecillion decillion nonillion octillion septillion sextillion quintillion quadrillio n trillion billion million thousandSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 21. Subnet Size — Subnets should always be /64 — Many vendors assume 64 bit boundary — 18.4 quintillion addresses per subnet — Perspective: — 31.5M seconds per year — 2.4 B seconds in average lifetime IPv6 Address Address Prefix Interface IdentifierSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 22. Address TypesSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 23. Local Link Address — Bound to local network — Non routable — Automatically configured — Uses MAC address to create unique address — Multi-homed devices use “Zones” LocalSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 24. Unique Local — Private within organization — Similar to RFC 1918 — Routable within organization — 40-bit pseudo-random number for uniqueness — Stateful or Stateless allocation — Can be tunnelled Unique Local LocalSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 25. Global Unicast — Globally unique — Public address space — 42 Undecillion address available — Prefix allocated by RIR/ISP — Stateful or Stateless allocation Global Unicast — Provides peer-to-peer connectivity Unique Local LocalSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 26. More Than AddressesSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 27. Extension Headers — IPv6 Uses simplified header — Chains additional headers onto one another — QoS, IPsec, TCP, UDP and other protocols implemented as “extension” headers — Protocol can be extended — Future friendly IPv6 Header Version Traffic Class Flow Label Payload Length Next Header Hop Limit Source Address Destination AddressSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 28. Neighbour Discovery — Uses link layer for auto configuration of nodes — Provides “plug-and-play” network functionality — Performs: — Router discovery — Prefix discovery — Address resolution — Parameter discovery — Duplicate address detectionSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 29. Path MTU Discovery — Based on IPv4 feature present in many routers — Functionality moved into core protocol — IPv6 does not like fragmentation — Right-sizes MTU for optimized transmission — Performed dynamically — Increased throughputSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 30. Multicast — Fundamental shift from IPv4’s broadcast mechanism — Broadcast not part of IPv6 — Allows networks to scale larger than IPv4 — Puts emphasis on the router rather than the switch — Can be used to discover services — Used by DHCP6 and other protocolsSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 31. Mobile IP — Documented in RFC 6275 — Allows forwarding of traffic from a “care of” address — Maintains session when joining new networks — Still experimental status — Currently complicated to implement — Will become more important as everything becomes mobile — LISP might be better alternative for someSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 32. Quality of Service (QoS) — Greater flexibility for managing QoS — Implemented as an extension header — Currently QoS in IPv6 is same as IPv4 — Has ability to provide better flow control — Future implementations will utilize more effectivelySaturday, May 19, 12
  • 33. IPsec — Part of core protocol — Developed in conjunction with IPv6 — Applications to provide VPN functionality — Implemented as extension header — Changes security in IPv6 — Encrypt IPv6 tunnelsSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 34. How good is your memory?Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 35. 10.4 .83.72Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 36. Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 37. 10.4 .83.72Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 38. Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 39. 1: 1010:92 34:4088 c d:ba23:c d1f:dcb 2 001:feSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 40. Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 41. 1: 1010:92 34:4088 c d:ba23:c d1f:dcb 2 001:feSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 42. Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 43. Needle in a Hay Stack dcd1:1010:9234:4088 dcb1:1010:9234:5088 dcb1:1010:9234:4088 dcb1:1010:9234:408b dbc1:1010:9234:4088 dcb7:1010:9234:4088 dcb1:1010:9234:4a88 dcb1:101a:9234:4088 dcb1:1010:8234:4088 dcb1:7010:9234:4088 dcb1:1011:9234:4088Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 44. Needle in a Hay Stack dcd1:1010:9234:4088 dcb1:1010:9234:5088 dcb1:1010:9234:4088 dcb1:1010:9234:408b dbc1:1010:9234:4088 dcb7:1010:9234:4088 dcb1:1010:9234:4a88 dcb1:101a:9234:4088 dcb1:1010:8234:4088 dcb1:7010:9234:4088 dcb1:1011:9234:4088Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 45. Management is KeySaturday, May 19, 12
  • 46. Addresses are not human friendlySaturday, May 19, 12
  • 47. Allocation patterns are sparseSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 48. IPAM key transition technologySaturday, May 19, 12
  • 49. Why do I need to Change?Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 50. Maintain connectivity with the rest of the worldSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 51. Killer Apps will fuel changeSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 52. Cloud applications require more addressesSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 53. IPv4 will move into legacy statusSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 54. ChallengesSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 55. Addresses will become hiddenSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 56. DNS will become more important.Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 57. Peer-to-Peer connectivity will be difficult to acceptSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 58. Security will be differentSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 59. Tunnelling can be complicated.Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 60. ConclusionsSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 61. IPv4 will run out sooner than expectedSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 62. Transitioning to IPv6 will require a well thought-out planSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 63. Peer-to-Peer will change how we build applicationsSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 64. Networks will become more flexibleSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 65. Addresses will no longer be a scarce resourceSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 66. Questions ?Saturday, May 19, 12
  • 67. About BlueCat Networks 24x7 5 95% 37% Hour On-site Customer Coverage Revenue Growth Hardware Repair Satisfaction Highest Rating Go-to Enterprise 120 2000 Strong Alliances Possible Partners Customers VendorSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 68. Special Offer for All Attendees Attend Our Complimentary IPv6 Technical Seminar: Getting Started with IPv6 ‣ Instructor-led 3-hour virtual seminar ‣ Learn the basic concepts of IPv6 ‣ Lay the groundwork for IPv6 success Watch your email for an invitation and voucher code to redeem online during registrationSaturday, May 19, 12
  • 69. Thank YouSaturday, May 19, 12