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What? Sea Scouts? Here? Learn how this program can help with recruitment and retaining your youth.
Objectives <ul><li>Scouters will: </li></ul><ul><li>Examine “nuts & bolts” that keep a Ship afloat </li></ul><ul><li>Revie...
Agenda <ul><li>Sea Scout History </li></ul><ul><li>Sea Scout Core Values </li></ul><ul><li>Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Pro...
Sea Scout Mission Statement <ul><li>“ To develop, enhance, and expand the Sea Scouts BSA program in a manner that emphasiz...
Founder of Scouting’s Vision <ul><li>Robert Baden-Powell – 1908: </li></ul><ul><li>“… A Scout should be able to manage a b...
Brother of Founder’s Vision <ul><li>Warington Baden-Powell – 1911: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Sea Scouting is simply a brand ...
Lord Baden-Powell Founder of Boy Scouts  and Sea Scouts History
History
History “ Teaching values through seamanship since 1912”
History
History
Sea Scout 4 S’s <ul><li>Scouting </li></ul><ul><li>Seamanship </li></ul><ul><li>Service </li></ul><ul><li>Social </li></ul>
Program Objectives <ul><li>Sailing & seamanship teach critical decision making skills as few other activities can. </li></...
Sea Scout Differentiators <ul><li>Uses naval customs & courtesies </li></ul><ul><li>Team focused w/ chain-of-command </li>...
Relationship to Venturing <ul><li>Membership & units are measured as a part of Venturing </li></ul><ul><li>Sea Scouts cont...
Resources - People Ship: Youth
Resources - People Ship: Adults
Resources - People Council
Resources - People Community
Resources - People Region
Resources - People National
Local Area Ships <ul><li>Atlanta Area Council </li></ul><ul><ul><li>6 Ships </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Flint River Council </l...
Resources - Information www.seascout.org  www.scouting.org  www.usps.org – US Power Squadrons  www.cgaux.org – US Coast Gu...
Resources - Assets What do you have? What is available? Storage Marinas Camps: Council? National?
Designing Your Program <ul><li>Analyze the ship’s strengths – youth, adults, resources </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze the ship’...
Designing Your Program <ul><li>Boats? </li></ul><ul><li>Will you have: </li></ul><ul><li>Chartered Organization or  ship-o...
Required Training <ul><li>Training for Everyone! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>BSA requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Saf...
<ul><li>Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Think about it:  It pays to plan ahead.  It wasn’t raining when Noah built the ark. </l...
Planning - 12 Month Ship Op Plan <ul><li>Things to consider: </li></ul><ul><li>Achievement Worksheet </li></ul><ul><li>Cou...
Planning - Super-activity <ul><li>Things to consider: </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>When to start  </li></ul...
Planning - Structural <ul><li>Youth developed </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a common set of expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Al...
Planning - Structural <ul><li>Youth developed </li></ul><ul><li>Rules that govern the ship </li></ul><ul><li>Includes memb...
Planning - Meetings & Activities <ul><li>Decisions, decisions… </li></ul><ul><li>Weekly meetings or Bi-weekly meetings </l...
Planning - Youth Leadership Boatswain Boatswain’s Mate Assistant Crew Leader Crew Leader Purser Storekeeper Yeoman
Petty Officer Organization
Petty Officer    Ship Leaders
Sharing the Helm - Skipper “ The Skipper is the key adult leader and is responsible for training Ship’s Boatswain. “ The u...
Sharing the Helm - Organization
Sharing the Helm - Youth <ul><li>Sea Scouts are young men and women ages 13-21. </li></ul><ul><li>Sea Scout officers lead ...
<ul><li>Pre-quarterdeck – Skipper and boatswain </li></ul><ul><li>(Empower Hour) </li></ul>Planning - Quarterdeck Training
<ul><li>Quarterdeck Meetings  </li></ul><ul><li>Run by the Boatswain </li></ul><ul><li>Long range planning </li></ul><ul><...
Advancement - Traditional Apprentice Ordinary Able Quartermaster
Advancement - Opportunities SEAL Sea Scout Advanced Leadership
Advancement – Non-Traditional
Advancement - Ceremonies (Landships) <ul><li>Bridges of Honor </li></ul><ul><li>Installation of Officers </li></ul><ul><li...
Uniforms Uniforms are not required in the Sea Scout program; however, youth and adults  participating in national events w...
Ship 378: The Dawn Treader <ul><li>Raison d'être </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scouts need to be prepared for environmental emerge...
S378: Land & Water Scouting <ul><li>Coed </li></ul><ul><li>Land & Water Agility </li></ul><ul><li>Council Service </li></u...
S378: Council Service <ul><li>Project COPE </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Low COPE & High COPE Instructors </li></ul></ul><ul><li>B...
S378: Membership <ul><li>Crew </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advancement </li></ul></ul><ul><...
S378: Annual Program <ul><li>Spring Break </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Long Cruise, Boating </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Spring </li></...
S378: Meetings & Outings <ul><li>Weekly Training & Admin Meetings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wednesdays  (2 hours) </li></ul></...
S378 Advancement Program <ul><li>Eagle Scout </li></ul><ul><li>Sea Scout Rank Advancement </li></ul><ul><li>Venturing Rang...
S378: Venturing Ranger <ul><li>½ Ranger (Venturing Outdoor Bronze) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>4 Core </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul...
S378: Venturing Awards <ul><li>Venturing Bronze </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sea Scouts (Ordinary) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Out...
Recruiting <ul><li>Must be on the minds of all adults all the time </li></ul><ul><li>Youth must be reminded to bring their...
Recruiting - Start Early   <ul><li>Start recruiting in 8 th  grade (for graduation) </li></ul><ul><li>You keep them longer...
Who’s Interested? <ul><li>Marketing our program to share the fun of Sea Scouts with… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sisters of Boy ...
Marketing Plan it! Do it! Tell everybody how much fun you had! What did you do last weekend?
Fair winds and following seas. Set Sail!
Sea Scouting <ul><li>If Scouting brings out the best in youth, </li></ul><ul><li>Sea Scouting brings out the best in Scout...
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This is Sea Scouting Ship 378 Style

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What? Sea Scouts? Here? Learn how this program can help with recruitment and retaining your youth. Presentation made a Flint River Council's Scouting University, 5 Nov 11.

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  • I.A. Objectives I.B. Introduce staff
  • I.D. Introduction to Sea Scouting Before we examine where you are going in your future with Sea Scouts, let’s look at where our council has been in its past. In 1910, Lord Baden Powell, founder of Boy Scouts, looked about. He was concerned by the homeless youth and gangs in England’s streets. Europe was politically unstable, and England’s merchant marine, backbone of British Navy, was manned by foreigners.
  • Powell decided to combine the best attributes of seamanship with the character training of Boy Scouts. It would give an avocation to older youth and England would be better prepared for what laid ahead.
  • In 1912, Sea Scouting came to America. To be a Sea Scout a young man had to subscribe to Boy Scout Oath and Law, pass tenderfoot requirements, be 15, and weigh at least 112 pounds. Since that time, Sea Scouts have been teaching values through seamanship.
  • America was changed forever on December 7, 1941. Our Pacific fleet was decimated at Pearl Harbor. Shortly after the bombing, Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox formally asked Sea Scout leaders and youth to consider naval service during WWII. Current and former Sea Scouts and leaders with at least two years of college between ages 19 and 50 were given immediate commissions. By the end of 1943, over 100,000 Sea Scouts were serving in the US Navy, Coast Guard and Marines.
  • So, what does the program look like across the nation today? Each ship has its own unique program designed and implemented by its co-ed youth members aged 14 to 21. Some ships sail small boats and catamarans or cruise in sailing sloops. Many sail competitively. In northern states, youth sail in the summer and ice race in winter. On the west coast, ships maintain and cruise in retired naval vessels. Basically, if it is an activity about, on, in, under or through the water, Sea Scouts are involved.
  • 1. Ship a. Youth: The youth of your ship will come to you with a variety of life experiences, ages, abilities and intelligence. Although there is great diversity, there are some developmental issues that all young adults are facing. It is an age of experimentation. Teens will try out new social roles, responsibilities, values and personalities. It is an age of taking risks which can be interesting, if not dangerous. Cognitive skills are in place, but the ability to see cause and effect is still under development. The youth you work with will be moving from dependence to interdependence. Social relationships take on a greater importance, and it is all complicated by physiological changes and sexual maturity. Bodies change, but so do bodies of thought. The youth in your ship will begin to think more critically and analytically as they age. They will reevaluate personal, family and social values. They will question inconsistencies in the values of those about them as they define their personal values that will help them become competent and capable adults.
  • 1.b. Adults: The skipper and the ship’s committee are the key to the success of the crew. Together they make sure the interests of the Sea Scouts, the program, and the wishes of the Chartered Organization are matched. It is important that each adult leader in your ship has an understanding of and a fondness for young adults. While they are busy developing and changing, they must be connected to caring adults who can coach, mentor, guide and remember. Each parent of a youth in your unit is a potential asset, and if your unit is co-ed, you must locate female advisors who are able and willing to attend the activities with the youth. You can use the Program Capability Inventory found in the Sea Scout Manual to identify their interests and skills. It is imperative that everyone is given a job. This will keep your adults actively involved.
  • 2. Council (Pass out the contact list you have pre-prepared of key contacts in your council. Point out key individuals on the contact list. Highlight people who are knowledgeable about local sailing or have specific skills such as engine repair.) Perhaps the single most critical factor in the longevity of the Sea Scout program is the networking that has occurred through the years. You are not alone. There are others nearby who have gone through the growing pains of launching a new ship, the trials of recruitment, and the sometimes overwhelming task of keeping boats in good working order. Get to know the skippers and adults in nearby ships. Plan multi-ship activities so the youth and adults can share expertise and knowledge of local waters, and they can infect each other with enthusiasm for the program. Networking is the simplest way to smooth out the bumps while you are getting your program established. Make sure you have a unit commissioner assigned from your district. While they are seldom experts in seamanship, they usually have experience in how a scouting unit works. They can help you with your people problems which are usually the majority of the serious problems you will confront. District Executives have contacts for recruiting, and they may know of other resources that will be of assistance to you.
  • 3. Community BSA has a memorandum of understanding with the United States Power Squadrons (USPS). The memorandum encourages Power Squadrons to sponsor Sea Scout ships, help ships provide both basic and advanced Power Squadron courses to Sea Scouts, and give Sea Scouts the opportunity to join the Power Squadron for a reduced fee. The Power Squadron also conducts comprehensive courtesy marine inspections of vessels to check them for required safety equipment and seaworthiness. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary (USCGA) is another volunteer water safety organization. They, too, will provide annual courtesy marine inspections. In some areas USCGA sponsors water safety days where Sea Scout and USCGA interests meet. Every state has a National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA) approved water safety course. The NASBLA course is required in most states for youth to operate a vessel over fourteen feet. The course is given in many locations throughout the year and can also be taken online. Contact your state boating safety agency for more information. The NASBLA approved course, the introductory USPS course, and the USCGA safe boating course are normally interchangeable. These courses also fulfill almost all the requirements for youth earning the Small Boat Handler Bar.
  • 4. Region There are four BSA regions in the United States. The regional Sea Scout structure varies between regions. Most regions have a regional commodore who is appointed by the National Sea Scout Committee. (Determine prior to teaching this course how your region supports Sea Scouts and who the key contacts are for the region.) The following are events of long-standing from the different regions. (Prior to SSALBT, you should update and revise the activities your region sponsors.) Western Region Ancient Mariner – San Francisco Bay Area, Memorial Day Southwestern Rendezvous – Longbeach, CA, Thanksgiving Safety At Sea—San Francisco Bay Area, Fall Central Region SNOWSTORM – Poplar Grove, IL, mid-January Winter Amidships – Fon du Lac, WI, February Rock River Regatta – Fort Atkinson, WI, April Badger Bash – Waukesha, WI, June Bay Jammer – Marinette, WI/Menominee, MI, July Blackhawk Regatta – Rockford IL, July Makahiki – Warsaw, IN, August Tall Ship Cruise – Chicago, IL, Navy Pier, September Devil’s Lake Hike – Baraboo, WI, October Creeporee – Long Lake BSA Camp, Halloween Football Barn Bash - Rockford, IL, November Sea Scout Adult Leader Basic Training Sea Scouts, BSA—Edition 12.6.09 11 Boy Scouts of America Southern Region Minto Rendezvous – Texas, Labor Day King Neptune Rendezvous – Charleston, SC, June Northeast Region Commodore Henry I. Nygard Area Regatta – St. Mary’s County, MD, Memorial Da y
  • 5. National a. Keith Christopher is our National Director of Sea Scouts. He appoints our National Commodore; currently Charlie Wurster, VADM, USCG (Ret.), who chairs the National Sea Scout Support Committee, oversees Sea Scout publications, networks with industry, and represents Sea Scouts at BSA meetings at the national level. b. The National Sea Scout Support Committee is composed of industry representatives, and others whose skills and knowledge add depth to the committee. Regional commodores represent their region on the committee. This committee has input into publications, promotional and program literature, training, and activities offered at the national level. c. Seabadge , an advanced Sea Scout management course, is offered on a regional or council level. Seabadge will not teach you to operate a vessel, but it will give you intense training in ship operations as well as providing an opportunity to network with other Sea Scout leaders throughout the region. This course, Sea Scout Adult Leader Basic Training, is a prerequisite for Seabadge. d. Seabadge Underway is a course taught on the water while underway. It is designed to teach relatively inexperienced boat operators to handle a vessel safely in moderate conditions, and it is also designed to teach experienced boat operators the Sea Scout method of operating a vessel. The course covers coastal navigation, marlinespike seamanship, vessel administration, vessel safety, Sea Scout customs, and how to instruct youth aboard a vessel. e. SEAL (Sea Scout Advanced Leadership) [Note: This material is covered in advancement. Choose where you wish to introduce the topic.]Training is a leadership course for youth who have achieved at least Ordinary rank. The course is managed at the national level and approved by the regions where the course is run. The week-long course is offered in multiple venues each summer and is a benchmark for leadership and initiative. Special opportunities such as National Boatswain, America’s Cup Course Marshals, Boatswain and Boatswain’s Mate for the Koch Cup Regatta, and selection for trips on submarines, etc. are only available to SEAL graduates. d. The William I. Koch Sea Scout Regatta is held every two years. This international event is sponsored by Bill Koch, former America’s Cup winner. Youth spend a week racing in 420’s for the Koch Cup which is modeled after the America’s Cup. e. The Minto Scholarship is given to a graduating Sea Scout senior. The Sea Scout Adult Leader Basic Training Sea Scouts, BSA—Edition 12.6.09 12 Boy Scouts of America recipient spends a summer at sea aboard the TTS Clipper, the training vessel for Texas A&amp;M Galveston. The youth who is selected earns six hours of college credit while underway.
  • B. Information While people make it happen, another critical resource is accurate information. 1. The Sea Scout Manual has almost everything a youth or adult needs to know to run the program. ―Chapters One and ―Two give you history, customs, and practical help for running your ship. ―Chapter Three‖ covers advancement and the requirements for each rank, and ―Chapter Four‖ contains most of the information necessary for rank advancement and running a vessel in a safe manner. 2. BSA Advisor Training – The Sea Scout program has been around for many years, and BSA provides several training sessions to equip new advisors with the basics regarding dealing with adolescents. The first important course is the Fast Start Training. This course lays the groundwork and includes the very important Youth Protection Training. Unfortunately, everything is not always perfect in the lives of teenagers, and leaders need to have basic preparation. Next is the course you are in today – SSALBT. This course gives you the nuts and bolts of the program and helps you get started. The final course one needs as a Sea Scout advisor is Seabadge which deals more with personal interactions and management. 3. Sources you will find helpful are Chapman’s Piloting (Elbert S. Maloney, author. Hearst Marine Books: New York.) and Learning to Sail: The Annapolis Sailing School Guide for Young Sailors of All Ages (Di Goodman and Ian Brodie, authors. McGraw-Hill: New York, 1994.) Chapman’s is the most thorough seamanship reference for boaters. 4. Pass out a calendar of events for your council and area. Point out upcoming events to participants. 5. Pass out a listing of helpful websites (Amend Appendix A as necessary before distributing).
  • C. Assets Once the youth and adults know what type program they want to run, look about you for all available assets. Where are the marinas and boatyards? Will they offer free space in return for community service? Sea Scouts have a special relationship with BoatUS and West Marine. Apply for a Port Supply Card so you can receive significant savings. Where are the camps located in your council? What activities can be held there? Do the adults in your ship have equipment or access to facilities they will share? Once you know what is already available, you will be ready to make decisions about what is needed and what kind of budgeting and fundraising will be necessary to support your ship’s goals.
  • A. Strengths and Weaknesses Analysis All too often, units fail and no one understands why. The youth were present, the leaders were in place, but the unit didn’t thrive. Sometimes people buy into a program thinking that it runs so well elsewhere that it will be a guaranteed success. Before investing too much time and effort into launching your ship, take a dispassionate and objective look at your unit’s strengths and weaknesses. You need to consider the abilities and training of your ship’s committee, your youth, and yourself. You need to assess the equipment available to you and determine whether anyone is competent to use it. Asking the right questions is important. What do you have? What are the capabilities of the adults? Does anyone know anything about boats? Does anyone have any experience – with boats, teenagers, scouting? Has anyone received any specialized training? Has anyone had their basic training and Youth Protection? What are the demands on everyone’s time beyond scouting? If you’re coed, do you have a female advisor? What are the capabilities and interests of the youth? What equipment do you have access to? Consider both what you own or control and what you can borrow or rent. A ship’s program has to have a happy balance between the chartering organization’s expectations, the desires of the youth and the wishes of the adults. Other questions you need to ask concern time, types of activities and super-activities, insurance, fundraising, and boats. Write down your observations. Doing the analysis with your committee and your youth gives you a starting point for planning. Plan to capitalize and build upon your identified strengths and overcome your weaknesses.
  • B. Boats? You do not have to own boats to be a Sea Scout Ship. You can use canoes, kayaks and rafts. You can be a SCUBA ship, but more likely than not, your unit will make use of some type of boat. 1. Chartered organization or ship-owned vessels If the ship owns the boats, the advantages are possession and control. You will need to ensure that the vessels are properly titled because the equipment that belongs to a scout unit normally belongs to the chartered organization. It may mean that you need to establish a 501(c) 3 corporation to be your own chartered organization to maintain control of your boats. The boats then become your complete responsibility. When the chartered organization owns the boats, you may be able to fit some of your liability and property insurance needs under their insurance umbrella. However, you are subject to the changing minds of the institution’s governing board, and a large equipment exposure may make them cautious. 2. Privately owned vessels A subset of ship-owned boats is where the individual leaders of the ship own the boats and let the members of the ship use them. There are several disadvantages to this option. The leaders essentially bear all the costs of upkeep and liability on the boats, and should they leave the ship, the boats will leave with them. 3. Council owned vessels In many councils, the council will agree to own the Sea Scout vessels with the understanding that these vessels are available for the use of all scout units that have qualified operators for the vessels. The council usually has the liability insurance coverage through the BSA insurance program. In many cases, the vessels are old enough that insuring them against loss is not practical. Scout council insurance covers all Sea Scout boats (ship, chartered organization and council) up to 26’ in length or 40 horsepower. Boats over 26’ and/or 40 HP may be covered for an additional premium (both council and chartered organization boats – See www.seascout.org. Then click on resources for adults, then Cruise Plan).
  • b. For everyone Regardless of your years and experience on the water, there are BSA requirements that must be met before you can take youth out on the water. You must take Safe Swim Defense and Safety Afloat . These courses are offered regularly at the council level since you must take them every two years, and you can also take them online through the online learning center on www.scouting.org . (Pass out a copy of the float plan, Appendix B.) BSA requires that you file a float plan for your outings on the water. You can find instructions for filing the Float Plan at www.seascout.org.While not a training requirement, BSA does require that vessels have an annual courtesy marine examination. The US Coast Guard Auxiliary and the US Power Squadrons offer this service free of charge. For more information see – Resources for Adults, Safe Boating Standards.
  • Almost every scout training course covers planning. We all know, “To fail to plan is to plan to fail,” but our youth have little experience with planning. If your goal is to have a ship that is run by the youth; you need to give them some guidance and some tools to do the job.
  • 12 Month Operational Plan Once officers are elected, either have an extended quarterdeck training and meeting or a retreat. If the youth plan the entire year and give a copy of the calendar to each member of the ship, adults and youth will be able to plan their availability, and families will know of possible conflicts well in advance. The first step in developing an operational plan is to hammer out the year’s calendar. As the youth plan the year, have them consider ship, council, region, and national events. They should also study the criteria for National Flagship and build this into their year. Once the calendar is in place, have the youth look at each activity and decide what training occurs before the event takes place. The youth can then plan for training either through programs at meetings or make other arrangements. For example, if the ship decides to compete in a rendezvous that has eighteen events, the youth will want to plug the event training into the meeting agenda. Now they have the program for eighteen meetings planned. Not only will they be preparing for rendezvous, but they will most likely be acquiring advancement skills at the same time.
  • Superactivities Superactivities take many forms for Sea Scouts. Some units use their own vessels to cruise for five or more days while others charter vessels to explore new waters. Sea Scouts are not limited to sailing or cruising. White-water rafting, hiking, canoeing, skiing, diving and camping are just a few alternatives scouts may want to consider. The superactivity gives your scouts a focal point for training, advancement, growth, and fundraising. A sample schedule for planning a superactivity is found in the Sea Scout Manual .
  • Code of Conduct Developing a Code of Conduct will empower your youth to take responsibility for their behavior and the behavior of their shipmates. This simple document forces the youth to think through their purpose, their values, and what will be an intolerable threat to their safety and the welfare of their ship. A code of conduct defines acceptable/unacceptable behaviors and clearly states consequences for misbehaviors. The document should be composed by the youth and should reflect their beliefs. It gives them ownership, and they are more likely to honor their code. (Pass out and review sample Code of Conduct, Appendix C.)
  • By-laws By-laws are the rules that govern your unit. When the youth develop them they need to consider membership, meeting days and times, officers, elections, dues, etc. (Pass out sample by-laws, Appendix D.)
  • Meetings and activities Your youth need to decide how often to meet. The pattern of two meetings a month is an option; however, as your ship begins to grow and the youth become more enthusiastic about what they are doing, do not be surprised if they choose to meet at least once a week topped off with an aggressive weekend activity schedule, as well.
  • Once you have a Mission Statement, By-Laws, and Code of Conduct, schedule an election of officers. Refer to the Sea Scout Manual for job descriptions of each office. Suggest that your Boatswain candidates prepare campaign plans for presentation to the group.
  • A. Adults Sea Scouting is too big a job for the skipper alone. When a youth joins, you have a prospective adult who can help lighten the load with transportation, vessel repair, training, or whatever is necessary to help facilitate the program for the youth. If you give the adults a purpose to be there, they will return. If you are a Skipper, you must not try to do everything alone. Remember: You need help so you don’t overburden yourself and burn out, and so you don’t overburden just the faithful few. Whenever a youth joins, you have a prospective adult. Give them a purpose and they will return. The specific responsibilities of the Skipper and his Mates include: Fostering an environment within the Sea Scout ship that has a true sense of community and encourages everyone’s growth and responsibility to one another. Developing ship youth to lead – to plan, make decisions, and carry out a program of activities over an extended period. Encouraging participation and support for the Sea Scout ship from the chartered organization, associate advisors, ship committee, parents and other adults in the community. Upholding the standards and polices of the chartered organization and the Boy Scouts of America. Providing the necessary framework for protecting the members of the ship from abuse Ensuring that activities are conducted within BSA safety guidelines and requirements. Skippers, mates and other advisors should be trained by the BSA. Seeking to cultivate within the members of the crew a capacity to enjoy life – to have fun through the Sea Scout experience. The Skipper does not have to be an expert in Sea Scouts. However, he or she must be a good example for youth and must be able to train and coach the ship’s elected officers. He or she must have the full support of the chartered organization.
  • Share the Helm – Adults Adult Leaders When an organization organizes a Sea Scout ship, its leadership agrees to recruit adult volunteer leaders. These consist of a Skipper, one or more mates, and a ship committee of three or more members, one serving as the chair of the committee. These leaders must be adult men and women twenty-one years of age or older who will guide the ship toward programs resulting in good character, citizenship, and fitness for Sea Scouts. The Ship’s Committee The ships committee recruits the Skipper and mates. The committee obtains equipment, approves the ship’s program, and helps with fund-raising and financial management. The committee usually meets monthly.
  • B. Youth Sea Scouting in its ideal state is run by the youth with very little interference from the adults, but in most cases, youth have had no experience with this kind of responsibility. As soon as your elections are over, train your officers. The Sea Scout Manual contains comprehensive job descriptions that can be adapted for your unit. Communicate clearly with your boatswain. Follow-up regularly to consult regarding meeting agendas and upcoming activities. Help the youth use an activity checklist, and make suggestions regarding the appointment of the right youth to be activity chairpersons. Coach the boatswain to supervise rather than run all activities and to make collaborative decisions rather than unilateral ones. Remember, “For growth, lead followers. To multiply, lead leaders.”
  • The initial quarterdeck (Refer to Appendix E) is the first quarterdeck meeting (officers only) immediately after officer elections. In preparation for this meeting, ask the boatswain to outline his/her vision for the term of office and prepare job descriptions for his/her supporting officers. The skipper’s role in this meeting is to empower the boatswain to run the ship. It is also the skipper’s opportunity to discuss the significance of the role of activity chairpersons.
  • Once officers are elected and the Skipper and boatswain have conferred, conduct a quarterdeck training as soon as possible after elections. The Sea Scout Manual discusses training with you job descriptions. If possible, take the kids on a working retreat. Teach them their jobs, tell them which adult they will be working closely with, and guide them as they knock out a year’s ship operational plan. Give them the tools for success, then step aside. 2. Subsequent quarterdecks are planning sessions with the boatswain in charge. While your unit is small, the youth may not feel the need to set aside a specific date and time for a Quarterdeck meeting; however, the purpose of a Quarterdeck is for long-range planning and goal setting. Make sure your youth have planning tools to assist them. (Pass out Ship Meeting Plan, Appendix F, and Quarterdeck Meeting Plan, Appendix G.) Every youth needs the opportunity to be an activity chairperson. While they are following the unit’s wishes, each scout needs to have the responsibility for making menus, purchasing, packing, communication, equipment, and event all come together. This will teach them adult skills in a supportive, fail-safe environment. It also prepares the entire group for knowledgeable participation in the planning of a super-activity. (Distribute copies of Appendix H, Sample Activity Planner.)
  • A. Traditional 1. Apprentice rank requires learning basic customs and courtesies, basic knots and completing a swim test. Not only does this rank introduce a youth to what unites Sea Scouts across the world, but it prepares the youth to function safely in ship activities. 2. Ordinary rank is an important milestone. A youth must be Ordinary to apply for SEAL. 3. Able rank requires a youth to perform at higher skill levels and be actively involved in the leadership of the unit. 4. Quartermaster is the highest rank that can be earned in Sea Scouts. A youth who achieves this level has taken a greater leadership role in his ship and has taught others in his unit skills that meet ordinary requirements. Two unique requirements for this rank are the Quartermaster project and the Quartermaster sail. To complete the project, a youth must follow the guidelines and use the workbook provided for the Eagle Scout service project. The Quartermaster sail commands a crew of at least four other scouts for a 40 hour cruise that includes some time underway at night. SEAL successful completion is an alternative for earning the Quartermaster award instead of the Quartermaster sail.
  • SEAL (Sea Scout Advanced Leadership) Training is a leadership course for youth who have achieved at least Ordinary rank. The course is managed at the national level and approved by the regions where the course is run. The week-long course is offered in multiple venues each summer and is a benchmark for leadership and initiative. Special opportunities such as National Boatswain, America’s Cup Course Marshals, Boatswain and Boatswain’s Mate for the Koch Cup Regatta, and selection for trips on submarines, etc. are only available to SEAL graduates.
  • B. Non-traditional 1. Small Boat Handler Bar – indicates the Sea Scout has the knowledge and skills to be safe on the water. Most of the requirements for this award can be met by completing a NASBLA approved safe boating course. 2. Qualified Seaman Bar – denotes a scout not only has the knowledge and skill to be safe on the water, but has also demonstrated the ability to take charge of a vessel and handle it with competence.
  • D. Ceremonies Boards of Review are called Bridges of Review in Sea Scouts. Youth may sit on Bridges of Review with the exception of Quartermaster Bridges of Review. Courts of Honor are Bridges of Honor in Sea Scouts. Awards should be recognized and officers should be installed with a Bridge of Honor. Sample formal landship ceremonies can be found in the Sea Scout Manual and at seascout.org.
  • Uniforms: Emphasize that uniforming is a long-standing tradition of the Sea Scout program and clearly identifies participants of the program. Refer to the Sea Scout Manual (pages 105-121) for information regarding uniforms, insignia and insignia placement.
  • Recruiting and marketing are perhaps our most important tasks. If you do not have youth enrolled, you do not have a program. No program, no impact on the character of youth. Adults must think of recruiting all the time. Encourage your youth to recruit friends who are at least one grade level below them in school. This will keep your ship from collapse because all the youth age out at the same time. Sometimes youth are hesitant to join because of conflicts with sports, band, or other extra-curricular activities. We cannot afford to have an either-them-or-us attitude or we will close the door for too many youth. High schoolers are pulled in many directions, but they will stay with the ship if you provide some attendance flexibility.
  • Many successful ships introduce eighth grade students in their spring semester to Sea Scouts because youth recruited in the summer between eighth and ninth grade will be with the program for the maximum number of years. Another benefit is that eighth graders do not drive. Their parents must bring them to meetings, so you’ve got a potential adult recruit, too. Make contacts in your local schools so you can go into the 8 th grade in the spring of the year and recruit. A teacher who is also a Scouter is particularly helpful. Youth recruited into the ship at the end of their 8 th grade year stay in the ship longer than those recruited later. If you put on a strong program during the summer that you recruit them, they will make room for Sea Scouting during their high school years. Also connect with your local Order of the Arrow Lodge members and participate in council and district events (Scout expositions, University of Scouting, camporees, etc.) to share the story of Sea Scouts and how their youth members can stay active in the program for a longer time, as well as older siblings.
  • Another important component of recruitment is marketing. If your ship has a Bridge of Honor, participates in a service project, or just does something that is remarkable and fun, make sure the papers know about it. Submit an action-packed photo of kids having fun and list a contact and a phone number. If it looks and sounds like fun, youth will come.
  • Skipper’s Minute: You came today to get trained because you want to make a difference in the lives of our youth. Abraham Lincoln once said, “―A child is someone who is going to carry on what you have started. He is going to sit where you are sitting and, when you are gone, attend to those things which you think are most important. You can create all the policies you please, but how they are carried out depends on him. . . He will assume control of your cities, states, and nations. He is going to move in and take over your churches, schools, universities and corporations. . .the fate of humanity is in his hand.” With the knowledge we’ve armed you with in this training and your personal dedication and leadership, you will affect our future in a significant way.
  • Transcript of "This is Sea Scouting Ship 378 Style"

    1. 1. What? Sea Scouts? Here? Learn how this program can help with recruitment and retaining your youth.
    2. 2. Objectives <ul><li>Scouters will: </li></ul><ul><li>Examine “nuts & bolts” that keep a Ship afloat </li></ul><ul><li>Review resources that will support their program </li></ul><ul><li>Explore opportunities, advancement and recognition unique to Sea Scouting </li></ul>
    3. 3. Agenda <ul><li>Sea Scout History </li></ul><ul><li>Sea Scout Core Values </li></ul><ul><li>Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Program Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning & Organization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advancement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ship 378, The Dawn Treader’s Program </li></ul><ul><li>Recruiting & Marketing </li></ul>
    4. 4. Sea Scout Mission Statement <ul><li>“ To develop, enhance, and expand the Sea Scouts BSA program in a manner that emphasizes the purposes and achieves the objectives of the Boy Scouts of America, working to help local councils improve their membership and programs.” </li></ul>
    5. 5. Founder of Scouting’s Vision <ul><li>Robert Baden-Powell – 1908: </li></ul><ul><li>“… A Scout should be able to manage a boat, to bring it properly alongside a ship or pier…” </li></ul>
    6. 6. Brother of Founder’s Vision <ul><li>Warington Baden-Powell – 1911: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Sea Scouting is simply a brand of Boy Scouting.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Scouts first, seamen afterwards.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Sea Scouting is not necessarily a scheme for turning out a boy as a ready-made sailor with a view to his going to sea. But rather to teach him, by means which attract him, to be a handy, quick and disciplined man, able to look after himself and to help others in danger.” </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Lord Baden-Powell Founder of Boy Scouts and Sea Scouts History
    8. 8. History
    9. 9. History “ Teaching values through seamanship since 1912”
    10. 10. History
    11. 11. History
    12. 12. Sea Scout 4 S’s <ul><li>Scouting </li></ul><ul><li>Seamanship </li></ul><ul><li>Service </li></ul><ul><li>Social </li></ul>
    13. 13. Program Objectives <ul><li>Sailing & seamanship teach critical decision making skills as few other activities can. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach leadership, critical thinking skills, teamwork, & community involvement, while having fun. </li></ul><ul><li>Retaining teenage Scouts. </li></ul>
    14. 14. Sea Scout Differentiators <ul><li>Uses naval customs & courtesies </li></ul><ul><li>Team focused w/ chain-of-command </li></ul><ul><li>Structured program </li></ul><ul><li>Quartermaster is the highest rank available to a Sea Scout </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Equivalent to Eagle Scout. </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Relationship to Venturing <ul><li>Membership & units are measured as a part of Venturing </li></ul><ul><li>Sea Scouts continues to be a part of the Venturing program </li></ul><ul><li>No change anticipated in allowing Sea Scouts to earn the Venturing awards </li></ul>
    16. 16. Resources - People Ship: Youth
    17. 17. Resources - People Ship: Adults
    18. 18. Resources - People Council
    19. 19. Resources - People Community
    20. 20. Resources - People Region
    21. 21. Resources - People National
    22. 22. Local Area Ships <ul><li>Atlanta Area Council </li></ul><ul><ul><li>6 Ships </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Flint River Council </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ship 378, Newnan, GA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>McDonough, GA </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Resources - Information www.seascout.org www.scouting.org www.usps.org – US Power Squadrons www.cgaux.org – US Coast Guard Auxiliary www.navy.mil – U.S. Navy www.uscg.mil – U.S. Coast Guard www.prestigeflag.com moritzembroidary.com – patches, etc.
    24. 24. Resources - Assets What do you have? What is available? Storage Marinas Camps: Council? National?
    25. 25. Designing Your Program <ul><li>Analyze the ship’s strengths – youth, adults, resources </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze the ship’s weaknesses – youth, adults, resources </li></ul>3. Develop a plan – capitalize on strengths, set goals and develop program to overcome weaknesses Needs Assessment: Strengths? Weaknesses?
    26. 26. Designing Your Program <ul><li>Boats? </li></ul><ul><li>Will you have: </li></ul><ul><li>Chartered Organization or ship-owned vessels? </li></ul><ul><li>Privately owned vessels? </li></ul><ul><li>Council owned vessels? </li></ul>
    27. 27. Required Training <ul><li>Training for Everyone! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>BSA requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Safe Swim Defense / Safety Afloat </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Float Plans </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Vessel safety examinations / checklist </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>See SHAC for an example </li></ul></ul></ul>
    28. 28. <ul><li>Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Think about it: It pays to plan ahead. It wasn’t raining when Noah built the ark. </li></ul>
    29. 29. Planning - 12 Month Ship Op Plan <ul><li>Things to consider: </li></ul><ul><li>Achievement Worksheet </li></ul><ul><li>Council Activities </li></ul><ul><li>Regional events </li></ul><ul><li>Meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Superactivity </li></ul><ul><li>SEAL, Koch Cup, etc. </li></ul>
    30. 30. Planning - Super-activity <ul><li>Things to consider: </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>When to start </li></ul><ul><li>Where to go </li></ul><ul><li>How long a trip </li></ul><ul><li>Details, details, details </li></ul><ul><li>Long Cruise badge </li></ul>
    31. 31. Planning - Structural <ul><li>Youth developed </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a common set of expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Allows most discipline to be handled by the youth </li></ul>Code of Conduct
    32. 32. Planning - Structural <ul><li>Youth developed </li></ul><ul><li>Rules that govern the ship </li></ul><ul><li>Includes membership, dues, election procedures, etc. </li></ul>By-laws
    33. 33. Planning - Meetings & Activities <ul><li>Decisions, decisions… </li></ul><ul><li>Weekly meetings or Bi-weekly meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Monthly activities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All Sea Scout or variety </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. Planning - Youth Leadership Boatswain Boatswain’s Mate Assistant Crew Leader Crew Leader Purser Storekeeper Yeoman
    35. 35. Petty Officer Organization
    36. 36. Petty Officer  Ship Leaders
    37. 37. Sharing the Helm - Skipper “ The Skipper is the key adult leader and is responsible for training Ship’s Boatswain. “ The ultimate responsibility for the Ship rests with the Skipper.” BSA Policy as outlined in the Sea Scout Manual
    38. 38. Sharing the Helm - Organization
    39. 39. Sharing the Helm - Youth <ul><li>Sea Scouts are young men and women ages 13-21. </li></ul><ul><li>Sea Scout officers lead the ship’s programs and are responsible for coordinating the process of planning and implementing their ship program. </li></ul>
    40. 40. <ul><li>Pre-quarterdeck – Skipper and boatswain </li></ul><ul><li>(Empower Hour) </li></ul>Planning - Quarterdeck Training
    41. 41. <ul><li>Quarterdeck Meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Run by the Boatswain </li></ul><ul><li>Long range planning </li></ul><ul><li>Goal setting </li></ul><ul><li>Appoint activity chairs </li></ul>Planning – Quarterdeck Meetings
    42. 42. Advancement - Traditional Apprentice Ordinary Able Quartermaster
    43. 43. Advancement - Opportunities SEAL Sea Scout Advanced Leadership
    44. 44. Advancement – Non-Traditional
    45. 45. Advancement - Ceremonies (Landships) <ul><li>Bridges of Honor </li></ul><ul><li>Installation of Officers </li></ul><ul><li>Landship Ceremony </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides nautical flavor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be tailored for the occasion </li></ul></ul>
    46. 46. Uniforms Uniforms are not required in the Sea Scout program; however, youth and adults participating in national events will be required to wear the national standard uniform.
    47. 47. Ship 378: The Dawn Treader <ul><li>Raison d'être </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scouts need to be prepared for environmental emergencies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Land </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Water </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Focus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>High adventure, Christian-life based </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conservation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assist Scouts in finishing Eagle </li></ul></ul>
    48. 48. S378: Land & Water Scouting <ul><li>Coed </li></ul><ul><li>Land & Water Agility </li></ul><ul><li>Council Service </li></ul><ul><li>Boy Scout Development </li></ul><ul><li>Camp Bel-Tel Conservation </li></ul>
    49. 49. S378: Council Service <ul><li>Project COPE </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Low COPE & High COPE Instructors </li></ul></ul><ul><li>BSA Lifeguard </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Flint River canoe trips </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Northern Tier Preparation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Northern Tier weekends </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Flag Ceremonies </li></ul><ul><li>Boat Maintenance </li></ul>
    50. 50. S378: Membership <ul><li>Crew </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advancement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Passengers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Participants at any level short of Crew </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ship Outings </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Working on Eagle </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Busy Scouts </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Venturers & Scouts of other units for an event </li></ul></ul></ul>
    51. 51. S378: Annual Program <ul><li>Spring Break </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Long Cruise, Boating </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Spring </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recruiting, Organizational Advancement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Summer </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Boating, SEAL, Water Mania </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fall </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regatta, Seamanship Advancement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Winter </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Life Saving, Wilderness First Aid, Survival </li></ul></ul>
    52. 52. S378: Meetings & Outings <ul><li>Weekly Training & Admin Meetings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wednesdays (2 hours) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Saturday Meetings Most Weeks (5 hours) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Projects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advancement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Monthly Outing </li></ul>
    53. 53. S378 Advancement Program <ul><li>Eagle Scout </li></ul><ul><li>Sea Scout Rank Advancement </li></ul><ul><li>Venturing Ranger </li></ul><ul><li>Venturing Awards </li></ul>
    54. 54. S378: Venturing Ranger <ul><li>½ Ranger (Venturing Outdoor Bronze) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>4 Core </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>First Aid, Cooking, LNT, Land Navigation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 Electives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Project COPE, LifeSaving </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Ranger </li></ul><ul><ul><li>4 Core </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Communication, Emergency Preparedness, Wilderness Survival, Conservation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 Electives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wilderness First Aid, Watercraft </li></ul></ul></ul>
    55. 55. S378: Venturing Awards <ul><li>Venturing Bronze </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sea Scouts (Ordinary) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Outdoor (1/2 Ranger) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Venturing Gold </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1-Year Personal Improvement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Six Areas </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Venturing Silver </li></ul>
    56. 56. Recruiting <ul><li>Must be on the minds of all adults all the time </li></ul><ul><li>Youth must be reminded to bring their younger friends regularly </li></ul><ul><li>We accept members any time </li></ul><ul><li>We allow for activity conflicts </li></ul>
    57. 57. Recruiting - Start Early <ul><li>Start recruiting in 8 th grade (for graduation) </li></ul><ul><li>You keep them longer </li></ul><ul><li>You get them before high school fills their program </li></ul>
    58. 58. Who’s Interested? <ul><li>Marketing our program to share the fun of Sea Scouts with… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sisters of Boy Scouts & all Girl Scouts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Venturing Crews </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boy Scout Troops </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Order of the Arrow (OA) members </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Youth groups involved in nautical activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Friends </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Private high schools & all middle schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Home schooling groups </li></ul></ul>
    59. 59. Marketing Plan it! Do it! Tell everybody how much fun you had! What did you do last weekend?
    60. 60. Fair winds and following seas. Set Sail!
    61. 61. Sea Scouting <ul><li>If Scouting brings out the best in youth, </li></ul><ul><li>Sea Scouting brings out the best in Scouting. </li></ul>
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