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  • FDU is New Jersey's largest private university with 6,514 undergraduate students and 3,550 graduate students Fairleigh Dickinson University has campuses in Teaneck, New Jersey – location of the Metropolitan Campus, 10 miles from NYC Madison, New Jersey – location of the College at Florham Wroxton, England – 3 miles from Banbury and 70 miles from London The student/faculty Ratio is 14.1, and the average class size is 18 The University offers over 100 undergraduate and graduate degree programs, including doctoral programs in clinical psychology and in school psychology, and an AACSB-accredited business school FDU has both Men's and Women's Division I (Knights) and Division III (Devils) teams in more than a dozen sports
  • Read paragraph! We think of ourselves foremost as a research and consulting company – we developed the services arm of GDA to support the implementation of our recommendations. In developing everything from our prospect management theory, to the size and shape of a direct mail letter, to the use of “admissions” or “prospective students” on a college website, we base everything we do on market research. We think that’s a fundamental part of developing effective marketing. Read service list! My expertise: electronic communications and integrating communications Guaranteed Visibility: a public relations and positioning/branding system. Hand it back to John
  • 1.       The campus visit is the only real predictor of enrollment . The likelihood of a student enrolling who does not visit the campus is very slim. Usually four of ten of the seniors who visit the university campus will enroll. The better job a university does of making the campus visit a positive experience for the student, the more likely he/she will enroll.   2.       The only contacts that count are those made by the student . Materials mailed to students and even telephone calls initiated by the admissions office are primarily passive, if considered from the prospective student’s viewpoint. On the other hand, if a student does something such as write a letter or email requesting more information, seek out an admissions counselor at a high school visit or college night, submit an SAT score, and so forth, he/she is demonstrating more than a casual level of interest. That is why the most important contacts with the institution are those that are self-initiated (e.g., telephone and letter inquirers, standardized test scores sent, etc.). The more contacts a student initiates, the more interest he/she is demonstrating, and the more likely he/she is to apply and enroll.   3.       An admissions staff cannot work effectively with all the inquirers it receives . To be effective, the admissions office needs to work constantly to determine the interest of all candidates and concentrate the most time on those who are qualified and continue to show interest. There should be systems in place to keep the entire prospect pool informed about the college, but the territory managing counselor should be focusing his/her time and energy on the ones who continue to demonstrate interest.   4.       Knowledge is power . The more you know about students’ abilities as well as academic and extracurricular interests, and the more these can be related to opportunities at Poly, the more likely you are to convert prospective students to applicants and enrollees. Comprehensive information about the student provides numerous openings for continuing the “dialogue” necessary for success. It is much like fund-raising: the more you know about the interests of a donor, the greater the likelihood of a match.   5.       You cannot count on the admissions staff alone to recruit students . Our research shows us that prospective students do not always consider admissions personnel credible sources of information. College-bound students may appreciate the attention and help of an admissions staff person, but they expect other sources or people to verify claims made by the staff. For this reason, current students, faculty and alumni must be brought into the recruitment mix.
  • 1.       The emphasis should be on customization as well as personalization . Many colleges mistake personalization for customization. Simply putting a hand-written note on generic responses to an inquiry, or as an acknowledgment of a meeting at a college fair is personalization. Responding with special information that provides insights and information on issues of particular interest to the student is customization. That is why learning about the student’s interests and concerns early in the process is essential.   2.       A single message is more effective than multiple messages . College-bound students are bombarded with information about the myriad higher education opportunities they have available. You cannot assume that all the important and distinctive characteristics of your college are being heard just because they are included in a viewbook. A contact by mail, phone or through the Internet that focuses on a single important message about your institution is more likely to be absorbed and credited to your institution than mind-numbing multiple messages.   3.       Admissions is a management information driven business. Everything that is done must be coded in a database, tracked and measured for its effectiveness throughout the recruitment process. The software that is used to support the process must be comprehensive, have strong report generator capabilities, be user-friendly and flexible. There is a problem if the least computer literate member of the staff cannot use the software independently.   4.       Recruitment is directive counseling, not hard sales. The college selection process is one of the most angst-ridden exercises a young person will go through in his/her first eighteen years of life. A successful recruiter understands this and executes a recruitment program designed to reduce anxiety and build confidence. The most effective counseling will be done at the student’s convenience and not the counselor’s or institution’s.   5.       Professionalism is critical . Successful prospect management recruitment programs require a bright, highly motivated, independent, well-trained, stable admissions staff. A college or university cannot afford to put the future of the institution in the hands of a poorly trained, under-paid corps of recent college grads who turn over every year or two. Youth and enthusiasm are important, but it takes two years to mold a person with the right skill set into a good prospect manager and once you have one it makes absolutely no sense to pay them $30,000 per year.
  • This summer GDAIS conducted an extensive survey of college-bound high students. We used an even mix of search and non-search prospects from the prospect pools of varying types of private colleges and universities from across the country We did this to: find out how students are getting information determine how the increase in electronic communication is changing student recruitment Find out if we were operating under correct assumptions Test our theories Find out how to make our efforts more effective In addition to using this information internally, we’re sharing the research with our clients Here’s a relevant sampling of what we learned specifically regarding electronic communications We drew names form 6 schools Varying in size, location, region, selectivity Margin of error: +/- 3%
  • Analysis 1: Colleges need to get information to students sooner It’s clear that students are entering the search process earlier and earlier. When this is coupled with the increasing number of schools to which each student is applying, it increased the importance of getting an institution's name in the minds of students earlier. Earl is going to speak a bit about the different stages of how students approach the college search process and the different types of information students are looking for during these stages. But these numbers make it clear that in order for a prospective student to consider a college, he or she must know about it early on. Analysis 2: Give some thought to where you’re allocating your resources – particularly when it comes to travel
  • Analysis: Don’t get rid of your letters and viewbook, but you can’t afford not to be using e-mail and the Web effectively (measurably) Analysis: You’ve got to do both, but make sure what you do on the Web is not passive
  • A college website is clearly the preferred method for a student to contact a college. Presumably this has a lot to do with the anonymous nature of the Web – it’s a very non-threatening way for students to contact a college without worrying about having to talk to someone, which they’re unwilling to do – particularly early in the search process. Compare that to a phone call. Based on our prospect management theory – that students who express interest in the college are the most likely to apply and enroll – it’s critical that your website have many easy ways for students to express interest (forms, open ended questions, opportunities to customize site content, etc.)
  • starting the college search earlier More colleges are sending more information to students earlier in the process Direct mail Search response rates are decreasing, but that doesn’t mean it’s not having an effect Spam is already having a devastating effect on Search e-mails, so opt-in early and give students an incentive using the Web as a research tool Colleges need to design their Websites with students in mind (overview information, easy navigation, multiple ways for students to contact the school The Web is primarily a passive medium, so make sure you’re collecting information Colleges need to use the Web to figure out which students have the most interest Students – and their parents – still like to read publications
  • Colleges need to develop a series of multi-media (print and electronic) communications that delivers doses of salient information (get the right information to students when they’re looking for it) uses consistent messaging and language to cement the institution in the minds of prospective students throughout the recruitment process At each stage of this communication flow, colleges need a way to assess the interest-level of each prospect to use information about students to make a better (personalized and customized) appeal Colleges need a way to measure their success (tracking prospects until the enroll) to test and improve their recruitment efforts
  • Web site is meant to be broad-based and encompasses all aspects of university life. The Dialog sites are specifically designed around the way in which students approach the college search process. Not a lot of searching for information.
  • Web site is meant to be broad-based and encompasses all aspects of university life. The Dialog sites are specifically designed around the way in which students approach the college search process. Not a lot of searching for information.
  • Web site is meant to be broad-based and encompasses all aspects of university life. The Dialog sites are specifically designed around the way in which students approach the college search process. Not a lot of searching for information.
  • Undergraduate prospective students were getting confused by the two campuses Each campus has a very unique character: College at Florham: more residential, suburban campus, more traditional-aged students Metropolitan Campus: more urban location, more international students, more part-time and non-traditional students We had to make sure prospects learned about the right campus earlier in the search process. If a prospective students learned about the “wrong” campus first, they would drop FDU from their college search lists
  • Develop a consistent messaging theme: One University – Two Great Locations “ It’s about attitude. It’s about lifestyle It’s about how you want to learn…and how you want to live” With two very different campuses, FDU attracts two very different kinds of students – we played on this concept and let students decide which campus they prefer. Use a series of contacts in three distinct mediums: Print direct mail letter Appeals to those who learn verbally Visual print brochure Appeals to those who learn visually
  • E-mail invitation to survey Appeals to students’ interest Explains the value they will receive Survey mini-website Helps them find the right campus first Has elements for both visual and verbal learners (although you have to use less verbiage on the Web!) Has just enough information to pique their interest and entice them to learn more Looks cool and is fun to use How the mini-site works: Which campus is right for you? http://choosing.fdu.edu Which campus survey: Survey Questions Data collection: Metropolitan Form Campus Description: Florham Splash Page
  • Email Text messages with academic information – based on the stages students go through during the search process, academic information (investment benefit) needs to come up front. HTML FDU Newsletter: Nov 2002 – this kind of consumption benefit plays a critical later in the process, when students are sorting schools within their final list. Flash messages: Scholarship Reminderr – there’s no question that money talks. This scholarship reminder went out to remind students to send in an application to be eligible. It had a tremendous response for e-mail – over 40% Additional Mini-Website It will provide more of an introduction to the University. Although the immediate priority was to distinguish the two distinct campuses from one another, the next most critical step is to create an introduction to the entire university. It will come before the survey site in the communication flow It will have messages for other key prospective student constituencies International students Graduate students MBA students Non-traditional students Part-time students
  • Read all bullets This information is given a special code and added to the admissions database, along with other contact sources such as responses from the print search, visits to campus, phone calls, unsolicited e-mails to the admissions office, etc. Then, FDU begins a follow-up program (next slide)
  • The prospect is added to the mailing list and begins to receive a series of integrated print and electronic communications (academic fact sheets, brochures, e-mail messages, links to additional mini-sites) The prospect is assigned to a territory manager (an individual admissions counselor) The admissions counselor follows up with customized information relevant to the student's interests as well as personalized appeals (notes, e-mails, etc.). Despite all the use of technology at FDU and at Tulsa, it’s this personal contact – particularly repeated contact – between admissions counselors and students that makes the difference as to whether or not a student will apply and enroll. Deciding on a college is a monumental decision – for many students it’s the biggest decision they’ve had to make. When you get down to it, many students feel more conformable choosing a school with which they feel a personal, individual connection. Our philosophy is that technology shouldn’t be used as a replacement for this kind of relationship-building – it’s simply another medium through which they can be built. Our whole strategy behind our integrated communications programs is really based on this two-way flow of communication (that’s why we called it Dialog). You have to listen to what students are telling you, and try to respond accordingly – irrespective of the medium.

see the Power Point slides from the presentation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment Two Case Studies: Fairleigh Dickinson University The University of Tulsa and consultant GDA Integrated Services
  • 2. Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment John Corso Assoc. VP for Enrollment and Student Moderator Services & Dean of Admission Jonathan Steele Associate Vice President Earl Johnson Senior Associate Dean of Admission Bernetta Millonde University Director of Undergraduate Admissions Becky Wiseman Admission Communications Coordinator Panelists
  • 3.
    • A private university affiliated with the Presbyterian Church
    • Located in Tulsa, Oklahoma
    • Total enrollment: 4,072 students (2,672 undergraduate, 763 graduate, 637 law)
    • Average class size: 19; Student-faculty ratio: 12:1
    • 60% of 2003 freshman class graduated in the top 10% of their high school class
    • 49 National Merit Scholars in 2003 freshman class
    • Bachelor’s degrees in 58 areas of study, in addition to 33 master’s degree programs, 10 doctoral degree programs and the Juris Doctorate degree
    • NCAA Division I athletics and a member of the Western Athletic Conference (WAC)
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 4.
    • FDU is New Jersey's largest private university with 6,514 undergraduate students and 3,550 graduate students
    • Fairleigh Dickinson University has campuses in
      • Teaneck, New Jersey
      • Madison, New Jersey
      • Wroxton, England
    • The student/faculty Ratio is 14.1, and the average class size is 18
    • The University offers over 100 undergraduate and graduate degree programs
    • FDU has both Men's and Women's Division I and Division III athletics
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 5.
    • GDA Integrated Services is a market research, consulting and services firm specializing in customized, integrated marketing solutions to aid colleges and universities compete successfully for students, funding and visibility in the competitive twenty-first century.
    • Services include:
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment Come visit us in booth 124
    • Fundraising Communications
    • Video Production
    • Public Relations Counsel
    • Printed Communications
    • “ Guaranteed Visibility”
    • Electronic Communications
    • Website Design
    • Integrated Communications
    • Direct Mail
    • Integrated Marketing Plans
    • Telemarketing
    • Market Research
  • 6. Prospect Management
    • “ A process or activity that influences the size, shape and characteristics of a student body by directing institutional efforts in marketing, recruitment, and admissions as well as pricing and financial aid. In addition, the process exerts a significant influence on academic career advising, the institutional research agenda, orientation, retention, and student services.”
    • – Don Hossler, Creating Effective Enrollment Management Systems
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment Essentially, enrollment management is, as Hossler states elsewhere, “an integrated, systems approach to influencing college enrollments.” Enrollment management focuses on the entirety of the student’s collegiate experience – from initial inquiry through graduation and post-graduation. It is student-sensitive; student-responsive. It views the collegiate experience as the STUDENTS perceive and experience it… Its purpose: to recruit satisfied and successful alumni
  • 7. Prospect Management
    • “ The guidance and direction through the admissions process of those students most likely or most desirable to apply and enroll .”.
    • – GDA Integrated Services
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment The emphasis is on increasing the inquiry-to-application yield. Student are categorized according to their likelihood to enroll early in the recruitment cycle, then, using techniques and strategies targeted to find out more about them, these prospective students are “managed” through the admissions process to achieve a high yield.
  • 8. 10 Keys of Prospect Management
    • The campus visit is the only real predictor of enrollment
    • The only contacts that count are those made by the student
    • An admissions staff cannot work effectively with all the inquirers it receives
    • Knowledge is power
    • You cannot count on the admissions staff alone to recruit students
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 9. 10 Keys of Prospect Management
    • The emphasis should be on customization as well as personalization
    • A single message is more effective than multiple messages
    • Admissions is a management information driven business
    • Recruitment is directive counseling, not hard sales
    • Professionalism is critical
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 10. How Students Like to Communicate
    • GDAIS conducted an extensive survey of college-bound high school students from the applicant and search pools of six different institutions.
    • We asked them about how they approach the college search process.
    • This is some of what we learned…
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 11. GDAIS Research
    • When do students begin their college search?
      • Before their senior year: 95%
      • Before their junior year: 55%
      • Before their sophomore year: 20%
      • Before entering high school: 2%
    • How have students received most of their information about colleges?
      • Information mailed to their homes: 53%
      • Internet: 46%
      • College fair/night: 12%
      • Visit to campus: 9%
      • High school guidance counselor: 6%
      • College guide book: 6%
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 12. GDAIS Research
    • Which format, paper or electronic, is more useful to college search:
      • Paper: 57%
      • Electronic: 32%
      • Both equally: 9%
    • Which format do they prefer to use in the college selection process:
      • Paper: 48%
      • Electronic: 45%
      • Both equally: 5%
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 13. GDAIS Research Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment Students described how they were most likely to contact a college in which they became interested:     Very likely Likely Not likely Through a college's Web site 42% 47% 11% A college search Web site 39% 40% 21% E-mail to the college 28% 46% 26% Mail a letter or postcard to the college 25% 41% 34% A telephone call to the college 6% 29% 65%
  • 14. Research Interpretation
    • Prospective students are starting the college search earlier than ever before
    • More students are using the Web as a research tool
    • They still like to read print publications
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 15. Research Interpretation
    • Colleges need to develop a series of multi-media (print and electronic) communications
    • At each stage of this communication flow, colleges need to collect information
    • Colleges need a way to measure their success
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 16. Dialog Process
    • Implementation of an automated sequence of emails beginning at the sophomore year that spans through the senior year
    • Sophomores are served exclusively with email and internet strategies to maximize budget and stay in front of student for longer period of time
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 17. Marketing Philosophy
    • Print marketing and electronic communication strategies are designed with two stages of the search process in mind:
    • Investments Benefits – quality of education, % of students going to graduate school, major area of interest, etc.
    • Consumption Benefits – student body make-up, personalities, extracurricular life, residential offerings, etc.
    • Dialog is specifically designed with these benefits in mind.
    • Our traditional mail and email strategy is geared toward the prospect management approach – strategic approach to measuring self-initiated contact and responses from various sources of mailings/emails.
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 18. Dialog E-mails & Sites
    • Introductory E-mail & Mini-Website – focuses briefly on consumption and investments benefits; captures student information for subsequent contacts (Academics, Student Life, City of Tulsa)
    • Academic Site – defines investments benefits such as majors and quality of faculty, research experiences, etc.
    • Student Life – consumption benefits are identified
    • City of Tulsa HTML E-mail – provides overview of Tulsa’s cultural, shopping and entertainment outlets
    • Facilities HTML E-mail – highlights campus facilities
    • Orientation HTML E-mail – encourages committed students to register for New Student Orientation activities
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 19.
    • Tulsa Dialog Intro Site E-mail
    • Tulsa Dialog Intro Site
    • Tulsa Dialog Intro Site Registration Form
    • Tulsa Dialog Intro Site Database
    • Tulsa Dialog Follow-up
    • Tulsa E-mail City of Tulsa
    • Tulsa E-mail New Facilities
    • Tulsa E-mail Freshmen Orientation
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 20. Virtual Tour
    • Philosophy :
    • Facilities needed to be a major marketing tool
    • Allows prospective students to preview campus facilities
    • Goals :
    • Create an online prospect management vehicle for the admissions office capable of collecting information about prospective students
    • Provide information about campus life and Tulsa’s emerging campus facilities through an engaging, interactive experience
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 21.
    • Tulsa Virtual Tour Introduction
    • Tulsa Website Virtual Tour Page
    • Tulsa Dialog Virtual Tour Database
    • Tulsa Website Admissions Home Page
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 22. Statistical Impact of Dialog on Admission Web site
    • Number of Visits +33%
    • Average Length of Visits +26.4%
    • Number of Repeat Visitors +42.8%
    • Admission Counselor Page +323.7%
    • Online Requests for Information +70%
    • Campus Visits Scheduled Online +25.6%
    • Online Application for Admission +194.5%
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment Fall Class of 2003
  • 23. FDU: Using the Research
    • Undergraduate prospective students were getting confused by the two campuses
    • Each campus has a very unique character:
      • College at Florham
      • Metropolitan Campus
    • We had to make sure prospects learned about the right campus earlier in the search process
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 24. FDU’s Integrated Search: Print
    • Develop a consistent messaging theme: One University – Two Great Locations
    • Use a series of contacts in three distinct mediums:
      • Print direct mail letter
      • Visual print brochure
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 25. FDU’s Integrated Search: Electronic
    • E-mail invitation to online survey
    • Survey mini-website
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
    • How the mini-site works:
    • Which campus is right for you?
    • Which campus survey
    • Data collection
    • Campus Description
  • 26. FDU: Other Electronic Communications
    • Email
      • Text messages with academic information
      • HTML FDU Newsletter
      • Flash messages
    • Additional Mini-Website
      • It will provide more of an introduction to the University
      • It will come before the survey site in the communication flow
      • It will have messages for other key prospective student constituencies
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 27. FDU: Gathering Data
    • FDU captures names and contact information of Web inquiries
    • They also capture the prospective student’s intended major
    • They also know in which campus the student will most likely be interested
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 28. FDU: Follow-up
    • The prospect receives a series of integrated print and electronic communications
    • The prospect is assigned to a territory manager
    • The admissions counselor follows up with customized information relevant to the student's interests
    Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment
  • 29. Integrating Print and Electronic Communication for Recruitment Thank You!