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High Performance Sales and Marketing for the Web
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High Performance Sales and Marketing for the Web

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  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • (c) 2008 Eight by Eight LLC
  • Transcript

    • 1. CLICKS THAT COUNT
      • 38 Sure-Fire Tips for Increasing Your Website Conversion Today without Breaking the Bank
      • Amy Africa, [email_address]
    • 2. What are the 5 most important things every website should have?
      • Solid entry pages (12+)
      • Streamlined and easy-to-use navigation (including text search function)
      • The perfect shopping SYSTEM (includes cart and abandoned programs)
      • Thrust and trigger e-mails
      • NCASE (includes organics and alternates)
    • 3. What is the #1 most underestimated thing online?
      • Evidence. Proof that someone else just like them was already there.
      • Comes in all forms – ask the experts, polls, surveys, user reviews, and most important, PICTURES OF PEOPLE
    • 4. What are the 2 most important things every entry page should have ON THE FIRST VIEW?
      • E-Commerce Sites
        • ATC or Buy Now Buttons
        • Perpetual Cart in at least two places
      • Lead Generation Sites
        • 6-12 CTA for the inquiry
        • Perpetual Lead Form in at least two places
    • 5. What is the length of time in which the user stays or goes on your website?
      • You need to measure from the time the user types what they’re looking for into Google.
      • Men make faster decisions than women.
      • Strangely enough, older people make faster decisions than younger ones.
    • 6. What is the #1 tactic that you can use on your website to get people to stay when they’re about to leave?
      • Plugs and SAB’s
        • Purpose is to get users to drill deeper into the site.
        • Should be like mini-advertisements.
        • Every plug or SAB should have CLICK HERE NOW at the bottom of the box.
        • Provocative messages work best. These include teasers, facts, quizzes, polls, and the like.
    • 7. What is the maximum amount of traffic that any one entry page should account for?
      • 6 to 10 percent.
      • Block any non-viable entry pages from search engines.
      • Entry pages have a direct, and HUGE, impact on conversion.
      • Solid entry pages become RTP’s.
    • 8. What is the maximum amount of time that the user should spend on the entry page?
      • 40 seconds the first time they see it.
      • 7-18 seconds thereafter.
      • If they’re spending more than a minute, your navigation is too complicated.
      • If they’re spending less than 10 seconds, your navigation is not complicated enough.
    • 9. From a user perspective, what is the “perfect cart?”
      • One-click.
      • Second choice:
        • View Cart (sometimes, not always)
        • Welcome Page
        • Bill-To
        • Ship To
        • Payment Information
        • Review Your Order
        • Confirmation Page
    • 10. What is a perpetual cart and do I need one?
      • A perpetual cart is a cart that stays with you at all times and EVERY site should have AT LEAST one.
      • Best of breed sites have a perpetual cart in the upper righthand corner, the right column and the bottom.
      • They also have a larger-than-life, red PTC button at the bottom of the middle column.
    • 11. What things should be in my perpetual cart?
      • Number of items and total $
      • Red checkout button when the user has item(s) in their cart
      • 100% secure shopping guaranteed tag
      • Shopping cart icon
      • Links for view cart, print cart, e-mail cart and save cart
    • 12. What things truly make a difference in the cart from a user perspective?
      • Speed
      • Dynamic and/or pre-filled information
      • Alternate contact information
      • Picture of Wilford Brimley
      • Security and privacy guarantees
      • Single view presentations
      • Simplicity in colors and fields
      • Temperature bars
    • 13. I don’t have a cart. How do I create the perfect lead form?
      • Use vertical capturing fields only.
      • Prefill any/all information that you can.
      • Format the page, using the middle column only.
      • Use the colors that work.
      • Use as many submit now buttons as you can.
      • Ask ONLY relevant questions.
      • Make sure to address privacy and security on every view.
      • Use full contact information.
    • 14. What is C-Navigation?
      • Top Navigation
        • Product tabs
        • Action bar
        • P/S Navigation
      • Left-Hand Navigation
        • Index of your Store
      • Bottom Navigation
        • Repeat of top navigation
    • 15. What should be in my right-hand navigation?
      • There’s no such thing as right-hand navigation. The sole purpose of the right-hand column is to “save” the user from exiting.
        • Offer box with deadline
        • Bestsellers lists
        • Recently viewed items
        • Highlights of specific products or categories
    • 16. We have a two-column site. Is that ok?
      • No. (Read: absolutely not if you want to maximize your conversions.)
      • Yes, I know. Three-column sites are ugly.
    • 17. What percentage of success does my navigation really account for?
      • 40-60% at a minimum.
      • Navigation is a self-fulfilling prophecy.
      • Text search should be a bonus. You should not include it as a means to your success.
      • Users don’t want to search, they want to find. You need to give them a variety of ways to find what they are looking for?
    • 18. I just heard about backwards navigation. What is it?
      • Things like breadcrumbs, recently viewed items, and Q-blocks, make up backwards navigation.
      • You should employ it any (and every!) chance you get.
    • 19. Where should I put my text search box?
      • If it’s perfect (or close to perfect) put it in the upper middle column (a la Amazon.)
      • If it’s not, place it in the top of the lefthand column, under the e-mail sign-up box. (The e-mail sign-up box should disappear if you have already collected their e-mail address.)
    • 20. What is the average number of FS and what can I do about it?
      • Failed searches account for about 2/3 of searches on an average B2B site.
      • You can help fix them with generic recommendations for no finds, improving your search results presentation, developing a dictionary and a thesaurus, using an abandoned search program (test e-mails and telemarketing) and so on….
      • Searchers have #2 highest propensity to buy.
    • 21. What is this BTF line that usability folks always talk about?
      • The Below-the-Fold line is critical when it comes to web design.
      • Web designers design pages. Users see views. They are incredibly different.
    • 22. How can I improve my product page conversion?
      • Use more Buy Now/ATC buttons
      • Employ multiple visuals
      • Use pictures of people
      • Use H1, H2 and quick facts – don’t assume that your users can and/or are reading anything
      • Ask for the order on every page
    • 23. What is theming? Is it that thing that used to not work?
      • Theming allows you to feature a different topic every time a user visits your site.
      • Two years ago, it was the kiss of death. Now, for most sites, it works like gangbusters.
      • You need to develop a theme calendar.
    • 24. Should I really put in the effort to cater to my repeat visitors?
      • Repeat users should account for about half of your traffic.
      • Page personalization works well. Start with “Welcome Back Mark.”
      • If there are items in their carts, take them there immediately.
      • Your main entry page should change based on your traffic pattern.
    • 25. What is a RURL?
      • A referring URL is the last place the user was before they came to your site. It has a huge impact on your conversion.
    • 26. All these metrics drive me bananas. What should I look at first?
      • Your top exit pages. They’re often the easiest things to fix. (The exception is text search.)
    • 27. What’s an AAUS?
      • Average Active User Session. It’s the length of time that the user spends ACTIVELY on your site.
    • 28. What’s the difference between a page view and a drill?
      • A page view is just that – a view of the page.
      • A drill is an action the user takes.
      • You should look at your drills in conjunction with your AAUS.
    • 29. What things should I look at that nobody has ever told me to look at?
      • CTS and DTS.
        • Clicks-to-Sale
        • Days-to-Sale
    • 30. What should my AR really be?
      • Shopping Sites
        • 60% in checkout
        • View cart page will have the most abandons. That is NOT part of your checkout.
      • Lead Generation Sites
        • 50% on forms
    • 31. What’s the difference between thrust and triggers?
      • Thrust – assigned groups of people
      • Trigger – aka Good Dog e-mails (start with the 3 abandons)
      • To
      • From
      • Subject line
      • First two lines of your e-mail
      • Format
      • Deliverability
    • 32. What are the best ways to create an integrated strategy?
      • Watch your metrics, especially users paths and waves
      • Use different landing pages or sites for offline users
      • Emphasize Quick Order in at least 3 quads
      • Utilize P/S and redundant navigation
      • Feature a perpetual cart in the URQ/Offer Box Area
      • Use deadlines and/or test theming
      • Integrate e-mail deployment plan with offline circulation plan (thrust)
      • Focus on PCE’s and organic searches
    • 33. What is hubbing?
      • Concentrated strategy to connect all your microsites with ONE main site, called a hub.
        • Design it with the purpose of eliminating text search but build it for the search engines.
        • It’s not a landing page, it’s a specific site.
        • You need to be aggressive. The user has already proven a propensity to buy. Customize your cart and personalize as much of the site as you can.
    • 34. Thank you!
      • Questions? Comments?
      • [email_address]

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