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    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Document Transcript

    • Northumberland Sport County Sports Partnerships (CSPs) Workforce Development Plans: Audit of Skill Needs: Sports, Fitness and Outdoors April 2007
    • Northumberland Sport – April 2007 1.EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A high percentage of the volunteer Recent research within skills and training workforce undertakes roles such as has identified the need to develop an coaching, teaching, instructing, leadership understanding of the local workforce and sports official. Of the paid workforce, within the North East region to inform operational staff, non-managerial support County Sport Partnership (CSP) workforce staff, managers, supervisors and senior development plans. administrator occupations are the most prevalent of roles. Sport Structures Ltd was commissioned by Sport England, SkillsActive and sports From the data received, there appears to be coach UK (scUK) to undertake research no shortfall in the voluntary or coaching through an audit of skill needs to further workforce yet, there is conflicting evidence explore the needs of the sporting suggesting a need for more coaches across workforce in the North East. the Partnership and an ever increasing demand for volunteers within sports clubs. A systematic research process using a The qualification most in need by both the survey designed by SkillsActive was paid and voluntary workforce is Level 2 administered through web and email- coaching. based market research and direct telemarketing techniques. Recruitment difficulties and vacancies Data was collated from 389 organisations The main skills lacking or in need of within the region. This data was combined improvement are sport-specific technical with regional data from a national Sports, skills, communication, team working, Fitness and Outdoor survey in 2005 to initiative, first aid and child protection. Skills create a regional dataset of 477 gaps highlighted were found in coach and organisations. officials roles for the paid and volunteer workforces. Within Northumberland Sport the total number of responses was 113 (24% of Vacancies within the Partnership were the regional response) with the highest spread across voluntary/charitable/non- level of response from the profit organisations, limited companies and voluntary/charity/non-profit sector. Data local authorities. from these organisations has been Responding organisations stated coach analysed in order to provide statistics in vacancies and coaching roles as being hard relation to: to fill for both the paid and volunteer workforce. Of the paid workforce, fitness • Sports workforce profile instructors/exercise to music teachers (level • Recruitment difficulties and vacancies 2) was identified as being hard to fill • Training development needs vacancies. Volunteer responses stated committee member roles as being hard to Sports workforce profile fill. Overall, 51% of the responding workforce Paid and volunteer organisations stated lack anticipates that the future staffing level of qualifications and skills as a key reason will increase over the next 12 months. Of for job vacancies. Organisations with a paid the responding organisations, 56% workforce also identified lack of interest employ volunteers and 44% employ paid whereas volunteer organisations stated time staff. constraints and volunteer regulations as key reasons for job vacancies. Page i
    • Northumberland Sport – April 2007 Training and development needs Priorities for development Respondents stated more external funding 1. The production of an accurate and support for training would improve maintained partnership wide training provision. Cheaper training database of organisations with a courses and more local provision were sports workforce and where also seen as key improvements possible contact details for individual workforce members The Partnership core team suggested their main perceived strengths as 2. Maintain a county-wide group to communication and interpersonal skills. monitor and evaluate the The core team perceived their most implementation of the effective competencies as ‘giving Northumberland Sport workforce customers a positive impression of development plan yourself and your organisation’ and ‘managing yourself’. 3. Conduct further research across A number of competencies were the Partnership to establish robust suggested to be only quite effective data for planning and costing of including ‘managing finance for your area the plan of responsibility’ and ‘developing productive working relationships with 4. Work with partners at CSN level, external partners/organisations’. where these are active, to collate data and information for planning There were several common areas for and implementation of the plan. development within the core team with project management (most frequently requested) and budget awareness rating highly. The most common methods for development are training courses or practical experience through work however, there are a number of specific methods suggested for certain areas of development. The key messages and priorities for development from this report will be used to inform a Workforce Development Plan for Northumberland Sport to be completed in the summer of 2007. Page ii
    • CONTENTS PAGE 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.............................................................................. i CONTENTS PAGE.......................................................................................... 1 INTRODUCTION............................................................................................ 4 2.1 Background.......................................................................................................................4 2.2 Aims and Objectives........................................................................................................4 2.3 Methodology ....................................................................................................................4 2. THE VALUE OF SPORT IN THE NORTH EAST..................................11 3.1 Population Profile of the North East........................................................................12 3.2 The Sports, Fitness and Outdoors Sector...............................................................13 4 THE NORTHUMBERLAND SPORT WORKFORCE.............................15 4.1 Organisational Profile....................................................................................................16 4.2 Workforce Characteristics..........................................................................................18 4.3 Expectations for the Future........................................................................................19 4.4 The Voluntary Workforce .........................................................................................23 4.5 The Coaching Workforce............................................................................................24 5 RECRUITMENT DIFFICULTIES AND VACANCIES.............................31 5.1 Employment Turnover..................................................................................................32 5.2 Vacancies and Recruitment Difficulties.....................................................................32 5.3 The Skills Challenge.......................................................................................................40 6 TRAINING DEVELOPMENT NEEDS.......................................................43 6.1 Improvements in Training Provision.........................................................................44 6.2 CSP Workforce Training Needs Analysis................................................................44 7 CONCLUSIONS........................................................................................... 49 Figure 3.a Justification of non response.......................................................7 Figure 3.b Response by county sports partnership areas.........................9 Figure 4.1.c Type of organisation................................................................16 Figure 4.1.d Organisation size breakdown of the paid and volunteer workforce........................................................................................................17
    • Figure 4.1.e Type of employment...............................................................17 Figure 4.3.f Staff levels expected over the next 12 months...................19 Figure 4.3.g Average proportion of the workforce that leave and need replacing each year........................................................................................20 Figure 4.3.h Occupational profile –paid and volunteer workforce........20 Figure 4.3.i Gender........................................................................................22 Figure 4.3.j Age profile – volunteer and paid workforce........................22 Figure 4.4.k Number of volunteers............................................................23 Figure 4.5.l Number of coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders 24 Figure 4.5.m Qualification level of current coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders.......................................................................................25 Figure 4.5.n Qualification level needed for coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders.......................................................................................26 Figure 4.5.o Number of paid coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders by Sports...........................................................................................27 Figure 4.5.p Number of volunteer coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders by Sports.............................................................................29 Figure 5.2.q Main reasons for job vacancies being hard-to-fill – Paid workers...........................................................................................................36 Figure 5.3.r Main skills in need of improvement......................................42 Figure 6.1.s Improvements to training provision.....................................44 Table 3.a Response by county sports partnership areas..........................9 Table 4.2 (a) Top five sports offered by responding organisations in Northumberland............................................................................................18 Table 4.3.c Employment Status...................................................................21 Table 4.5.d Qualification profile – coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders...............................................................................................25 Table 5.2.e Vacancies and hard-to-fill vacancies in the paid workforce by occupation.......................................................................................................34 Table 5.2.f Paid roles identified as hard-to-fill.........................................35
    • Table 5.2.g Vacancies and hard-to-fill vacancies in the volunteer workforce by occupation..............................................................................38 Table 5.2.h Volunteer roles identified as hard-to-fill.............................38 Table 5.2.i Main reasons for job vacancies being hard-to-fill – Volunteer workers ..........................................................................................................39 Table 5.3.j Proportion of all organisations experiencing a skills gap....40 Table5.3.k Roles with skills gaps.................................................................40 Table 6.2.l Skills profile................................................................................45 Table 6.2.m Competencies profile..............................................................46 Table 6.2.n Areas for Development...........................................................47
    • INTRODUCTION 2.1 Background Recent research has shown that there is a need for more regional prioritisation with regard to workforce development of the sporting sector. Although a number of research studies have been undertaken there is still a need to develop an understanding of regional and sub-regional issues. During 2006, Sport England regions worked with SkillsActive Regional Development Managers and other key partners such as the Regional Development Agencies (RDAs) to develop Sector Skills Agreement Regional Action Plans (SSARAP). These plans presented regional workforce statistics and outlined priority skills issues and actions required to alleviate them. This research forms part of a wider programme to develop 49 County Workforce Plans by March 2007. SkillsActive, Sport England and sportscoach UK will be working with the local County Sports Partnerships (CSP) to develop these plans, which will incorporate the findings of:  A Regional Audit of Skill Needs  A Training Needs Analysis of all professional county staff This report will present the key findings of the Regional Audit of Skill Needs outlining statistics for Northumberland Sport as well as the training needs analysis for the partnerships core team. 2.2Aims and Objectives In 2006, Sport Structures Ltd was commissioned by Sport England, SkillsActive and sports coach UK (scUK) to undertake this research to further explore the needs of the sporting workforce at regional and sub-regional level. The main objectives of the project were:  To provide local workforce statistics (current and future) and an evidence base to support workforce development planning.  To provide supporting evidence to develop sub-regional/County level Workforce Development Plans, which identify the training, development and educational needs of the local workforce, setting out priorities for the next 3 years. 2.3Methodology As part of the Sector Skills Agreement, SkillsActive undertook a national Sports, Fitness and Outdoors Survey in 2005 (SFO) of which the SFO survey generated 1,550 responses in England. The survey was undertaken with employers in the following sub-sectors: • Health and Fitness • Sport and Recreation
    • • The Outdoors. Given that the questionnaire had recently captured information needed to inform the CSP Workforce Development Strategies it was decided that this survey should be used as a basis for further research and each region would seek to boost survey responses in their respective area building on data already captured. A Steering Group was formed to develop a template questionnaire comprising of Sport England, SkillsActive, scUK and Peter Taylor of Sheffield Hallam University. This was shorter than the original SFO survey questionnaire used in 2005, however when the questions were common to both, the wording and structure was kept the same to allow the two sets of survey data to be merged. The final template questionnaire was produced by SkillsActive however, some Sport England regions wanted to add some additional questions to the survey. Sampling The sample population for the survey covered all businesses in the following core sectors: • Local Authorities • Education • Voluntary Sports Organisations • National Governing Bodies • Health • Private Sector A sample frame was created for each region, based on SkillsActive’s, Sport England’s and local CSP databases of employers and data purchased from John Turner 1. Additionally, contractors may have sourced additional contacts from other sources (e.g. Experian Business Database). A process of de-duplication was undertaken on the final database to provide a tailored list of prospective respondents (including non-respondents of the SFO survey) and exclude existing respondents (those that had taken part in the SFO survey). Interviews were sought with those with knowledge of human resources (the number and type of people employed or volunteering) at the site, recruitment difficulties and the skill needs for the paid or volunteer roles. Fieldwork Sport Structures Limited provided management and delivery of the collection of data in the North East through a partnership with Goodform Limited. It is apparent that data collection at the scale identified in the region required a mixed method approach to maximise the distribution and completion of the questionnaire. The following methods were therefore utilised; web based market research, email based market research, direct telemarketing and regular forum meetings with CSP lead officers. An online questionnaire link was produced which allowed respondents to complete their information online. The link was distributed to the sub regional partnerships for use within their own websites and featured on the home page of Sport England North East to maximise exposure to the intended recipients. In total, 76.31% of responses in the region were through an online survey response. A hardcopy response option was also provided which included an option for returning through the post (17.19%) or to provide a response via an email attachment (3.77%). 1 John Turner Direct Marketing Limited
    • E-flyers were specifically designed to attract attention and act as a marketing tool for the questionnaire administering the online link to the desired respondents. The e-flyers were carefully scheduled to be distributed at key points within the collection period to ensure a broad level of distribution. The e-flyer was distributed to a total of 1017 individuals in the region of which 863 (84.85%) were successfully delivered. A total of 274 (26.94%) individuals opened the email with 113 (11.11%) clicking through to the survey. A similar level of response was received when an adjusted ‘reminder’ e-flyer was circulated. Research experience dictates that although web based and email/ e-flyers are effective at providing a level of response, personal contact can promote responses therefore the e- flyer distribution was complemented by telemarketing. Telemarketing was used as a means of explaining the project and long term benefits to completing the required data as well as signposting the respondent to completing the survey online. In total 1478 individuals from Public, Private and Voluntary Sector organisations were attempted to be contacted via telemarketing calls regarding completion of the North East survey. The following outcomes were generated through the telemarketing approach: Table 3 Telemarketing call outcome Call Outcome Call Outcome Count % Incomplete/Incorrect Details 802 54.26% Agreed To Complete 204 13.80% Call 2 No Answer 89 6.02% Cannot Complete 82 5.55% Already Completed 22 1.49% Duplicate Contact 117 7.92% Cricket Club 16 1.08% Call 3 No Answer 146 9.88% Grand Total 1478 100.00% The main difficulty was accessing respondents related to the reliability of the contact details, as data for 802 (54.26%) individuals was either incomplete or incorrect. This may be due to a lack of telephone number, number not recognised, no contact name listed in the database or that the individual was not known on the number held. 9% of contact details were disregarded as they were either duplicated contacts or represented cricket clubs. Cricket clubs were not involved within the study due to a separate workforce study administered by the English Cricket Board 2006/7. A series of scheduled calls were undertaken at specific times to suit voluntary organisations although all effort was made to reach individuals 15.43% (n=235) of the individuals could not be contacted.
    • The project was discussed in detail with 308 (20.84%) individuals with the vast majority (n=204) agreeing to complete the questionnaire. 82 (5.55%) advised that they would not be in a position to provide a response. Those not in a position to provide a response were asked to provide justification. The most frequent justification for not providing a response was that the individual was ‘no longer involved in the sport/club/organisation’ (39.02%). 24.39% of individuals advised that they were ‘not interested in participating’ while 13.41% advised that they were unable to complete the questionnaire due to a lack of time to complete and return. Figure 3.a Justification of non response Colleague To Complete Not On Workforce Team Questionnaire Too Long Not Interested In Participating Unspecified No Longer Involved In Sport/Club/Organisation Justification Questionnaire Too Complicated Relocated Away From North East Region Lack Of Time To Complete Current Role Not Applicable To Questionnaire Club No Longer Exists Personal Circumstances 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% % of organisations not in a position to respond Base: all organisations within the region not in a position to respond (82) In addition to the traditional market research approaches there was a need to be pro active in presenting face to face marketing opportunities. Sport Structures ensured that those people able to influence the level of response within the region received regular updates on the responses received. Incentives were included to encourage a higher response rate the incentives were regional based entry prize draws for money can’t buy or perceived high value prizes including
    • tickets for sporting events within the region and a broader prize of free vouchers towards an organisations training needs.
    • The response within the region was a total of 389 organisations. In combination with the SFO dataset the regional response total is 477. The total response is divided to demonstrate the proportion of regional responses from each county sports partnership area. Table 3.a Response by county sports partnership areas Response by CSP area County Durham 26% Northumberland 24% Tyne & Wear 20% Tees Valley 22% County Unknown 9% Base: all responding organisations within the region (477) Figure 3.b Response by county sports partnership areas County Unknown 41 Tees Valley 105 CSP Area Tyne & Wear 93 Northumberland 113 County Durham 125 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Count Base: total organisations to respond within the region (477) Data Analysis The data from the responding organisations was cleansed and coded within SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). The recently collected dataset was merged with the previously collected SFO dataset to create a consolidated set of data for the region which could be analysed regionally and for each CSP separately. The rest of this report is structured as follows: Section 3 outlines the contribution of the Sports sectors to the North East economy. Section 4 profiles the Sporting workforce in Northumberland Sport, based on findings from the Regional Skills Audit. It explores the differences between the voluntary and paid workforce and where appropriate draws comparisons with the regional average. Section 5 explores recruitment difficulties faced by employers in the Northumberland Sport and their skills challenges.
    • Section 6 identifies the training and development needs of employers and the partnership core team in the Northumberland Sport. Section 7 summaries the key findings of the research and outlines how it will inform the Northumberland Sport Workforce Development Strategy.
    • 2.THE VALUE OF SPORT IN THE NORTH EAST Key Messages The following points are key messages drawn from supporting data in regards to the value of sport in the North East: • Sport in the North East generates £1.1 billion annual turnover • Sport in the North East generates £455 million in annual value added (1.75% of regions economy) • Approximately 295,000 people participate in organised sports clubs in the region • Approximately 1/3 of the paid sport sector workforce in the North east are sports coaches • The North East have 367 or 6% of England’s health and fitness clubs (within the public and private sector) • The main aim of the North East is to work together to drive levels of participation upward each year by at least 1%, meaning 665 new participants each week until 2020 to meet targets set for the North East. This section provides a population and health profile of the North East and outlines the role of the Sports, Fitness and Outdoors sector in meeting participation and health targets. It then explores the overall contribution of the sector to the North East economy, identifying its value in terms of Gross Value Added (GVA) output, and annual spend. The data was sourced utilising the Skills Active North East Sector Skills 2006 Agreement, Regional Action Plan2 and the Government Office Region3 statistics to provide valid and relevant information in reference to the North East region. 2 Skills Active North East Regional Action Plans, 2006. 3 Government Office Region. Health Survey for England 2002-2004, The department of health.
    • 3.1 Population Profile of the North East The North East includes the counties of Northumberland and Durham, the five metropolitan districts of Tyne and Wear and the five unitary districts of Tee’s valley. The North East provides a mix of urban and rural environments, with 30% of the region designated as ‘World Heritage Site’, ‘National Park’, ‘Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty’, ‘Heritage Coast’ and ‘Forest Park’. Population - The North East is one of the smallest English regions both in area (8,573 sq. km) and population (2.6 million). The population of England was estimated at 50,431,700. North East population estimates 48.7% (1,245,100) are males and 51.3% (1,313,200) are females. The North East is in line with National trends within the age structure, showing an aging population; 18.6% is aged 0-15 years, 62% are of working age, and 19.4% are older people. Approximately 2.4% of the regions population are from ethnic minorities which includes 55.9% of the ethnic minority population being of Asian or British Asian origin1. Economic - In 2004 the north east had an estimated Gross Value Added (GVA) output of £333 million, accounting for 5% of the total England GVA for the sector. The productivity in the North East is estimated to be approximately £18, 500 in 2004. Productivity in the North East has increased by 28% in the ten years up to 2004 compared to 37% nationally. Latest estimates of employment in the North East document that 70.5% of people of working age are in employment, nearly 4% below the national average for the UK at 74.3% (The Annual Population Survey 2005-2006). Figures identify the North East at 1.2% above the UK average for unemployment at 6.2% (UK 5%). However, the North East is showing positive employment growth figures of 5.2% compared to the national average growth rate of 1.9%. Health - The average life expectancy for males is estimated (based on life expectancy at birth for the 2003-2005 period) at 75.4 years for males and 79.8 years for females, both these figures are between 1- 2% below the average in England. Teenage conception rates are nearly 10% higher in the North East (51.2%) compared to the national average (England 42.0%). 50% of the north east population live in wards ranked in the worst 10% based on the Health Deprivation and Disability domain of the Index of Multiple Deprivation 2000 (State of the Region Report 2003 – NEA). Death rates from coronary heart disease and cancers are significantly above the national average, with smoking, poor diet and lack of exercise rates showing similar trends. The Government Office region (2003) found 59.2% of the North East population were classified as overweight and obese compared to a 55.5% average for England. The prevalence of childhood obesity in the North East was investigated by the Government Office Region (2002-2004). The research identified 16.4% of children aged 2-10 years in the North East as obese, the third highest region in England and 24% of children aged 11-15 years as obese and showing the second highest regional figures in the country. Crime - The North East boast lower robbery rates at 0.8 per 1,000 population compared to 1.9 English average. Additionally burglary offences show similar trends of 12 per 1,000 households as compared with 13.8 for England.
    • Transport - The North East provide encouraging figures for road casualties for people killed or seriously injured with the lowest of all the English regions at 40 per 100,000 population. Significantly below the average for England which resides at 60. Housing - 24% of the regions housing is identified as non-decent compared to England average of 35.4%. Based on the housing domain of the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) 2000 36% of the North East population living in wards ranked in the most deprived or ‘worst’ 10% of wards in England. 3.2 The Sports, Fitness and Outdoors Sector The Government stated that sport and physical activity are essential tools for involving individuals and organisations in a contribution towards the region’s targets for ‘sport, health, economic activity, education and skills, community partnerships and social inclusion’. Additionally sport in the North East was stated as creating a sense of regional pride and prestige, increasing quality of life and fundamental to delivering wider social changes. The regional plan for sport outlined working together to create fair and equal opportunities for people to start, stay and succeed in sport and physical activity. Through increasing participation, widening access, improving health and well being, creating stronger and safer communities, improving education and levels of performance, and benefiting the economy. The main aim of the North East is to work together to drive levels of participation upward each year by at least 1%, meaning 665 new participants each week until 2020 to meet targets set for the North East. The Active Leisure and Learning sector has been outperforming the entire economy in the North East in the last 5 years. There are 1,400 organisations in this sector in the North East, employing at least 25,700 people in paid jobs, accounting for 5% of the sectors employment in England. Sport and recreation was highlighted as the largest of the sub sectors with 56% of GVA and 65% of employment. The smallest of the sub sectors was identified as the outdoors accumulating 5% of GVA and 4% of employment in the region. 50% of the paid workforce for the sector are employed on a part time basis (47% nationally). 9% of the sector workforce are self employed in the North East (10% nationally) Sport, Fitness and Outdoor sector summary: • Sport in the North East generates £1.1 billion annual turnover • Health and fitness output in 2006 was estimated at £28,731 and predicted to grow to £32,207 for 2009 • Sport and recreation output in 2006 was £211,673 and predicted at £237,075 in 2009 • The outdoor sector produced an output of £18985 in 2006 and is predicted to be £20721 in 2009 • Sport in the North East sport generates £455 million in annual value added (1.75% of regions economy) • Approximately 295,000 people participate in organised sports clubs in the region • Sports coaches proportionate 1/3 of the paid sport sector workforce in the North east • The Active People Survey results provide current participation information for a sample within the North East and nationally. 20.5% of the North East participate in physical activity for 30 minutes 3 times per week (Key Performance Indicator 1). The national average is 21%. Northumberland showed the highest participation for KPI 1 with 22%.
    • • 4.25% of the Active people sample in the North East stated volunteering for at least one hour per week over the research criteria period of 4 weeks. The national average was 4.7%. Durham showed the highest participation figures with 6% stating meeting this requirement. • 74% of boy’s participate in high levels of activity (England 70%) • 13% of boys participate in medium levels of activity (England 13%) • 13% of boys participate in low levels of activity (England 17%) • 64% of girls participate in high levels of activity (England 61%) • 15% of girls participate in medium levels of activity (England 16%) • 21% of girls participate in low levels of activity (England 22%) • The Active People Survey provided data highlighting recreational walking (17.7%), swimming (11.3%), and Gym (10.2%) as the most popular sports and recreational activities in the North East region. • The North East has 92 private health clubs, and a further 36 are planned for the future as of 2003. This equates to 5% of private health club across England. • The private health club membership for the North East is 135,512 as of 2003. This equates to 4% of private health club membership across England. • The North East region posses 220 public clubs, with 19 planned for the future. This equates to 7% of the leisure centres across England. • In total of both public and private clubs existing and planned the North East have 367 or 6% of England’s clubs. The North East has a number of full time professional sports clubs including football, cricket, rugby, basketball, and ice hockey. The professional clubs can become large businesses and bring a high profile status to the region. Details of any planned developments London 2012 Games is expected to have a major impact on the active leisure sector including employment growth in sport, increased levels of participation in sport, increased levels of physical activity and promotion of access for disabled people. The North East will have the opportunity to enable volunteers from the region to experience and contribute to the London 2012 Games.
    • 4 THE NORTHUMBERLAND SPORT WORKFORCE Key Messages: The following points are key messages drawn from analysis of the sports workforce in Northumberland Sport • Total organisations to respond from Northumberland were 113. The highest level of response was from the voluntary/charity/non-profit sector • 42% of organisations have a volunteer workforce only • From responding organisations a total of 47 sports are offered by within Northumberland with the top five sports indicated as; football, swimming, netball, basketball and gymnastics • Overall, 51% of the responding workforce anticipates that the future staffing level will increase over the next 12 months. Of the respondents 56% are volunteers and 44% are paid employees • Volunteers have a higher percentage of the workforce undertaking roles such as coaching, teaching, instructing, leadership and sports officials • Paid employees undertake a high percentage of operational, non-managerial support, manager, supervisor and senior administrator occupations • The volunteer workforce is predominantly male whereas the paid workforce has a marginally higher female representation • The volunteer workforce tends to have an older age profile than the paid workforce • In looking at the current number of volunteers and coaches in relation to the number perceived as needed there appears to be no shortfall in the voluntary or coaching workforce • The qualification most in need by both the paid and voluntary workforce is level 2 coaching • The largest shortfall of paid coaches at Level 2 is apparent in canoeing, gymnastics, sailing and trampolining • The largest shortfall of paid coaches at Level 3 is apparent within canoeing, movement & dance, sailing and windsurfing • The largest shortfall of voluntary coaches is at Level 1 is apparent within Badminton, Netball and Tennis This section outlines the organisational and workforce profile for responding organisations from the Sport, Fitness and Outdoors sector in Northumberland Sport based on the response sample. Furthermore, it draws comparisons between paid and voluntary workers and explores the characteristics of those working as coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders.
    • 4.1 Organisational Profile The total number of organisations to respond from Northumberland stands at 113 (all data is therefore based on the responses from this sample). The highest level of response came from the voluntary/ charity/ non-profit sector (57%) which is 15% higher than the regional average. The voluntary/ charity/ non-profit sector is high due to 66% of responding private limited companies suggesting that they were voluntary/ charity/ non- profit. Sports/ membership clubs have received a high response level (36%). 29.20% of sports/ membership clubs indicated that they are voluntary/ charity/ non-profit. Figure 4.1.c Type of organisation 60% CSP 50% % of organisations Region 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% er n t ny hip b it n en io c lu th of t io pa at rs m pr O isa m n is hip rn ne n- co an ve rt ga no rs rg pa or go d be y/ ite lo & rit em lt h y& l im na /SE ha ea m rit io /c te ts/ er H at ho ry iva or d uc ta ut tra Pr Sp Ed lun lA le Vo ca So Lo Type of organisation Base: all organisations (113) Note: responding organisations could respond to more than one category Organisation size The responding Northumberland organisations have higher representation (8%) than the regional average from organisations of a size 1 to10. The number of organisations within a medium business size (11to 49) is 8% lower than the regional average. Within business size bands 50 to 199 and 200 plus the responding organisations almost align exactly with the regional average. In looking in more detail at the breakdown of organisational size it appears that organisations with volunteers only are within a smaller business size band (either 1-10 or 11-49). In contrast organisations with only paid employees are apparent in three business size bands with no paid only organisations within the 200 plus category. Those organisations to have both paid employees and volunteers are wide ranging in business size bands with several organisations suggesting they have a workforce of 200 plus.
    • Figure 4.1.d Organisation size breakdown of the paid and volunteer workforce 80% 70% Paid Only 60% Volunteer Only % of organisations 50% Both paid and voluntary staff 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1 to 10 11 to 49 50 to 199 200 + Business size (banded) Base: all responding organisations (113) Note: business size relates to the size of the workforce Through a cross tabulation between organisation size and what sports are offered by the organisation it was apparent that there was no clear difference between organisations size and the sports that they offered, this may have been due to the size of the sample. Types of Employment The types of employment of the responding organisations within Northumberland are dominated (42%) by organisations with a volunteer only workforce (5% above the regional average). Organisations with both paid and voluntary staff constitute 32% whilst organisations with only paid employees account for 25% of the response. This differs from the regional distribution of employment type as regionally organisations with only volunteers comprise 36%, both paid and voluntary staff 37% and organisations with paid employees 26%. Figure 4.1.e Type of employment 32% 25% Paid employees only Volunteers only Both paid and voluntary staff 42% Base: all responding organisations (113)
    • Profile of sports offered A total of 47 sports are offered by responding organisations, which is the most diverse within in comparison with the other North East CSPs. The top five ranked sports offered by the responding organisations are listed in Table 4.1 (a). In comparison with the region Northumberland is consistently higher (2-6%) than the regional average in all of the top five sports. In addition Movement and Dance also had a high frequency 20.2% in Northumberland compared to the regional figure of 13.6%. Table 4.2 (a) Top five sports offered by responding organisations in Northumberland Offered by Regional Rank responding average organisations Football 1 35.4% 30.4% Swimming 2 28.3% 26.0% Netball 3 27.3% 20.9% Basketball 4 22.2% 18.2% Gymnastics 5 21.2% 15.8% Base: all responding organisations (113) Organisations responding from Northumberland also offered a number of less conventional sports including clay pigeon shooting, surfing, windsurfing and skiing/snowboarding. 4.2 Workforce Characteristics To provide an overview of the sub-regional workforce the total workforce figures from respondents are addressed against the regional workforce. • The total number of paid employees from the responding organisations stands at 1351. The average number per organisation is identified with a mean value of 11.9 and median of 10. In comparison with the regional workforce Northumberland have a similar average number of paid employees (region mean 6.7, median of 10). • The total number of volunteers from the responding organisations working in the sector stands at 616. The average number per organisation is identified with a mean value of 5.5 and median of 13. In comparison with the regional workforce Northumberland have a slightly lower than average number of volunteers (region mean 21.0, median of 15). In looking in more detail at the high level of paid employees’ in comparison to volunteers it is apparent that there are several North County leisure facilities which identify a high number of full and part time coaches, teachers, instructors, and activity leaders and operational staff.
    • 4.3 Expectations for the Future Overall 51% of the responding workforce anticipates that the future staffing level within their organisation will increase over the next 12 months, 41% anticipate that it will stay the same and only 8% feel that it will decrease over the next 12 months. The anticipated future staffing level differs within the paid and voluntary workforce, 56% of volunteers suggested that there would be an increase (4% predict it to increase a great deal) where as 44% of the paid workforce thought that there would be an increase (2% predicted it to increase a great deal). At the other end of the scale only 2% of the paid workforce thought staff levels could decrease a great deal compared to no volunteers selecting this outcome. Figure 4.3.f Staff levels expected over the next 12 months Volunteer 4% 52% 38% 6% 2% 2% Increase a great deal Paid 2% 42% 44% 7% Incease a little Stay the same Decrease a little Decrease a great deal All 3% 47% 41% 7% 1% Don't Know 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% % of organisations Base: all responding organisations (113) Responding organisations were asked to indicate the estimated percentage of the workforce to leave and need replacing each year. In looking at the response to the average proportion of the paid workforce in comparison to the volunteer workforce there appears to be a percentage of organisations that have a consistent workforce, as 73% of the paid workforce and 75% of the volunteer workforce do not need replacing each year.
    • Figure 4.3.g Average proportion of the workforce that leave and need replacing each year 80% 70% Paid 60% % of organisations Volunteer 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0% 1-10% 11-20% 21-30% 31-40% 41-50% 51-60% 61-80% 81-100% Proportion of Workforce Base: all responding organisations with volunteers (83) Occupation profile and employment status All occupational principle roles include both paid staff and volunteers except professional sports players (no professional sports players were apparent within the responding organisations). The majority of the workforce can be classified as coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders. Figure 4.3.h Occupational profile –paid and volunteer workforce 60% 50% Paid Volunteer 40% % of workforce 30% 20% 10% 0% Sports.community/play instructors, activity Operational staff supervisors, senior Professional sports Coaches, teachers, Sports officials Non-managerial development officers support staff administrators Managers, leaders players Principal job role Base: all responding organisations (113)
    • The occupation profile of the responding organisations differs between the paid and voluntary workforce as volunteers have a higher percentage (17% above the paid workforce) undertaking roles such as coaching (including teaching, instructing and leading) and sports officials (17% above the paid workforce). The paid workforce are also highly represented within the role of coaching (including teaching, instructing and leading) however in comparison to the voluntary workforce paid roles are more apparent within operational positions, non-managerial support staff and management (including supervisors and senior administrators) and sport, community/ play development officers. The responding paid workers can be further investigated through a breakdown of employment status. Employment status demonstrates the percentage of the paid workforce to be working full-time, part-time, agency, self employed and seasonal. Part- time working is the most common status with 43.08% of the workforce 2.7% above the regional average. The seasonal paid workforce varies in scale with the median providing a clearer indication of the average number of seasonal staff. Table 4.3.c Employment Status Northumberland Regional average Status Workforce Mean Median Workforce Mean Median Full-time (More than 26.05% 10.0 6 32.75% 10.4 6 30 hours per week) Part-time (Less than 43.08% 15.7 6 40.34% 11.8 5 30 hours per week) Agency 0.30% 4.0 4 0.60% 3.6 3 labour Self employed/ 4.81% 3.8 4 7.18% 6.0 3 freelance Seasonal 25.76% 38.7 4 19.13% 21.0 5 Base: all responding organisations (113) Note: the data provided by the responding organisations may have been based on estimated numbers Demographics of the Workforce Gender The total workforce from responding organisations demonstrates a slightly larger male representation 52.6% compared to 47.4% female. In looking at the gender divide there are 20% more males than females in the volunteer workforce which is similar to the regional average, where as there are 2% more females in the paid workforce. Regional comparison indicates differences in the paid workforce as only 42% of the paid workforce across the region is female.
    • Figure 4.3.i Gender Volunteer 60% 40% Male Female Paid 49% 51% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% % of workforce Base: all responding organisations (113) Note: the data provided by the responding organisations may have been based on estimated numbers Age The age profile of the total workforce demonstrates the 35 to 44 age ranges to be the highest percentage of the workforce (21.6%). There are some differences in the volunteer workforce in comparison to the paid; volunteers fluctuate in the age ranges with fewer in the 25-34 age range compared to 12% more in the 35 to 44 age range. In contrast the paid workforce peaks within the 25 to 24 age range. Figure 4.3.j Age profile – volunteer and paid workforce 25% 20% Paid Volunteer % of workforce 15% 10% 5% 0% 16 to 19 20 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55 to 64 65+ Age (banded) Base: all responding organisations (113) Note: the data provided by the responding organisations may have been based on estimated numbers
    • Ethnic Origin 99.84% of the paid workforce are White compared to 98.68% of the voluntary workforce. In looking at the diversity of the workforce the paid workforce have representation from Asian and Asian British and mixed ethnic background minorities where as the voluntary workforce has representation from the Chinese minority. It should be noted that the data provided by the responding organisations may have been based on estimated numbers therefore a more detailed ethnicity breakdown can not be provided. Disability 0.19% of the paid workforce are registered as disabled in comparison to 0.65% of the volunteer workforce. It should be noted that the data provided by the responding organisations may have been based on estimated numbers therefore a more detailed disability breakdown can not be provided. 4.4 The Voluntary Workforce Figure 4.4 (a) demonstrates the number of volunteers that responding organisations currently have, need and have recruited in the last 12 months. In looking at the current number of volunteers in relation to what is needed there appears to not be a shortfall within the voluntary workforce as it is suggested that the organisations have 62 more volunteers than needed. In total 212 volunteers were recruited within the last 12 months which could look toward assisting with any identified shortfall (further details about vacancies and voluntary workforce turnover are available in section five). Figure 4.4.k Number of volunteers No of volunteers that 616 the organisation currently have No of volunteers 554 that the organisation need No of volunteers that organisation has 212 recruited in the last 12 months 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 no of volunteers Base: all responding organisations with volunteers (83 Note: the term ‘need’ was not clearly defined within the survey, which may impact upon provided responses as it could be seen to be referring to either current or future need.
    • 4.5 The Coaching Workforce Responding organisations were asked how many paid and volunteer coaches, teachers, instructors, and activity leaders they have and how many they need: • The total numbers of coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders is 260. • The total number of paid coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders is 34 (13.1%). • The total number of voluntary coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders is 226 (86.9%) The coaching workforce has a significantly higher level of volunteers than the paid workforce (86.9%). Organisations providing a response were also required to suggest how many paid and volunteer coaches, teachers, instructors, and activity leaders they need: • The total number of coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders needed is 205. • The total number of paid coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders needed is 70 (34.1%) • The total number of volunteer coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders that organisations need was suggested as 135 (65.8%). There appears to be no shortfall of paid or voluntary coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders. This aligns with the regional picture however differs when looking in more detail at coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders’ qualifications see figures 4.5 (d) and (e). Figure 4.5.l Number of coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders Number of coaches teachers, instructors 34 226 have Paid Volunteer Number of coaches teachers, instructors 70 135 need 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Number of coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders Base: all responding organisations with coaches, teachers etc (50) Note: the term ‘need’ was not clearly defined within the survey, which may impact upon provided responses as it could be seen to be referring to either current or future need. Qualification profile The coaching workforce is addressed in more detail through a qualification profile of the responding organisations. Through a comparison of the paid and volunteer workforce qualification profile it is apparent that a high proportion of volunteers hold lower level
    • qualifications such as NGB Level 1 where as the paid workforce has a significantly higher proportion of NGB Level 2 and Level 3 plus. Table 4.5.d Qualification profile – coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders Paid Volunteers Leader/CSLA/JSLA 0% 8% NGB L1 16% 45% NGB L2 65% 21% NGB L3+ 17% 3% Other 2% 10% No Qualifications 0% 13% Base: all organisations with coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders (50) The difference in the paid and voluntary coaching qualification profile may be due to minimum requirements outlined within paid employment contracts, insurance issues or the need for Level 2 coaches to undertake a supervisory role within certain organisations. The paid coaching workforce may also have a stronger desire for potential career development; further research would assist to clarify these initial findings. Figure 4.5.m Qualification level of current coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders Volunteer 8% 45% 21% 3% 10% 13% Leader/CSLA/JSLA NGB L1 2% Paid 16% 65% 17% NGB L2 NGB L3+ Other All 4% 31% 43% 10% 6% 6% No Quals 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% % of coaches, teachers, instructors & activity leaders Base: all responding organisations with coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders (50) The organisations were requested to indicate the desired qualifications held by their paid and volunteer workforce. The qualification suggested as most in need by responding organisations for both the paid and volunteer workforce is NGB Level 2.
    • Table 4.5 b Desired qualification profiles –coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders Paid Volunteers Leader/CSLA/JSLA 0% 0% NGB L1 6% 9% NGB L2 64% 44% NGB L3+ 28% 15% Other 1% 13% No Qualifications 1% 19% Base: all responding organisations with coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders (50) Note: the term ‘need’ was not clearly defined within the survey, which may impact upon provided responses as it could be seen to be referring to either current or future need. Although there is an identified need for coaches within all qualification types, individuals holding no qualifications were seen as needed within the volunteer workforce. This raises questions as to whether organisations are seeking volunteer coaches with no qualifications, how this could effect insurance, the roles in which unqualified coaches are operating and what competencies are measured. It may be that organisations were suggesting a need for helpers or assistants for the qualified coaching workforce this however remains unclear. Figure 4.5.n Qualification level needed for coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders Volunteer 9% 44% 15% 13% 19% Leader/CSLA/JSLA 1% NGB L1 NGB L2 Paid 6% 64% 28% NGB L3+ 1% Other No Quals All 7% 57% 23% 6% 8% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% % of coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders Base: all responding organisations with coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders (50)
    • Sport specific qualification levels Respondents were asked to address coaching (including teachers, instructors and activity leaders) qualifications in more detail against specific sports in regards to the paid workforce. Figure 4.5 (d) demonstrates the number of paid coaches by sport. Any sports missing from the figure did not present any data. The red arrows on the table indicate the short falls within sports qualifications whilst the blue arrows highlight the potential up-skilling opportunities. In summary the short falls are described below: There is only one short fall at NGB level 1which is demonstrated in Trampolining. NGB Level 2 can be identified as having the largest shortfall and is apparent in the following sports: • Canoeing • Gymnastics • Sailing • Trampolining NGB Level 3 shortfall sports: • Canoeing • Movement & Dance • Sailing • Windsurfing Up-skilling opportunities refer to the ability for individuals at a lower skill level or qualification to be developed to meet skill shortfalls or for those with out qualifications to be developed to meet the specific requirements. In looking at the sports with a shortfall not all have up-skilling opportunities this may be due to the incompletion of data. The small number of respondents per sport can not provide an exact picture of up-skilling opportunities, further investigation of opportunities will be required to inform accurate decision making. Figure 4.5.o Number of paid coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders by Sports Up-skilling opportunity Shortfall Leader / No CSLA/ NGB Sport Quals JSLA NGB L1 NGB L2 L3+ Have 0 0 1 0 0 Need 0 0 0 0 0 Multi sport Shortfall 0 0 -1 0 0 Have 0 0 0 1 0 Need 0 0 0 1 0 Athletics 0 0 0 0 0 Have 0 0 0 1 0 Need 0 0 0 1 0 Basketball 0 0 0 0 0
    • Leader / No CSLA/ NGB Sport Quals JSLA NGB L1 NGB L2 L3+ Have 0 0 0 3 4 Need 0 0 0 4 5 Canoeing 0 0 0 1 1 Have 0 0 0 1 0 Need 0 0 0 0 0 Cricket 0 0 0 -1 0 Have 0 0 0 4 1 Need 0 0 0 0 0 Fitness 0 0 0 -4 -1 Have 0 0 2 6 4 Need 0 0 0 6 0 Football 0 0 -2 0 -4 Have 0 0 0 0 0 Need 1 0 0 0 0 Golf 1 0 0 0 0 Have 0 0 4 7 4 Need 0 0 4 16 4 Gymnastics 0 0 0 9 0 Have 0 0 1 0 0 Need 0 0 0 0 0 Hockey 0 0 -1 0 0 Have 1 0 0 0 2 Need 0 0 0 0 2 Ice Hockey -1 0 0 0 0 Have 0 0 19 118 0 Movement Need 0 0 0 17 9 & Dance 0 0 -19 -101 9 Have 0 0 2 2 0 Need 0 0 0 0 0 Netball 0 0 -2 -2 0 Have 0 0 0 1 0 Rugby Need 0 0 0 0 0 Union 0 0 0 -1 0 Have 0 0 1 1 2 Need 0 0 0 8 4 Sailing 0 0 -1 7 2 Have 0 0 16 39 28 Need 0 0 0 36 4 Swimming 0 0 -16 -3 -24 Have 0 0 1 0 0 Need 0 0 1 0 0 Tennis 0 0 0 0 0
    • Leader / No CSLA/ NGB Sport Quals JSLA NGB L1 NGB L2 L3+ Have 0 0 0 0 1 Trampolinin Need 0 0 2 1 1 g 0 0 2 1 0 Have 0 0 0 2 0 Need 0 0 0 2 2 Windsurfing 0 0 0 0 2 Note: the term ‘need’ was not clearly defined within the survey, which may impact upon provided responses as it could be seen to be referring to either current or future need. Respondents were also asked to address coaching (including teachers, instructors and activity leaders) qualifications in more detail against specific sports in regards to volunteers. Figure 4.5 (e) demonstrates the number of volunteer coaches by sports. Any sports missing from the figure did not present any data. In summary the volunteer shortfalls are as follows: NGB Level 1short fall sports: • Badminton • Netball • Tennis Only Windsurfing indicated a short fall in NGB Level 2 similarly only Netball demonstrated a short fall in NGB Level 3. Up-skilling opportunities refer to the ability for individuals at a lower skill level or qualification to be developed to meet skill shortfalls or for those with out qualifications to be developed to meet the specific requirements. In looking at the sports with a shortfall not all have up-skilling opportunities this may be due to the incompletion of data. The small number of respondents per sport can not provide an exact picture of up-skilling opportunities, further investigation of opportunities will be required to inform accurate decision making. Figure 4.5.p Number of volunteer coaches, teachers, instructors and activity leaders by Sports Up-skilling opportunity Shortfall Leader No /CSLA/ NGB Sport Quals JSLA NGB L1 NGB L2 L3+ Have 0 0 3 4 1 Need 0 0 0 0 0 Multi sport Shortfall 0 0 -3 -4 -1 Have 0 0 1 0 0 Need 0 0 2 0 0 Badminton 0 0 1 0 0
    • Leader No /CSLA/ NGB Sport Quals JSLA NGB L1 NGB L2 L3+ Have 2 19 8 17 3 Need 0 1 6 5 0 Basketball -2 -18 -2 -12 -3 Have 0 0 0 2 0 Need 0 0 0 0 0 Bowls 0 0 0 -2 0 Have 0 1 0 0 0 Need 0 0 0 0 0 Boxing 0 -1 0 0 0 Have 0 0 0 0 0 Need 0 0 0 1 0 Canoeing 0 0 0 1 0 Have 9 0 83 11 1 Need 0 0 27 1 0 Football -9 0 -56 -10 -1 Have 2 0 0 0 0 Need 7 0 0 0 0 Golf 5 0 0 0 0 Have 0 0 0 0 0 Need 0 0 0 0 0 Karate 0 0 0 0 0 Have 4 3 9 12 0 Need 0 2 11 8 5 Netball -4 -1 2 -4 5 Have 1 0 1 0 0 Rugby Need 0 0 0 0 0 Union -1 0 -1 0 0 Have 0 0 0 0 0 Need 0 0 0 1 0 Sailing 0 0 0 1 0 Have 9 0 12 7 3 Need 0 0 9 5 1 Swimming -9 0 -3 -2 -2 Have 8 0 0 0 0 Need 0 0 1 0 0 Tennis -8 0 1 0 0 Have 0 0 0 0 0 Need 0 0 0 1 0 Windsurfing 0 0 0 1 0 Note: the term ‘need’ was not clearly defined within the survey, which may impact upon provided responses as it could be seen to be referring to either current or future need.
    • 5 RECRUITMENT DIFFICULTIES AND VACANCIES Key Messages The following points are key messages drawn from analysis of the recruitment difficulties and vacancies in Northumberland Sport: • The main skills lacking or in need of improvement are sport-specific technical skills, communication, team working, initiative, first aid and child protection • Skills gaps highlighted were found in coach and officials roles for the paid and volunteer workforces • The total paid vacancies in the last 12 months were 228 (from responding organisations) • The total volunteer vacancies in the last 12 months were 747 (from responding organisations) • Voluntary/charitable/non-profit, limited companies and local authorities were responding organisation types with the majority of vacancies • Responding organisations stated coach vacancies and coaching roles as being hard to fill for both the paid and volunteer workforce. Paid responses also identified fitness instructors/exercise to music teacher (level 2) as being hard to fill vacancies. Volunteer responses stated committee member roles as being hard to fill • Paid and volunteer respondents stated lack of qualifications and skills as a key reason for job vacancies. Organisations with a paid workforce also identified lack of interest; where as volunteer reasons included time constraints and volunteer regulations as key reasons for job vacancies. This section outlines the reported recruitment difficulties and skills challenges faced by the responding Sports, Fitness and Outdoors sector in Northumberland Sport.
    • 5.1 Employment Turnover The employment turnover for responding organisations with paid staff regionally was identified as 2627 of the paid staff needing to be replaced in the last year. Northumberland employment turnover for responding organisations identifies 645 of the paid staff needing to be replaced. The volunteer turnover regionally identified 2595 of volunteers needing to be replaced over a year. Northumberland volunteer employment turnover for responding organisations is 498. This highlights a turnover difference of 147 when comparing Northumberland paid and volunteer staff, 5.2 Vacancies and Recruitment Difficulties 228 vacancies in paid employment from responding organisations were reported in the last year equating to 17% of the total number of paid employees from the responding organisations. The total number of employees from the responding organisations was identified as 1351. 16 of the responding organisations reported both a paid vacancy and reported hard to fill vacancies over the last year. A correlation of the paid vacancies and hard to fill vacancies uncovered only 16 of the responding organisations stating both types of vacancies. In analysing the responses for hard to fill vacancies, 46 of responding organisations identified hard to fill vacancies, of which 20% were paid vacancies. The top three responding organisation types stating vacancies in the past 12 months were voluntary/charitable/non profit (n=12), (private) limited companies (n=11), and local authorities (n=5). In looking at the reported vacancies against sports offered; responding organisations offering swimming, football, and movement & dance reported more vacancies in comparison to other responding organisations offering different sports. • 13 organisation types that offer swimming reported vacancies, • 12 organisations offering football, • 12 organisations offering movement and dance The responding organisations stated the occupations that are most likely to have a vacancy that was hard to fill were operational staff (n=91) with the highest number of vacancies, coaches, teachers, instructors, activity leaders (n= 63) and Non-managerial support staff stating 41 vacancies. The highest number of reported hard to fill vacancies is coaches, teachers, instructors, activity leaders (n=36) followed by non-managerial support staff (n=7). The regional averages from the responding organisations highlighted similar trends with Coaches, teachers, instructors, activity leaders receiving a high number of vacancies (n=243) and hard to fill vacancies (n=91). Operational staff received the second highest number of vacancies regionally (n=32). Organisations responding in Northumberland reported the operational staff category with the highest number of vacancies. The regional number of hard to fill vacancies identified sports/community/play development officers as the third highest (n=16), where Northumberland only reported 1 hard to fill vacancy for the sports/community category.
    • Table 5.2.e Vacancies and hard-to-fill vacancies in the paid workforce by occupation Vacancies as Number of Hard to fill Hard to fill Number of a % of all reported Hard vacancies as vacancies as reported employment to Fill a % of all a % of all Vacancies Vacancies vacancies employment Managers, supervisors, 25 2% 2 1% 0% senior administrators Sports / community / play 8 1% 1 0% 0% development officers Coaches, teachers, 63 5% 36 16% 3% instructors, activity leaders Operational 91 7% 0 0% 0% staff Professional 0 0% 0 0% 0% sports players Sports officials 0 0% 0 0% 0% Non- managerial 41 3% 7 3% 1% support staff TOTAL 228 17% 46 20% 3% Base: all responding organisations with paid staff (64) Hard to fill vacancies – Paid employment Employers were asked to identify up to three specific job roles that they considered to be hard-to-fill. The top two most frequently mentioned roles for paid staff were coach (n=10), and Fitness (aerobics) instructor/exercise to music teacher level 2 (n=6). Regional responses identified two of the same top two job roles of coach and fitness instructor. The third hardest role to fill regionally was sports/community development officer. Responses in Northumberland did not record any hard to fill vacancies from this job role.
    • Table 5.2.f Paid roles identified as hard-to-fill Job role Frequency Percentage Coach 10 45% Fitness (aerobics) instructor/exercise to music teacher 6 27% level 2 Catering/kitchen staff 1 4.5% Lifeguard/recreation attendant/leisure attendant/sports 1 4.5% assistant Office/admin staff/clerical 1 4.5% Outdoors activity leader/instructor/facilitator 1 4.5% Personal trainer/level 3 instructor/GP referral 1 4.5% Education 1 4.5% Total 22 100% Base: all responding organisations with a paid workforce (64) The top reasons employees of the responding organisations cite for hard to fill vacancies for the paid workforce were: 1. Lack of technical qualifications required for job (12%) (Regional 8%) 2. Low number of applicants with required skills (8%) (Regional 11%) 3. Not enough people interested in this type of job (8%) (Regional 8%) 4. Low number of applicants generally (6%) (Regional 7%) 5. Poor terms and conditions offered for post/low pay (5%) (Regional 6%)
    • Figure 5.2.q Main reasons for job vacancies being hard-to-fill – Paid workers 1.8% Remote location/ poor public transport 1.8% Too much competit ion from other employers 2.7% Don't Know Other 2.7% 2.7% Job entails shift work/ unsociab le hours 3.5% High cost/ lack of accommodation 3.5% Poor career progression/ lack of prospects 4.4% Seasonal work 4.4% Low number of applicants with required attitude/m otivati... 5.3% Poor terms & conditions offered for post/low pay 6.2% Low number of applicants generally 7.9% Not enough people intereste d in this type of job 8.0% Low number of applicants with required skills 11.9% Lack of technical qualification required for job 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% % of organisations Base all responding organisations with paid workforce (64), citing hard to fill vacancies (46) Hard-to-fill vacancies that are a result of a lack of qualifications or experience are termed skills shortage vacancies (lack of technical qualifications required for the job, low number of applicants with required skill, lack of work experience the company demands). • 12% (n=14) of responding employers identify skill shortage vacancies, 2% above the regional average of 10%. • 6% of responding organisations with vacancies stated a skills shortage vacancy, percentage based on the total number of paid vacancies (228) • 30% of responding organisations with a hard to fill vacancy stated a skills shortage vacancy, percentage based on the total number of paid hard to fill vacancies (46)
    • Volunteer Workforce 747 vacancies were reported in the last year from the responding organisations. The total number of responding organisations identifies 616 volunteer positions. The volunteer vacancies equate to 121% of the total number of volunteer employment. The high percentage highlighted identifies more volunteer vacancies than current volunteer employment numbers. The responding organisations stated 131 more vacancies than the total number of volunteer employees. 8 of the responding organisations reported both a volunteer vacancy and reported hard to fill vacancies in the last year (8 less organisations than the paid employment). A correlation of the volunteer and hard to fill vacancies uncovered only 8 organisations stating both types of vacancies. In analysing the responses for hard to fill vacancies, 178 of the responding organisations identified hard to fill vacancies, of which 24% were volunteer vacancies. The top three volunteer vacancies by organisational type were identified as 20 sports/membership club type organisations, 20 voluntary/charitable/non, and 2 educational type organisation. In looking at reported vacancies against offered sports, responding organisations that offered football, netball, and swimming reported the more vacancies in comparison to other responding organisations offering different sports. 1. 9 organisations that offer football, 2. 9 organisations offering netball, 3. 5 organisations offering swimming. The occupations that are most likely to have a vacancy and a hard to fill vacancy identified by the responding organisations were Coaches, activity leaders and helpers receiving the highest number of vacancies and hard to fill vacancies. Sports officials and club officials were in the top three receiving the highest number of vacancies and hard to fill vacancies. The paid workforce showed similar trends with coaches receiving the highest amount of vacancies and hard to fill vacancies. The regional trends highlighted very similar occupations as the volunteer workforce. Regional responses identified, coaches, sports officials, and club officials in the top three vacancies and hard to fill vacancies. Regionally coaches, club officials, and sport officials were reported as the hardest to fill vacancies, these findings were mirrored with the volunteer workforce with coaches and sport officials appearing in the top three hard to fill vacancies.
    • Table 5.2.g Vacancies and hard-to-fill vacancies in the volunteer workforce by occupation Vacancies as Number of Hard to fill Hard to fill Number of a % of all reported Hard vacancies as vacancies as reported employment to Fill a % of all a % of all Vacancies Vacancies vacancies employment Club officials ( chair, 239 39% 59 8% 10% secretary etc) Coaches, activity leaders 250 41% 45 6% 7% and helpers Team Captains 87 14% 3 0% 0% Operational help (e.g. facilities, 14 2% 30 4% 5% transport, cleaning) Sports officials ( referees, 152 25% 37 5% 6% umpires etc) Volunteer co- 5 1% 4 1% 1% ordinator TOTAL 747 121% 178 24% 29% Base: all responding organisations with volunteers (63) Hard to fill vacancies – Volunteers Employers of responding organisations were asked to identify up to three specific job roles that they considered to be hard-to-fill. The top three frequently mentioned roles for volunteer employment was committee member (n=10), coach (n=8), and officials (n=6). Northumberland is similar to regional responses with Coaches (n=43), committee member (n=26), and officials (n=23) featuring in the top three hard roles to fill. Employers were asked to identify up to three specific job roles that they considered to be hard-to-fill. Table 5.2.h Volunteer roles identified as hard-to-fill Job role Frequency Percentage Committee member 10 29% Coach 8 24% Officials 6 18% Office/admin staff/clerical 2 6% Accountant, treasurer 2 6% Team captain 2 6% Handyman/maintenance 1 3% Lifeguard/recreation attendant/leisure attendant/sports 1 3% assistant PR/campaigning/fund raising 1 3% Child protection/welfare officer 1 3% Total 34 100% Base: all organisations with volunteers (83)
    • Responding organisations cited the top 5 reasons for hard to fill vacancies with the volunteer workforce, identified were; • Nobody has the time to do it (24%) (Regional 26%), • Low numbers of volunteers with required attitude/motivation/personality (20%) (Regional 20%), • Lack of technical qualification required for job (15%) (Regional 12%), • Low number of volunteers with required skills (13%) (Regional 15%), • Increased regulatory requirements for volunteers (12%) (Regional 12%) Northumberland Sport responding organisations showed similar averages for the top five reasons of hard to fill vacancies when compared to the regional average percentage. Hard to fill vacancies that are a result of a lack of qualification or experience are termed skills shortage vacancies (lack of technical qualifications required for the job, low number of applicants with required skill, lack of work experience the company demands). • 15% (n=17) of employers identified skill shortage volunteer vacancies (lack of lack of qualifications or experience) compared to the regional average of 13%. • The Northumberland volunteer workforce showed 2% higher average against the regional average for skill shortage of volunteer vacancies. Table 5.2.i Main reasons for job vacancies being hard-to-fill – Volunteer workers Don't Know 0.0% Other 3.5% Remote location/ 3.5% poor public transport Lack of work experience the company demands 3.5% Nobody co-ordinates recruitment of volunteers 4.4% Too much form filling 5.3% Fear of litigation 6.2% There's too much work for one person 8.0% Voluntary role entails unsociable hours / seasonal work 8.0% People do not understand what the voluntary role involves 10.6% Increased regulatory requirements for volunteers 12.4% Low number of volunteers 13.3% with required skills Lack of technical qualification 15.0% required for job Low number of volunteers with 20.4% required attitude/motivation/personality Nobody has the time to do it 23.9% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% % of organisations Base all organisations with hard to fill vacancies (113)
    • The paid and volunteer workforce both significantly and consistently highlighted coaches as an occupation and role with vacancies and hard to fill vacancies. However, the reasons for job vacancies being hard to fill identified some differences between the paid and volunteer workforces. The paid workforce identified lack of skills and qualifications, and lack of interest in the type of job, where the volunteer workforce stated lack of time, lack of volunteers with the required attitude and motivation. The only similarity with the paid and volunteer workforce was lack of qualifications. 5.3 The Skills Challenge Skills Gaps A skills gap exists when members of the existing workforce are thought to have lower skills than are necessary to meet business or industry objectives as well as when employers regard some of their staff as not being fully proficient to meet the requirements of their job. 22% of employers report that their workforce has a skills gap, 34% stated no gap in skills and 3% reported being unsure. Twelve sports/membership club type organisations, 10 voluntary/charitable/non profit, and 4 local authority organisations identified a gap between skills of current employees and the skills the organisation requires. Only one sole trader/self employed organisation and one other organisation stated a skills gap. 9 organisations offering netball identified a skills gap with current employees. 7 organisations offering football similarly stated a gap in skills. Table 5.3.j Proportion of all organisations experiencing a skills gap Responding Skills gap organisations Yes 22% No 34% Don't know 3% No response 41% Base: all responding organisations (113) Job roles Coach, officials, and lifeguard/recreation attendant/leisure attendant/sports assistant were identified as the roles with the most skills gaps. Table5.3.k Roles with skills gaps Frequency Percentage Coach 14 56% Officials 5 20% Lifeguard/recreation attendant/leisure attendant/sports assistant 2 8% Office/admin staff/clerical 2 8% Fitness instructor/exercise to music teacher level 2 2 8% Total 25 100%
    • Base: all responding organisations experiencing a skills gap (37)
    • Skills in need of improvement Responding organisations were asked to indicate which skills are lacking or need improving in the skills gap roles they identified above. The main skills lacking or in need of improvement were sport specific technical skills, communication, team working, initiative, first aid and child protection. Figure 5.3.r Main skills in need of improvement Foreign languages Reading and Writing Professional IT Skills Other 2 Numeracy Other 1 Basic computer/IT skills Management Life saving Ability to follow instructions Maintenance/repair/use of equipment Personal appearance & attitude Customer service Project management Equity Problem solving Working with disabled people Health & safety Planning and preparing work Child protection First aid Initiative Team working Communication Sport specific technical skills 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% % of organisations Base: all responding organisations experiencing a skills gap (37)
    • 6 TRAINING DEVELOPMENT NEEDS Key Messages The following points are key messages drawn from analysis of the training development needs of Northumberland Sport: • 35% of respondents stated more external funding support for training would improve training provision • Cheaper training courses and more local provision were also seen as key improvements • The partnership core team suggested their main perceived strengths as communication and interpersonal skills • Not one of the core team suggested that they were poor in any of the identified skills, although several suggested that they only achieve satisfactory performance in a number of skills including networking and decision making • Those competencies perceived as most effective are ‘giving customers a positive impression of yourself and your organisation’ and ‘managing yourself’ • A number of competencies were suggested to be only quite effective including ‘managing finance for your area of responsibility’ and ‘developing productive working relationships with external partners/ organisations • Project management was the most frequently suggested training need • There are several common areas for development with project management and budget awareness rated highly. The most common methods for development are training courses or practical experience through work; however there are a number of specific methods for certain areas of development. This section outlines current involvement in training activity and outlines key improvements to training provision.
    • 6.1 Improvements in Training Provision Respondents were asked what improvements they would like to see in training provision. 35% of Northumberland respondents stated more external funding support for training 7% above the regional average. Cheaper training courses and more local provision of training courses were within the top three responses matching the regional output. In looking at the type of responding organisations against the suggested improvement there was little difference between most types. Educational organisations and private limited companies stated the requirement of more external funding support clearly above other training provision. Figure 6.1.s Improvements to training provision 40% 35% CSP Area 30% % of organisations Region 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% More information/ promotion of More external funding support Cheaper training courses More training locally More time-flexible training More local provision of training ordination of training courses More central planning/co- training courses for training courses Base: all responding organisations (113) 6.2 CSP Workforce Training Needs Analysis The partnership was required to gather Training Needs Analysis data from their core team in order to identify specific workforce training needs to be included in the overall workforce development plan for the CSP and to assist individuals in developing their own professional development plan. The data was captured by the partnership through the distribution of a SkillsActive (2006) - Training Needs Analysis template. Northumberland Sport identified 12 individuals as its core team; the following analysis is based on the responses provided by that team. Strengths Respondents suggested a number of perceived personal strengths with the most frequent identified as communication and interpersonal skills, which were seen as vital to successful interaction with internal and external individuals or organisations. • Communication (n=7) • Interpersonal skills (n=4) • Management & leadership (n=3) • Team working (n=3) Green; Most frequent high rating skill area Red; Most frequent low rating skill area
    • • Partnership working (n=3) • Knowledge (n=3) • Experience (n=3) • Organisation (n=2) • Planning (n=2) • Time management (n=2) • Strategic awareness/thinking (n=2) Skills Respondents were asked to indicate their perceived performance of the skills outlined in table 6.2 (a). Each skill required a rating of very good to poor or not applicable. Table 6.2.l Skills profile Figures relate to valid percentage within each category Skills very good satisfact poor Not good ory applicabl e Reading 58.3 33.3 8.3 0 0 Writing 58.3 41.7 0 0 0 Numeracy 27.3 72.7 0 0 0 Communication 16.7 83.3 0 0 0 Customer service 58.3 41.7 0 0 0 Basic computer/ IT 33.3 50.0 16.7 0 0 Skills Problem-solving 16.7 75.0 8.3 0 0 Leadership 25.0 50.0 16.7 0 8.3 Management 25.0 33.3 16.7 0 25.0 Innovation 16.7 66.7 16.7 0 0 Decision Making 25.0 50.0 25.0 0 0 Team working 50.0 41.7 8.3 0 0 Networking 33.3 25.0 41.7 0 0 The highest rated skills were highlighted as reading, writing, customer service, communication, numeracy and innovation. Not one of the responding workforce suggested that they were poor in any of the identified skills, although several suggested that they only achieve satisfactory performance in a number of skills including networking and decision making. Further training in these specific skills was not clearly identified. Competencies In a similar way to the assessment of skills the responding workforce were requested to rate their performance within a number of competencies outline in table 6.2 (b). Each competency required a rating of very effective to not effective or not applicable.
    • Table 6.2.m Competencies profile Figures relate to valid percentage within each category Competencies very effect quite not not effect ive effect effect applic ive ive ive able Managing yourself 41.7 41.7 8.3 0 8.3 Managing your own resources 25.0 50.0 16.7 0 8.3 Managing your personal networks 25.0 58.3 8.3 0 8.3 Developing productive working 33.3 58.3 8.3 0 0 relationships with colleagues Developing productive working relationships with external partners/ 8.3 58.3 33.3 0 0 organisations Giving customers a positive impression of yourself and your 50.0 33.3 16.7 0 0 organisation Resolving customer’ problems 8.3 75.0 8.3 0 8.3 Working with others to improve 25.0 66.7 8.3 0 0 customer service Contributing to the development of 16.7 75.0 8.3 0 0 teams and individuals Working with colleagues in a team 25.0 66.7 8.3 0 0 Promoting equality of opportunity and diversity in your area of 25.0 41.7 25.0 0 8.3 responsibility Managing or coordinating a project 8.3 66.7 16.7 0 8.3 or activity Managing or coordinating a programme of complementary 8.3 58.3 25.0 0 8.3 projects and/or activities Planning and preparing projects 8.3 66.7 16.7 0 8.3 and/ or activities Reviewing the delivery of projects 25.0 41.7 25.0 0 8.3 and/ or activities Implementing operational plans for 8.3 58.3 16.7 0 16.7 your area of responsibility Manage finance for your area of 8.3 41.7 41.7 0 8.3 responsibility Maintain the health and safety of 25.0 58.3 16.7 0 0 self and others Maintaining a safe and secure 25.0 58.3 16.7 0 0 working environment Allocate and monitor the progress and quality of work in your area of 25.0 58.3 16.7 0 0 responsibility Green; Most frequent high rating competencies area Red; Most frequent low rating competencies area Those competencies perceived as most effective are ‘giving customers a positive impression of yourself and your organisation’ and ‘managing yourself’. The other most effective competencies are specific to providing good customer service and team working.
    • None of the core team suggested they were not effective at any of the competencies although a number of competencies were suggested to be only quite effective these included: • Manage finance for your area of responsibility • Developing productive working relationships with external partners/ organisations Training Needs A variety of training needs have been identified; project management was the most frequently suggested training need. • Project Management (including Microsoft project software) (n=5) • IT skills (n=3) • Managing Budgets (n=3) • Marketing/ PR skills (n=3) • Improved coaching knowledge (n=2) • Funding applications (n=2) • First Aid for Sport Qualification (n=2) • Confidence and assertiveness workshops (n=1) • Areas/ organisations able to access funding (n=1) • Leadership and managing others (n=1) • Advanced communications skills (n=1) • Managing large audiences (n=1) • Networking (n=1) • Child protection and equality training (n=1) • Human Resource Development (n=1) • FA Level 3 (UEFA b) Experience (n=1) • RSA11 TYPING (n=1) Areas for development The team were asked to indicate areas for development within their role and the methods most suitable for their development. There are several common areas for development similarly to the perceived training needs project management and budget awareness rate highly. The most common methods for development are training courses or practical experience through work; however there are a number of specific methods for certain areas of development. Table 6.2.n Areas for Development Areas for development Methods for development • Training courses • Practical experience through work Budget awareness (n=5) • Internal training • Qualification • Training courses Project Management (n=3) • Qualification • Practical experience through work Equality (n=3) • Industry specific training to respond to (specifically disability sport & social ongoing legislative changes and inclusion) emerging good practice. Coaching development (n=3) • ASA Coaching level 3 • Attend Level 3 Taster Day • Training courses
    • Areas for development Methods for development • Qualification • Training courses Marketing/ Public Relations (n=2) • Qualification • Training courses Developing managerial skills (n=2) • Practical experience through work • Attend Assertiveness Training Day Assertiveness (n=2) • Workshop • Training courses IT skills (n=2) • Qualification • Practical experience through work Presentation Skills (n=2) • Practical experience through work Understanding of the media (n=1) • Training modules (how to manage and make approaches) • Training course Youth and Community Training (n=1) • Qualification • Practical experience through work • Opportunities to attend or lead at Strategic County, Regional or National Strategic influencing skills (n=1) meetings • Personal coaching and mentoring • Performance measures related to role • Training course Knowledge of organisation (n=1) • Practical experience through work Appraisals (n=1) • Training course Funding (n=1) • Training Course
    • 7 CONCLUSIONS The following conclusions have been drawn from the key findings of the audit: • The data collected from respondents suggested there is no shortfall of volunteers and coaches; this requires further analysis within a broader range of organisations than those covered within this study as specific sports suggested shortfalls in a number of coaching areas mainly coaching Level 2 qualifications. o The voluntary workforce indicates a shortfall of voluntary coaches at level 1 within Badminton, Netball and Tennis. o Coaches with Level 2 coaching qualifications are in demand from the responding organisations, with the largest shortfall of paid coaches apparent in Canoeing, Gymnastics, Sailing and Trampolining. Several of these sports also demonstrate a shortfall at Level 3 coaching qualification – Canoeing, movement and dance, sailing and windsurfing. • Coaching roles were identified by both the paid and voluntary workforce as having the highest number of vacancies and hard to fill vacancies. Volunteers also suggested committee member roles as hard to fill. Lack of qualifications and skills are identified as the key reasons for vacancies. • Coaching roles and officials across the county were identified as the most common roles with skills gaps. • Technical skills, communication, team working, initiative, first aid and child protection were identified as the main skills in need of improvement within the county’s workforce. • Respondents suggest that cheaper training courses with more local provision would be a key change to improve training provision across Northumberland Sport. • Across the core team the training needs analysis highlighted that networking and decision making were skills which needed to be improved through relevant training. • To improve the core team’s work areas, developing productive working relationships with external partners and managing finance for your area of responsibility were identified as in need of further development through relevant training methods. • It should be acknowledged that there are limitations to this study. The collection of data through the circulation of a survey accompanied with systematic follow ups and direct telemarketing allowed the desired sample of respondents to be accessed. Difficulties were however faced as there appears to be no definitive database of current organisations within the partnership. 54.26% of the collated contact information had incorrect or incomplete details. • The audit is based on data collected within two different time frames and through differing collection methods, nationally via the Sports, Fitness and Outdoors survey in 2005 and through recent regional based data collection in 2007.
    • • Time constraints in the recent regional based data collection and analysis of overall combined data have impacted upon the level of interpretation which accompanies the reported results. It is important for these results to be viewed within the context of the study. Next steps • These results provide a snapshot of the workforce within the partnership that provides a platform from which to base further investigations. The continuation of the workforce development planning process will utilise the results to open and shape discussions within the partnership. It is anticipated that the partnership will be able to provide a local context and further interpretation of the findings to inform the workforce development plan. Key priorities for development • The production of an accurate and maintained partnership wide database of organisations with a sports workforce and where possible contact details for individual workforce members • Establish a county-wide group to implement the Northumberland Sport workforce development plan • Conduct further research across the county to establish robust data for planning and costing of the plan • Work with partners as CSN level, where these are in existence, to collate data and information for planning and implementation of the plan