BMA State of B2B Direct Marketing- Introductory Slides

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  • 1. State of B2B Direct Marketing
    • Presented to the BMA Norcal Chapter
    • August 24, 2005
    • Moderated By:
    • Laurie B. Beasley,President, Beasley Direct Marketing, Inc.
    • Panelists:
    • Bill Mirbach, Vice President of Direct Marketing, Intuit
    • Katherine Van Diepen, Director of Marketing, Anritsu Corporation
    • Erin McCart, Senior Marketing Campaign Manager, EMC Corporation
  • 2. Agenda -
    • 11:45 am – 1:30 pm
    • Direct Marketing Industry Perspective
    • Presentations by our Panelists:
      • Bill Mirbach, VP of Direct Marketing, Intuit
      • Katherine Van Diepen, Director of Marketing, Anritsu Corp
      • Erin McCart, Marketing Campaign Manager, EMC Corp.
  • 3. 1:45 Direct Mail Workshop
    • Direct Mail Formats that Work – And Why
    • Where to Start – Regardless of the Media
    • Creative Testing – What Works and Why
    • Getting Through to the CXO Audience
    • What To Do When the Product is New…or “so-so”
    • Email Made More Effective – You’re going to send them along with your direct mail, right?
    • Print Ads, etc.
  • 4.
    • Is Email or Direct Mail Getting a Better Response?
    • ………… .Neither!
  • 5. Industry Perspective
    • While Internet gets a lot of attention, and e-Mail is a hot topic...
    • Telemarketing dominates B2B marketing response to house files… and prospecting isn’t much different:
      • Telemarketing 6.44%
      • Email 5.93%
      • Dimensional Direct Mail 5.53%
      • Flat Direct Mail 3.10%
  • 6. B2B Lead Generation Results by Media
  • 7. Advertising Spending (and Projection)
  • 8. Highlights from the DMA 2005 Postal and E-Mail Marketing Report
    • Postal Mail on the Upswing.
      • Interestingly, the % of marketers in 2004 who planned volume increases for direct mail (64%) almost matched results from DMA’s 1998 survey –prior to economic downturn– in which 67% predicted increases.
    • A Perspective on Postal vs. E-Mail Qty:
      • Postal mail 3 million pieces annually
      • E-Mail 1 million messages annually
  • 9. Highlights from the DMA 2005 Postal and E-Mail Marketing Report
    • Use of Outside Prospecting for Postal Mail Returns to Pre-Economic Downturn Levels.
      • Outside list usage growth: 28.4% in 2002; 36.3% in 2003, and to 45.8% in 2004.
    • Marketers Grow Much More Conservative of Outside E-mail Lists.
      • List quality and drop in response rates given as reasons for hesitancy to use outside e-Mail lists.
    • E-Mail & Postal Housefiles Much More Actively Used.
      • Cost effectiveness of housefiles and the ability to segment by recency, frequency, and monetary value (RFM) listed as reasons for increase.
  • 10. Highlights from the DMA 2005 Postal and E-Mail Marketing Report
    • Recent Postal and E-Mail Response Performance Results Show Significant Improvement
      • For postal mail the turnaround started in 2003, as 42.8% of respondents reported increases in up-front performance over the previous year, and 52.4% reported increases for 2004.
      • For e-mail, the percentage of respondents who reported increases in up-front response performance grew from 35.2% in 2002 to 42.7% in 2003 and 51% for 2004.
  • 11. Highlights from the DMA 2005 Postal and E-Mail Marketing Report
    • Conclusion: Aggressive Plans to Increase Postal Mail and e-mail Volumes for the Purpose of Generating Orders, Leads, We, and Retail Traffic.
    • See Chart on Next Page
  • 12. Comparison in Intended Purposes for Postal and e-Mail
  • 13. Cost Per Lead Often Compells the Media Choices