Fuel for Exercising
Muscle
Fuel for Energy
Energy
Source
Carbohydrate
Fat
Protein
Carbohydrate
Primary source of energy
All carbohydrate is ultimately broken down to
glucose or stored in the muscle or liv...
FAT
Large source of energy during prolonged, less
intense exercise.
Rate of energy release is slow.
Less readily available...
Protein
Minor energy source
Utilized during severe depletion of the other
macronutrients or during starvation.
It can be u...
Rate of Energy Release
Bioenergetics
Phosphorylation
Anaerobic metabolism
Aerobic metabolism
Fuel for Energy
Three Energy Systems
Immediate (ATP – Phosphocreatine System)
Short Term (Glycolytic System)
Long Term (Ox...
ATP – PCr System
Simplest of the energy systems.
This process does not require oxygen, but it can occur in
the presence of...
Short term system
Liberation of energy through the breakdown of
glucose.
Anaerobic glycolysis entails a complex process
in...
Long Term System
Most complex of the three system
Slow to turn on, but has a tremendous energy –
yielding capacity
Primary...
Oxidation of Fat
Triglycerides - major
energy source
Lipolysis carried out by
lipases
Beta Oxidation – Enzymatic
catabolis...
Oxidation of Protein
Gluconeogenesis
Conversion into intermediates (pyruvate / acetyl
CoA)
Energy yielded approx. 4.1 kcal...
Interaction of the three
energy systems
Do not work independent of each other.
Each system contributes to the total energy...
Running Event Immediate Short Term Long Term
100 m 95 3 2
200 m 95 2 3
400 m 80 15 5
800 m 30 65 5
1,500 m 20 55 25
3,000 ...
Exercise physiology 3
Exercise physiology 3
Exercise physiology 3
Exercise physiology 3
Exercise physiology 3
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Exercise physiology 3

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Exercise physiology 3

  1. 1. Fuel for Exercising Muscle
  2. 2. Fuel for Energy Energy Source Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  3. 3. Carbohydrate Primary source of energy All carbohydrate is ultimately broken down to glucose or stored in the muscle or liver as glycogen Dietary sources of starches and sugar to replenish carbohydrate reserve.
  4. 4. FAT Large source of energy during prolonged, less intense exercise. Rate of energy release is slow. Less readily available for cellular metabolism because it must be reduced from its complex form.
  5. 5. Protein Minor energy source Utilized during severe depletion of the other macronutrients or during starvation. It can be used to generate free fatty acids FFAs for cellular energy Or converted to glucose through the process of gluconeogenesis. It can supply 5 to 10% of the energy needed to sustain prolonged exercise.
  6. 6. Rate of Energy Release
  7. 7. Bioenergetics Phosphorylation Anaerobic metabolism Aerobic metabolism
  8. 8. Fuel for Energy Three Energy Systems Immediate (ATP – Phosphocreatine System) Short Term (Glycolytic System) Long Term (Oxidative System)
  9. 9. ATP – PCr System Simplest of the energy systems. This process does not require oxygen, but it can occur in the presence of oxygen. During the first few seconds of intense muscular activity (sprinting), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is maintained at a relatively constant level as phosphocreatine (PCr) declines. Combination of ATP and PCr stores can sustain the muscles energy needs for up to approximately 15 sec of an all out sprint.
  10. 10. Short term system Liberation of energy through the breakdown of glucose. Anaerobic glycolysis entails a complex process involving 10 – 12 enzymatic reactions for the breakdown of glycogen to lactic acid. Does not produce large amount of ATP. Predominates during early minutes of high intense exercise (all out sprint for 1 – 2 min).
  11. 11. Long Term System Most complex of the three system Slow to turn on, but has a tremendous energy – yielding capacity Primary method of energy production during endurance events.
  12. 12. Oxidation of Fat Triglycerides - major energy source Lipolysis carried out by lipases Beta Oxidation – Enzymatic catabolism of fat by the mitochondria. FFA is cleaved to acetic acid
  13. 13. Oxidation of Protein Gluconeogenesis Conversion into intermediates (pyruvate / acetyl CoA) Energy yielded approx. 4.1 kcal/g
  14. 14. Interaction of the three energy systems Do not work independent of each other. Each system contributes to the total energy needs of the body. One system usually predominates, depending on the activity.
  15. 15. Running Event Immediate Short Term Long Term 100 m 95 3 2 200 m 95 2 3 400 m 80 15 5 800 m 30 65 5 1,500 m 20 55 25 3,000 m 20 40 40 5,000 m 10 20 70 10,000 m 5 15 80 Marathon (42.2 km) 5 5 90 Percentage of Emphasis on the Three Metabolic Energy Systems in Training For Various Running Events

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