Imagine The Possibilities

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Imagine The Possibilities

  1. 1. Imagine the Possibilities How Knowledge Management Builds Communications-Campaign Partnerships Shelby Kloures Radcliffe Executive Director of Campaign Administration Bucknell University
  2. 2. <ul><li>Christopher Cullen </li></ul><ul><li>Director, Marketing, Government, Community & Public Affairs </li></ul><ul><li>Johns Hopkins Institutions </li></ul><ul><li>David J. Gibson </li></ul><ul><li>Director of Communications </li></ul><ul><li>Dartmouth College </li></ul><ul><li>Rebecca Vogel </li></ul><ul><li>Director of Marketing and Communications </li></ul><ul><li>Stanford University </li></ul><ul><li>Christina Wallace </li></ul><ul><li>Development Writer </li></ul><ul><li>Bucknell University </li></ul>
  3. 3. Goals <ul><li>What is Knowledge Management? </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities for Strategic Partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding Your Constituents </li></ul><ul><li>The Communications Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Feasibility, Message Development, and Testing </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is Knowledge Management? <ul><li>Information Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Acquisition, Storage, Retrieval </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Information Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Business Process & Technology Integration </li></ul>
  5. 5. Systems and Technology Strategic & Informed Decisions and Actions Biographic Information Activity Information Giving Information Facts Scores Responses Models Analysis Reports & Charts Alerts Delivery
  6. 6. Business Systems & Technology Business Systems & Technology
  7. 7. Opportunities for Strategic Partnerships <ul><li>Data Acquisition </li></ul><ul><li>Information Integrity </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding the Constituents </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Campaign Communications </li></ul>
  8. 8. Data Acquisition <ul><li>Benchmarking (Naming, Performance) </li></ul><ul><li>Prominent Graduates </li></ul><ul><li>Interview Prep - Research </li></ul><ul><li>Vocation Coding </li></ul><ul><li>Data Acquisition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contact Information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Employment Information </li></ul></ul>If you scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.
  9. 9. Information Integrity <ul><li>Common Definitions </li></ul><ul><li>Transparent Reporting </li></ul><ul><li>Milestone Reporting </li></ul><ul><li>Presidential Remarks </li></ul><ul><li>Annual Gift </li></ul><ul><li>Cost Per $ Raised </li></ul><ul><li>Silent Scholarship </li></ul><ul><li>Receipts </li></ul><ul><li>Commitments </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership Gift </li></ul>Strong and Active Partnerships with Finance are Important for Information Integrity
  10. 10. Understanding the Constituents Reunion Young Alumni Mature Alumni Parents Corporations Foundations Faculty/Staff Undergraduates MBAs PHDs Accounting Finance Marketing Full Time Executive
  11. 11. Understanding the Constituents Donors Lapsed Donors Never Donors SYBUNTS LYBUNTS Donors Leadership Donors
  12. 12. Understanding the Constituents <ul><li>Assumptions We Make </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Young alumni behave differently than mature </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reunion matters to everyone </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Major affiliation is more important </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Graduate degree holders are different </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Athletes/Greek/Men/Women/Married/Single are different </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Understanding the Constituents <ul><li>Assumptions We Make </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Graphic messages resonate more than text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Glossy printing is important </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Videos work best with younger audiences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Younger constituents aren’t estate planning </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Understanding the Constituents <ul><li>Testing Assumptions Proves them….? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Right </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>At one institution, young alumni are much more likely to respond to e-mail communications </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wrong </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>At one institution, major is the least important affiliation, extra curricular connections are most important </li></ul></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Understanding the Constituents <ul><li>Testing Assumptions Proves them….? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Right </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>At one institution, alumni in reunion are more likely to open e-mails with reunion in the subject line </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wrong </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>At one institution, constituents don’t want to see images of current students </li></ul></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Understanding the Constituents <ul><li>Do you know which of your assumptions are true? </li></ul>We’ll talk about testing assumptions in a little bit.
  17. 17. Understanding the Constituents <ul><li>The Fundamental Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Attitudinal Information </li></ul><ul><li>Demographics, Scores, and Segmentation </li></ul><ul><li>Predictive Modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Personas </li></ul>
  18. 18. The Fundamental Questions <ul><li>Who are our constituents/donors? </li></ul><ul><li>Why do they get involved/give? </li></ul><ul><li>What formats/content will work best? </li></ul>
  19. 19. The Fundamental Questions Why do they matter? <ul><li>One size does not fit all </li></ul><ul><li>Busy, savvy constituents </li></ul><ul><li>L.L. Bean </li></ul><ul><li>Budgets are tight. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s the right thing to do. </li></ul>
  20. 20. The Fundamental Questions: How do we answer them? <ul><li>Attitudinal Information </li></ul><ul><li>Data Mining </li></ul><ul><li>Demographics & Market Segments </li></ul><ul><li>Predictive Modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Cluster Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Personas </li></ul>
  21. 21. Attitudinal Information <ul><li>The Pre-Campaign Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Alumni Magazine Surveys </li></ul><ul><li>Online Surveys </li></ul><ul><li>Senior Surveys </li></ul><ul><li>Reunion Surveys </li></ul><ul><li>Responses and Participation </li></ul><ul><li>Anonymous or not? </li></ul>
  22. 22. Data Mining <ul><li>Facts </li></ul><ul><li>Percentages </li></ul><ul><li>Scores </li></ul>
  23. 23. Data Mining <ul><li>Facts </li></ul><ul><li>Percentages </li></ul><ul><li>Scores </li></ul><ul><li>Our graduates earn an average of $100K/yr. </li></ul><ul><li>Our graduates work primarily in major cities. </li></ul><ul><li>Our most popular major is marketing. </li></ul><ul><li>Our largest donation is $1.5M. </li></ul><ul><li>Executive MBA program graduates have an average gift size of $250; Traditional MBA program graduates have an average gift size of $760. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of our alumni (3,460) of our alumni live in California. </li></ul><ul><li>Our undergraduate alumni participation is 47%. Our graduate alumni participation is 61%. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Data Mining <ul><li>Facts </li></ul><ul><li>Percentages </li></ul><ul><li>Scores </li></ul><ul><li>82% of our alumni live in the tri-state area. </li></ul><ul><li>75% of our alumni who were Greek are donors, 48% of our alumni who were not Greek are donors. </li></ul><ul><li>We have e-mail addresses on 73% of our alumni 1-15 years out and 42% of our alumni 16+ years out. We have e-mail addresses on 80% of our retired alumni. </li></ul><ul><li>Of parents who give, 80% also have business degrees. </li></ul><ul><li>60% of our varsity athlete graduates are donors. 48% of that group gives to athletics, and 52% gives outside of athletics. </li></ul>
  25. 25. Data Mining
  26. 26. Data Mining <ul><li>Facts </li></ul><ul><li>Percentages </li></ul><ul><li>Scores </li></ul><ul><li>Prospect Scores </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Capacity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inclination </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Giving Scores </li></ul><ul><ul><li>RFM (Recency, Frequency, Monetary) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Engagement/Affinity Scores </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Student Activities, Volunteer Roles, Event Attendance, Online Community Activity, Communication Activity </li></ul></ul>
  27. 27. Data Mining: Scores/Prospect Ratings Unrated Capacity U $500-$999 P $1K-$2.4K O $2.5K-$4K N $5K-$9K M $10K-$24K L $25K-$49K K $50K-$99K J $100K-$249K I $250K-$499K H $500K-$999K G $1M-$5M F $5M-$10M E $10M-$24M D $25M-$49M C $50M-$99M B $100M+ A Do Not Cultivate 5 Not Likely 4 Distant or Less Inclined 3 Somewhat Inclined 2 Favorably Inclined 1 Undetermined Inclination 0
  28. 28. Data Mining: Scores/ Prospect Ratings 4760 TOTAL PROSPECT POOL     3232 Principal & Major Gift Suspects 3216 Major Gift Suspects 16 Principal Gift Suspects Suspects   1528 Principal & Major Gift Prospects   1332 Total 853 $100K to $249K 315 $250K to $499K 164 $500K to $999K Major Gift Prospects   196 Total 134 $1M to $5M 31 $5M to $10M 5 $10M to $25M 20 $25M to $50M 3 $50M to $100M 3 $100M and Up   Principal Prospects
  29. 29. Data Mining: Scores/RFM <ul><ul><li>A numerical representation of giving </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluates giving in past 15 fiscal years </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ranges from 0-15 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>0-5 points for each area: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Recency: How recently have people given? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Frequency: How often do people give? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Monetary: How much do people give? </li></ul></ul></ul>
  30. 30. Data Mining: Scores/RFM
  31. 31. Data Mining: Scores: Engagement/Affinity <ul><li>Current & former volunteer roles (weighted) </li></ul><ul><li>Event attendance </li></ul><ul><li>Student activities (weighted) </li></ul><ul><li>Online community activity </li></ul><ul><li>E-Mail response rates </li></ul>
  32. 32. Demographics & Market Segmentation
  33. 33. Demographics & Market Segments <ul><li>Targeting by Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Consumer Behavior Segmentation </li></ul><ul><li>Financial Segmentation </li></ul><ul><li>Communication Segmentation </li></ul><ul><li>Wealth Segmentation </li></ul>
  34. 34. Demographics & Market Segments Example: PRIZM Clusters Middle America Country Comfort Landed Gentry Micro-City Blues 2 nd City Society Inner Suburbs Middleburbs The Affluentials Elite Suburbs Urban Cores Midtown Mix Urban Uptown
  35. 35. Demographics & Market Segments Example: PRIZM Clusters Second City Elite Brite Lites Li’l City Upward Bound Middle America Country Comfort Landed Gentry Micro-City Blues Urban Cores Inner Suburbs Middleburbs The Affluentials Elite Suburbs 2 nd City Society Midtown Mix Urban Uptown
  36. 36. Demographics & Market Segments Example: PRIZM Clusters Second City Elite There's money to be found in the nation's smaller cities, and you're most likely to find it in Second City Elite. The residents of these satellite cities tend to be prosperous executives who decorate their $200,000 homes with multiple computers, large-screen TV sets and an impressive collection of wines. With more than half holding college degrees, Second City Elite residents enjoy cultural activities–from reading books to attending theater and dance productions. Middle America Country Comfort Landed Gentry Micro-City Blues Urban Cores Inner Suburbs Middleburbs The Affluentials Elite Suburbs 2 nd City Society Midtown Mix Urban Uptown
  37. 37. Demographics & Market Segments Example: PRIZM Clusters Brite Lites Li’l City Not all of the America's chic sophisticates live in major metros. Brite Lights, Li'l City is a group of well-off, middle-aged couples settled in the nation's satellite cities. Residents of these typical DINK (double income, no kids) households have college educations, well-paying business and professional careers and swank homes filled with the latest technology. Middle America Country Comfort Landed Gentry Micro-City Blues Urban Cores Inner Suburbs Middleburbs The Affluentials Elite Suburbs 2 nd City Society Midtown Mix Urban Uptown
  38. 38. Demographics & Market Segments Example: PRIZM Clusters Upward Bound More than any other segment, Upward Bound appears to be the home of those legendary Soccer Moms and Dads. In these small satellite cities, upper-class families boast dual incomes, college degrees and new split-levels and colonials. Residents of Upward Bound tend to be kid-obsessed, with heavy purchases of computers, action figures, dolls, board games, bicycles and camping equipment. Middle America Country Comfort Landed Gentry Micro-City Blues Urban Cores Inner Suburbs Middleburbs The Affluentials Elite Suburbs 2 nd City Society Midtown Mix Urban Uptown
  39. 39. Cluster Analysis
  40. 40. Philanthropic Motivations <ul><li>Loyalty </li></ul><ul><li>Global Impact </li></ul><ul><li>Personal Interest </li></ul><ul><li>Duty </li></ul><ul><li>Empathy </li></ul><ul><li>Mixed Messages </li></ul>
  41. 41. Loyalty <ul><li>Earned by the organization </li></ul><ul><li>Population of Loyalty Donors is Declining </li></ul>
  42. 42. Global Impact <ul><li>Motivation not organization, but objective </li></ul><ul><li>Unlikely to give to make a non-profit better </li></ul><ul><li>Need most strategic cultivation and stewardship </li></ul><ul><li>Growing percentage of philanthropic population </li></ul>
  43. 43. Personal Interest <ul><li>Similar to Global Impact </li></ul><ul><li>'Global Objective' blends with personal opportunity </li></ul>
  44. 44. Duty <ul><li>Common in religious organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Most effective to leave feelings of obligation to the donor. </li></ul><ul><li>Successful strategies focus on making it easier to fulfill the obligation. </li></ul>
  45. 45. Empathy <ul><li>Typically low to mid-range donors </li></ul><ul><li>Rarely give regularly - respond to a crisis or &quot;heart-string&quot; need </li></ul><ul><li>Respond to emotional messages in direct marketing. </li></ul>
  46. 46. Mixed Messages <ul><li>NPR: If you listen to us every day, it is your duty to give to us. To the loyal donor, it sounds like a spoiled child saying &quot;you owe me dessert after my meal&quot; To the global and personal impact donors, you sound like a company saying &quot;you shop in our stores, it is your obligation to buy our stock.&quot; </li></ul>
  47. 47. Predictive Modeling
  48. 48. Predictive Modeling High Capacity High Propensity Focus on Principal Prospects Only Focus Major Gift Fund Raising Here Focus Participation Efforts Here
  49. 49. Predictive Modeling Propensity Score is 84% Predictive
  50. 50. Understanding our Constituents: Putting it All Together
  51. 51. Understanding the Constituents Reunion Young Alumni Mature Alumni Parents Corporations Foundations Faculty/Staff Undergraduates MBAs PHDs Accounting Finance Marketing Full Time Executive
  52. 52. Understanding the Constituents Reunion Young Alumni Mature Alumni Parents Corporations Foundations Faculty/Staff Alumni Alumni Prospects Alumni Donors
  53. 53. Strategic Communication <ul><li>Constituent Patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Constituent Preferences </li></ul><ul><li>Communication Tracking </li></ul><ul><li>Communication Coordination </li></ul>
  54. 54. Campaign Communications <ul><li>Selection and Use of External Vendors </li></ul><ul><li>Talking Points for Fund Raisers and Alumni Relations Professionals </li></ul><ul><li>Foundation for Campaign Communications </li></ul><ul><li>Tracking Effectiveness </li></ul>
  55. 55. A Word (or Two) on Testing <ul><li>DO IT! </li></ul>
  56. 56. Summary
  57. 57. If you remember nothing else… <ul><li>KNOW your audience. </li></ul><ul><li>TEST your assumptions. </li></ul><ul><li>BUILD a better segmentation system. </li></ul><ul><li>MEET the audience where they are. </li></ul><ul><li>PARTNERSHIP can make it happen. </li></ul>
  58. 58. Questions <ul><li>Shelby Kloures Radcliffe </li></ul><ul><li>Bucknell University </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>570-577-3514 </li></ul>
  59. 59. Bibliography <ul><li>Letting Go of the Words: Writing Web Content that Works by Janice Redish </li></ul><ul><li>101 Ways to Make Meetings Active , by Mel Silberman </li></ul><ul><li>The One to One Fieldbook , by Don Peppers and Martha Rogers </li></ul><ul><li>Research Analytics , by Josh Birkholz </li></ul><ul><li>Interviews (referenced earlier) </li></ul><ul><li>Creating a Campaign Communications Plan (Presentation), by Rebecca Smith Vogel, Stanford University – available on SlideShare.Com </li></ul>

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